Tuesday Forum: May 26, 2020

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2,188 Responses to Tuesday Forum: May 26, 2020

  1. Top Ender

    Hobart Mercury today…

    Teddy’s secret love

    When Teddy Sheean failed to return from WWII, his fiancee took his engagement ring, worn secretly under her clothes, and put it on her marriage finger forever. Top Ender tells the story

    IT was not even known to naval hero Teddy Sheean’s best mate that he had become engaged before he departed for Darwin on his last mission.

    When he failed to return, his fiancee took his engagement ring, worn secretly under her clothes, from around her neck and put it on her marriage finger forever. It went to her cremation with her by special request, because normally jewellery is taken from the body of the departed, and returned to relatives. The diamond ring is therefore lost — as is HMAS Armidale, and the grave of one of Tasmania’s greatest war heroes.

    Who was the secret lover?

    This is an aspect of Teddy Sheean’s life that has been previously hidden in the pages of a history book.

    In the year 2000, a lady handed over a photo of Teddy Sheean, even then well-known, to the Latrobe RSL.

    It was of Teddy and an unidentified woman about his age. The donor asked for the photo to be handed to Garry Ivory, Teddy’s nephew, who was then developing a reputation as a campaigner for a Victoria Cross. On the reverse of the photo were written simply two words: “Engaged couple.”

    Garry inquired among the extended family and friends, with little result. It was not until some 15 years later that he worked with me when I was writing a book also campaigning for Teddy’s VC.

    Ordinary Seaman Sheean, it transpired, had indeed become engaged, on his last leave home, in May-June 1942, when he was in Tasmania.

    He had been here from his posting in Sydney, and had by his leave escaped almost certain death. On May 31, 1942 three Japanese midget submarines attacked shipping in the harbour, and a torpedo blew up the Kuttabul, sinking her and killing 21 naval ratings in the process. Teddy, meanwhile, had been securing his future — or so he thought — with his girlfriend in Tasmania: they would keep the relationship secret and reveal it when he returned.

    FAMILY TIES: Kathleen Lapthorne, centre in the green dress, in 1984 at the Baptist Church, Devonport. Back, her siblings Derek, left, and Noel (husband of Clorice). Front, Gladys, Kath and Lexie.

    It was Clorice Lapthorne, the sister-in-law of Teddy’s fiancee, who gave the photograph to the Latrobe RSL. The fiancee’s name was Kathleen Ruby Lapthorne.

    In 1942, she was 20 years old. Clorice had married Kath’s younger brother Noel Lapthorne.

    At some stage, Teddy had acquired an engagement ring. Whether it was purchased or was a family heirloom is unknown, but the young sailor gave Kathleen a ring.

    By now, having been in the navy for over a year, he was well off by comparison with his former farming work, and was able to afford something with a diamond.

    The ring was an impressive piece of jewellery, according to Clorice, made out of yellow gold, with a central medium-size diamond and two smaller ones to the sides. Up until Teddy died, when he was at sea serving on HMAS Armidale, she wore it on a chain around her neck.

    The ring was then worn by Kathleen for the rest of her life, on her marriage finger.

    Kathleen spent most of her adult life looking after her parents, who did not enjoy good health. She did not have another fiancee. She didn’t talk about Teddy a lot. “Maybe it was a melancholy afternoon on the day when she said he was the love of my life,” Clorice says. But Kathleen kept the picture of herself and Teddy on her bedside table for the rest of her days. She died at the Meercroft Home for the Aged, in Devonport, on April 22, 1998, five days after her 76th birthday.

    This adds a small human facet to the hero on whose behalf many are now battling. For there is “manifest injustice” in the Sheean case — one of the very aspects the Tribunal appointed last year was looking for. Australia as a nation has often sought out unfairness and tried to remedy it. For example, a few years back, some five decades after the Battle of Long Tan in Vietnam, further decoration was given to many. So why is it not possible to recognise and remedy another injustice — that of the lack of a Victoria Cross for anyone from the Royal Australian Navy? Teddy Sheean’s is the most deserved, and it would go some way to remedy bad treatment. For the navy was treated differently, and unfairly, in World War II.

    Imagine today if every approval for an Australian gallantry award had to be ticked off by someone in London. That was what our navy had to endure from 1939 to 1945. The other two forces had their awards approved in Australia. Navies take a long time to grow, and ours had been “parented” by the Royal Navy. When war arrived, there was no time for revision.

    At the end of 1942, Teddy Sheean manned his 20mm anti-aircraft gun to the end, fighting off swarms of Japanese aircraft.

    Even as the corvette Armidale sank underneath him, having disobeyed the order to abandon ship in an effort to save his shipmates’ lives, he fired to the last.

    The system the navy endured in World War II is one of the most unfair ever perpetuated on Australian military personnel. It is more than time it was remedied. Sheean is the best known of its heroes — the award of a VC to him would at least symbolise the righting of the wrong. And now its own tribunal has made the recommendation, the government should heed the findings of the inquiry it started.

    Teddy’s lover Kathleen will rest better.

    Military historian and retired naval officer Top Ender wrote Honour Denied, Teddy Sheean, a Tasmanian Hero, published by Avonmore Books.

  2. Snoopy

    Twostix
    #3466990, posted on May 29, 2020 at 8:28 am
    I said two months ago we’re going to have to vote our way out of this.

    Only if Jeanette Young allows the election to proceed.

  3. MemoryFault

    I said two months ago we’re going to have to vote our way out of this.

    Yeah. Vote Liberal ‘cos at least they’re not Labor.
    And everything would be so different with a Liberal state government.
    They could use Morrison as their role model. Look how well that’s turned out.

  4. Twostix

    Queensland’s chief health officer, Dr Jeannette Young, said this negative test was invalid.

    “It was done … after the gentleman had died, and it was contaminated with quite a bit of blood, so, therefore, it wasn’t an effective test,” she said. “There was a test done [before] which is a very sensitive test, and it came back positive. So I believe it was a positive.”

    QLD officially has a puppet dictator in place.

  5. min

    Sally McManus focusses on higher wages and job security how can you ever have consensus with someone who does not realise there can be no higher wages and job security if you do not have a job . Stupid Labor as posted previously Hawke’s consensus did not live up to promise . Although thought of a much loved figure , his behaviour as a man was appalling, not the sort that could be described as admirable from any point of view.
    Is it not strange that someone like Hawke is admired when others who are berated and put down by the leftie media who then influence public . So eating a raw onion , for instance , is much worse than a womanising drunk.

  6. Snoopy

    I’m considering voting for Themm. Are they still a force? What’s Themm’s position on the Covid-19 provisions of the Public Health Act 2005?

  7. Twostix

    Yes. A situation created nationally by a Liberal – National coalition government.

    The federal liberals didn’t storm QLD parliament on March 19 and scribble into the QLD public health act five lines saying that Jeannette Young has unlimited power forever and ever no backsies.

  8. Snoopy

    Is Jeanette Young sure that the first test, “a very sensitive test”, wasn’t contaminated with paw paw?

  9. Mother Lode

    ‘Whether or not COVID-19 was the precipitating cause for his death, that’s how we report it,’ she said.

    This needs to be broadcast far and wide in Queensland with examples of how misleading this approach is.

    I believe there is in many people who have not immersed themselves in real or virtual environments where criticism is leveled at those in power to believe that the people called experts are nevertheless at the forefront of their fields, and to feel assured that politicians, while susceptible to peccadilloes such gaming travel allowances and preferring family and friends in appointments, are not sociopathic Machiavellian snakes who view them as merely a political means.

    They really need to see how dire and corrupted the system is.

  10. miltonf

    So eating a raw onion , for instance , is much worse than a womanising drunk.

    As Trump says, the media are the enemy of the people. There was a full on putsch to undo the 2013 election result both from within and outside the LP.

  11. Twostix

    The only way for the unbelievable “emergency powers” jeannette young has to go on is for jeanette young to keep finding people with cov19.

    I think I see a little problem.

  12. calli

    Whether or not COVID-19 was the precipitating cause for his death, that’s how we report it,’ she said.

    Is this the same person who said she would close the schools, not because the children were at risk, but because she could (to send a message of “seriousness”)?

  13. MemoryFault

    No, Morrison didn’t that.
    He just formed a National Cabinet and started ruling by Sunday afternoon press release decree.
    Much more democratic.

  14. Twostix

    QLD’s last Chief Scientist was just jailed for theft.

    So elite.

  15. Twostix

    Qld has an election shortly.

    Having a puppet dictator in place sure would help the government goung into that.

  16. Mother Lode

    how can you ever have consensus with someone who does not realise there can be no higher wages and job security if you do not have a job .

    It has long been, perhaps always, been one of the core idiocies of the labour movement, that their each success results in the destruction of jobs – except in the public sector, of course.

  17. OldOzzie

    Thanks Tom.

    Michael Ramirez and Johannes Leak today – the UK Cartoonists don’t gel

  18. So eating a raw onion , for instance , is much worse than a womanising drunk.

    There’s something surreal about that one. Part of the disconnection between the media caste & Australians. It would seem eating raw onions is totally unknown to the media caste.

  19. Tel

    Maybe Tel, but it highlights a problem for all shipping and crews. It seems that the virus loves a good cruise.

    Just how sick the crew are should be the main concern. We’re going to have to live with this disease for some time and it’s fair to wonder if being under the weather from COVID is a reason to keep the world shut.

    The most up to date information I have (see what Daniil Gorbatenko has been researching ) is that most (not all) of the virus transmission has been via aerosol particles (not heavy ballistic droplets) that hang around in enclosed spaces and people breathe them in. That’s why masks help (no they are not 100% protection, but would you prefer some protection or nothing). That’s why it spread on the Diamond Princess despite their attempts to keep everyone isolated from one another, because they were sitting in enclosed cabins with the air circulating. Aerosol particles waft around much like cigarette smoke, so if a person 2m away is smoking, can you smell it?

    This might be the real reason cigarette smokers have been statistically “protected” in as much as smokers are sent outside away from enclosed spaces.

  20. OldOzzie

    The Hydroxychloroquine Controversy Is A Reminder That Prescription Laws Are A Government Racket

    After President Trump declared that he uses hydroxychloroquine, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) walked back its advice against the drug and seemingly all others as well. “The decision to take any drug,” the head of the agency said, is “between a patient and their doctor.”

    The FDA has had two shining moments during the spread of the coronavirus. At neither time did the agency do something so much as it undid something.

    The first moment was March 13, when the FDA dropped its onerous approval process for coronavirus test kits. It was still late to the game, but the move helped save face.

    On Tuesday, there wasn’t much left to preserve after the FDA commissioner issued a statement essentially nullifying much of his own bureaucracy’s purpose for existing.

    “The decision to take any drug is ultimately a decision between a patient and their doctor,” FDA commissioner Dr. Stephen Hahn said in an emailed statement to various news outlets, including the Hill and CNBC.

    This came in response to President Trump’s remarks that same day that he had been taking hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) as a preventative measure against COVID-19 for “a couple weeks.”

    “I think people should be allowed to,” Trump said.

    The FDA would say that, technically, people are allowed to use HCQ. It’s just not government approved for anything other than malaria, lupus, and rheumatoid arthritis. And although doctors may, and do, prescribe it for “off-label” treatments, a prescription—a government-mandated document that controls public access—is still required.

    Trump got it right when he said people should be allowed to decide for themselves. His words clearly influenced the FDA’s messaging. We can allow ourselves a little hope, but realistically, substantial reform towards more freedom in medicine may have to wait until a worse crisis demands it.

    As an aside, the controversy over HCQ’s use – and apparent worldwide damnation of the drug (since President Trump suggested it) has raised a few eyebrows recently.

    Consider these two recent examples:

    1. Indian studies fully support the use of HCQ in COVID-19 cases:

    2. And the Australian study that has been ‘touted’ around the world as “proving” HCQ is unsafe against COVID-19 is now being questioned openly…

    But data from Johns Hopkins University shows only 67 deaths from Covid-19 had been recorded in Australia by 21 April. The number did not rise to 73 until 23 April. The data relied upon by researchers to draw their conclusions in the Lancet is not readily available in Australian clinical databases, leading many to ask where it came from.

    “If they got this wrong, what else could be wrong?” Dr Allen Cheng, an epidemiologist and infectious disease doctor with Alfred Health in Melbourne, said. It was also a “red flag” to him that the paper listed only four authors.

    Bear in mind that – before Trump’s recommendation – it was once viewed as among the most promising medicines to treat the virus, and the Australian Department of Health had been stockpiling millions of doses of the drug in case clinical trials found it proved useful.

    It is difficult to avoid the conclusion that HCQ/zinc is being sidelined in order to clear the way for a profitable vaccine and a vaccination mandate.

  21. feelthebern

    It is difficult to avoid the conclusion that HCQ/zinc is being sidelined in order to clear the way for a profitable vaccine and a vaccination mandate.

    Big pharma makes a buck margin this treatment.
    Or they could push for other treatments that make a thousand bucks margin per treatment, picked up by the tax payer.
    Pretty clear to see where this one ends up.

  22. feelthebern

    Big pharma loved the Joe Biden “moon shot” for cancer treatments.
    Big pharma hates the Trump “clutching at straws” for cancer treatments.
    Bottom line, big pharma doesn’t want to find cures.
    They want to sell treatments for long, long periods of time.

  23. feelthebern

    The Trump “clutching at straws” laws are not just for cancer obviously.

  24. cohenite

    Kayleigh rips the msm a new arse again. The media are just vile: it starts about 8 minutes in:

    https://videos.whatfinger.com/2020/05/28/live-kayleigh-mcenany-holds-a-white-house-press-conference-2/

  25. OldOzzie

    Creeping state aid spooking farmers

    Australian farmers face “creeping protectionism” as countries use the coronavirus pandemic to impose agricultural trade barriers, new research conducted for the Department of Agriculture says.

    The report, to be released on Friday, says global subsidies and protection for agriculture could already be costing $10bn in Australian agricultural exports, and world efforts to reduce trade barriers have stalled or reversed.

    The Australian Bureau of Agricultural and Resource Economics and Sciences study says Australian farmers are some of the least subsidised in the world at only 2 per cent of their revenue, second only to New Zealand and compared with 50 per cent or more in some European and Asian countries.

    It says with the pandemic, “there is a risk of creeping protectionism” in agricultural markets.

    “Since late March, several countries have moved to impose export restrictions to shore up domestic food supplies,” the report says, noting that Vietnam imposed rice export restrictions.

    “The focus of restrictions has been on staple commodities, like rice, wheat and some other grains.”

    Some countries have moved to prop up agriculture through economic packages. While such moves are aimed at keeping businesses solvent, ABARES says they “could create further distortions in global agricultural markets”.

    “The US Coronavirus Food Assistance Program, for example, includes an additional $US16bn ($24bn) in farm aid,” it notes.

    These measures could result in up to 40 per cent of US farm incomes coming from government payments, up from 10 per cent before the US-China trade dispute.

    “The use of export restrictions and increases in support during COVID, along with the initial signs of a trend to rising overall levels of support brings into focus the need for an effective inter­national system to ensure agricultural markets continue to address food security concerns and drive economic development,” it says.

    “For Australia alone, estimates suggest that global subsidies and trade barriers could be costing Australian agriculture between $8bn and $10bn in exports ­annually.”

    Out of the $62bn worth of food and fibre Australian farmers produced in 2018-19, nearly 80 per cent, or $49bn, was exported, according to the National Farmers Federation, which also sounded warnings about COVID acting as a Trojan horse against free trade.

    “There’s no doubt that the COVID-19 pandemic is a significant challenge for many countries, including Australia,” NFF chief executive Tony Mahar said on Thursday.

    “It’s during these challenging times that our unwavering commitment to free and liberalised trade will be tested.”

