Green Jobs

TAFKAS likes smoked salmon.  Let’s not go through a debate on the subject.

Fortunately for TAFKAS though, there is a wholesaler near his home who sells retail.  This wholesaler sells 2 types of smoked salmon: Norwegian smoked salmon and Tasmanian smoked salmon.

This is not a high school maths problem, but …

The Norwegian salmon costs $32 per kilo.  The Tasmanian costs $40 per kilo.

The Norwegian salmon needs to travel about 16,000 km to get to Sydney.  The Tasmanian salmon needs to travel about 1,000 km to get to Sydney.

The cheaper salmon needs to travel 16 times the distance than the more expensive salmon.

What is the difference that explains a higher price for the product that needs to travel the shorter distance?  Some might say branding, quality, blah blah blah.

TAFKAS might suggest electricity.  A significant component in the price of smoked salmon is the electricity used in refrigeration (freezing).

We can pretend green jobs, but TAFKAS can’t imagine in the great global competitive challenge, most of Australian manufacturing at all competitive.  Which is why our major exports are resources and services.

Once upon a time, Australia’s distance and high cost of labour (per unit of productivity) could be compensated for by low energy costs.  No more.  No longer.  No how.

If people want to talk about the lack of manufacturing in Australia, they should start with that.  They can waffle the latest buzz about advanced manufacturing but the reason it is advanced is that it is roboticized and computerised.  Not too much labour involved.

So future Australian manufacturing will be high capital and low labour to compensate for the high cost of labour.  No matter the output of Prime Minister Morrison’s Accord Mark Who, you just can’t compare the productivity of an average union member and a machine that works 24/7, doesn’t take sickies and doesn’t talk back.

Sadly, the damage has been done.  And the green jobs of the future will be sitting in the park and collecting welfare with an ever diminishing purchasing power.

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76 Responses to Green Jobs

  1. Sinclair Davidson

    You’ve missed the obvious. Those dirty stinking foreigners are trying to steal Australian jobs by selling their fish at a lower price than good wholesome decent Australian fish.

    Remember buy local – buy your kids a job.

    🙂

  2. I don’t think it has anything to do with power costs, it’s just marketing 101 that puts a premium on Tasmanian products in general. It comes from a clean, green, state free of additives.

  3. On another note, why is it that in Australia we can’t buy high quality food that we produce for a reasonable price? Marketing 101 again where all the top quality produce goes directly to Asia and we’re left, more or less, with scraps. There is produce that Australia grows/makes that you can’t even buy in Australia.

  4. John64

    Clearly the Norskies are dumping it. Slap an 80% tariff on their salmon.

  5. @Sinclair Davidson

    You’ve missed the obvious. Those dirty stinking foreigners are trying to steal Australian jobs by selling their fish at a lower price than good wholesome decent Australian fish.

    Of course you are right Sinc. Perhaps the Tasmanians should engage in a but of whaling and send the product back to Norway, below cost of course. That will teach em to sell us cheap product.

  6. Ed Case

    From memory, Tasmania decided to have a farmed salmon industry about 50 years ago.
    Took a long while and a lot of funding to get off the ground, there were and are environmemtal issues and they can’t compete with Norway.
    Most important, do they compete on quality?

  7. Bruce of Newcastle

    And the green jobs of the future will be sitting in the park and collecting welfare

    In Heinlein’s Starship Troopers the most useless govt service was to paint rocks white, as I recall.
    Greens, though, want to paint rocks white to save the world.

    Paint rocks white to stop global warming, says scientist

    There’s the perfect description of a Green job.

  8. sfw

    I may be wrong but I saw somewhere that a lot of fish like the salmon are caught in Norwegian (or whatever) waters but are then shipped to China where they are processed, salmon take a fair bit of work to debone etc and after processing in China they are packed and shipped. So the fish from Norway cover even greater distances than you thought.

  9. John64

    Most important, do they compete on quality?

