The shame of the University of Queensland

Cross posting  a powerful piece from Paul Fritjers at Club Troppo.

The management of the University of Queensland, and in particular Peter Hoj and Peter Varghese, stand condemned today by the international media, by both Labor and Liberal politicians, by both left-wing and right-wing Australians, by its own students, and by the powerful pro-American lobby. That management unleashed a shit-storm on itself today by its decision (via a kangaroo court) to suspend Drew Pavlou for 2 years and thus oust him as student representative on the UQ Senate, as well as make it impossible for him to finish his studies.

Going deep into the background, a very scary situation.

In short, UQ management is but the tip of the ice-berg of a totally corrupted system that encircles and constricts the University of Queensland. The corrupt network encircling it includes a whole network of interested top-politicians, property developers, former UQ-managers, interested professional bodies (lawyers and medics in particular), and others. This is exactly the group that would normally decide how to actually “clean up” the University of Queensland in the Drew Pavlou affair.

I hope you can thus see why it is so unlikely that the present scandal will lead to a true clean up of the problems with the university and why hence a cosmetic make-over is so much more likely: most of the big movers and shakers in Brisbane have a lot to lose from a real clean-up. They might make room for the pro-American anti-CCP lobby that wants CCP influences gone from the UQ campus, but that’s not the same as letting go of their investments entirely. And the anti-CCP lobby has no real stake in cleaning up local corruption. Their interest is not the university community in Queensland. Not their fight.

I wonder if the lone classical liberal in Carlton will comment on this? I suppose he plays to his strengths in detailed analysis and leaves the political comment to other people. Fair enough.

Liberty Quote – Conventional wisdom does not regard Communism with the same abhorrence as fascism, even though if you want to be an accountant about it and add up the skulls of the dead, you will find that the Communists murdered many more people than the fascists did, began murdering before fascists came to power and carried on murdering after the fascists had gone. Yet few can bring themselves to see fascism and Communism as moral equivalents. — Nick Cohen

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80 Responses to The shame of the University of Queensland

  1. Entropy

    I will enjoy watching the impact the China stoush on universities. They might actually start getting interested in decent offerings for domestic students.

  2. Royal Commission
    Shut it down
    Salt the earth
    Burn the rubble
    Deport the pro Beijing influencers
    Root out the Chinese 🍯

    etc

    This is the start of a long March through the institutions

    We can expropriate assets easily.

    We cannot get rid of thousands of compromised people so easily.

    The day a foreign government can tell me what I can or cannot say is the day I become literally a martyr.

    I am not bullshiting anyone here.

    Imagine a country where it is an offence to declare such a thing.

    Good luck with the public trial, fuckheads. The day that happens then we have become a colony of China and the government collectively has committed treason and sedition (literally).

    This is bloody outrageous.

    Imagine being spied upon by a bunch of soft, pasty, smooth handed arts/law graduates for “daring” to say such an “inflammatory” thing.

    This is all kinds of fucked up.

  3. Crossie

    He who pays the piper calls the tune. And now we know who is the payer.

    The only question is will QU stay bought?

  4. Crossie

    The day a foreign government can tell me what I can or cannot say is the day I become literally a martyr.

    You’re not a martyr, our grandchildren are. What we need to do is teach them how to prevent it.

  5. Tim

    Where are the federal and state pollies. They provide the funding for these idiots. They should be able to take it away and demand the Chancellor and VC resignations. This cannot be allowed to stand. They need to do something about JCU while they are at it

  6. ASIO and UQ are coddling Chinese communists.

  7. IainC

    Re the Liberty Quote. If you’re a smart sociopath who reads, you become a Marxist; if a dull one who hates books, a Nazi. The end results are the same. Both outsource their butchery to those with souls of iron, and the occupants and number of the death camps are practically the same.

  8. Crossie

    Tim
    #3468979, posted on May 31, 2020 at 8:30 am
    Where are the federal and state pollies. They provide the funding for these idiots. They should be able to take it away and demand the Chancellor and VC resignations. This cannot be allowed to stand. They need to do something about JCU while they are at it

    All the other VCs are pressuring governments not to do anything about because they need the money from Chinese students. This kid is a sacrificial lamb that the Chinese government demanded.