    Agriculture Minister David Littleproud declined to comment.

  26. stackja

    Top Ender
    #3466997, posted on May 29, 2020 at 8:32 am

    Thank you.

  27. OldOzzie

    ‘Sectors will continue to need support’

    Josh Frydenberg has refused to be drawn on whether the government will expand the Jobkeeper wage subsidy program beyond its expiration date in September even though Home Affairs Minister Peter Dutton said the government is “flexible” on the issue on Channel 9 while the Treasurer was downplaying the possibility on Channel 7 earlier this morning.

    Appearing on Today, The Treasurer continued to push his messaging on the issue, saying the government is likely to consider targeted support for industry instead of expanding the scheme.

    “We know that there will be some sectors that will continue to need support, for

    example tourism, as the international borders remain closed,” Mr Frydenberg told Today.

    “Also construction in the housing sector will be important to give support and we are thinking through those options. But as for additional measures, it is right now too early to say.”

    When confronted with Mr Dutton’s earlier comments, Mr Frydenberg pivoted to the issue of state borders.

    “Well, we do understand that it’s going to be difficult for some sectors,” he said.

    “So as long as those international borders are closed, tourism is going to be hit. But 70% of the tourism dollar is actually domestic tourism.

    “That’s why it’s so important that the premiers of Queensland around Tasmania, South Australia, and Western Australia, lift the restrictions on – in domestic borders because there is no medical reason why those borders should remain closed.”

  28. Tom

    the UK Cartoonists don’t gel

    OldOzzie, BoJo Derangement is even bigger in the British media than Trump Derangement is in the American media, not helped this week by the fact that Dominic Cummings is behaving like the British king — untouchable, rules are for other people, etc.

    As the architect of Brexit, Cummings sees himself as Peta Credlin saw herself in 2013 — indispensible to Tony Abbott’s fragile self-image before the Turnbull coup. Unfortunately, I think Cummings is probably right — if Johnson is forced to sack him, the Tory government will probably fall apart.

    Johnson is a one-hit wonder who stumbled on the idea that Brexit was good for British sovereignty and most of the British public wanted to get out of Europe. But he is a lefty at heart and his girlfriend and mother of his son Wilfred is the British equivalent of a Green voter, a signed and sealed Remainer who dreams about mixing with the artistes on Paris’s Left Bank.

    Unfortunately, she has Boris by the balls — but if it wasn’t her, it would probably be some other image-conscious floozie. Look at Boris’s hair, FFS. He’s still a naughty 13-year-old at Eton.

  29. Their ABC has some race-baiter negro skyping in from Minneapolis, talking about how the police are not here for black people, the protests (known elsewhere as “riots”) how the legal system & the govt is purposed to grind black people down.
    Etc etc etc.
    She actually says this is all because of a racist President & names Trump.

    Well chosen contributor there, ABC.

  30. It looks as if the Murdoch business model (buy them up/shut them down) has come back to bite Newscorp on the bum.

    The restructure announced on Thursday by local chairman Michael Miller will come with a significant one-off cost as News will be responsible for tens of millions in redundancy payments resulting from the removal of between 600 and 1000 staff.

    It will also deprive conservative readers, particularly in regional Queensland, of their regular diet of syndicated crap (Bolt/Murray et al) that was channeled through these local mastheads. That generation won’t go digital.
    Every cloud has a silver lining.

  31. OldOzzie

    Abandon workplace wars for post-virus jobs growth

    The Australian EDITORIAL

    ACTU secretary Sally McManus was right to declare in our pages on Thursday that as we contemplate the mammoth challenge of rebuilding Australia’s economy, “it’s become clear that there is no going back to business as usual”. Unemployment is still rising, companies are failing, investment has slumped and vast areas of industry are on life support. Our industrial relations have regressed, exacerbating conflict and entrenching tribalism. Scott Morrison has urged trade unions and employers to put down their weapons and find common ground. That’s the new spirit his government will try to encourage as a facilitator of five working groups in coming months to make workplace relations fit for purpose in a post-pandemic rebuild.

    Something was needed to break the sclerosis at the workplace, and the Prime Minister has pursued a middle-of-the-road path. The big-bang reform of John Howard’s Work Choices and steady union-directed re-regulation of the workplace under Kevin Rudd and Julia Gillard bequeathed a sick, hybrid enterprise bargaining system with multiple comorbidities: overly complex awards (and too many of them), an absurd “better off overall” test for new agreements, and the world’s highest minimum wage, to name but a few ills. Several thorough reports detected systemic blockages, but the Coalition had become timid, while Labor under Bill Shorten had settled on full-scale class war: a “living wage” by fiat and a shifty fix of the workplace rules to benefit its industrial wing. A year ago, mainstream voters rebuffed this suspect redistribution agenda and put their trust in Mr Morrison’s more orthodox economic management and aspiration.

    This middle-of-the-road approach to workplace reform is not a variant of Bob Hawke’s Prices and Incomes Accord model of almost four decades ago. How could it be, given institutional makeover, the Coalition in power and a minimalist role of unions in economic affairs? Mr Morrison’s compact is alive to the near impossibility of achieving meaningful legislative change with a fractious Senate. Witness the Canberra palaver in trying to put limits on the lawlessness of rogue construction unions. To the chagrin of employers and his own MPs, Mr Morrison has set aside the Ensuring Integrity bill. Ms McManus has recognised the merit of employer concerns over the “better off overall” test and inefficiencies and delays in the bargaining process. The coming talks will involve give and take, but the national interest demands a new order that encourages job creation.

    Labor is struggling to find its balance and a positive role during this peace. When Anthony Albanese was elected Labor leader, he vowed to ditch class fury and support policies that aided output growth — rather than continue Labor’s redistribution fetish. The Opposition Leader is not completely shut out of the reform process, given Labor eventually will vote on any new industrial legislation. But the early signs are not promising, as many in Labor’s political show have built brands on “fighting Tories”. ALP national president Wayne Swan, an inveterate class warrior even when federal treasurer, is again rattling the tin for donations: “We’re fighting against vested interests with deep pockets who will use this pandemic to drive down wages and conditions.” Mr Albanese’s challenge is to show he is committed to jobs and recovery, not reviving ancient battles in these calamitous times.

  32. OldOzzie

    Tom
    #3467042, posted on May 29, 2020 at 9:40 am
    the UK Cartoonists don’t gel

    Look at Boris’s hair, FFS. He’s still a naughty 13-year-old at Eton.

    +1

  33. thefrollickingmole

    Orange man bad takes Zuckerberg to the woodshed and reminds him his whole business model relies on one fairly unjust piece of legal fiction.
    https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2020/may/28/zuckerberg-facebook-police-online-speech-trump

    Two years after admitting under political pressure that Facebook must do more to prevent disinformation campaigns on its platform, founder Mark Zuckerberg told Fox News on Thursday that the company should step away from regulating online speech.

    Zuckerberg’s remarks seemed designed to ingratiate his company to the White House, as Donald Trump escalated a war with rival social media platform Twitter over that company’s efforts to begin factchecking some of Trump’s posts.

    “I just believe strongly that Facebook shouldn’t be the arbiter of truth of everything that people say online,” Zuckerberg told Fox News. “Private companies probably shouldn’t be, especially these platform companies, shouldn’t be in the position of doing that.”

    The lamestream media will spin dropping censorship as imposing censorship somehow, but this mighr be a good move by the Trump. I thought picking a fight with companies which can “Buy pixels by the barrel” (to update a saying)would be a huge own goal.

  34. OldOzzie

    US taps allies to pressure China over Hong Kong national security law

    The US, Britain, Australia and Canada call on China to honour the Sino-British Joint Declaration in a statement

    The four foreign ministers say the national security law would undermine the ‘one country, two systems framework’

  35. The US, Britain, Australia and Canada call on China to honour the Sino-British Joint Declaration in a statement

    Notable omission is St. Horsey-Chops.
    She’s not interested in freedom or democracy.

    How deep is she in the Belt & Road deal?

  36. min

    The Lancet article on the use of Hydoxychloriquine forCovidv 19 was tested on those with the virus and non randomised at that . Then of course guess who died? As I understand, it is used as a preventative not a cure the zinc being an antiviral helps increase immunity . It seems medical research has not improved much since I was studying at Post Graduate level Statistics Research and Analysis when I poured over medical research to find flaws in the conclusions because of poor methodology or data collection.

  37. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    The Australian Bureau of Agricultural and Resource Economics and Sciences study says Australian farmers are some of the least subsidised in the world at only 2 per cent of their revenue, second only to New Zealand and compared with 50 per cent or more in some European and Asian countries.

    Should be required reading for those inner city dwellers- usually Greenies- who think Australian farmers are subsidized to the same level as their European and American counterparts.

  38. stackja

    High Court ruling favours release of ‘Palace Papers’ on …
    The Sydney Morning Herald-12 minutes ago
    Professor Jenny Hocking, a political historian who has written extensively on Labor figures including former prime minister Gough Whitlam and …
    Palace letters: high court ruling paves the way for release of …
    International-The Guardian-15 minutes ago
    High Court decides ‘Palace letters’ written during the Whitlam …
    ABC News-11 minutes ago
    Historian Jenny Hocking has won her High Court bid to access to the letters exchanged between then governor-general Sir John Kerr and the …

  39. mh

    Jack Dorsey has a ChiCom hand up his arse

    False claims that Derek Chauvin was on stage at a Trump rally went viral and have not been moderated by Twitter.

    https://www.breitbart.com/tech/2020/05/28/twitter-no-warning-on-misleading-viral-photo-of-minneapolis-cop-at-trump-rally/

  40. OldOzzie

    University ignores lessons of the past

    It has taken 50 years, but in their pursuit of anti-China student protester Drew Pavlou, the University of Queensland has achieved what Joh Bjelke-Petersen could not.

    By HENRY ERGAS

    Fifty years ago this month, 200,000 people marched through Australia’s cities in the first ­Vietnam moratorium. The period leading up to the demonstrations had been tumultuous on campuses across the country, including at the University of Queensland. ­Already by 1967, opposition to conscription had merged there with protests against the state ­government’s restrictions on civil liberties, unleashing an escalating tide of agitation.

    Yet even when that mobilisation was at its peak, expulsions were not on the university’s agenda. And on the rare occasions when they were mooted, it was for offences involving violence and the destruction of university property rather than for demonstrating, insulting the administration or engaging in strident debate.

    The university’s reticence was hardly due to lack of pressure. Infuriated by the unrest, the state government, which controlled the university’s funding, repeatedly demanded action, with premier Joh Bjelke-Petersen naming the “ringleaders” to be expelled.

    But those calls fell on deaf ears. As distinguished biochemist Ed Webb, who was deputy vice-chancellor (academic), explained, when “there are real issues in society that need to be addressed”, the university had an obligation to permit “individuals in the university to see that others are made aware of them”. Yes, that might provoke a hostile reaction; but fear of that reaction could never be a “reason for prohibiting the expression of opinions on things of great importance”.

    Five decades on, those lessons have plainly been forgotten. Instead, the university chose to commemorate the anniversary by initiating disciplinary proceedings against Drew Pavlou.

    That Pavlou’s actions incensed the Chinese regime is entirely unsurprising. Organising protests in support of the pro-democracy activists in Hong Kong and against China’s repression of the Uighurs was bad enough; ridiculing the university’s cosy relationship with China by posting a “COVID-19 ­Biohazard” warning at its Confucius Institute can only have elevated the 20-year-old’s conduct into a hanging offence.

    After all, as Charlie Chaplin said on releasing The Great Dictator, with its merciless portrayal of Hitler as “Adenoid Hynkel”, “let’s laugh them to scorn”, for mockery is the little person’s most powerful weapon against the jackboots and truncheons of tyrants.

    That truth has been confirmed time and again. “The surest defence against Evil is extreme individualism, originality of thinking, whimsicality, even — if you will — eccentricity,” declared Joseph Brodsky, the Nobel prize-winning poet who, before being expelled from the Soviet Union, was incarcerated in its insane asylums for denouncing the Soviet regime’s madness.

    One might have expected the university’s leadership to know all that. And rather than submitting Pavlou to months of uncertainty for the crime of satire, one might have expected them to focus on identifying the Chinese students who assaulted the pro-democracy activists, as well as on removing from his position as an adjunct professor China’s consul-general in Brisbane, Xu Jie, who blatantly breached the university’s code of conduct by publicly commending the assailants.

    It is too easy, and too generous, to explain their decision to instead turn on Pavlou by pointing to the university’s dependence on Chinese students. No doubt, that figured in their minds; but the reality is that their predecessors’ dependence on Bjelke-Petersen’s government was far greater.

    If that earlier generation didn’t buckle, it wasn’t because their choices were without con­sequence: it was because those choices involved matters of principle. There is, in that comparison, a crucial point. The problem is not that the leaders of our universities, in responding to incentives created by successive governments, have let themselves become vulnerable to the Chinese regime’s blackmail. It is that their ethical moorings are so fragile, the blackmail has every chance of success.

    Unfortunately, they are not alone in leaving ethical standards behind. There is, as those with long memories will know, no doubt that if the administration had acted then as it has now, the university would have ground to a halt.

    To say that is not to claim that things were better, nearly golden, in more or less remote times. Nor is it to gloss over the grievous faults of the students and staff who regularly packed the “forum” at St Lucia, as the campus’ main meeting ground was called. They were, on the contrary, blind to the crimes of the North Vietnamese and ignored the horrors their victory would bring.

    But while they were almost wilfully naive, their commitment to freedom of expression was beyond question. The fact many of the university’s most influential activists came from the Catholic Newman Society and the Christian social movements, with their emphasis on sincerity, witness and engagement, merely made that commitment more intense.

    Faced with cases such as ­Pavlou’s, they would have felt compelled to act. But, all too often, today’s staff and students feel no such imperative.

    In part, that reflects the withering of campus life that had occurred even before the present lockdowns came into effect. With vast numbers of students working part-time, faculty routinely address empty lecture halls, eliminating the questioning and interaction that are central to teaching and to the formation of social networks.

    The ever-growing number of foreign students, who struggle with English, and so tend to associate with their colingual peers, has compounded the social fragmentation, converting once bustling campuses into spiritual wastelands.

    But if the commitment to free speech has waned it is also because students and staff can espouse the fashionable causes of the day without any danger to themselves. Far from risking prison sentences and hefty fines for demonstrating, as was the case in Queensland, they can indulge in protests about ­racism, refugees and “carbon pollution” basking in the glow of ­public approval. Goethe’s warning that “Man must win his liberty every day afresh” therefore means nothing to them, no more than Mill’s admonition that the freedom that really matters is that of those with whom we passionately disagree.

    To that extent, Marx was right. Once they were comfortably dominant, he predicted, the bourgeois intellectuals would jettison the liberal values they had championed when they were an exiguous minority. Like the Anglican bishops with their 39 “articles of religion”, they would, at that point, far more readily scuttle 38/39ths of their principles than 1/39th of their ­income.

    Marx could have had the ­University of Queensland in mind. But if an education is worth having, it is not because of the earnings it unlocks; it is because the ability to look at the world for oneself is the greatest gift of all. By pursuing Pavlou for doing just that, the university has accomplished, 50 years later, what Bjelke-Petersen could never achieve.

    HENRY ERGAS COLUMNIST
    Henry Ergas AO is an economist who spent many years at the OECD in Paris before returning to Australia. He has taught at a number of universities, including Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government,

  41. stackja

    Liberty Quote
    The dominant lesson of the Great Depression and the Great Recession is that when government overspends, overtaxes and over-regulates, economic freedom is suppressed and economic growth vanishes.

    — Phil Gramm and Michael Solon

  42. Hay Stockard

    Thanks Tom
    Mark Knight. Funny because it’s true.