    In fairness Tassal Salmon is my favourite. Magnificent stuff.

  10. Infidel Tiger King

    Remember buy local – buy your kids a job.

    True.

    The future is localism and a good dash of nationalism.

  11. Bela Bartok

    Those Norwegians took our JERBS!

    Just by the by, which salmon is better?
    As bemused says above, our local products are often ‘prestige’, or ‘quality’ and therefore twice as much as the export. Check out olive oil in the supermarket… our local oils are way more expensive than the imported Italian stuff.

  12. Roger

    TAFKAS likes smoked salmon. Let’s not go through a debate on the subject.

    De gustibus non est disputandum.

    And I’d buy Tasmanian salmon over Norwegian any day, esp. if the latter is processed in China as sfw suggests.

  13. Free Radical

    Sadly, your “analysis” is lacking in detail. Here is a little bit that probably more than explains the difference in your price “comparison”:

    Norway is the biggest producer of farmed Atlantic salmon in the world. Over 1 million tonnes per annum.

    Australia (Tasmania) is a minnow in the salmon farming industry. Only 60,000 tones per annum.

    I’ll let you take it from there.

  14. @free radical

    Perhaps if tasmania were more price competitive it might sell more. Including within Australia.

  15. Rebel with cause

    $40 kg for Tasmania Salmon seems a bit steep, especially at wholesale prices. Price may also be affected by disruption to domestic freight services.

  16. @rebel.

    Yes. Domestic freight disruption. Because international freight has been unaffected.

  17. Karabar

    Is the Norwegian fish wild vs the Tasmanian farmed salmon?
    Costs more to farm it than to hunt it.

  18. Rebel with cause

    Tassal are selling skinless portions for $30kg at their own retail outlet.

  19. I will also bet that Australian wholesalers and retailers take a much bigger cut from Tasmanian salmon that they can from Norwegian salmon (it all depends on who is buying and selling to the end consumer).

  20. strayandrongo

    We shouldn’t eat farmed salmon, buy fresh Atlantic salmon and actually get some health out of it. You can see the oil in Atlantic salmon, famed salmon they leave in dye to colour the meat…. Gross …

  21. Rebel with cause

    TAFKAS – so you are putting a $10+ price difference between Tasmania and mainland down to energy prices?

  22. BoyfromTottenham

    The last time in NZ I was amazed at the low price of salmon in the supermarket – about half the price in Oz (hence I ate a lot of salmon whilst I was there – yum). Why then aren’t we importing NZ salmon?

  23. gafa

    Illustrates why, despite all the chest-beating and bravado, we can’t and won’t decouple from servile dependence on the Chinese overlords…Australia has painted itself well and truly into a corner!

  24. min

    I buy Atlantic Salmon not necessarily Norwegian perhaps from other Scandinavian countries because it tastes better . Frozen Salmon from Aldi is good also cheaper than Tassal . we could always tell the difference from farmed trout and trout we caught in the lake and reckoned due to what trout ate .

  25. lily

    Tassal are selling skinless portions for $30kg at their own retail outlet.

    We pay between $30 to $40 a kilo here in Tassie depending on quality. I often look at it and think it isn’t top quality, like a lot of other products grown here in Tassie we get the rubbish and the rest is sent to the mainland or overseas. Products from McCains are grown in China sent to NZ processed and then sent to Australia.
    What do we feed our salmon? – Tassalwww.tassal.com.au ›
    The red colour comes from carotenoid pigments in the fishes’ diet, and in the wild these usually come from shrimp-like krill or other crustaceans that the salmon eat …