    What is curious is that all Australian universities existed and made a good living before the influx of Chinese students. I have not noticed an increase in staffing numbers in the last 15 years, there has been a decrease in fact. So what is the problem? Is it because now they have to compete for domestic students? Imagine that.

  9. rickw

    There is a very broad CCP 5th Column in Australia.

  10. Fitzgibbon, Liu, Richardson and now UQ.

    This is scandalous.

  11. Roger

    And we heard last week that the committee that recommended Viuctoria sign on the Belt & Road was full of people with CCP links.

    Meanwhile, ASIO’s focus is on anti-Chinese sentiment in the Australian community.

    Commission of inquiry please – shed light on the whole venal business of CCP influence in Australian institutions.

  12. bollux

    Don’t expect the head softcock to do anything.

  13. Tel

    The age of big universities is over.

    It made a lot of sense when we had poor quality communications, and you wanted all the expert knowledge in the one place for teaching to happen across a big lecture hall.

    These days modern technology makes that completely obsolete … communications networks allow anyone to learn anything anytime from any place. Sitting in a lecture theatre is a complete waste of your life. Used to make sense, but now it doesn’t.

  14. Got to have pracs for nurses, chemists and microbiologists.

    That can be learnt on the job though.

  15. Iampeter

    So, let me get this straight, everyone here is happy with the President of the United States little executive order from the other day, but this here is a “very scary situation?”

    K.

  16. Sinclair explicitly said he wasn’t. Trump isn’t undermining our sovereignty.

    Shilling for the CCP is a terrible mistake.

  17. Terry

    ‘So, let me get this straight…’

    No one is preventing you from getting anything straight. It is merely a by-product of your inability.

  18. rickw

    Don’t expect the head softcock to do anything.

    He’s not soft, he’s just really slow!

  19. Hay Stockard

    Just call me Casandra. I have been warning about “our” Universities for ages.

  20. Don

    I am a UQ graduate and I am appalled by what the Pavlou matter has revealed. Supposedly “a place of light and learning” it has become a spearhead of subversion. The cynicism of its leadership lays revealed. The question is will they and their communist pay masters be expelled from the temple?

  21. NoFixedAddress

    the CCP believes it cannot reform the Chinese economy and financial system without being consumed by its own population. Given this mindset, it is clear that no meaningful trade agreement between the China and the U.S. is possible. That’s because the U.S. demands are premised on China opening up, and the Chinese leadership firmly believes it could not survive that. The Chinese may agree to this or that on trade, but it’s all a lie. They have no intention to living up to any deal. To believe otherwise is beyond foolish. China feels it’s better to string President Trump along and hope for a China-friendly President Biden in the White House 2021. But even that will only buy China some time.

    The CCP has little choice but to look inward, stoke up nationalism, and blame outsiders, particularly the United States, for the country’s problems.

    It is through this prism that recent Chinese actions such as blaming the U.S, for the Wuhan virus, its crack down on Hong Kong, its heightened aggressiveness in the South China Sea, and Xi’s belligerent rhetoric to the Chinese army to prepare for war should be looked at. The CCP is in survival mode, and that makes China especially dangerous now.

    https://www.americanthinker.com/blog/2020/05/why_china_wont_reform.html

  22. NoFixedAddress

    Terry
    #3469095, posted on May 31, 2020 at 9:53 am

    ‘So, let me get this straight…’

    No one is preventing you from getting anything straight. It is merely a by-product of your inability.

    IamPeter = HeisStoned

  23. Entropy

    What is curious is that all Australian universities existed and made a good living before the influx of Chinese students. I have not noticed an increase in staffing numbers in the last 15 years, there has been a decrease in fact.

    Eh? 30 years ago resources were aging and as dusty as the French car driving lecturers. Nowadays campuses are bulging with flash, expensive and well built buildings that are infested with tribble-like admin and support staff.

  24. Sinclair Davidson

    Henry Ergas had a very good piece in The Australian on Friday.

    The problem is not that the leaders of our universities, in responding to incentives created by successive governments, have let themselves become vulnerable to the Chinese regime’s blackmail. It is that their ethical moorings are so fragile, the blackmail has every chance of success.

    This is not about commies under the beds. This is about the failure of moral and ethical leadership.

  25. Entropy

    Sure. Peter Varghese is by any measure an outstanding achiever. But has typical diplomat allegiances to the international political class it seems.

