Remember, remember the fourth of June

What to know about Tiananmen Square on the 30th anniversary of the ...

It may not rhyme but you should remember it all the same. These were protestors with a genuine mission, bravely seeking change in the face of a tyrannical government that sent tanks out onto the street. What they sought in China is what we already have but which so many of our own “protesters” are prepared to squander. For those on the streets in Beijing and elsewhere, this was known as the Chinese Democracy Movement. Our “protesters” here would be the ones ordering the tanks onto the streets in Beijing. They would be the ones who are trying to suppress the pro-democracy, pro-freedom protesters, no quotation marks there, in Hong Kong today. What you see below is from Wikipedia. It should be a reminder of what’s really at stake.

The Tiananmen Square protestsTiananmen Square massacre, or the Tiananmen Square Incident, commonly known as the June Fourth Incident (Chinese六四事件pinyinliùsì shìjiàn in mainland China, literally the six-four incident), were student-led demonstrations held in Tiananmen Square in Beijing during 1989. The popular national movement inspired by the Beijing protests is sometimes called the ’89 Democracy Movement (Chinese八九民運pinyinbājiǔ mínyùn). The protests started on April 15 and were forcibly suppressed on June 4 when the government declared martial law and sent the military to occupy central parts of Beijing. In what became known as the Tiananmen Square Massacre (Chinese天安門大屠殺pinyintiān’ānmén dà túshā), troops with assault rifles and tanks fired at the demonstrators and those trying to block the military’s advance into Tiananmen Square. Estimates of the death toll vary from several hundred to several thousand, with thousands more wounded.[2][3][4][5][6][7]

Set off by the death of pro-reform Communist general secretary Hu Yaobang in April 1989, amid the backdrop of rapid economic development and social changes in post-Mao China, the protests reflected anxieties about the country’s future in the popular consciousness and among the political elite. The reforms of the 1980s had led to a nascent market economy which benefited some people but seriously disaffected others, and the one-party political system also faced a challenge of legitimacy. Common grievances at the time included inflation, corruption, limited preparedness of graduates for the new economy,[8] and restrictions on political participation. The students called for greater accountability, constitutional due process, democracy, freedom of the press, and freedom of speech, although they were highly disorganized and their goals varied.[9][10] At the height of the protests, about 1 million people assembled in the Square.[11]

As the protests developed, the authorities responded with both conciliatory and hardline tactics, exposing deep divisions within the party leadership.[12] By May, a student-led hunger strike galvanized support for the demonstrators around the country, and the protests spread to some 400 cities.[13] Ultimately, Deng Xiaoping and other Communist Party elders believed the protests to be a political threat and resolved to use force.[14][15] The State Council declared martial law on May 20 and mobilized as many as 300,000 troops to Beijing.[13] The troops advanced into central parts of Beijing on the city’s major thoroughfares in the early morning hours of June 4, killing both demonstrators and bystanders in the process.

The international community, human rights organizations, and political analysts condemned the Chinese government for the massacre. Western countries imposed arms embargoes on China.[16] The Chinese government made widespread arrests of protesters and their supporters, suppressed other protests around China, expelled foreign journalists, strictly controlled coverage of the events in the domestic press, strengthened the police and internal security forces, and demoted or purged officials it deemed sympathetic to the protests.[17] More broadly, the suppression ended the political reforms since 1986 and halted the policies of liberalization in the 1980s, which were only resumed partly after Deng Xiaoping’s Southern Tour in 1992.[18][19][20] Considered a watershed event, the protests set the limits on political expression in China up to the present day.[21] Its memory is widely associated with questioning the legitimacy of Communist Party rule and remains one of the most sensitive and most widely censored topics in China.[22][23]

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15 Responses to Remember, remember the fourth of June

  1. stackja

    MSM don’t want to remember. Too busy covering “the races”.

  2. stackja

    Facebook censors the event.