  26. Colonel Crispin Berka

    You’ll have to tell that to Kates who was very recently enthralled by all the supply-side stimulus emanating out of ScoMo. https://catallaxyfiles.com/2020/05/26/a-supply-side-take-on-the-pms-package/
    Must agree with TAKFAS that ceasing the unnecessary artificial inflating of the costs of inputs is surely the quickest and least expensive way to get industry production moving, rather than showering the CFMEU’s mates with money.
    Being able to charge more because the taxpayer is forced to pay for it will almost certainly not result in the produced housing being any more affordable than the stock preceding it. Which is a real shame because the International Housing Affordability Survey has over the last 15 years consistently ranked Australia as having the 2nd-least affordable housing in the world. The only market with housing consistently more unaffordable than ours was Hong Kong, a tiny peninsula with the fourth highest population density of any country. Only the absurd combination of local council height restrictions, a CBD mentality, regulator-driven consolidation of the finance industry, and ununsustainable dreamy cultural obsession with the quarter-acre block can explain how a resource everybody wants can be so unaffordable.
    One would hope it wouldn’t take a pandemic for government to get concerned about housing supply, but here we are.

    (Maybe we should just abandon protectionism and go full globalist on this one. Hyundai Houses. Shipped in bolt-together modules from South Korea. They’d be affordable and good quality. Why pay for the energy and union bungles of the past when you don’t have to?)

    Anyhow, fish. Workers have to pay for all the services (public or private) they use out of their wages, which puts upward pressure on wages. And the price of every other service is affected by the cost of energy. So we don’t have to ignore or downplay the contribution of labour to the fish price to still arrive at the conclusion that Ruinables are fishy.

    All this building ScoMo wants is going to actually happen in Asia, and we will be lucky if it results from any designs and IP held by Australian companies. Even if the shareholders, bosses, and other miscellaneous fat-cats of Australian firms profit from a surge in production, they’re more likely to spend that income on exotic goods like Porsches and prestigious Norwegian salmon for dinner than some local tat.

    TL;DR : People keeping their job would have helped more people than supply-side policy will.

  27. the rest is sent to the mainland or overseas

    It pretty much all goes overseas, other than maybe a few expensive restaurants. When I watch some US cooking shows, I’m agape at the range and quality of meat available and the prices. All we get is crap quality at high prices. We used to laugh at UK meat prices and how the tables have turned.

    I like to cook brisket and never in my life have I seen one piece of brisket that comes anywhere near the size of what the US has available. All we get are thin slabs of meat with hardly any fat attached. All of our meat seems to be cut into thin, half inch, slices and it doesn’t matter what type it is.

  28. Tim Neilson

    Free Radical
    #3465691, posted on May 27, 2020 at 3:08 pm

    Not immediately convincing.

    Norway has dozens of salmon farms. There’s no prima facie reason why Tasmania shouldn’t be home to a couple of producers operating on the same scale as a Norwegian producer.

    If there’s something about supporting infrastructure that is a scale issue, don’t hesitate to provide evidence, though.

  29. Ed Case

    Why then aren’t we importing NZ salmon?

    The may be a good reason, tho I’d like to hear it.
    New Zealand food quality is miles ahead of Australia’s, in my opinion.
    They can keep their humans, well below Australian standards.

  30. Watch Your Back

    I find everything is expensive in Australia. When I first got here, stuff was about one third of UK prices. Now everything is double the price.

    I’d suggest the causes are high labour costs, high energy costs and high compliance costs.

  31. Pyrmonter

    @ TAFKAS

    What exactly is the problem? You don’t suggest the Tasmanians aren’t selling their product. Consumer preferences differ, and if there people who wish to buy Tasmanian salmon for some reason, let them, and enjoy your Norwegian.

  32. Destroyer D69

    Tassal may be losing an amount of sales due to halal certification pushback a la cadburys.!!!!!!!!

  33. Vicki

    Travelling through outback coastal Australia (WA) some years ago, we found it almost impossible to buy locally caught Barramundi. We were constantly told that it was “for export’.

    Same goes for Lobster. Many years ago, it was not uncommon (although always expensive) to see Lobster on the menu in restaurants. Not so, now.