  26. Sinclair Davidson

    Nowadays campuses are bulging with flash, expensive and well built buildings

    They are also busting with Australian students who would never otherwise have gone to uni.

  27. cohenite

    The UQ debacles, the equally stinky JCU/Peter Ridd debacle and the fucked state generally of Australian unis is all due to this fucker, dan tehan, another lazy, useless piece of faux conservatism.

  28. FWIW I think clearly UQ has made a big mistake here, but as plenty of people were already saying that I decided not to volunteer my views, which I try to avoid unless I have something new to add.

    The Government is planning to strengthen the laws around student freedom of speech, in ways that would at least partly cover the Pavlou case, but with other omissions. I plan to write about at some point.

  29. Crossie

    These days modern technology makes that completely obsolete … communications networks allow anyone to learn anything anytime from any place. Sitting in a lecture theatre is a complete waste of your life. Used to make sense, but now it doesn’t.

    Like from China? Why do they have to be here if all domestic students have to learn remotely and all the staff have to work remotely?

    Could it be because Chinese students studying in Australia was never the aim? Was it always just a pretext for getting permanent residency?

  30. Rafe Champion

    This is not about commies under the beds. This is about the failure of moral and ethical leadership.
    It is probably both, and also the approx one third of students on campus who are being indoctrinated into socialism instead of learning marketable skills at the colleges that magically turned into universities in the 1990s.

  31. Angus Black

    They are also busting with Australian students who would never otherwise have gone to uni.

    …and, by and large, nor should they.

  32. Sinclair Davidson

    … the approx one third of students on campus who are being indoctrinated into socialism instead of learning marketable skills at the colleges that magically turned into universities in the 1990s.

    Yeah. No. Bullshit. Students are simply not being indoctrinated anywhere. Anyone who has marked an exam quickly learns how little attention students pay to what their lecturers really think. In any event, the market clears – people who have no marketable skill struggle to gain employment. Furthermore UQ was always a university.

    This whole notion that the education system collapsed in the 1990s when former CAEs became universities is old, tired and basically a cop out. The old grumps who were very proud of their exclusive university education and suddenly realised that they weren’t so special after all need to get over it. It’s been 30 years.

  33. Sinclair Davidson

    …and, by and large, nor should they.

    At least this is an honest argument. So maybe too many people go to uni. Okay. How are we going to decide who doesn’t get to go?

  34. Sinclair Davidson

    The Government is planning to strengthen the laws around student freedom of speech …

    Conservative government is going to pass a law legalising hooliganism and property damage?

  35. Iampeter

    They are also busting with Australian students who would never otherwise have gone to uni.

    Yea but aside from Law and certain specific medical professions, is it necessary for all these people to be going to Uni in the first place?

    At least this is an honest argument. So maybe too many people go to uni. Okay. How are we going to decide who doesn’t get to go?

    Privatize them. ay.

    The Government is planning to strengthen the laws around student freedom of speech, in ways that would at least partly cover the Pavlou case, but with other omissions. I plan to write about at some point.

    If the Government is planning on passing any laws that force universities to do anything then they will be violating free speech and property rights, not strengthening them.

  36. Jessie

    Hannah Forsyth (Australian Catholic University) has written a little of the history of reforms in the tertiary education sector.

    for eg University Autonomy and the Public Interest
    Source: https://aph.org.au/2017/11/university-autonomy-and-the-public-interest/

    What piqued my interest in Forsyth’s work was reference to Helen Hughes’ argument for ‘Australia to develop an international market‘ in university education.
    2014 A History of the Modern Australian University
    and partial reading of chapters:-
    # The ‘Rich Asians’ Plans
    # The Reformation
    describing a pre-activity group (inc Hughes) advising Dawkins’ Green Paper in Higher Education reforms.

    Proving very difficult to find papers regarding Peter Karmel’s opposition to the removal of CTEC*, the buffer body between universities and political interference of same. Forsyth references this at end of The Reformation chapter avail on google books link.

    The Australian has an informative obituary on Karmel.
    Reformist renowned for generosity Geoff Maslen 10/2/2009

    *Commonwealth Tertiary Education Commission

  37. Law has less of a need for university on campus study than pretty much all natural and applied science besides pure maths, stats and IT/comp sci. They all need to be at there if they are to offer degrees at all.