  43. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    . They were, on the contrary, blind to the crimes of the North Vietnamese and ignored the horrors their victory would bring.

    A hundred thousand South Vietnamese summarily executed, another two hundred thousand died from starvation or disease in the “re – education camps” – in the name of “liberation” and “re -unification.”

  44. Dr Faustus

    Man acquitted of entering a home with a weapon after successful sex fantasy defence

    Two men hired to carry out a stranger’s sexual fantasy of being tied up while clad in his underpants went to the wrong rural NSW address with machetes, but politely left after realising their mistake.

    According to statements tendered at the brief judge-alone trial, a man living in western NSW near Griffith wanted to be tied up and have a broom handle rubbed around his underwear.

    “He was willing to pay $5,000 if it was ‘really good’,” the judge said.

    As you would.

  45. Mother Lode

    Just watched that press conference with Kayleigh McEnany.

    Damn the press are bad.

    They aren’t asking about what is happening in the world and in America, and what the President thinks or is doing. It is all about trying to catch him out. There is no universe except the binary system of MSM and Trump.

    One guy said that the 100,000th Covid casualty had occurred the previous evening but Trump had not tweeted about it until the morning – and asked why it took so long.

    Why did the President send out a tweet sooner. That is what he thinks WH Press Briefings are for.

    Another guy predicated his question on the claim that Trump had lied 18,000 times since attaining office according to the WaPo. No doubt his follow up question was going to be ‘when did the President stop beating his wife’.

    Another was arguing (yes, he was mounting argument with his question) that mail ballots benefit both parties evenly according to a report from Standford (10,000 pages to be taken at his word). Instead he took task with Trump apparently saying that California was sending out mail ballots to everyone, just everyone on the roles. Kayleigh detailed that the roles were out of date, that they were piling up in front of apartment buildings because people had moved or died, that people were collecting them from the elderly, filling them out, and forging signatures, and that some of the roles in some counties in LA had more people on them than lived there. It is not unreasonable to suggest these ballots were just being sprayed around. But this guy fixated on the ‘everyone’.

    Absolutely ridiculous.

  46. thefrollickingmole

    Numbers silence on this case is surely a damning indictment of the whole state school system he was a part of.

    What did he know and why didnt he take those stories to the police?

    Investigation needed into whether there are more victims of alleged pa****phile Cletus O’Connor, NSW Labor says
    Education department has settled 14 cases relating to O’Connor’s alleged abuse dating back to 1973

    The investigation found evidence that O’Connor’s alleged offending was known about by people employed by the state, but that “inadequate” child protection policies meant the state had in effect “harboured” a serial p****ophile who “flagrantly” abused young boys.

    The education department has so far settled 14 cases in relation to O’Connor’s alleged abuse. The settlements were all made out of court and in line with the state’s model litigant guidelines. In a statement, a spokesman said the guidelines “aim to deal compassionately, sensitively and consistently with survivors of child sexual abuse” and that settlements involved a personal apology to victims.

  47. Infidel Tiger King

    The only way for the unbelievable “emergency powers” jeannette young has to go on is for jeanette young to keep finding people with cov19.

    I think I see a little problem.

    Just do what WA is doing: import them.

    We have the lowest rate of infection in the world but keep allowing foreign filth in to juke the stats.

  48. Mother Lode

    Just to spell out the below point a little more

    Another guy predicated his question on the claim that Trump had lied 18,000 times since attaining office according to the WaPo.

    Think about that – that is something like 15 lies a day. Every day.

  49. Mick Gold Coast QLD

    From Dr Faustus at 10:15 am:

    “Man acquitted of entering a home with a weapon after successful sex fantasy defence

    Two men hired to carry out a stranger’s sexual fantasy of being tied up while clad in his underpants went to the wrong … address ….

    According to statements tendered at the brief judge-alone trial, a man living in western NSW near Griffith wanted to be tied up and have a broom handle rubbed around his underwear.

    “He was willing to pay $5,000 if it was ‘really good’,” the judge said.

    As you would.”

    STan Grant, featured here earlier this week, is a noble savage / proud / wise elder man from the Griffith Nation. His tribe held the title deeds for the whole district for about 743,211 years until they were colonised by the Trimboli Tribe invaders from Calabria in about 1950.

  50. thefrollickingmole

    wanted to be tied up and have a broom handle rubbed around his underwear.

    The love that dare not… I give up, theres nothing can cover that one.

  51. Bruce of Newcastle

    “I just believe strongly that Facebook shouldn’t be the arbiter of truth of everything that people say online,” Zuckerberg told Fox News. “Private companies probably shouldn’t be, especially these platform companies, shouldn’t be in the position of doing that.”

    Amusingly Facebook just lost a court case in Germany for false fact-checking a righty news site.

    Judge finds fact-faking Facebook “fact-check” false (28 May)

    Now a judge has found Facebook’s fact-faking “fact-check” false and has ordered it to be taken down, on pain of a fine of up to 250,000-euro fine or up to two years’ imprisonment in default.

    So Mr Zuckerberg is doing exactly what Mr Zuckerberg says his company shouldn’t be doing…

  52. Mother Lode

    Ha! I confused the spelling of ‘rolls’ and ‘roles’ repeatedly.

    Thanks to Covid, we are all using ‘rolls’ sparingly.

    Wittgenstein had a bit of a thing on that. Take the sentence “Mr Scot is Scot”. He set the questions as to whether a person could mentally swap the ‘Scot’ and whether such a person had an additional ability or lacked one.

  53. Their ABC reporting on the spat between Trump & Twitter.
    The Twitter version presented as unquestionable fact.
    i.e. that Twitter’s “fact-check” of Trump had “debunked” anything Trump said.

  54. Mother Lode

    Amusingly Facebook just lost a court case in Germany for false fact-checking a righty news site.

    So people weren’t zucked in?

  55. Good morning all.
    More money to be flung at late metro trains in Dannograd. From the Hun:

    ‘Public transport operators will be paid up to $50 million to stop them abandoning Australia, with new data showing patronage has risen above the safe level for social distancing.
    The Herald Sun can reveal an agreement between Metro Trains, Yarra Trams and the State Government will see the companies paid to offset the financial hit of running regular services with plummeting patronage.
    The Andrews Government will also today urge all Victorians to continue working from home, as new figures show passenger numbers are making social distancing increasingly difficult.’

    I would have thought the incremental easing of restrictions would have boosted passenger numbers from bored people wanting to live their lives. Only speculation, could it be that Metro Trains and Yarra Trams are owned by Chinese interests? Wouldn’t surprise me.

  56. Dr Faustus

    OldOzzie, BoJo Derangement is even bigger in the British media than Trump Derangement is in the American media, not helped this week by the fact that Dominic Cummings is behaving like the British king — untouchable, rules are for other people, etc.

    This is all true.

    However the issue running through the cartoons is the general British shock and disgust at the unbelievably awful Government handling of Covid.

    Clumsy, badly timed and contradictory decisions, Johnson’s clownish public performances, fumbling experts, inconsistent Public Order Rules and Regulations dreadfully implemented by jackboot authorities. All leading to a World-leading public health fail, only slightly behind Spain. And then there is the social and economic carnage…

    Cummings is a political arsehole, although most of his bad behaviour is strictly beltway interest. What has given the UK the shits is – against a backdrop of Lockdown, inconvenience, grief and hardship – an insider strikes out on an obvious fuck-you frolic (that would be savagely crushed in anyone less protected), is aggressively unrepentant, and greasily backed up by the cloth-eared Team BoJo.

    The cartoonists have correctly picked up public sentiment.

  57. Free Radical

    thefrollickingmole #3467068, posted on May 29, 2020 at 10:20 am

    Defamation.

    The Professor told everyone last week to stop making these defamatory comments. Maybe it’s time he gave you a holiday.

  58. And further news:
    ‘The Victorian Government has ruled out a pay freeze for the public service despite dire economic forecasts and a $773 million deficit in the State budget.’

    Cue Ben Lee singing. FMD

  59. cohenite

    and greasily backed up by the cloth-eared Team BoJo.

    bojo is turning into as a big a disappointment as Brexit was a surprise. As has been suggested by Tom, I reckon that has a lot to do with the fact that a green karen has him by the balls.

  60. dopey

    SMH: Whitlam documents are potentially explosive of course.
    50 years to go off.

  61. Dr Faustus

    The Professor told everyone last week to stop making these defamatory comments. Maybe it’s time he gave you a holiday.

    And a complete lack of empathy for Men Who Love Broom Handles.
    Sickening.

  62. cohenite

    Free Radical
    #3467093, posted on May 29, 2020 at 10:57 am

    What’s defamatory about it pus brain.

  63. Infidel Tiger King

    Great news.

    Looks like an anti trust case is going to be filed against Google.

  64. Liberty Quote
    The dominant lesson of the Great Depression and the Great Recession is that when government overspends, overtaxes and over-regulates, economic freedom is suppressed and economic growth vanishes.

    Correction:
    The dominant lesson of the Great Depression and the Great Recession is that when greed overcomes reason, and when government fails to appropriately regulate, economic freedom is suppressed and economic growth vanishes.

    A second, no less important lesson, is that the most vulnerable suffer the most.

  65. Free Radical

    The Professor told everyone last week to stop making these defamatory comments. Maybe it’s time he gave you a holiday.

    And a complete lack of empathy for Men Who Love Broom Handles.
    Sickening.

    Sure. Good that you agree. Mick GC’s last para at 10.29am is a problem for Sinc in the same way.

  66. Delta A

    Sure. Good that you agree. Mick GC’s last para at 10.29am is a problem for Sinc in the same way.

    Whatevs, Karen.

  67. OldOzzie

    Morning Market Wrap: President Trump’s press conference announcement weighs on US equities
    29 May 2020

    Despite advancing in early trade, all major US indices finished Thursday’s session lower after the US President announced a press conference to be held on Friday regarding China and the situation in Hong Kong.

    Economic data showed a further 2.123 million Americans filed for jobless claims in the last week in addition to US GDP shrinking 5% in Q1 (higher than the expected 4.8%). The data did not spook the market’s confidence, the Dow Jones Industrial climbed 100 points at the open however finished 0.6% for the day after the Trump administration revealed plans for a China-focused press conference. The benchmark S&P500 and tech heavy Nasdaq were both up roughly 0.5% at midday and remained steady in the afternoon until the announcement came in the final half hour of trade. Bank shares slid after strong moves earlier in the week, Citigroup fell 5.93% and JPMorgan Chase dropped 1.49%. Twitter shares also retraced 4.5% after President Trump posed potential legislative pressures on social media companies. 6 out of the 11 sectors in the US market declined on Thursday, led by the energy sector which retraced 2.91%.

    ASX200 futures were down 18 points earlier, indicating a modest drop at the open. Yesterday the ASX200 posted another positive session, advancing 1.3% and again, led by Financials. The big 4 banks rose between 2.2% – 4.7% and the larger miners also saw strong buying, both Fortescue metals and RIO Tinto rose 3.4% and 2.3% respectively. Real Estate and Energy were the only sectors that lagged the market.

    The price of Brent crude oil reversed earlier losses and rose 1.6% overnight to US$35.29 per barrel. The US Energy Information Administration released figures indicating a steady increase in petrol demand. West Texas Intermediate (WTI) also advanced 2.7% and is trading at US$33.17 per barrel. Gold Futures gained 0.2% to US$1,713.30 and Iron ore continued it’s advance, gaining 1.4% to US$96.40 a tonne.

    In terms of economic data, Private sector credit data will be released locally. Abroad, US Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell will address the market and the US goods trade balance is issued.

  68. Farmer Gez

    Black Ball
    #3467091, posted on May 29, 2020 at 10:55 am
    Good morning all.
    More money to be flung at late metro trains in Dannograd.

    You’ve got to move with the politics Black Ball.
    Danjing

  69. Every decision that Karen made was done by her without someone standing over her and threatening her.
    She didn’t have to ignore the dogs on leash sign, but she chose to.
    Karen didn’t have to call the coppers in, but she did.
    The entire situation was one of her own creation, and whilst the penalty may have been a bit harsh, how many times has she pulled that stunt on some hapless bloke and gotten compliance? (Which seems to me to be what she was after – dominance in a social setting.)
    Perhaps a word or two with a work colleague/ex boyfriend, etc will give us more and better ammunition.

    And of course, as the history of this little overblown incident starts to come out, darling dog walker has a history…

  70. Danjing. On the Yangtze of course!

  71. Numbers silence on this case is surely a damning indictment of the whole state school system he was a part of.

    Really?
    Catallaxian logic is strange and wonderful to behold.
    A public school teacher (one of 49,000 permanent teachers and 45,000 casuals in the state system in NSW) has been charged with abuse. 94,000 were not.
    I was not “part of the whole state school system” in NSW.
    I have worked only in Queensland.
    And if whole systems are to be indicted, take a look at the evidence before the Commission.

    three-quarters (75.9 per cent) said they were abused in non-government schools, of which 73.8 per cent identified a Catholic school and 26.4 per cent identified an Independent school
    one-quarter (24.9 per cent) said they were abused in government schools
    almost three-quarters (71.8 per cent) said they were abused in a religious school, while 4.1 per cent said they were abused in a secular non-government school
    almost one in three (30.4 per cent) said they were abused in a boarding school setting, of which 96.8 per cent told us it was a non-government boarding school and 3.2 per cent identified a government boarding school. Of the non-government boarding schools, 57.0 per cent identified a Catholic school and 43.2 per cent identified an Independent school.

    It’s always a good idea to check the facts before you face plant.

  72. will

    It’s always a good idea to check the facts before you face plant.

    says the man with the rich fantasy life

    Tell me about the abuse in Qld schools by Labour pedos

  73. Farmer Gez

    Black Ball
    #3467117, posted on May 29, 2020 at 11:21 am
    Danjing. On the Yangtze of course!

    Now you’re onto it.
    According to the Australian, Little China Girl promised to love Premier Dan long time.

  74. Tell me about the abuse in Qld schools by Labour pedos

    You tell me, if you’re the authority on pedos.
    And if you’re referring to the political party, it’s “Labor”, not “Labour”.
    Another face plant.
    Catallaxy is humming along – an enduring and consistent digital exhibition of adolescent tomfoolery.
    It’s always good for a laugh…..

  75. will

    lunatic lefty goes off on irrelevancies, rather then address the issues

    typical

    so tell me about how the Qld State Education systems handles touchy teachers.

  76. OldOzzie

    Real Clear Politics – Trump’s Deregulation Efforts Pave Way for Economic Recovery

     Igniting an economic comeback is the federal government’s most important job now that efforts to flatten the curve and support medical workers have succeeded. President Trump recently released his  Executive Order on Regulatory Relief to Support Economic Recovery, empowering federal agencies to remove red tape to help businesses quickly and safely recover from the COVID-19 pandemic.

    Russ Vought, acting director of the Office of Management and Budget,  argues, “Typically, when our country has faced a crisis, Washington responds by grabbing more power. President Trump understands that to get the economy moving, the power needs to be given back to the people and entrepreneurs.”

    The president deserves credit for acting in a way most politicians would never consider. His administration is allowing doctors to  practice  medicine across state lines and rolling back regulations that made online learning difficult. These actions help combat the coronavirus while allowing Americans to live their lives as normally as possible. Hopefully, the rest of Washington follows President Trump’s lead and works together to speed our economic recovery.

    Federal agencies have taken over  600  deregulatory actions in response to the pandemic, and more deregulation is needed as we enter a new phase of our response. With  over 36 million  Americans unemployed and experts predicting the economy may  shrink  by 40% in the second quarter, Congress and the president need to pass policies allowing Americans to quickly get back to work without having to jump through pointless hoops.