    Quite frankly, my sympathy for the lobster traders of WA who have been blindsided by the fall in demand from China, is VERY limited. Have they diverted their catches to Aussie markets? If so, I haven’t noticed.

  34. Vicki

    When I watch some US cooking shows, I’m agape at the range and quality of meat available and the prices. All we get is crap quality at high prices

    Perhaps because of the obsession with Angus cuts. I prefer Hereford – but it is very hard to find. Wagyu is also preferable to Angus, but of course one pays for the privilege.

    The meat trade, like any other, is dominated by big buyers of the Supermarket chains who are influenced by marketing fads. There are much better cuts of meat available if they would buy more varied breeds on the hoof.

  35. lily

    There’s no prima facie reason why Tasmania shouldn’t be home to a couple of producers operating on the same scale as a Norwegian producer.

    Tell that to the Greens and the do-gooders who have moved here from the mainland states they have done their level best to close down the fishing industry in the state.

  36. dopey

    Well the cost is obvious. Tasmanian tiger gone, people switched to salmon.

  37. yarpos

    I share your love of smoked salmon. Id suggest that its simple economies of scale with Scandinavia producing for the world.

    If we are serious about buying Australian or maybe just not buying Chinese we will probably have to get used to the idea that it wont always be the cheapest. I buy Tassie salmon, but then again in Aldi it isnt that expensive.

  38. Stimpson J. Cat

    Norwegian smoked salmon and Tasmanian smoked salmon.

    Both of these examples are Foreign Countries.

    Do Better Please.

  39. theleftfootkick

    I think the big problem was as you alerted to, was getting it off the ground instead of into the water, oh well I guess someone would of said it anyhow.

  40. Squirrel

    Australia’s energy costs were low when we started cutting tariffs, but that wasn’t enough to save jobs/jerbs because other costs were higher, and have mostly stayed that way, or grown worse.

    In the period since tariff cuts started, we have done an absolutely world-beating job of pumping up our property prices – it started with residential, but has long since flowed through to commercial and industrial, so even if we hadn’t indulged in the insanity of cheering on the closure of coal-fired power stations, Australia’s export-exposed industries would still have high property and related costs to carry.

    The broader point is that competitive forces have been applied very selectively and unevenly across the economy – how else could we explain the fact that we have some of the highest paid elected and un-elected officials in the world (and so on down the line of the vast bureaucracies they command)?

  41. Rohan

    What supply agreement doe the wholesaler have here in OZ. After all, if he’s selling direct to customers at/below what his retail customers charge, the retail customers are going to be mighty miffed at him undercutting them. Then the wholesaler doesn’t have any business at all.

    You also haven’t investigated what the local regulatory complaince costs are for processing the Salmon compared to that in Norwegia. I’d wager that compliance costs are quite bit higher because of massive volumes of legislated/mandated food handling/safety laws.

    You can add to that compliance and regulatory burdens employing people with OHS laws, WorkSafe insurance, payrol tax, mandatory superannuation contributions, land tax, BASS statements for the ATO, EPA requirements (I would imagine that they would have to process wastewater onsite due to it’s high BOD). The list goes on and on and on…

    And lets not forget about the freight cost of getting the smoked salmon across the Bass Straight, which are not that dissimilar to having it shipped it all the way from Norwegia. I am not joking on that point. Our costal freight routes are hideiously expensive as it’s a closed union shop both on the boats and at the docks. Taswegia is held hostage to that due to it being the only state girt by sea. It’s significantly cheaper to have a container road freighted to Perth on a B-Double than it is to ship it to Devonport. And it’s more or less the same cost if I were to ship that container to South Africa or maybe 10-15% more to Brasil. Sure, you don’t have the customs charges/document handling fees, but that’s it. You still have all the warfe charges. cartage charges to/from the warves etc etc.