    Law was successfully taught without or on the peripheries of the university system.

    Accountants don’t need to set foot in a university, they are usually good students because they want to GTFO.

  38. Jessie

    [email protected]

    I thought this was a very useful academic contribution to my understanding(s) in the the history of civilisations (and development). Given current academic texts of newly discovered agrarian practices pre-colonial Australia.

    Serpent Labret with Articulated Tongue
    A.D. 1300–1521
    Aztec

    Magnification of the photos is recommended.

    Also this:-
    Necklace with Beads in the Shape of Jaguar Teeth
    source: https://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/705547

  39. yarpos

    JCU now UQ, its all turning into a bit of a festering mess

  40. John A

    Yeah. No. Bullshit. Students are simply not being indoctrinated anywhere.

    Doomlord, wanna buy a bridge?

    How do they manage to absorb so many ideas that don’t work, then?

  41. John A

    Liberty Quote – Conventional wisdom does not regard Communism with the same abhorrence as fascism, even though if you want to be an accountant about it and add up the skulls of the dead, you will find that the Communists murdered many more people than the fascists did, began murdering before fascists came to power and carried on murdering after the fascists had gone. Yet few can bring themselves to see fascism and Communism as moral equivalents. — Nick Cohen

    This incorporates the assumption that fascism has gone the way of all the earth, and that it is somehow different to Communism with a moral equivalence the only common factor.

    However, both are top-down, command principles of totalitarian government and both assume an atheistic world-view – that there is no God / Higher Authority / Definer of Right-and-Wrong / Declarer of “True” Justice to Whom we must be accountable.

  42. Angus Black

    At least this is an honest argument. So maybe too many people go to uni. Okay. How are we going to decide who doesn’t get to go?

    That’s easy, the bright get to go, the thick don’t. Those who don’t put the work in, once they arrive, are shown the door.

  43. Angus Black

    At least this is an honest argument. So maybe too many people go to uni. Okay. How are we going to decide who doesn’t get to go?

    Less flippantly, most jobs simply don’t require or benefit from a tertiary educated workforce. For the vast majority of white collar jobs, rather less education and skills are needed today than were needed 50 years ago…take a serious look, it’s easy to see. Those people didn’t need a tertiary education 50 years ago and they certainly don’t need one today.

    For those jobs which do benefit from tertiary training, I contend that the vast majority would be better served by the Master/Apprentice/Nightschool model. Beyond the trades, doctors, nurses, lawyers, vets, accountants spring immediately to mind…but that is just the tip of the iceberg.

    Feel free to show me where I’m wrong.

  44. That’s easy, the bright get to go, the thick don’t. Those who don’t put the work in, once they arrive, are shown the door.

    You say that, but let’s be honest here.

    A lot of people struggle with PDEs, biochem, administrative law and quantum mechanics.

    Some lecturers do very little work. Any excuse to not answer questions. Every other educational paradigm is correct but asking the professor a question. Kind of belies how much they know or not.

    The problem is universities are not focused on competency. That would kill off such academic laziness. As well as nonsense like “jurisprudence” subjects. Ahem.

  45. Most trades and degrees should be by correspondence and cadetship, and the qualification is the qualification.

    None of this PDY or CPE scamming please.

  46. Pro Eng

    Did you know that the problem at UQ dates back many years and has a link to JCU. Prof Ove Hough-Gulberg -wiki says,” is a biologist and climate scientist specialising in coral reefs, in particular bleaching due to global warming and climate change. He has published over 500 journal articles and been cited over 50,000 times.” That is a joke of course his papers on coral reefs and climate change are rubbish as pointed out by the late and great Dr Bob Carter.
    O H-G gave evidence to an inquiry on Adani mine in which he claimed to have a connection with IPPC. Under O H-G and supported by him and UQ was John Cook of Skeptical Science (do you call Cook in NAZI uniform?) I recall that O H-G, and involving the UQ Vice -chancellor Hoj, was taken to court for providing an engineering service when not registered. Do not know the outcome but Cook left UQ and Hoj has kept O H-G quiet.
    The way to get at Universities is to take them to court. Qld has the Professional Engineers Act and the Public sector Ethics Act both of which apply to Qld Unis. Did people know Melbourne University gave the untruthful person Al Gore an honorary PhD degree?

