Energy policy. Moving the deckchairs on the Titanic

WARNING: MUDDLE-HEADED WOMBATS AT WORK!

The plan is to go for broke with more windmills and apply  massive efforts to grid management. This is apparent in the annual reports of the AEMO where you can find the most intricate examination of  things like the entrails of the interconnectors between SA and Victoria (the deckchairs) while the icebergs lying in wait escape attention.

Watts Up picked up a local reports that the NSW government has been swamped with offers to build more windmills and they will contribute improved grid infrastructure and streamlined approvals for new wind farm projects in designated renewable energy zones.

Apparently this approach is  borrowed from Texas. See how it worked out there.

As the temperatures climbed, demand from air conditioners soared and winds slowed, the state’s grid operator found itself with a shrinking margin of reserve power. And when the amount of spare capacity dipped below a tripwire of 2,300 megawatts (less than 3% of the state’s energy needs) on Aug. 13 and again Aug. 15, the Electric Reliability Council of Texas, or ERCOT, was forced to take action.

Power plants rushed to ramp up their outputs to take advantage of prices that briefly soared past a state mandated cap of $9,000 per megawatt-hour – up from about only $19 hours earlier. The companies that own transmission and distribution systems, meanwhile, hurried to reduce consumption by their customers, knowing that the rates the companies will pay next year are based on when demand is highest.

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9 Responses to Energy policy. Moving the deckchairs on the Titanic

  1. nb says:

    https://nsidc.org/arcticseaicenews/antarctic-daily-image-update/
    https://nsidc.org/arcticseaicenews/category/daily-image/
    We live in strange times. Or have populations always had to put up with these kinds of nuff-nuffs-who-must?

  2. Professor Fred Lenin says:

    I have always said ,if 5,0op windmills wont supply enough power on calm days and nights build and subsidise 10,000 more thst will solve the problem . Gangrene carpetbagger logic at work .

  3. bemused says:

    A question just popped up in my head, strange, I know. But are windmills’ ability to generate power affected by the demand placed on them?

    What I mean is that if a windmill is merrily spinning away delivering 10% of its capacity and suddenly additional demand arises and the wind doesn’t increase, is there effectively a strain placed on the windmill that reduces its ability to generate that 10%?

    An analogy might be a car that’s driving along a flat road and then encounters a steep hill. The load on the engine increases and without sufficient power available, the car slows down and could overheat. Much the same, I guess, if you put a strain on an electric drill and it can’t handle the work demanded.

  4. chaamjamal says:

    On the bright side, carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuels will go down and that will cause the the rise in atmospheric CO2 concentration to slow down.

    Here is the math for that relationship.

    https://tambonthongchai.com/2020/05/18/12479/

  5. Chris says:

    On the bright side, carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuels will go down and that will cause the the rise in atmospheric CO2 concentration to slow down.

    Here is the math for that relationship.

    lol

  6. Mike Ryan says:

    I’m moving into my new place – 2 2 bedroom semi in Newcastle, NSW. Alreaqdy have a spot for an LPG generator with 2 big gas tanks. I’m already on natural gas so will have solid redundancy.
    FACT: You can’t operate refrigerated supply chains with renewable energy. When the shit inevitably hits the fan there will be blood on the streets. Rioting and mayhem.

  7. Hodor says:

    The place is rooted, why no nuclear?

  8. Herodotus says:

    The American import is doing the rooting, re-routing, rotor-hitting, refabrication, rot-introduction.

  9. RobK says:

    Bemused,
    are windmills’ ability to generate power affected by the demand placed on them?
    Thee are different types of wind turbine generators but generally speaking the generators will put energy into the grid to the maximum of their ability upto the point of some curtailment signal. If a sudden load is dropped on them there’s a small ability to draw a little inertia (to the extent of frequency change window but this is monitored because sudden frequency changes are also a symptom of a fault occurring). The battery buffering is helpful in these situations and can supply some minutes to makeup a surge, this can give extra time for thermal fossil fuel units to overcome any thermal lag.

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