    Maybe TAFKAS needs to investigate all the reasons why before going on a rant saying it’s the fault of those earning +/- minimum wage at the processing plant as being the most likely reason. It’s the whole system of doing business in Australia that’s the problem. And that’s because it’s mandated by politicians who don’t know what the hell they’re legislating, or the implications therof.

  42. tgs

    And lets not forget about the freight cost of getting the smoked salmon across the Bass Straight, which are not that dissimilar to having it shipped it all the way from Norwegia. I am not joking on that point. Our costal freight routes are hideiously expensive as it’s a closed union shop both on the boats and at the docks.

    Bingo.

    This is the real answer.

  43. The meat trade, like any other, is dominated by big buyers of the Supermarket chains who are influenced by marketing fads. There are much better cuts of meat available if they would buy more varied breeds on the hoof.

    I’m not sure where the problem lies. We have a butcher in our small township who’s been in place for a very long time and makes some really good sausages and does hang, dry and cut his own meat, but it’s just so expensive. So we only buy from him in limited quantities.

    But even he can’t get a good sized brisket, saying it’s just not available because you apparently require a good sized cow/bull. This is a site where I get some of my cooking ideas (his Guga rub is outstanding) and guess where his Wagyu comes from (about the 40 sec mark)? I’ve never seen such sold in Australia.

  44. theleftfootkick

    The fact is that many of the meat works are owned and run by the supermarkets, and they grow out there beef or rather yearlings to a precise weight and fat measurement, they are generally slaughtered at at around 18 months. The stock is keep on the lean side more than the fatter side, remember people are fussy customers. The so marbling of beef is a thing that the Asians like, I think it is mussy and good old fashioned grass fed beef has a much better texture and flavour to it. The carcass is not hung as in the old days to allow the meat to tenderise, but rather it is butchered out immediately within the same facility and vacuumed packed into the fridge very quickly. Unlike in the good old days when beef cattle was killed as 3 year old bullocks, and the carcass was allowed to ‘cure’ for up 10 days? before it was butchered out. I did a bit of meat lumping years ago, carrying the fore quarters of beef was ok but the butts, they were some else! my advice never pick a fight with a meat lumper, especially ones who carried a lot of butts lol, (that wasn’t me incidentley my career in that field was short and sweet)

  45. Thanks rohan but Tafkas made no mention of minimum wages.he was talking about the price of energy.

  46. Derp

    Damn you. Now I want to go to the shop and get smoked salmon and that requires putting pants on.

  47. Free Radical

    Mmmm. Tassal smoked salmon on a bagel for breakfast. Hard to beat.

  48. Deplorable

    bemused
    #3465650, posted on May 27, 2020 at 2:07 pm
    I don’t think it has anything to do with power costs, it’s just marketing 101 that puts a premium on Tasmanian products in general. It comes from a clean, green, state free of additives.

    That is a really amusing statement Bemused.

  49. Sydney Boy

    The Norgie salmon is being dumped on Australia at less than the price of production. The EU quite happily breaks its own free trade agreements regularly. If Australia was to do the same the EU would be running to the WTO post haste.

    I also wonder how water (yes, water) can be shipped in heavy glass bottles (Voss water – interestingly now owned by The Rock) from Norway to Australia and still be sold at a competitive price.

    Italian tomatoes have been dumped on Australia for years.

  50. mareeS

    Sinclair, we buy our seafood directly fresh-caught from mates off their trawlers in Port of Newcastle for cash. Also oysters and crabs from Port Stephens, lobsters from off the local reefs. Can’t do better than that. Notafan of anything farmed.

  51. we buy our seafood directly fresh-caught from mates off their trawlers

    When we lived in Townsville, we’d buy freshly caught tiger and banana prawns off the boats. I’ve never seen either anywhere on sale in Victoristan.

  52. Pyrmonter

    @ SydneyBoy

    – ‘anti-dumping’ is protectionism by another name – and bad for all the other reasons trade ‘protection’ (‘anti-foreign tax’) is bad.