     By issuing an executive order directing the government to cut red tape, President Trump is committing to unleash the American economy. Businesses should be encouraged to reopen in the safest way possible, without worrying about being closed or sued.

    A vast majority of Americans back these deregulatory efforts because they know useless regulations impede growth. Polling  shows  that 66% of Americans support giving President Trump extended deregulatory powers during the COVID-19 pandemic, and 74% believe the permitting process for infrastructure projects should be simplified. 

  77. so tell me about how the Qld State Education systems handles touchy teachers.

    No, you tell me.
    There’s all sorts of reports available from the respective state teacher registration boards.
    It’s all publicly available.
    Go for it…..

  78. Top Ender:

    Interesting to muse on China having some sort of internal rebellion.
    I guess if the middle class keep getting steadily better off, and the working class remain hopeful, nothing much will happen.

    That’s been the bargain all along – the Chinese people will give the Communist Party control, but the Party must keep the people fed and entertained.
    This is China’s biggest issue – the only way it can be put aside is by the threat of war against China.

  79. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    And if you’re referring to the political party, it’s “Labor”, not “Labour”.
    Another face plant.
    Catallaxy is humming along – an enduring and consistent digital exhibition of adolescent tomfoolery.

    Labor – No room for “U”

    Catallaxy is humming along, and Numbers Bob just can’t stay away. This blog owns him, lock, stock and barrel.

  80. Yeah sure Liability Boob, just one teacher in the public system has ever been charged with abuse.

    You irredeemable joke.

  81. Cassie of Sydney

    “Free Radical
    #3467106, posted on May 29, 2020 at 11:12 am”

    I see that FR has taken it upon himself to be the blog censor….accusing people here there and everywhere of being “defamatory.

  82. Cassie of Sydney

    “Catallaxy is humming along, and Numbers Bob just can’t stay away. This blog owns him, lock, stock and barrel.”

    No doubt about it.

  83. Hay Stockard

    Why interact with numbers? Would you play chess with a pigeon?

  84. Cassie of Sydney

    “Hay Stockard
    #3467141, posted on May 29, 2020 at 11:54 am
    Why interact with numbers? Would you play chess with a pigeon?”

    HS….that’s very defamatory to pigeons!

  85. “Catallaxy is humming along, and Numbers Bob just can’t stay away. This blog owns him, lock, stock and barrel.”

    I’ve 1500 words to write on my proposal today.
    This site offers amusement every 250 words.
    Reminds me of a five minute break whilst patrolling.

  86. Yeah sure Liability Boob, just one teacher in the public system has ever been charged with abuse.

    If you’re so obsessed with this topic, why not check the actual statistics and do some comparisons with the private (subsidised) system?
    It’s all available…..

  87. Infidel Tiger King

    The NRL’s highly anticipated return on Thursday night shattered ratings records and cracked the magic million on its way to being the most watched regular season match since 2014.

    A total of 918,000 watched the Eels’ big win on Nine across both metropolitan and regional areas, while 355,000 tuned in on Fox League.

    Wowee.

    I think V’landys is an awful person but his continual pushing to get league back playing has been righteous. And it has paid off in spades.

  88. jo

    Black Ball
    #3467117, posted on May 29, 2020 at 11:21 am
    Danjing. On the Yangtze of course!

    Wish I’d thought of it.

  89. OldOzzie

    Tucker Carlson: Mail-In Ballot Harvesting Is Ripe With Voter Fraud

    TUCKER CARLSON: A lot of people in this country have been suffering through this pandemic but many of our most ambitious politicians have treated the disaster as a massive opportunity.

    A chance to implement their entire agenda all at once, immigration amnesty to massive tech censorship. The biggest goal is to eliminate every remaining barrier to voter fraud in this country. They claim to do that by enacting nationwide mail-in voting. Earlier today the president tweeted this about universal mail-in voting. “There is no way that mail-in ballots will be anything less than substantially fraudulent. Mail boxes will be robbed, and illegally printed out and signed. The governor is sending them out to millions of people and anyone living in the state will come like will get one. How and for whom to vote. This will be a rigged election. No way!”

    Now for the first time ever, Twitter.com, the company responded directly to one of the president’s tweets. They inserted a link below this one to declare authoritatively that the tweet was false. “Get the facts about mail-in ballots.” If the user has taken to a Twitter news page with a headline declaring “Trump makes the unsubstantiated claim that mail-in voting will lead to voter fraud.” That’s the official story. Voter fraud never happens no matter what and it definitely won’t happen with mail-in voting. You are hearing trusted news anchors tell you that, a lot. And they say it like they know it. Anyone who disagrees is a conspiracy nut, a flat Earther, a freak. Probably doesn’t vaccinate his kids.

    They’re lying. That’s a lie and we know it’s a lie because of fraud at mail-in voting already happens. Not speculating. Do you have Google? Look it up. Ballot harvesting is the problem. Ballot harvesting is the process when the third-party collects and turns in ballots on behalf of another person. It’s only possible with mail-in ballots.

  90. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    High Court rules in favour of releasing letters between the Queen and Sir John Kerr over Gough Whitlam’s dismissal

    Olivia Caisley
    Reporter
    @livcaisley
    An hour ago May 29, 2020
    19 Comments

    The High Court has ruled that hundreds of letters between the Queen and former governor-general Sir John Kerr before the Dismissal of the Whitlam government are public records and should be released.

    The landmark judgment handed down on Friday comes after a legal battle by historian Jenny Hocking, who says keeping them secret only fuels public distrust and Australians deserve to know the full history of the greatest constitutional crisis in the nation’s history.

    The so-called palace letters between Buckingham Palace and Sir John Kerr about the time of the 1975 dismissal had been deemed “personal communications” by the National Archives of Australia and the Federal Court.

    Ms Hocking spent four years attempting to secure the release of the 211 letters through the courts – a bid that was resisted by the NAA.

    From the Oz. NEWSFLASH – There was no grand conspiracy. Kerr sent Whitlam to the polls, and the Australian people dismissed him in a landslide.

  91. thefrollickingmole

    Free Radical
    #3467093, posted on May 29, 2020 at 10:57 am
    thefrollickingmole #3467068, posted on May 29, 2020 at 10:20 am

    Defamation.

    The Professor told everyone last week to stop making these defamatory comments. Maybe it’s time he gave you a holiday.

    I hope so, in that case more than a decade of twitter, ABC, experts etc are up for nearly identical “Just asking the question” with relation to Cardinal Pell (7-0 be his name) must fall under the same category.

    Now wobble off and play in the traffic skin suit boy.

  92. rickw

    Daily dose of Vietnam!

  93. thefrollickingmole

    Wang also ignores the culture of cover up mentioned in the news report, its the equivalent of asking the pre-Melbourne response set up by Pell (7-0 be his name) what their figures are.

  94. rickw

    ‘The Victorian Government has ruled out a pay freeze for the public service despite dire economic forecasts and a $773 million deficit in the State budget.’

    They can’t give their voter base a pay cut, political suicide.

    I reckon public servants should be barred from voting. Eliminates the lunacy of a voting block voting for the party offering the best pay deal.

  95. cohenite

    The troll who should be dead is on a winner: state schools have less pedos than private schools.

  96. The troll who should be dead is on a winner: state schools have less pedos than private schools.

    This is a very weird place.
    “Winning” and “losing” is only necessary to those who have a problem with self-image.
    Facts, which are of much more consequence, always take a back seat.

  97. Roger

    From the unlikeliest of sources:

    UK Architects for Social Housing offer an analysis of the UK’s response to covid-19 that concludes it is a manufactured crisis and the lockdown was unwarranted…

    Whether this crisis has been manufactured by the Government and its corporate clients and to what purpose should no longer be questions except for those who refuse to read the data and legislation I have presented and analysed in my last two articles: the question we must answer is how to oppose the totalitarian measures this crisis has ushered in.

    RTWT Further links at site.

  98. incoherent rambler

    the question we must answer is how to oppose the totalitarian measures this crisis has ushered in.

    Indeed.

    HoP may be the only way.

  99. notafan

    As the RC excluded government schools any findings regarding percentages should be discounted.

    Not to mention that boarding is/was comparatively rare in government schools.

    Now should some future government enquiry include all institutions providing care we might see different outcomes.

    We will never know how many very young children have been abused in institutions…

    And the obvious

    Predators go where they have access.

    It’s not non government schools that are a problem in and of themselves.

  100. MemoryFault

    Whether this crisis has been manufactured by the Government and its corporate clients and to what purpose should no longer be questions except for those who refuse to read the data and legislation I have presented and analysed in my last two articles: the question we must answer is how to oppose the totalitarian measures this crisis has ushered in.

    And to quote the old Carpenters song – “We’ve Only Just Begun”.
    Interesting how five countries have been in lock step from the start of all this – the UK, the USA, Canada, Australia and New Zealand. Aka the five UKUSA Pact countries, home of Project Echelon, which became PRISM once it incorporated the internet, then Five Eyes when phone tracking became possible, and now something else – unknown – now that it incorporates voice recognition.

    I’m not sure where the roller coaster is going, but it promises to be one helluva ride.
    I think we’re going to need more than a kiss for luck though.

  101. OldOzzie

    Trump Signs Executive Order Stripping Social Media Companies Of “Liability Shield”

    Update (2045ET): The full text of the executive order has been published (the final order is essentially identical to a ‘draft’ copy leaked to the press last night):

    By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the laws of the United States of America, it is hereby ordered as follows:

    Section 1.

    Policy.

    During a press conference where President Trump signed an executive order pressuring social media companies like Facebook, Google and Twitter to stop showing political bias. The order is meant to chip away at the “liability shield” these platforms enjoy thanks to Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act of 1996.

    The EO also requires the DoJ to work with state AGs to make sure they enforce laws on “deceptive” business practices. He added that social media companies are “tantamount to a monopoly” and have had unlimited power to shape and alter the national conversation.

    When Twitter tags tweets as “misinformation”, they cease being a platform and effectively become “an editor with a viewpoint”. “What they chose to promote or ignore is nothing short of political activism,” Trump said. “This censorship is a threat to freedom itself – imagine if your phone company edited your text messages or blocked your phone calls.”

    AG Barr, who was also in attendance, said Section 230 “was stretched way beyond its original intention…its purpose was to allow websites that were acting virtually as bulletin boards were not responsible for third-party information…”. When they “curate” their collection and start “censoring” particular content, they become publishers, and they shouldn’t be entitled to the same kind of shield that was set up earlier. He also explained how the executive order sets up a “rule making procedure for the FCC” to try and “get back to the original interpretation” of Section 230.

    It also encourages state attorneys general to come up with “model” legislation addressing this at the state level.

    “Currently social media platforms like twitter enjoy a liability shield because they are a ‘neutral platform’ – which they are not…social media companies who engage in editing or censorship will be stripped of this shield, while companies will be punished should they engage in any “deceptive” acts. Federal agencies will also be barred from buying advertising on these platforms – a direct attack on their bottom line.

    Trump said he expects legal challenges to the order, but believes the White House will “do well” with them.

    These companies grew because they held themselves out as a public forum…but now that they have become these very powerful networks, they’ve now switched, and they are using that market power to enforce particular view points,” he said. This should be addressed not only via the order, but in court challenges and legislation on Capitol Hill.

    Conservatives believe these platforms shouldn’t be allowed to show as much bias in favor of liberals and progressive political views.

    During the Q&A, Trump bashed Twitter’s head of site integrity, Yoel Roth, who has made hysterical statements on his own twitter account, like insisting that there are “actual Nazis” in the White House. “If you’re going to have a guy like this make those decisions…I think we should just shut it down, as far as I’m concerned,” Trump said, adding that he would need to look into the legality of trying to close down Twitter (maybe he can convince Elon Musk to buy it, then delete it?).

  102. From The Daily Mail. State Governments are lucky Federal Govt footing the bill, so far, of them keeping workers away from work. Naturally state workers at home are on full pay as it is the rest of us that pays for them whilst private sector goes bust. Plus VIC are getting their 4.8% pay rise.

    “Victorian Premier Daniel Andrews has banned white-collar workers from returning to their offices and threatened fines for any boss who ignores the rules. He has also urged workers to dob on their bosses if they are told to come back into work. Mr Andrews said that police will be checking offices to make sure employers do not breach the order which lasts until the end of June”.

  103. thefrollickingmole

    And the obvious

    Predators go where they have access.

    Nail on the head there, the common thread through all of these are predators will seek positions of “respectability” and power over their targets.

    We had at least 2 fruity teachers at our school, which also had a boarders section, to the best of my knowledge no allegations about those teachers.

    But others in the same order did.

  104. OldOzzie

    President Trump Signs Executive Order – Directing Efforts to Prevent On-Line Censorship – Video and XO
    Posted on May 28, 2020 by sundance

    This afternoon President Trump held a press availability in the oval office answering questions from the media as he signed an executive order [Available Here] directing the prevention of on-line censorship in social media platforms.

    The president was joined by Attorney General Bill Barr, and both leaders delivered remarks and answered questions from the media. [Video Below, Transcript to Follow]

  105. cohenite

    This is a very weird place.

    The troll who should be dead doesn’t do irony. What a surprise.

  106. cohenite

    OldOzzie
    #3467185, posted on May 29, 2020 at 1:02 pm
    EXECUTIVE ORDERS
    Executive Order on Preventing Online Censorship
    INFRASTRUCTURE & TECHNOLOGY

    One big liberty quote.

  107. Arnost:

    On face value – Karen Amy’s complaint / call to the police was [even by Karen Christian’s account] 100% factual. “There is an African-American man, I am in Central Park, he is recording me and threatened myself and my dog,”.

    …and that was what got my suspicions up.
    It was 100% factual. Measured. And practised. And this poor bastard has just walked into a sociopaths minefield.

  108. Infidel Tiger King

    Julio Rosas
    @Julio_Rosas11
    ·
    40m
    Police cars revolving lightPolice cars revolving lightPolice cars revolving light: Can’t believe what I’m seeing the Minneapolis police has ABANDONED the 3rd precinct’s building!! Rioters have stormed in the parking lot and are now damaging the building.

    Things are going well in the US. At least they are destroying government property now.

  109. Infidel Tiger King

    Breaking911
    @Breaking911
    MINNEAPOLIS POLICE & FIREFIGHTERS TOLD TO STAND DOWN AS RIOTERS LOOT & BURN THE CITY; RESIDENTS NEAR CHAOS ARE FLEEING THE CITY
    11:38 AM · May 29, 2020·

    This is what happens when you elect Democrats.

  110. Arnost

    Having a quick read of the Trump social media EO, it seems that it is more a call to develop / change the regulation. There isn’t anything actually changing the existing law. There is a lot of “within 60 days of the date of this order” “Within 30 days of the date of this order,… shall report” “consultation” ” establish a working group” etc. So a nothing burger,

    But what is interesting is that China is explicitly called out:

    One United States company, for example, created a search engine for the Chinese Communist Party that would have blacklisted searches for “human rights,” hid data unfavorable to the Chinese Communist Party, and tracked users determined appropriate for surveillance. It also established research partnerships in China that provide direct benefits to the Chinese military. Other companies have accepted advertisements paid for by the Chinese government that spread false information about China’s mass imprisonment of religious minorities, thereby enabling these abuses of human rights. They have also amplified China’s propaganda abroad, including by allowing Chinese government officials to use their platforms to spread misinformation regarding the origins of the COVID-19 pandemic, and to undermine pro-democracy protests in Hong Kong

    Trumps wheels within wheels negotiation 3-d chess style may suggest that maybe, just maybe he picked this fight specifically to gain advantage against Chinese interests. And Joe Scarborough and even @jack are roadkill along the way to get to a different goal.