  47. He has published over 500 journal articles

    What a bullshit artist.

    So after honours/masters and his PhD, he has published 12,500 pages of top tier, groundbreaking research?

  48. Fisky

    The problem is not that the leaders of our universities, in responding to incentives created by successive governments, have let themselves become vulnerable to the Chinese regime’s blackmail. It is that their ethical moorings are so fragile, the blackmail has every chance of success.

    No, the problem is precisely that adopting a strategy whereby 20+% of your revenue is coming from the PRC means that the PRC will exercise influence over you. That is all. No need to overthink this, libertarians!

  49. Sinclair Davidson

    Gentlepeople – google is your friend.

    He has very impressive statistics.

  50. Sinclair Davidson

    No, the problem is precisely that adopting a strategy whereby 20+% of your revenue is coming from the PRC means that the PRC will exercise influence over you. That is all. No need to overthink this, libertarians!

    Hmmmm. As opposed to 40% – 50% coming from Canberra which means the Statists will exercise influence over you. That is all. No need to overthink this, Statists!

  51. Fisky

    The reason why libertarians are trying to run the dumb line that Beijing does not engage in active measures on university campuses, is because libertarians do not want to challenge Beijing at all. They are actually fine with the status quo of Beijing exercising brutal leverage over international students, threatening their families back home, bribing/blackmailing leaders of business and academia and so on. Letting this continue poses no threat to libertarian ideology because at heart they are open borders globalists, whereas confronting the PRC’s influence refutes a lot of libertarian priors.

  52. Fisky

    Hmmmm. As opposed to 40% – 50% coming from Canberra which means the Statists will exercise influence over you. That is all. No need to overthink this, Statists!

    OK, call me when ASIO start threatening the families of domestic students for holding the wrong political opinions or attending anti-Canberra protests. This is exactly what Beijing does to international students, but you are basically fine with that for some reason.

  53. Sinclair Davidson

    Does your Mum know you’ve been drinking the red cordial again?

  54. Fisky

    I think when we start trying to assert equivalence between Beijing and Canberra, we’ve either given up on liberty or we are revealing our real intentions which is to run interference for Beijing. Which is kind of sad.

  55. Sinclair Davidson

    Fisky – you know that the Australian government threatened a foreign think tank that was quoting my research criticising Australian government policy? How is that any different from what you have described?

  56. Fisky

    Oh really? What was the colour of the threat?

  57. Sinclair Davidson

    Does it matter?

  58. Sinclair Davidson

    The same government that tried to deplatform me last year because I had been critical of a policy.

  59. Tel

    At least this is an honest argument. So maybe too many people go to uni. Okay. How are we going to decide who doesn’t get to go?

    It was all working fine before Whitlam came along.

    However, times have changed and what is needed is more “skin in the game” from the student, not 100% loans upfront but at least partial fees upfront to prove they really want it. On top of that, the university should only get full payment as the individual pays off their debt. Perhaps one quarter of the fees, or something like that would be held back as a guarantee that this student does become a tax paying adult.

    Also, with foreign students, Australian taxpayers should not be handing out “scholarships” as a style of foreign aid, such that the foreign student then uses our tax money as a university fee.

  60. Fisky

    Yes it does matter, because there is a rather large gulf between saying on one hand, don’t publish this paper or (something something) and, if you attend this HK human rights protest, you father in Guangzhou will lose his job, your brother will be kicked out of Tsinghua, and you will be arrested upon return to the PRC. I thought libertarians would be able to discriminate between different shades of government interference given this is supposed to be their specialism.

  61. Fisky

    There’s a further meta-argument to be made here – we started this thread asserting the reason for their supine behaviour on China is that university leaders had lost their moral bearings. We conclude by asserting moral equivalence between Australia and China???

  62. Tel

    OK, call me when ASIO start threatening the families of domestic students for holding the wrong political opinions or attending anti-Canberra protests. This is exactly what Beijing does to international students, but you are basically fine with that for some reason.

    When ASIO makes a public statement that they are investigating “anti-Chinese sentient” at a time when China has been clearly pulling the strings at the WHO and led to all of us being locked up under house arrest … that must surely come across as just a little bit threatening.

    OK, it’s a bit more subtle than what the CCP does, but it is at least reminiscent is style and purpose.

    We conclude by asserting moral equivalence between Australia and China???