  3. exsteelworker

    The world looks the other way when human rights in China are mentioned. But if a western nation is accused all hell breaks loose. China good because of Cha hing $. USA Trump bad…get it?

  4. Rafe Champion

    Thanks Steve, anything in the MSM?

  5. steve

    Here is an idea we swap one Chinese who loves democracy for one Australian socialist who can’t wait for their country to be socialist until all are relocated to China. Win win for all concerned.

  6. duncanm

    .. its most instructive to google “may 35th”

  7. H B Bear

    China must be close to losing its “social licence”.

  8. duncanm

    Typical rewriting of history in the media at the moment on what Trump said about Tianenmen, too.

    https://www.businessinsider.com.au/trump-praised-china-tiananmen-foreshadowing-response-to-george-floyd-protests-2020-6?r=US&IR=T

    n 1990, President Donald Trump (then a real estate magnate and private citizen) praised China for showing the “power of strength” via its notorious, bloody crackdown on pro-democracy protesters in Tiananmen Square the year prior.

    .. riight.
    this is what he actually said.

    When the students poured into Tiananmen Square, the Chinese government almost blew it. Then they were vicious, they were horrible, but they put it down with strength. That shows you the power of strength. Our country is right now perceived as weak….as being spit on by the rest of the world

  9. Davey Boy

    We should also remember the Goddess of Democracy in Tiananmen Square.
    It was bulldozed over, along with the students.

    Now also banned in Hong Kong.

    The Goddess of Democracy, also known as the Goddess of Democracy and Freedom, the Spirit of Democracy,[1] and the Goddess of Liberty (自由女神; zìyóu nǚshén[1]), was a 10-metre-tall (33 ft) statue created during the 1989 Tiananmen Square protests. The statue was constructed over four days out of foam and papier-mâché over a metal armature. The constructors decided to make the statue as large as possible to try to dissuade the government from dismantling it: the government would either have to destroy the statue—an action which would potentially fuel further criticism of its policies—or leave it standing. Nevertheless, the statue was destroyed on June 4, 1989, by soldiers clearing the protesters from Tiananmen square. Since its destruction, numerous replicas and memorials have been erected around the world, including in Hong Kong, San Francisco, Washington, D.C., and Vancouver.

  10. Haven’t the Tiananmen protesters been branded “far-right extremists” by now?
    Come on PRC up your game or you’re going to be sent back to The Frankfurt School for remedial propaganda lessons.

  11. Hay Stockard

    The Red Chinese. Not a nice bunch of chaps.

  12. Lee

    In 1990, President Donald Trump (then a real estate magnate and private citizen) praised China for showing the “power of strength” via its notorious, bloody crackdown on pro-democracy protesters in Tiananmen Square the year prior.

    .. riight.
    this is what he actually said.

    When the students poured into Tiananmen Square, the Chinese government almost blew it. Then they were vicious, they were horrible, but they put it down with strength. That shows you the power of strength. Our country is right now perceived as weak….as being spit on by the rest of the world

    President Donald Trump misquoted or taken out of context?
    No, surely not!

  13. “Considered a watershed event, the protests set the limits on political expression in China up to the present day. Its memory is widely associated with questioning the legitimacy of Communist Party rule and remains one of the most sensitive and most widely censored topics in China.”

    Of course it’s all capitalism now with a focus on economic power and growth but ultimately under state control. Experts had said that it couldn’t be done but it appears to have been done. Here are the impossible economics circumstances they had to navigate to operate what appears to be a successful capitalist economy under the strong hand of the communist party of china.

    https://tambonthongchai.com/2020/06/04/wbm2001enterprise-reform-in-china/

  14. Roger

    Of course it’s all capitalism now with a focus on economic power and growth but ultimately under state control. Experts had said that it couldn’t be done but it appears to have been done.

    Straight out of Lenin’s handbook, chaamjamal.

    In 1921 in hi sNew Economic Policy Lenin advocated for state capitalism as a necessary stage in the advance to pure Communism in the period immediately following the Russian Civil War.

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