  111. Breaking911
    @Breaking911
    MINNEAPOLIS POLICE & FIREFIGHTERS TOLD TO STAND DOWN AS RIOTERS LOOT & BURN THE CITY; RESIDENTS NEAR CHAOS ARE FLEEING THE CITY
    11:38 AM · May 29, 2020·

    This is what happens when you elect Democrats.

    You get arrested in Minnesota only if you reopen a business.
    Loot it & the cops are ordered to let you loot.

  112. As the RC excluded government schools any findings regarding percentages should be discounted.

    Utter rubbish.
    The RC did not exclude government schools. From Wikipedia

    The commissioners invited members of the public to make submissions, either orally over the telephone, in writing, or via face-to-face meetings with a commission officer. Witnesses were offered the opportunity to tell their story to the Royal Commission via either public hearings or in private.

    Anyone who had experience of abuse was encouraged to make a submission. Whether the institution was private or public was irrelevant to the terms of reference.

    Not to mention that boarding is/was comparatively rare in government schools.

    What does that have to do with anything?

    Now should some future government enquiry include all institutions providing care we might see different outcomes.

    See above – all institutions, public and private – were included.

    It’s not non government schools that are a problem in and of themselves.

    That’s not the point at issue here.
    If you scroll back, you’ll note that one case of a perpetrator in a state school has been used to smear all state schools.
    That’s par for the course on Catallaxy, but it is egregious bullshit, backed up by nothing except bias and prejudice.
    The reality, as revealed by the RC, does not bear that out.

  113. cohenite

    Democratic Party presidential candidate Joe Biden has said he welcomes Chinese intrusion into “all levels of [U.S.] government, classrooms, laboratories, athletic fields and boardrooms.”

    The comments – unearthed from a 2011 Sichuan University speech – demonstrate either a fundamental misunderstanding of the Chinese Communist Party (CCP), or outright collusion with it.

    The former veep stated at the time:

    “In order to cement this robust partnership, we have to go beyond close ties between Washington and Beijing, which we’re working on every day, go beyond it to include all levels of government, go beyond it to include classrooms and laboratories, athletic fields and boardrooms.”

    Joe’s probably hanging out for brain transplant.

  114. stackja

    Hocking v Director-General of the National Archives of Australia [2020] HCA 19 (29 May 2020)

    Conclusion

    Orders should be made as follows:
    1. Appeal allowed.
    Set aside the orders of the Full Court of the Federal Court of Australia made on 8 February 2019 and, in their place, order that:
    (a) the appeal to the Full Court be allowed;

    (b) the orders of Griffiths J made on 16 March 2018 be set aside and, in their place, it be:

    (i) declared that the contents of Record AA1984/609 (“the deposited correspondence”) constitute Commonwealth records within the meaning of the Archives Act 1983 (Cth);

    (ii) ordered that a writ of mandamus issue to compel the Director-General of the National Archives of Australia to reconsider Professor Hocking’s request for access to the deposited correspondence; and

    (iii) ordered that the Director-General of the National Archives of Australia pay Professor Hocking’s costs at first instance; and

    (c) the Director-General of the National Archives of Australia pay Professor Hocking’s costs of the appeal to the Full Court.
    The Director-General of the National Archives pay Professor Hocking’s costs of this appeal.

  115. Arnost

    It was 100% factual. Measured. And practised.

    Works both ways. He’s more than clever enough [with a Harvard Degree and board roles on Audubon / GLAAD etc committees] to know that a black american threatening a single white female will scare / trigger her. His actions also smack of “practised” … There have been many many examples of Cancel Culture destruction of lives. And I’m not just talking about the dog treats. Like Amy may have KNOWN that the Police would take her side initially, he KNEW that when he virally accused her of racism that she will be socially destroyed and worse…

    Remember – if you are threatened – you SHOULD call the Police to sort it out… He didn’t need to virally shame her once she leashed her dog – but he did. [By the way … There may be more here to come. I’d bet he had someone else filming in the event Amy wasn’t a Leftie and pulled out a revolver and sorted it out that way, and these videos have a habit of leaking]

  116. notafan

    Numbers ignores the obvious.

    Access access access

  117. thefrollickingmole

    Not to mention that boarding is/was comparatively rare in government schools.

    What does that have to do with anything?

    Wang has now discarded the concept of “opportunity”, seeing no difference between, for example Cardinal Pells (7-0 be upon him) alleged 30 second face pape in a crowded cathedral and a school inspector being able to take children for long unsupervised drives and home visits where he was pretty well guaranteed there would be no witnesses.

    Fortunately numberwang wasnt on the Pell (7-0 be upon him) judicial bench or it would have gone 7-1 and he would have made a goose of himself.

    Teachers are second only to clergy in the list of abusers and wang wants to go “only one”.

    Either he was spectacularly fortunate to have never, ever, have heard a rumor about a “bad” teacher in his supervisory capacity, or he did what may unfortunately did back “in the old days” and dismissed it as malicious gossip.
    “everyone knows” appears to have applied to more than just a few shitty churchmen.

  118. Democratic Party presidential candidate Joe Biden has said he welcomes Chinese intrusion into “all levels of [U.S.] government, classrooms, laboratories, athletic fields and boardrooms.

    Dettol Donny has from time to time said nice things about the Chinese –
    @realDonald Trump – Jan 24 2020 –

    China has been working very hard to contain the Coronavirus. The United states greatly appreciates their efforts and transparency. It will all work out well. In particular, on behalf of the American People, I want to thank President Xi!

    And –

    Feb. 7, Remarks before Marine One departure:

    Late last night, I had a very good talk with President Xi, and we talked about — mostly about the coronavirus. They’re working really hard, and I think they are doing a very professional job. They’re in touch with World — the World — World Organization. CDC also. We’re working together. But World Health is working with them. CDC is working with them. I had a great conversation last night with President Xi. It’s a tough situation. I think they’re doing a very good job.

    There’s about 15 other instances.
    You’ve posted one for Biden……

  119. Arky

    Police cars revolving lightPolice cars revolving lightPolice cars revolving light: Can’t believe what I’m seeing the Minneapolis police has ABANDONED the 3rd precinct’s building!! Rioters have stormed in the parking lot and are now damaging the building.

    ..
    Good.
    We could learn something from the USA blacks.
    How much would it take for us to fight back against a police state?

  120. Arky

    Dettol Donny has from time to time said nice things about the Chinese –

    ..
    Not as much as you, you communist sympathising codpiece.

  121. Huck

    I would have thought the incremental easing of restrictions would have boosted passenger numbers from bored people wanting to live their lives. Only speculation, could it be that Metro Trains and Yarra Trams are owned by Chinese interests? Wouldn’t surprise me.

    Not sure about Yarra Trams, but Metro Trains is most definitely Chinese owned.
    Interestingly, the new HCMT trains that are being introduced are Chinese made.
    The Hunchback stated that these trains would have 40% local content on announcing the winning tender, however unit #1 has been scrapped as unusable (Did not even make it to testing stage), and the manufacturer has decided that this was due to the local fitting of the electrical looms and as such, all future units are being brought into the country as fully functioning shells.
    It seems the only local contribution is fitting out the interior seating as well as a few components of the drivers cab.
    The cynical might think that the disappearance of the 40% local rule may have something to do with the belt and road initiative.
    Despite this, I think the company does have a valid complaint, and is right to be chasing the government for money.
    The government has insisted that we continue operations as normal, however passenger numbers are down to bugger all and revenue has dropped accordingly.
    If this was a normal business, the services provided would have reduced in line with demand, as would staffing levels, however by government decree, we are operating with normal costs and decimated income.

  122. Bruce in WA

    From Bernard Gaynor’s SpaceChook page. (Yeah, yeah, I know …) Any West Aussies have any back-up links for his statement (bolded). I can’t find anything, but I’m not able to spend the time just at present to do a proper search. (“Yes, dear, I’m on my way …”)

    Posted By Bernard Gaynor on Friday, May 29, 2020 12:51 pm | 0 comments

    Alright, alright. I know.

    COVID-19 has seen politicians all over the world say stupid things. It’s like this disease has also destroyed the functioning brain cells of those running the joint.

    But Chairman Dan Andrews, the Chinese Lord Vizier of Victoria, has just topped the lot.

    In a speech today he outlined increased restrictions, forcing workers to remain at home under threat of new fines. And he’s even set up a hotline so that informants can dob in their boss.

    Why?

    Well, in his very own words, this is why:

    And we know that if just half the people who normally use public transport start driving to work, we will see our freeways and other major roads grind to a halt.

    The number of people on the roads and the transport network is already starting to increase and we cannot let that creep continue.

    If we do, then we’ll see commute times worse than anything any of us have ever experienced – two hours from Werribee to the city, 90 minutes from Reservoir and two and half hours from Mulgrave.

    So, in other words, new state wide restrictions on work travel are necessary because of the traffic in Melbourne.

    Normally, bad traffic is a reason to vote a government out. In this case, the mere thought of a traffic jam is enough to allow the government to lock you in.

    And it is just a mere thought. The reality is that traffic has plummeted with Transurban reporting a 50% drop in traffic volume in April. Melbourne just happened to have the greatest fall in all of Transurban’s toll networks.

    The truth is that Dan Andrews is a control freak who enjoys overseeing every aspect of your life. COVID-19 has been the answer to this tyrant’s dreams.

    Bad traffic is not a reality now. Yet it was a constant daily feature of life before Andrews seized this opportunity to let loose his inner dictator. And it has nothing to do with addressing a pandemic.

    I know that Dan Andrews is not alone in this shameless grab for ever more power.

    Western Australians can now be legally detained and forcibly vaccinated without permission, defying the very basic medical principle that patients must give consent. Queenslanders are enduring a closed border and ridiculous rules that allow more people to enter a church for a property sale inspection than for a service.

    But Dan Andrews has grabbed just a little more power than most.

    So it is no surprise that Dan Andrews, who signed up to the Communist Chinese government’s ‘Belt and Road’ initiative, has decided that the answer to his infrastructure problems is to take people’s freedom to travel away.

  123. feelthebern

    COAG gone.
    National Cabinet to be permanent.
    Good bye any hope of an economic rebound in Oz.

  124. feelthebern

    Rephrase.
    Any hope of a prolonged economic rebound.

  125. feelthebern

    & definitely compared to the US, Asia & even Europe.

  126. Numbers ignores the obvious.

    Access access access

    Which might explain why the incidence of children being abused within the family setting is much higher than in institutional settings.
    That’s the most ignored “obvious”.
    When it comes to abuse, generally kids are safer at school than they are at home.

  127. Roger

    COAG gone. National Cabinet to be permanent.

    If only we could get Trump to ring Scotty & say the National Cabinet is a bad idea…

  128. Not as much as you, you communist sympathising codpiece.

    Find me one post where I have praised the CCP.

  129. Old Lefty

    Now that Hocking has won her case, I hope the archives trump her and publish the lot on line, rather than give her a monopoly to drip-feed them out with political spin.

    And please, Numbers, look up the report of the p3d0 inquiry conducted by Justice Wood in NSW as part of the Royal Commission into police integrity in the 90s. It will disabuse you of the impression that there has never been a systemic problem in state schools. For some strange reason, the search engines on McClellan’s computers, like those of the ABC and Fairfax, seemed unable to find the report.

  130. notafan

    Exactly!

    Wasn’t someone arguing private school bad, public school good?

  131. calli

    Can COAG just be scrapped like that? Is there no parliamentary mechanism that requires this to be debated? Are the meetings in camera, are they recorded for Hansard and therefore public scrutiny?

  132. MemoryFault

    COAG gone.
    National Cabinet to be permanent.

    Was there ever any real doubt amongst Catallaxians that this was the intention from Day One?
    Or are there still some ho believe it’s all the result of “bungling and incompetence”?
    If so, the “Budget” in Oct0ber, no doubt produced by the National Cabinet, will be an eye opener.

    Can you say “Five Year Plan”, folks?
    I just knew you could.

  133. Infidel Tiger King

    COAG gone. National Cabinet to be permanent.

    If only we could get Trump to ring Scotty & say the National Cabinet is a bad idea…

    Consensus politics is the road to ruin.We have an adversarial system for a reason.

  134. Roger

    Can COAG just be scrapped like that? Is there no parliamentary mechanism that requires this to be debated? Are the meetings in camera, are they recorded for Hansard and therefore public scrutiny?

    Good questions, calli.

    Off teh top of my head (so I may be wrong on some details)…

    COAG is the creation of Keating.

    It’s the PM’s prerogative to change the arrangements if he wishes.

    Its minutes, to my knowledge, have never been published. Rather, it issues communiques.

    The minutes of its predecessor body, the Permiers’ Conferences, were published.

    The minutes of the Natinal Cabinet have not been published.

    Governments getting more secretive is not progress.

  135. Roger

    Premiers’ Conferences

  136. woolfe

    Phase 3 of
    eased restrictions
    take effect
    Saturday 6 June
    Limit on non-work
    gatherings raised
    to 100 people
    Indoor and/or outdoor venues with
    multiple, divided spaces may have
    up to 300 people, with up to 100
    people in each space
    The following activities can resume:
    Beauty therapy & personal
    care services
    Use of playgrounds, skate parks
    & outdoor gym equipment
    Full contact sports & training
    Gyms (with staff) &
    all fitness classes

    Galleries, museums,
    zoos, theatres, cinemas,
    concert venues, arcades &
    amusement parks
    Restaurants, cafes, bars and pubs
    can serve alcohol without a meal
    The capacity rule has been changed
    in WA to 2 square metres per person

  137. MemoryFault

    Can COAG just be scrapped like that? Is there no parliamentary mechanism that requires this to be debated?

    Calli, one of the things I’ve always admired about you is your sense of humour.
    aBTW, what’s a “parliament”?

  138. custard

    Re release of letter between ER and Kerr

    The High Court today handed down its decision on Hocking v DG National Archives of Australia.

    The High Court ruled in favour of Professor Hocking, finding that the ‘Palace Letters’ are Commonwealth records under the Archives Act 1983.

    The High Court has instructed the Director-General to reconsider Professor Hocking’s request for access to the correspondence accordingly.

    The National Archives has commenced the access examination process as required by the Act.

    The process assesses which Commonwealth records are made public once they reach the legislated open period, 20 years after their creation.

    National Archives Director-General David Fricker said: ‘We accept the High Court’s judgement and will now get to work examining these historically significant records for release under the provisions of the Archives Act 1983.

    ‘The National Archives is a pro-disclosure organisation. We operate on the basis that a Commonwealth record should be made publicly available, unless there is a specific and compelling need to withhold it. We work extremely hard to do this for the Australian people.’

    Last financial year the National Archives wholly released 96 per cent of records on request, partially released 3 per cent, and completely withheld only 1 per cent. In all, more than 310,400 records documenting the decisions and actions of previous governments were released.

  139. Infidel Tiger King

    Beginning Saturday, June 6 the 4sqm rule will be replaced with a 2qm rule – effectively doubling the number of people allowed in hospitality venues – up to a maximum of 100. That is a fivefold increase from the current limit of 20.

    Such liberty.

  140. OldOzzie

    Mark A
    #3467230, posted on May 29, 2020 at 2:46 pm
    Looking for a Bike anyone?

    That’s one “Bike” I like – what a way to clear Lycra off the road

  141. OldOzzie

    Only two COVID-19 patients left on ventilators

    Chief Medical Officer Brendan Murphy says there are only two people left on ventilators across the nation – a long way short of the 7000 the Morrison government catered for in the worse-case scenario.

    He called on Australians presenting with cold symptoms to get tested as it was the best way to track the spread of the virus.

    “We are doing 30,000 tests a day with a very low positivity rate of 0.05 per cent at the moment,” Professor Murphy said. “We would still like to do more tests. We would like every person with an acute respiratory problem, cough, cold, to get tested.”