    How about a slow but steady moral convergence between Australia and China … would you accept that?

  63. The reason why libertarians are trying to run the dumb line that Beijing does not engage in active measures on university campuses, is because libertarians do not want to challenge Beijing at all.

    Lay off the crack pipe. You’re starting to sound like I Am Peter.

  64. Catfeesh?

    If you want to do gender studies or anything in that arena, the answer is no. Good starting point, Sinc?

  65. NoFixedAddress

    Obviously Shakespeare didn’t go far enough,

    After we kill all the lawyers the alchemists will be next;
    forsooth what light through broken windows dost shine on academia.

    That’s a wrap!

  66. Sinclair Davidson

    Good starting point, Sinc?

    Actually no. Bad starting point. Signalling is a very important component of education. Someone who has majored in [insert topic] studies is sending a very clear message to potential employers.

  67. Fisky

    How about a slow but steady moral convergence between Australia and China … would you accept that?

    Yes, absolutely. The problem is that the measures required to counter it – a deliberate and comprehensive strategy of decoupling from the the People’s Republic of China – are opposed by 95% of libertarians.

  68. Sinclair Davidson

    Fisky – What I’m telling you is that all states and governments are evil. You’re telling me that the Chinese government are more evil. Maybe. But they are not sufficiently distinct from each other for my liking.

  69. Entropy

    Australian and Chinese governments not sufficiently distinct?
    Hmm, that is the sort of lack of discernment that can lead to someone thinking Malcolm Turnbull might be potentially great. Bwaaaaaahhhaaa!

    You will never live that one down.

  70. Entropy

    Perhaps you might be prepared to consider one lot is less bad than the other?

  71. Tel

    The problem is that the measures required to counter it – a deliberate and comprehensive strategy of decoupling from the the People’s Republic of China – are opposed by 95% of libertarians.

    How about we create a law that makes it illegal for any political party to take an Aldi bag full of cash and then not even make any record of the transaction? Do you think that 95% of libertarians would oppose such a law?

    Oh hang on, there already is exactly that law … but sadly it’s not enforced … because we blame 95% of libertarians, right? Those dreadful libertarians preventing laws being enforced. Golly!! We need new laws to fix that, so those could also not be enforced … that’s sure to help.

  72. Squirrel

    The UQ masterminds presumably felt that they had no choice but to make a martyr of Pavlou, but I wonder if any other botties have been smacked – e.g. some of those who were prominent in the clashes on campus over Hong Kong?

  73. Iampeter

    That is all. No need to overthink this, libertarians!

    How is the fact that Australian universities are so completely regulated that they survive by educating the children of foreign communists the fault of “libertarians?”

    I think when we start trying to assert equivalence between Beijing and Canberra, we’ve either given up on liberty or we are revealing our real intentions which is to run interference for Beijing.

    Since when do you support liberty? No one gives a damn about you’re rights, remember?
    You should love Beijing and their way of doing things.

  74. Spurgeon Monkfish III

    Shut it down.

    Fire them all.

    Mound of skulls.

    Salt the earth.

    Nuke. From. Orbit.

  75. Boambee John

    Doomlord

    Someone who has majored in [insert topic] studies is sending a very clear message to potential employers.

    So the private sdctor won’t touch them with a bargepole, but local councils, and state and Commonwealth bureaucracies, end up paying them premium wages to screw the country over?

  76. Rayvic

    It appears that UQ Chancellor Peter Varghese may have a conflict of interest by virtue of a close friendship with China when he was Secretary of Foreign Affairs. The honourable thing to do would be for him to stand down while an inquiry is conducted into the nature of the relationship, if any.

  77. Rayvic

    According to Semper Floreat of 30 May 2019, Peter Hoj will step down as Vice-Chancellor and President of the University in June 2020. If his term has been extended in the interim, it is in the national interest that he be fired together with Peter Varghese, unless the latter is found to be squeaky clean by rigorous inquiry.

  78. Crossie

    Also, with foreign students, Australian taxpayers should not be handing out “scholarships” as a style of foreign aid, such that the foreign student then uses our tax money as a university fee.

    Tell me again why we have international students?

  79. Iampeter

    Tell me again why we have international students?

    Because aside from government handouts they are a large source of income for our regulated-to-within-an-inch-of-their-life universities.

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