    – Norway isn’t an EU member (though a member of the EEA)

  53. Bruce of Newcastle

    Tassal sells smoked salmon offcuts in Coles for half the price of the good stuff.
    Except it is the same good stuff, in pieces not perfect fillets.
    One of the best products I’ve ever come across.
    Well done salmon farmer-peoples.

    TASSAL TASMANIAN SMOKED SALMON PIECES FOR COOKING 200G

    Yum!

  54. Wayne From Perth

    TAFKAS

    “but of whaling”

    But? You speak NZ ?

  55. dopey

    On a roll…. philly cheese, smoked salmon, capers, rocket, black pepper.

  56. Entropy

    As I recall a few years ago I read about the economics of long distance shipping of high priced produce. The upshot was that the higher the price, the less important the freight cost was. Thus the best stuff is always exported.

  57. Nob

    Sfw is correct.
    The Norwegian stuff is processed in Asia, usually China or Vietnam.

    Australians keep awarding themselves pay rises and compliance restrictions and then demand more pay rises so they can afford everything that has mysteriously become so expensive.

  58. Boambee John

    lily
    #3465769, posted on May 27, 2020 at 5:21 pm
    There’s no prima facie reason why Tasmania shouldn’t be home to a couple of producers operating on the same scale as a Norwegian producer.

    Tell that to the Greens and the do-gooders who have moved here from the mainland states they have done their level best to close down the fishing industry in the state.

    After a court battle the local council covering Macquarie Harbour gained the right to levy rates on the harbour bed under the fish farms.

  59. duncanm

    bemused
    #3465650, posted on May 27, 2020 at 2:07 pm

    I don’t think it has anything to do with power costs, it’s just marketing 101 that puts a premium on Tasmanian products in general. It comes from a clean, green, state free of additives.

    ..riiiiight.

    You do know that the south coast of Tas is peppered by salmon farms, right ?

    ‘clean, green, free of additives’ my arse.

  60. I hate to think what compliance burdens the Tassy Salmon growers are labouring under.
    I hate to think what cost burdens they’re under.

    Every time a ridiculous or stupid-but-punishing cost or roadblocks appears in my industry/business, my assumption is that other industries are facing their own specialist types of ball&chain.

  61. Bruce of Newcastle

    As I recall a few years ago I read about the economics of long distance shipping of high priced produce. The upshot was that the higher the price, the less important the freight cost was. Thus the best stuff is always exported.

    The Portuguese would ship black pepper in one direction, and black powder in the other direction. 😀

  62. Bruce in WA

    Norwegian smoked salmon from Catalano’s = $28 a kilo
    From Colesworths = $45 a kilo

    We often have a bagel, Kiri cream cheese, salmon, red onion and capers for breakfast.

    The Norwegian is far superior in taste and texture (as well as price).

    YMMV.

  63. Nob

    Salvatore, Social Distance Martyr
    #3466075, posted on May 27, 2020 at 9:42 pm

    Every time a ridiculous or stupid-but-punishing cost or roadblocks appears in my industry/business, my assumption is that other industries are facing their own specialist types of ball&chain.

    That’s a justifiable assumption anywhere these days , and more so for Australia.

    It’s also damn near impossible to get any public-facing consumer businesses or their suppliers to speak out in detail about costs, because of fear of activists targeting their bushiness.

  64. It’s also damn near impossible to get any public-facing consumer businesses or their suppliers to speak out in detail about costs, because of fear of activists targeting their bushiness.

    One obstacle is getting someone to believe it.

    The scale of the costs & the absurdity of the dickheadsmanship is not readily believed by the average punter.
    They assume they’re somehow having their leg pulled, or that the story is exaggerated.

  65. Chris M

    I want to know exactly what the farmed Salmon are fed on before I’ll buy again. Meanwhile were is the wild caught? Didn’t see any since I was in Alaska. It’s it readily available here.