  142. Mark A

    Did You Know?

    Legend originally meant “things to be read”, and in an era when both literacy and the written word were rare, to be “legendary” was considered to be worthy of being recorded for future generations to read about.

  143. Mark A

    OldOzzie
    #3467246, posted on May 29, 2020 at 3:07 pm

    How did the stew turn out?
    Hope it was worth the effort.

  144. OldOzzie

    ‘WE’RE ALL IN THIS TOGETHER’ IS A LIE
    Andrew Bolt, Herald Sun
    May 29, 2020 8:26am

    We’re told “we’re all in this together”. It’s the cry of the coronavirus panic. But Labor and some union bosses just proved what a lie that is. My editorial from The Bolt Report.

  145. OldOzzie

    Mark A
    #3467251, posted on May 29, 2020 at 3:11 pm
    OldOzzie
    #3467246, posted on May 29, 2020 at 3:07 pm

    How did the stew turn out?
    Hope it was worth the effort.

    Mark A,

    excellent, especially with a nice red – will serve me over next couple of days – tasty and worth the effort

  146. Zatara

    Infidel Tiger King
    #3467203, posted on May 29, 2020 at 1:49 pm

    Breaking911
    @Breaking911
    MINNEAPOLIS POLICE & FIREFIGHTERS TOLD TO STAND DOWN AS RIOTERS LOOT & BURN THE CITY; RESIDENTS NEAR CHAOS ARE FLEEING THE CITY
    11:38 AM · May 29, 2020·

    This is what happens when you elect Democrats.

    … and import 200,000 Somali tribesmen who refuse to assimilate. Who you then dump en-mass into a nice place where, as they are not encumbered by nature, disease, open tribal warfare, or the need to earn a living, they rapidly reproduce to the point where they outnumber the original locals (thus ensuring the Dem vote).

    Meanwhile, the do-gooders who “rescued” them from their home country wonder what could have possibly gone wrong.

  147. OldOzzie

    Victorians’ back-to-work plans shelved as Keilor Downs College student tests positive for coronavirus

    Victorians who have been working from home will be banned from returning to work in a bid to keep people away from gathering in large numbers.

    From Monday employers will face fines if they ask employees to end their working from home arrangements.

    Until now the state government had advised Victorians to work from home if possible.

    But that advice will be made an order under the Public Health and Wellbeing Act from Monday.

    Premier Daniel Andrews said today the move was necessary to continue to contain the spread of coronavirus.

    The Premier said it was not yet clear how long the work from home order would stay in place.

    But he said any changes to the order would be unlikely before the end of June.

    “If you have been working from home, you must keep working from home,” Mr Andrews said.

    “We have the power to enforce that.

    “If an office that has, currently, 80 per cent of their staff working from home, decided ‘we’ll just ignore the chief health officer and have everybody come back Monday’ then they would be in breach of the public health orders, and there are significant penalties,” he said.

    Mr Andrews said the move had been taken to reduce public transport usage.

    He said there were fears of a second outbreak of coronavirus if the public transport system started running beyond 15 per cent capacity.

    “We can’t have a situation where our public transport system is running at 100 per cent capacity,” he said.

    “By working from home, we limit the number of people moving around, and we limit the spread of this virus.

    “The majority of Victorians and employers are following the work from home advice.

    “But for the small number that are not, this is about removing any shadow of doubt: if you can work from home, you must continue to do so.”

  148. OldOzzie

    Rita Panahi: Twitter needs to be treated like a real publisher

    Rita Panahi, Herald Sun
    May 28, 2020 9:51pm
    Subscriber only

    If Twitter wants to behave like a publisher then it should be treated like one. It can’t pretend to be a neutral platform when it exerts editorial control including selective “fact checking”, shadow-banning and other underhanded forms of censorship that are almost always targeted at conservatives.

    This week Twitter unwisely picked a fight with its most powerful account holder, US President Donald Trump.

    For reasons that defy logic they picked Trump’s tweets about mail-in ballots and voter fraud to label with a “fact-check” linking to a highly partisan CNN piece.

    As Sohrab Ahmari noted in the New York Post the dubious fact-check Twitter directed users to was “the kind of opinion-masquerading-as-reportage that CNN, and too many other mainstream outlets, specialise in.

    “Experts say mail-in ballots are very rarely linked to voter fraud,” the story tsk-tsk’d — the experts apparently having forgotten the debacle of thousands of lost, missing and uncounted mail-in ballots reported by The New York Times last month.

    Trump then tweeted a number of times about the platform “stifling free speech” and the need for big tech to clean up its act.

    “Twitter has now shown that everything we have been saying about them (and their other compatriots) is correct. Big action to follow!” Trump posted.

    “Big Tech is doing everything in their very considerable power to CENSOR in advance of the 2020 Election. If that happens, we no longer have our freedom. I will never let it happen! They tried hard in 2016, and lost. Now they are going absolutely CRAZY. Stay Tuned!!!”

    On Thursday we learned the action will come in the form of an executive order.

    We’ll know on Friday the details and whether it’s bluster to appease some of the Republican base or something more substantive.

    The early speculation is the order will target Google and social media platforms under Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, which protects online platforms from being held accountable for the content their users post.

    As it stands a handful of social media giants have a virtual monopoly on the flow of information and speech in the public square.

    Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, Google and Silicon Valley’s Left-leaning ways have been well documented and the subject of senate hearings.

    Take Twitter’s head of site integrity Yoel Roth, who is in charge of developing and enforcing Twitter’s rules and was a key part of the site’s “fact-checking” policies. Here is a man who posts deranged diatribes against Trump and Republicans being tasked with determining what is truthful.

    Who is going to fact check some of Roth’s tweets including his claims that there are “actual Nazis in the White House” and likening Trump adviser Kellyanne Conway to Joseph Goebbels, Adolf Hitler’s minister of propaganda.

    To label Roth anti-Trump doesn’t do his deep loathing justice. This is a young man so overcome with hatred for conservatives he maligns anyone who votes differently to him.

    After the last election he posted: “I’m just saying, we fly over those states that voted for a racist tangerine for a reason.”

    Yes, I’m sure we can trust Roth and his like-minded colleagues to treat conservatives who they slander as racists and Nazis fairly.

    Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey on Thursday posted a series of self-serving, contradictory tweets where he claimed the site wasn’t “an arbiter of truth” but would “continue to point out incorrect or disputed information”.

    Conservatives and libertarians have become accustomed to having their content demonetised on YouTube, ranked low on Google searches and suppressed or censored on Twitter and Facebook.

    The double standards in policing speech on Twitter is evident in the way conservatives are banned for “infractions” that don’t seem to apply to Leftist account holders who can spew all sorts of defamatory abuse and threats. “Misgendering” a dude with a full beard who identifies as a pixie will see you suspended but any abuse of conservatives is considered fair game.

    And, in the parallel universe Twitter often inhabits if you are not proudly Left then you are considered “alt-Right” or “virtually a Nazi”.

    While Twitter targets Trump it allows the Iranian regime to spew its lies on the platform even though Twitter is banned in the Isl*mic Republic. Twitter has also failed to fact check Chinese government propagandists including deputy director of the Chinese ministry of foreign affairs information department, Lijian Zhao, who tweeted that COVID-19 originated in the US and plenty of other batshit-crazy conspiracy theories.

    You don’t need to be on Twitter to be subjected to the platform’s enormous influence. Just about every media player, commentator and journalist is on Twitter and what happens on the site has an enormous influence on what you see highlighted on the mainstream and new media.

  149. Infidel Tiger King

    Victorians trapped at home.

    West Australians trapped in heaving pubs.

    The natural order returned.

  150. cohenite

    There’s about 15 other instances.
    You’ve posted one for Biden……

    You fucking dumb kunt; Trump deals with the chunks as he would any opponent: good cop/bad cop, which he can do because he has the US and the West’s back. Biden, corrupt, demented fuck he is deals with the chunks as any corrupt pollie does: for anything he can get and fuck the US and the West.

    Being an arsehole traitor commie loving prick it is it no wonder you can’t tell the difference. Now please feel free to fuck off and die.

  151. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Re release of letter between ER and Kerr

    David Smith – the Governor General’s Secretary, who read the proclamation dissolving Parliament – wrote a very good account of the Dismissal. He points out that it was the Labor Party, who had the Speaker of the House write to the Queen, asking her to overrule the Governor General, cancel the upcoming elections and restore Whitlam to office as Prime Minister. (“Head of State” David Smith, Page 259.) Buckingham Palace replied that the Australian Constitution placed all constitutional matters in the hands of the Governor general, and the Queen had no part in any decisions made by the Governor General in accordance with that Constitution.

    Smith also points out that Senator Lionel Murphy, on 18th June, 1970, tabled a list of ONE HUNDRED AND SIXTY NINE occasions, where Labor Oppositions had attempted to oppose money Bills in the Senate for the sole purpose of forcing the Government of the day to face the people at an early election. (“Head of State” Page 264.)…

  152. It will disabuse you of the impression that there has never been a systemic problem in state schools

    Where did I write that?
    Institutional child abuse is always a problem in whatever system it occurs.
    The point is that one teacher in the public system has been charged with an offence, and posters here have used that to smear the whole public system.
    The history of the problem, the statistics, and the action taken to deal with it show pretty clearly that when it comes to schools, it has always been a bigger problem in private (subsidised) institutions.
    That is a simple historical fact, and all the bullshit posted here won’t alter it.

  153. Trump deals with the chunks as he would any opponent: good cop/bad cop, which he can do because he has the US and the West’s back.

    The only back Dettol Donny has is his own.
    He has effectively abandoned any western leadership role.

  154. feelthebern

    As it currently stands, the Hoover institute at Stanford has too many retard neo-cons, an ok mix of econmists, and not enough historians.

  155. 2dogs

    it has always been a bigger problem in private (subsidised) institutions

    Government says government not bad! Who’d a thunk it?

  156. When Scomo and his mob stuff up, they do it on a grand scale.
    But never mind, it’s only the taxpayer’s money.

    The Federal Government has announced it will refund $721 million worth of debts it clawed back through its controversial Robodebt scheme.

    Services Australia said in a statement that 470,000 debts would be waived, with refunds to be rolled out from July.

    “Refunds will also be made for any interest charges and/or recovery fees paid on related debts,” Human Services Minister Stuart Robert said in a statement.

  157. OldOzzie

    Conventional seeding – then and now

    At the beginning of the 1990s, the offset sowing method was very common in East Germany. In the meantime, conventional seeding is making its comeback. Michael Horsch explains the reasons.

    terraHORSCH: Mister Horsch, what can you tell us about the beginnings of the offset sowing system?

    Michael Horsch: At the beginning of the 1990s, we sold some PD 12 seed drills in East Germany. At that time, the PD 12 was the first pneumatic HORSCH seed drill with more than 12 m working width and at the same time one of the largest seed drills on the European market.

    The standard tractor then was 180 hp and was perfectly suitable to pull a PD 12. The soil, however, had to be prepared intensely in advance and with mulch seed it was not that easy. On light soils it worked well, but on heavier soils it was considerably more difficult and two to three seedbed preparation passes had to be carried out in advance. This required two to three additional tractors – only to prepare the seedbed. Including the seed drill, you always needed three to four tractors. The sowing quality was – because of the light drag coulters and depending on the seedbed preparation – sometimes better and sometimes worse.

    How did it continue in the 2010s?

    Michael Horsch: Around 2010 the power of the tractors slowly approached 350 hp and the working width of the HORSCH Pronto increased to 9 m. For larger farms it became more and more difficult to find qualified staff to handle the working peaks that became shorter and shorter in due time. This was the reason why we increased the working width of the HORSCH Pronto to 12 m. The problem, however, was that even the 400 hp tractors were not powerful enough to pull a HORSCH Pronto 12 SW. 500 to 600 hp were required to do so.

    Interesting Read _ Farmer Gez would be interested in your thoughts?

  158. Snoopy

    The only back Dettol Donny has is his own.
    He has effectively abandoned any western leadership role.

    If Trump ordered US forces to invade Vietnam would that make you happy?

  159. notafan

    No it’s clearly residential care settings that are the problem because abusers seek them out, not schools per se.

  160. thefrollickingmole

    FIFY

    The point is that one teacher in the private system has been charged with an offence, and posters here have used that to smear the whole private system.

    Self awareness, you lack.
    Logic, you torture
    Your debating, sophistry
    FOAD, you havent.

    Sad old monomaniac.
    Who despite being a self confessed area inspector for schools through the heyday of kiddy fiddling teachers never heard a rumor.
    Despite being in the profession with the second highest crime rate.

  161. Louis Hissink

    It looks like exosomes have an identical appearance to that virus, and that it’s created by any organism that has been insulted by fear, chemical, etc. So if you test positive, what is being detected is the presence of the exosome, and not a virus. The exosomes are produced as a consequence of an underlying medical issue and nothing to do with a virus.

    Whether it is a scam, definite policy or the result of plain stupidity remains moot.

    https://youtu.be/0YvNRno-JB8

  162. feelthebern

    His exact numbers change interview to interview, but Satya Nadella, CEO of Microsoft, says that developed economies have had 10 years of tech force fed to them in 2 months.
    Had to disagree with that.

  163. Arky

    Find me one post where I have praised the CCP.

    ..
    Why?
    If I bother to dig up your old posts you will just move the goal posts again.
    Everyone here knows exactly what you are.
    How about you do the work and write a post explicitly and unapologetically criticising the CCP in no uncertain terms?
    You won’t though, willya fuckhead?

  164. Arky

    Are we still doing the no insults at the cat thing? If so, I take back the fuckhead thing.

  165. stackja

    Australian people must always keep politicians under control. Whitlam didn’t want an election. Governor General acted. People voted.
    Leftists unhappy ever since.

  166. Bear Necessities

    Trump has tweeted “…when looting starts, the shooting starts..” wrt Minneapolis. The National Guard could be making a appearance soon.

  167. feelthebern

    PS, want to derail a virtue signalling fool mid sermon?
    Do this.
    Agree agree agree & then drop in, that’s right, that’s what the CEO of Microsoft was saying, you know, what’s his name.
    99 times out of 100 they’ll say Bill Gates !! with huge confidence.
    Then say…err no…it’s actually a Satya Nadella…

  168. Arky

    Looking forward to dinner tonight.
    Taco Tuesday.

  169. OldOzzie

    Arky
    #3467287, posted on May 29, 2020 at 4:02 pm
    Looking forward to dinner tonight.
    Taco Tuesday.

    I know I miss track of the days, but today is Friday isn’r it?

  170. Arky

    today is Friday isn’r it?

    ..
    Who cares?
    I want tacos.

  171. feelthebern

    The governor (D) has to request the national guard.
    The mayor (D) would have to advise the governor that help is needed.
    The chief of police (D) would have to advise that they have lost control.

  172. feelthebern

    In the US, they sell these things called Choco Tacos.

  173. Cassie of Sydney

    “thefrollickingmole
    #3467277, posted on May 29, 2020 at 3:49 pm”

    Careful, you’ll wake up from his slumber our very own Catallaxy chief censor and all things arbiter of what’s legally appropriate here…he’s currently sleeping in a basement surrounded by his personal collection of skin suits, he’s also known as Free Radical…aka Grigs….aka 8th Toilet Block….he’ll start crying out….defamation…defamation…defamation.

  174. Zatara

    As it currently stands, the Hoover institute at Stanford has too many retard neo-cons, an ok mix of econmists, and not enough historians.

    They have Victor Davis Hanson and Thomas Sowell, that’s an excellent start.

  175. Who despite being a self confessed area inspector for schools through the heyday of kiddy fiddling teachers never heard a rumor.