  66. BorisG

    I like smoked salmon but I also like Dutch herring. That has disapprove from Woolie shelves in March and has not come back.

  67. Sydney Boy

    – ‘anti-dumping’ is protectionism by another name – and bad for all the other reasons trade ‘protection’ (‘anti-foreign tax’) is bad.

    Unfortunately the dumping is possible only through government subsidies. Which is protectionism.

    How much less tax could people pay around the world if governments were not interfering with free trade?

  68. Bruce

    @BoN:

    “Paint rocks white to stop global warming, says scientist

    There’s the perfect description of a Green job.”

    And the best part is that the “white” in the white paint is a mineral pigment, commonly Titanium Oxide.

    At least in Australia, Titanium Oxide is obtained by “mining” ocean beaches and sand islands like Stradbroke Island in Queensland.. Last time I looked, “sand-mining” like that was an utter abomination to the Eco-fascists.

    Back to Lead Oxide-based white paint? That requires mining as well.

    Situational ethics in play? With Eco-fascists? Who’da thunk it?

  69. Struth

    Is it the high cost of Australian labour, or the high cost of labour compliance that is the problem regarding labour costs?
    The simplistic “union worker” description does not fit with the fact hardly anyone in the private sector is in the union and many people here in Qld go to work here for about 24 bucks an hour.
    So again, yes it’s true the cost of labour is extremely high in Australia, but that isn’t going into the worker’s pockets, but straight back to the government in the form of employment compliance, forced PPE and worksafe bullshit, and regulations ensuring what used to take one bloke to do, now takes five, as four stand around him dressed up to the nines in PPE, warning others away, because the dangerous situation of someone doing something is actually occurring.
    You could pay the Australian workers half of what they now receive and their employment would still be too costly.
    It’s a mess with power, it’s a mess in every sphere of production.
    All caused by the shackles of UN led government.

  70. bollux

    Struth, you should get a job as a lollipop man on a starting wage of $180,000 on a CFMEU site.

  71. OldOzzie

    Re Beef and Lamb

    Covid-19 has brought some benefits – Restaurant suppliers are now going direct – not necessarily chaep but the Quality is superb

    Milly Hill Meat Order Online:

    Let Us Meat Your Needs With These Specials!
    Specials:
    Bone In Lamb Shoulder Roast Approx. 1.5Kg / Piece $32.90
    Wagyu Rump Steak Approx 300 Grams Each ( 4 Pieces Per Pack ) For $24.90
    Bacon Bones 500 Gram Packs ( Ideal for Soup ) $6.90
    Orders Over $200.00 Free Delivery, Under $200.00 Delivery Fee Will Be $28.00.

    and

    Vic’s Meats Direct

    who supply Qantas 1st Class – https://wine.qantas.com/p/Barbecue-Deluxe-%2B-Sangiovese/DSVICSBBQ6_V

  72. Struth

    Struth, you should get a job as a lollipop man on a starting wage of $180,000 on a CFMEU site.

    Dare to dream, hey?
    but
    Lollipop men may be working for a private firm, but those guys are on a government contract.
    It’s a CFMEU site precisely because of that.
    Which reaffirms my point.
    Government corruption and regs are the real cause of employment costs.
    Plenty of guys (not me) driving fully loaded b doubles around Qld for 24 bucks an hour, being taxed to death to pay for that bullshit.

  73. Bushkid

    John64
    #3465674, posted on May 27, 2020 at 2:41 pm
    Most important, do they compete on quality?

    In fairness Tassal Salmon is my favourite. Magnificent stuff.

    I have to agree with that, John64. I reckon it’s well worth the couple of extra dollars. It’s a small weekly indulgence to have their fresh salmon fillets (sautéed in butter and lemon juice until the edges are crisp, with a jacket potato and some fresh greens!) The smoked variety is for special occasions only though.

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