    Wow.
    I’ve been promoted.
    The last “area inspector for schools” in Queensland was in the mid eighties.
    At that time I was a principal.

    Despite being in the profession with the second highest crime rate.

    Now which “profession” is that – soldiering, teaching, educational administration, or educational consultancy?
    And when you’ve worked that out, link to the data that substantiates your assertion.

  176. Zatara

    The governor (D) has to request the national guard.

    Actually, the state National Guard belongs to the Governor. He/she can activate them at will.

    On the other hand, the President can federalize the troops and take that option himself.

  177. Arky

    Where’s the post criticising the CCP?
    You won’t willya?

  178. Shy Ted

    Not really real estate porn, more one for CatSleuths. Would you live here? If not, why not? Big money prizes for the winner.

  179. Arky

    Where’s the post criticising the CCP?
    You won’t willya?

    ..
    And the reason he won’t?
    Aside from the fact that he might one day want to fly through Hong Kong without having an uneasy feeling when the coppers there check his phone?
    Well, it’s obvious, innit?

  180. Tailgunner

    He has effectively abandoned any western leadership role.

    Lol.
    Let’s imagine what my man, Mr T, would say in response to this nonsense take on current events.
    How many Biden2022 shirts you want me to order for ya’, Gook Killer?

  181. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)
    #3466320, posted on May 28, 2020 at 10:19 am
    interesting read
    Is The U.S. Prepared For War With China?

    The ChiComs are very smart, but too clever by half.

    Covid19 has nothing on Obama as an opportunity for them to gain strategic advantage. All their shenanigans will be nought if it ever becomes a hot war. Trump has been making hay, such that China has simply fallen further behind.

    Even without technological capability aspect, the Chinese armed forces have no military experience, unlike the US. Any hot war would be a bloodbath for the Chinese military. In any case, Trump has been ready for post covid19, despite Democrat attempts to destroy everything.

  182. thefrollickingmole

    Are we still doing the no insults at the cat thing? If so, I take back the fuckhead thing.

    I think you are ok, truth is a protection…

    Cassie of Sydney
    Already done about .5 seconds (note to pendant mummie crotch sniffers, exaggeration used for effect) after it was posted.

    link to the data that substantiates your assertion.
    oh dear wang, even the ABC shows you are a know nothing.
    Many adult perpetrators of abuse held roles associated with positions of leadership, power and authority.
    Perpetrators who held multiple roles, such as residential care workers in religious ministries, are counted in multiple categories.

    Person in religious ministry
    2113
    Teacher
    1378

    …….

    You were boasting here about travelling extensively checking different schools.
    But not a school inspector.

  183. Mark A

    Shy Ted
    #3467304, posted on May 29, 2020 at 4:19 pm

    Not really real estate porn, more one for CatSleuths. Would you live here? If not, why not? Big money prizes for the winner.

    No way.
    It’s a commercial building of questionable taste and no style.
    Definitely not a home.

  184. OldOzzie

    NBN offers up to gigabit speeds but many miss out

    CHRIS GRIFFITH
    TECHNOLOGY REPORTER

    NBN Co will radically increase consumer download speeds due to more Australians working at home. Some users will have access to a theoretical speed of close to 1000 Megabits per second (one Gigabit) on the “Home Ultrafast” tier, one of three new speed tiers being rolled out from today.

    But only those with fibre-to-the-home and seven per cent of HFC (Hybrid Fibre Coaxial) users will access anything like Gigabit speeds with copper connections used with fibre-to-the-node and fibre-to-the curb limited to 100Mbps, the current top-of-range speed for consumers.

    The ability of the NBN Co to deliver speeds above 100Mbps but only to some sections of the network brings into play the limitations of moving from the original fibre-to-the home model to mixed options that use old copper wiring.

    There’s multiple reasons for NBN’s decision to roll out faster speeds. First there’s been an NBN wholesale review of the changing dynamics of the internet market which shows Australians are connecting many more devices to their home networks.

    The other reason is the shift to working at home due to the pandemic and projections of many continuing to work from home after it.

    Before COVID-19, Australians typically enjoyed high capacity internet in offices, but more modest internet coverage at home. The lockdown has blurred the lines between the two, with faster provisioning needed in home internet services.

    The Morrison Government has welcomed the new plans. Communications minister Paul Fletcher said the launch demonstrated the network’s upgrade potential.

    “These higher speed plans have been developed in consultation with RSPs (retail service providers) and provide competitive price points for RSPs to market services to customers,” Mr Fletcher said.

    “They are intended to support households with heavy data download demands, including gamers, large families and homes that have five or more people who often use home broadband simultaneously.”

    NBN Co chief customer officer – residential Brad Whitcomb said self-isolation had seen many Australians scrutinise their NBN plan. “The more people and the more devices connected within the home, the more utility and benefit customers are able to derive from higher speed plans over the NBN network,” he said.

    NBN is offering three new speed tiers to consumers via retailers. Home Ultrafast offers 500 to 1000Mbps download and 50MBps upload speeds, Home Superfast has a peak wholesale download/upload speed of up to 250Mbps and 25Mbps, again just to fibre and HFC users for now.

    The two Home Fast schemes offer 100Mbps download and up to 20Mbps upload speeds to fibre, HFC, FTTB, FTTC and FTTC customers.

    NBN Co has also released its wholesale pricing to retailers.

    Mr Fletcher said that while Home Superfast and Home Ultrafast products will be initially available only to FTTP and portions of HFC users, NBN was progressively upgrading parts of the network so that more Australians could access the higher speed tiers.

    Labor said the announcement was a vindication of its original fibre plan, and raised troubling questions.

    “Why is the Morrison Government now prioritising 1,000 megabit speeds on HFC, when some Australians can’t even achieve 25 megabits per second speeds over copper?” said shadow communications minister Michelle Rowland. “And why is funding from the regional fixed wireless network being cut, in order to funnel more money into Telstra’s ageing HFC network?

    “This government doesn’t have a clue what they are doing. They are leaving regional Australians behind and deepening the gap in digital capability.”

    Mr Whitcomb said NBN Co would conduct new trials of G.fast protocols that could improve the performance of copper.

    There are reports of G.fast handling speeds to 1 Gigabit per second, but Mr Whitcomb said upgrading a user’s internet speed and bandwidth would depend on the length, vintage and quality of the copper wiring, and a user’s internet wiring at home.

    “Theoretically XG-Fast can go to 10 Gig (Gigabits per second) or something like that but in the real world application, we would expect to be able to support our super fast (tier) pending these trials but we’re not near a commercial launch of that at this stage but we are exploring G.fast as an option there.”

    Mr Whitcomb said NBN also would “over provision” bandwidth so that customers received closer to the speed they believed they were paying for. For example, a retailer providing 50Mbps internet might add their own overheads, so customers get only, say, 42Mbps. NBN Co will seek to make up that difference. “We’re now going to over provision that 50 by about 10 or 15 per cent,” Mr Whitcomb said.

    Research by NBN Co revealed a trend of customers upgrading plans. Some 23 per cent of those surveyed had upgraded to faster internet within the last 12 months, and a further 24 per cent said they planned to upgrade to higher speed home internet within 12 months. Together that’s almost half of NBN’s consumer customers.

    The survey found that about 80 per cent of new customers were choosing 50 or 100Mbps rather than entry level speeds.

    Mr Whitcomb said NBN Co had seen significant upgrades where people and families of multiple members worked from home, learned from home and entertained themselves all at the same time.

  185. Andreas

    I recall a cop shooting an Australian woman in Minneapolis. No one set fire to anything or stole any big-screen TVs. Just saying.

  186. Arky

    the Chinese armed forces have no military experience,

    ..
    Not really.
    I don’t like this underestimating the chinese.
    It’s a part of their two pronged propaganda effort to lull people into inaction.
    We will be at war with china soon enough.
    Playing down their abilities is just as bad as overstating them:
    ..

    3.5 Chinese Civil War (First phase, 1927–36)
    3.6 Second Sino-Japanese War (part of World War II, 1931–45)
    3.7 Ili Rebellion (1946–49)
    3.8 Chinese Civil War (Second phase, 1945–49)
    3.8.1 1945
    3.8.2 1946
    3.8.3 1947
    3.8.4 1948
    3.8.5 1949
    3.8.6 1950
    3.8.7 1951
    3.8.8 1952
    3.8.9 1953
    3.8.10 1955
    3.8.11 1960
    3.8.12 1950–58
    3.9 Invasion of Tibet (1950)
    3.10 Korean War (1950–53)
    3.11 Vietnam War (1959–75)
    3.12 Sino-Indian War (1962)
    3.13 Sino-Soviet border conflict (1969)
    3.14 Sino-Vietnamese War (1979)

  187. JC

    Zatara
    #3467301, posted on May 29, 2020 at 4:18 pm

    The governor (D) has to request the national guard.

    Actually, the state National Guard belongs to the Governor. He/she can activate them at will.

    On the other hand, the President can federalize the troops and take that option himself.

    Zat, does a president require the governors’ acquiescence?

  188. Arky

    I recall a cop shooting an Australian woman in Minneapolis. No one set fire to anything or stole any big-screen TVs. Just saying.

    ..
    Which is why it’s so easy to implement a police state on some people.

  189. Infidel Tiger King

    These riots are exacerbated by the lockdown.

    First chance people get to go out and it’s a free for all.

  190. Snoopy

    Rio Tinto blasting of 46,000-year-old <a href="Rio Tinto blasting of 46,000-year-old Aboriginal sites compared to Islamic State’s destruction in Palmyra

  191. OldOzzie

    Tailgunner
    #3467308, posted on May 29, 2020 at 4:25 pm

    The preferred POTUS, as called by some pedo- enabler from Toowoomba.
    Don’t Die,Joe!
    🤣🤣🤣

    Creepy Joe Biden’s Greatest Hits

    Tailgunner he really did not want to let go of Hillary

    From the Comments

    Russ R

    Anyone who embraces Hillary Clinton that long should automatically be disqualified for the office of the President. Even Bill won’t touch her

    Tennessee Honey

    HITLERY PUT HER ARMS & HANDS DOWN & HE WAS STILL HOLDING ON. WHAT THE?

  192. Rex Anger

    Even without technological capability aspect, the Chinese armed forces have no military experience, unlike the US

    There is that. They have had some minor success in border scuffles with India. But these have all been small-scale actions in mountainous terrain, where the PLA enjoyed the advantages of initiative (cos they started them) and ready reinforcement and supply (as previously stated).

    I suspect the latest incursion, where the PLA have apparently dug in on actual Indian territory, is playing chicken with Modhi. Or an attempt to distract them.from something in Pakistan. Maybe even a little of both.

    The Indians have had big stand-up fights with Pakistan and prevailed, where they have started on both the front and back foot.

    I suspect that a concerted action on India’s part would decisively fall in their favour, but they might fear China just goes for the tactical nukes as an option of first resort. Like winning a game of chess by flipping the table over and shooting your opponent in the face.

  193. Snoopy

    Rio Tinto blasting of 46,000-year-old <a href="Rio Tinto blasting of 46,000-year-old Aboriginal sites compared to Uslamic State’s destruction in Palmyra

  194. Zatara

    Zat, does a president require the governors’ acquiescence?

    Nope. Being a sensitive political prerogative thing he’d likely ask the Governor to activate them himself but if the Governor balks the President can do it on his own as long as the activation is in accordance with federal law.

    Suppressing insurrection, domestic violence, unlawful obstructions, assemblages, or rebellion are all issues the law allows him to do it for. Along with the normal wartime issues.

  195. JC

    First chance people get to go out and it’s a free for all.

    Because Wendy’s and the other stores were inextricably linked to the thug cop. It’s fucking unreal what goes on. There’s perhaps three people in the entire US who would support the cop’s action and the black community not only riots but they also loot stores.

  196. Free Radical

    Whatevs

    Lol. G’day, Boomer. How ya hoppin’?

  197. JC

    Jeez lord, now that’s a move in the stock price.

    At first, it seemed that global lockdowns combined with millions of people out of work was a disaster for a group offering credit to Millenials for discretionary spending.

    Just two months ago, when Afterpay shares crashed to $8.90, Molnar and Eisen would have fallen off the Rich List entirely with equity stakes worth $182 million.

    But as governments mobilise to prop up the incomes of battered households, all of a sudden Afterpay had a Lazarus moment. Its shares hit a record high $50 this week, valuing equity stakes held by both its founders at over $1 billion apiece.

    March 23 this stock hit a low of $8.90. It closed today at almost 48 bucks.

  198. Bruce of Newcastle

    Looking forward to dinner tonight.
    Taco Tuesday.

    Reminds me of this:

    Hot Fudge Sundae falls on a Tuesdae this week.

    Must reread that novel, not least since most Democrats would rather an extinction-causing meteor than Trump being re-elected, at least in New Hamshire.

  199. thefrollickingmole

    There’s perhaps three people in the entire US who would support the cop’s action

    One of them is probably Joe biden, channeling the ex KKK democrat Bryd.

    When Baskin called for nominations for Exalted Cyclops, the highest-ranking official in the Klavern, Byrd was nominated and quickly elected by unanimous vote. [18]

    It was Baskin who told Byrd, “You have a talent for leadership, Bob … The country needs young men like you in the leadership of the nation.” Byrd later recalled, “Suddenly lights flashed in my mind! Someone important had recognized my abilities! I was only 23 or 24 years old, and the thought of a political career had never really hit me. But strike me that night, it did.”[19] Byrd became a recruiter and leader of his chapter.[12] When it came time to elect the top officer (Exalted Cyclops) in the local Klan unit, Byrd won unanimously.[12]

    ….
    He rose to become one of the Senate’s most powerful members, serving as secretary of the Senate Democratic Caucus from 1967 to 1971 and—after defeating his longtime colleague, Ted Kennedy—as Senate Majority Whip from 1971 to 1977. Over the next three decades, Byrd led the Democratic caucus in numerous roles depending on whether his party held control of the Senate, including Senate Majority Leader, Senate Minority Leader, President pro tempore of the United States Senate and President pro tempore emeritus.[7] As President pro tempore—a position he held four times in his career—he was third in the line of presidential succession, after the Vice President and the Speaker of the House of Representatives.

  200. Zatara

    … the black community not only riots but they also loot stores.

    Given the videos of them laughing and partying as they looted it’s probably a safe bet that the majority of the looters had no idea what the riot was about in the first place.

    In chaos there is opportunity.

    Reminded me of Mogadishu.

  201. JC

    At around 11.17 pm this evening Rones will tell us he bought Afterpay on March 23.

  202. OldOzzie

    Vindicated: John Mearsheimer saw today’s bellicose China coming

    TOM SWITZER

    Rarely in history has an academic been as intellectually vindicated as John Mearsheimer. Two decades ago, his bold thesis was that great-power rivalry was not over. Like many prophets, Mearsheimer was ignored. But he accurately foresaw the intense Sino-American security competition that the corona­virus crisis has exposed.

    In The Tragedy of Great Power Politics, the veteran University of Chicago political scientist argued that, notwithstanding the collapse of the Soviet empire, insecurity and conflict remained inevitable by-products of the anarchic international system. As its power increase­d and definition of national interests grew, China would be more assertive in areas on which its security and prosperity depended. As the global hegemon, the US would go to great lengths to stop the rising power from dominating Asia. According to the headline of a Mearsheimer article on this page in November 2005: “The rise of China will not be peaceful at all.”

    In those days, Mearsheimer’s realism was at odds with the zeitgeist. This was the era of an increasing­ly globalised and border­­less world, where inter­dependency and integration were the overriding realities of inter­national relations. State rivalries and military power seemed to make ­little sense. The prevailing wisdom was that rapid economic growth almost ensured the emerg­ence of a democratic polity in China, as it had in Taiwan and South Korea. The more China embraced­ global capitalism, the more likely it would integrate peacefully in the rules-based international order.

    However, Mearsheimer never suffered the “great delusion”, as his most recent book is called. ­Almost a lone voice in the post-Cold War era, he argued that international life remained the kind of brutal competition for power that it had been since ­Th*cydides. Failing any kind of world government to enforce rules and norms, great powers find it impossibl­e to trust each other. The tragedy is that striving for security leads to heightened tensions.

    For Mearsheimer, the consequences were clear: by growing ­enchanted with the China market, the world was just feeding the beast. Far from becoming a ­responsible stakeholder in world affairs, Beijing was bound to upset the strategic sensibilities of neighbouring states, from Japan and South Korea to India and Vietnam. As a result, the US should pivot to Asia, deepen security ties with allies, develop new strategic partnerships with old foes and draw a line in the sand, in this case, water, by checking Beijing’s ambitions.

    Alas, after America’s Cold War victory, both Democratic and Republican administrations indulged in what Mearsheimer’s academic colleague Stephen Walt calls the “hubristic fantasy” of global “liberal­ hegemony”, which both scholars warned would cost the US dearly in prestige and influence.

    It was during this time that Mearsheimer and I became friends: in July 2002 he persuaded me that a war to topple S*ddam H*ssein’s regime would be foolish and catastrophic. (At the time, I was opinion editor of these pages and, although our editorials remained hawkish, our commentary sections, unlike those of our anti-war competitors, were a ping-pong table for both sides in the debate.)

    Mearsheimer was as right about Iraq and America’s other Wilsonian misadventures in the Middle East as he was about picking a fight with Russia: NATO expansio­n eastwards just drove Moscow into the arms of Beijing and has made it more difficult for Washington to make Asia its first strategic priority.

    Meanwhile, China’s rise continued unabated: think of its escal­ating defence build-up, per­sis­t­ent cyber-espionage and global meddling, pumped-up nationalism, huge propaganda and dis­infor­m­ation campaigns, pending forceful takeover of Hong Kong and growing intimidation of Taiwan, aggressive­ build-up of military outposts beyond its border in the South China Sea, and so on.

    “Mearsheimer’s warning has come to pass: we starry-eyed proponents of engagement have been mugged by reality.”

    How often do you hear talk about growing tensions­ between China and not just the US and Australia but many other parts of the world? In a new Centre for Independent Studies paper, one of Australia’s leading security experts, Alan Dupont, says the US-China standoff over trade, technology and strategy has precipitated a new cold war.

    Many people blame China’s assertivenes­s primarily on its autocratic leader, X* Jinping. What they don’t understand is that the US-China rivalry, as Mearsheimer foreshadowed two decades ago, is at root a function of the structure of the international system, not personalities or the pandemic. That’s why most Westerners did not see this rivalry coming. They don’t believe in what Mearsheimer calls the tragic nature of great-power politics.

    Nor do they understand that the competition is a zero-sum game. Or that Australia is not going to be able to finesse its dilem­ma, effectively sit on the sidelines and enjoy the best of both worlds: unconstrained trade with China under the US security umbrella­. Vested business interests and a few academics continue to believe a new US-China trade deal or a rapprochement between Beijing and an incoming Biden administration will spare Canberra difficult choices. But they’re talking the language of a different era.

    Today’s China, notwithstanding its own limitations and internal weaknesses, shows every sign of wanting to overthrow the US-led security system in the region. X*’s repression is not winning Beijing respect abroad. Not since the 1960s have both sides of politics in Washington and Canberra been so united against the red menace.

    And although Donald Trump has been chaotic and incompetent, American staying power in Asia is for real: the question is whether a US-led coalition pursues a ­strategy of containment, as Mearsheimer recommends, or one of “engaging and constraining” China, as former Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade head Peter Varghese suggests.

    The cold, hard reality is that peace never proves permanent. In power politics, security trumps prosperity. Just ask Mearsheimer.

    Tom Switzer is executive director of the Centre for Independent Studies and a presenter at the ABC.

  203. Bruce of Newcastle

    I suspect that a concerted action on India’s part would decisively fall in their favour, but they might fear China just goes for the tactical nukes as an option of first resort.

    A short while ago I read this excellent story on the India-Chinese arm-wrestle in Ladakh.

    Escobar Warns India, China Teeter Toward Border Clash As Beijing Flexes Its Muscles (29 May)

    As the Hindustan Times reported:

    “India has pushed in high altitude warfare troops with support elements to the eastern Ladakh theater to counter [the] Chinese People’s Liberation Army’s aggressive posture designed to browbeat the government to stop building border infrastructure in the Daulat Beg Oldie sector as it may threaten the Lhasa-Kashgar highway in Aksai Chin.”

    The highway runs from Tibet to southwestern Xinjiang Province, where the Karakoram Highway – the northern part of the China-Pakistan Economic Corridor – goes from Kashgar to Islamabad. Thence a road heads through Balochistan to Pakistan’s strategic Gwadar port, as part of China’s Belt and Road Initiative.

    It looks like an interesting miix of great game playing by India being trumped by China using Putin-style facts on the ground, to whit: 10,000 dug-in PLA soldiers. Must be a miserable gig up there in the thin atmosphere and freezing cold.

  204. cohenite

    Snoopy
    #3467330, posted on May 29, 2020 at 4:49 pm
    Rio Tinto blasting of 46,000-year-old <a href="Rio Tinto blasting of 46,000-year-old Aboriginal sites compared to Uslamic State’s destruction in Palmyra

    Molyneux when he was out here with the divine Lauren Southern in his talk made a very cogent comparison between 56th Nations and the RoP with the 34rd nations exhibiting all of the fucked characteristics of the RoP, so maybe there’s something in it. Oh wait a minute, it’s Rio Tinto which are the RoP. Of course.

  205. Mother Lode

    Anyone else tried Abelour A’Bunadh?

    Full cask strength. Very fruity, and you can really taste the sherry casks.

    Now, to pop out and buy some coke. In the glass bottle – a scotch like this deserves an observance of certain niceties.

  206. Rex Anger:

    Only fractions, Winston?

    I was asked to tone it down a tad, Rex.

  207. The early speculation is the order will target Google and social media platforms under Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, which protects online platforms from being held accountable for the content their users post.

    Au contraire, how quickly Dumbocrats have forgotten Trump’s emergency powers. They are so easily fooled it’s laughable.

  208. Rex Anger

    I was asked to tone it down a tad, Rex.

    @ Winston- 😉

  209. OldOzzie

    Coronavirus: Hungry Chinese defy Beijing’s bluster by importing 3000 tonnes of fresh Aussie produce

    GEOFF CHAMBERS FEDERAL POLITICAL CORRESPONDENT

    RICHARD FERGUSON REPORTER

    China is importing plane loads of premium Australian seafood and beef through the Morrison government’s freight assistance program, which has locked in more than $1bn worth of produce exports to 28 international markets.

    Despite Beijing’s high-profile suspension of four meatworks and slapping tariffs on barley, The Australian can reveal 3000 tonnes of Australian products — including rock lobster, salmon, milk and beef — are bound for China through Shanghai and Xiamen.

    The government’s $110m ­freight assistance mechanism, announced last month, has secured 1048 export flights carrying 23,000 tonnes worth of Australian produce, with 10,000 tonnes already hitting overseas markets.

    The export program — run by former Toll Holdings and Linfox chief executive Michael Byrne — has sent freight flights to countries including China, Japan, Singapore, the UAE, Malaysia, Hong Kong, Thailand, New Zealand and South Korea.

    Mr Byrne said the success of the freight flights presented an “opportunity” for Australia to expand its trading capacity. “There’s a simple reason why we’ve moved so much produce — it is of such high quality and there’s so much demand (for it). Customers overseas still want our beef, our lamb, our lobsters and our crayfish,” Mr Byrne told The Australian.

    “Agriculture and trade could help push the recovery. For me, it’s about getting more birds in the sky, more planes flying our produce out to those markets.”

    Mr Byrne, a self-described “hardcore industry man” working with 60 Austrade, Agriculture and Home Affairs officials, said the ­national cabinet co-ordination had been key to the program’s success. With 90 per cent of exports usually ferried on passenger aircraft, the COVID-19 package has provided a lifeline with single freight flights packing on average $1m of produce, including beef, lamb, pork, fresh milk, salmon, tuna, lobster, nuts, strawberries, rockmelons and capsicums.

    Trade Minister Simon Birmingham said: “With very few international passenger planes ­flying at present, our agricultural and seafood producers continue to face major hurdles getting their produce into key export markets.

    “Our exporters have worked hard to build relationships with overseas customers and lock in long-term contracts. Making sure they can honour contracts whilst also getting more exports out the door will be crucial to reducing job losses through this crisis.”

    Agreements have recently been signed enabling the export of tuna to Japan and Victorian chilled beef to Germany, which will be distributed across Europe.

    Seizing on the winter strawberry season, flights have also been locked in to send West Australian and Queensland strawberries to Thailand and New Zealand.

    Stockyard Beef, which operates a 20,000 cattle feedlot near Toowoomba in Queensland, is using the international freight mechanism to help export luxury wagyu and Angus beef to 17 countries.

    David Clark, Stockyard Beef general manager of marketing, said the collapse in fine dining overseas had been quickly replaced by premium retailers across Europe, China, the Middle East and Southeast Asia demanding high-quality Australian beef.

    “Retail prices have held up and we haven’t been discounting. We haven’t had to let go of any of our staff,” he told The Australian.

    “Our philosophy has always been to get the product to market, and the freight mechanism has ­really helped with that. It has given us the confidence to keep going.”

    The freight assistance mechanism, which mainly focuses on helping agricultural and fisheries ex­porters get their fresh produce into markets within days, began last month as a temporary measure to address the collapse of the commercial airfreight sector triggered by the global COVID-19 crisis.

  210. Infidel Tiger King

    … the black community not only riots but they also loot stores.

    A huge percentage of the rioters are white college kids looking at the pics

  211. Molyneux when he was out here with the divine Lauren Southern in his talk made a very cogent comparison between 56th Nations and the RoP with the 34rd nations exhibiting all of the fucked characteristics of the RoP, so maybe there’s something in it. Oh wait a minute, it’s Rio Tinto which are the RoP. Of course.

    Stop babbling.

  212. calli

    Any chance of Aussies getting some of that subsidised premium tucker?

    Ta.

  213. Infidel Tiger King

    Molyneux when he was out here with the divine Lauren Southern in his talk made a very cogent comparison between 56th Nations and the RoP with the 34rd nations exhibiting all of the fucked characteristics of the RoP, so maybe there’s something in it. Oh wait a minute, it’s Rio Tinto which are the RoP. Of course

    Molyneux once also made the salient point that it was natural for the Germans to overreact and exterminate the Jooz after they had seen what they did in Russia.

  214. areff

    I was in the middle of the Crown Heights riots, which saw Melbourne man Yankel Rosenbaum stabbed to death. The dusky sons of Brooklyn were so incensed with Joos for being Joos and daring to draw breath in “their” part of the borough they went out and … looted all the Korean-owned delis and sneaker shops, especially the latter.

    The people united
    Can always be re-feeted

  215. JC

    Cronkite

    Will STFU about Molly. He’s a freaking weirdo and we don’t like him. Show some circumspection at times you idiot.

  216. Bruce of Newcastle

    Any chance of Aussies getting some of that subsidised premium tucker?

    Cheesecake.
    Yum!

  217. calli

    Funny about the need to pinch stuff when in deep mourning.

    Goroka Okuk riots – guy raced past my place with a looted sewing machine on his head.

    Clearly planned to Stitch n’ Bitch.

  218. Not entirely sure it’s a wise decision by Tom Elliott to have his father on of a Friday afternoon.

  219. areff

    Interesting listening: US Black Talk Radio. Lots of podcasts from chip-on-the-should black hucksters keeping resentment against whitey on the boil.

    https://www.blacktalkradionetwork.com/

  220. cohenite

    I got the fucking trifecta: dot, stalker and bringing up the rear with his shiny arse, head prefect.

    Dot had nothing, stalker went Godwin and head prefect scratched his arse. Gazinga. Here are the handsome couple:

    https://www.rnz.co.nz/news/national/362284/alt-right-speakers-stefan-molyneux-and-lauren-southern-anger-nz-m.slims

  221. jupes

    3.14 Sino-Vietnamese War (1979)

    A 19 year old PLA soldier in that war will be 60 now, Arky.

    Compare his experience to a US soldier who was 19 in 2001. He would be 38 and probably have a dozen tours of duty under his belt.

  222. Mark Felton with another great piece of history.

    The plot to assassinate der Kaiser (WW1).

    I will now consider it an honour to be called “a difficult, thin skinned and inadequate man”.

  223. cohenite

    I got the fucking trifecta: dot, stalker and bringing up the rear with his shiny arse, head prefect.

    Dot had nothing, stalker went Godwin and head prefect scratched his arse. Gazinga.

    Here are the handsome couple, Lauren and Molyneux demolishing possibly the ugliest, dumbest reporter, at least in new zealandistan, which is not much of a claim:

  224. Dr Faustus

    … the black community not only riots but they also loot stores.

    Impressively calm looting too.
    The only obvious hurry-along in this Target redistribution sequence was by the lone, equal opportunity white landwhale.

  225. Here are the handsome couple, Lauren and Molyneux

    Molyneux once also made the salient point that it was natural for the Germans to overreact and exterminate the Jooz after they had seen what they did in Russia.

    You’re gonna excuse this drooling cretin for his homespun garbage and Irvingisms?

  226. Infidel Tiger King

    Impressively calm looting too.

    When the Dem Mayor stands the police and fire department down, you’d don’t have to hustle.

  227. Arky

    by China using Putin-style facts on the ground, to whit: 10,000 dug-in PLA soldiers.

    ..
    Yes, but are they gender- queer friendly and diversity trained?

  228. Maj:

    Australia’s first Chinese-born MP has accused Beijing of undermining Hong Kong’s autonomy as tough new national security laws designed to stamp out dissent sail through China’s National People’s Congress.

    Red Theatre.
    Of course she’d say that, wouldn’t she?
    They must think we’re as stupid as their own….

  229. areff

    Twitter now censoring Trump for “glorifying violence”

    This Tweet violated the Twitter Rules about glorifying violence. However, Twitter has determined that it may be in the public’s interest for the Tweet to remain accessible. Learn more

    click on it and you get see Trump’s original tweet

    ….These THUGS are dishonoring the memory of George Floyd, and I won’t let that happen. Just spoke to Governor Tim Walz and told him that the Military is with him all the way. Any difficulty and we will assume control but, when the looting starts, the shooting starts. Thank you!

    https://twitter.com/realDonaldTrump/status/1266231100780744704

  230. calli

    Poor zookeeper is in hospital tonight after a brush with a pair of male lions.

    I was reliably informed by the Seven reporter, “Lion attacks are extremely rare in Australia.”

    Thank goodness for that. I was getting a bit worried.

  231. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Anyone else tried Abelour A’Bunadh?

    Full cask strength. Very fruity, and you can really taste the sherry casks.

    Now, to pop out and buy some coke. In the glass bottle – a scotch like this deserves an observance of certain niceties.

    Best taken with water only, and remember full cask strength is 60% alcohol – it’s a trap for young players.

  232. Infidel Tiger King

    Sounds and looks like Antifa got in there and turned these protests into riots.

  233. Legalise Sedition:

    You simply cannot have traditional marriage under the laws we live under.

    Exactly – and it was always going to end up at this point when the the girls got the vote.

  234. Hay Stockard

    Was given a bottle of Johnny Walker IP. One of their trial blends. Actually quite nice. I expect it’s a bit pricey but haven’t checked.

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