Paul Collits on the way we are losing the cultural and political wars

He has an impressive cv and his argument is summed up in this short tract.

The_Australian_Rights_Big_Mistake (2)

The main thing is to appreciate that culture is  upstream of politics and the mainstream of the political culture is no better on the non-left side than it is on the other. He suggests to pay attention to The Australian Federation Party and also Mark Latham “Australia’s only current politician who is focused on the main game and who thinks clearly about the things that count for those of us in struggle street.”

The authentic, people-centred Australian “right”, again, noting “whatever that means”, has a series of urgent tasks if it is to break free of the consequences of its big mistake.

One, the rightist groups need to talk to one another.  To recognise the problem, and to discuss it.  To form serious power groups interested in The Fight as I have described it.  Use the Liberal Party, by all means, but don’t obsess over its electoral welfare.  Getting good people into the Liberal Party, indeed into all parties, is not without merit as one part of the strategy.  Just do not expect miracles, or a quick pay off.  And the task IS rather urgent. 

I think it is a mistake to identify as “rightwing”   but if people want to go with that, then so be it, just get on with all the other things that need to be done. And don’t be surprised if we keep losing.

Update. Similar comments on Boris Johnson in The Spectator.

The best thing I can say about Boris Johnson is that he’s not a real Tory. The Prime Minister belongs instead to the popular liberal right, though he seems to get less popular by the day. His appeal to right-wing voters is based on his promise to ‘get Brexit done’ and the demented, 30-tweet-thread rage-pain he stirs in the hearts of some progressives. What these supporters have not yet but one day will have to confront is the fact that Boris is not one of them. Not on immigration, not on climate change, not on the culture wars.

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24 Responses to Paul Collits on the way we are losing the cultural and political wars

  1. Ainsley Hayes

    On the theme of culture war and ‘safetyism’ as one of its elements, someone with an unpronounceable nic just pasted a great poem by Howard Nemerov on a thread at Reason:

    Because I am drunk, this Independence Night,
    I watch the fireworks from far away,
    from a high hill, across the moony green
    Of lakes and other hills to the town harbor,
    Where stately illuminations are flung aloft,
    One light shattering in a hundred lights
    Minute by minute. The reason I am crying,
    Aside from only being country drunk,
    That is, may be that I have just remembered
    The sparklers, rockets, roman candles and
    so on, we used to be allowed to buy
    When I was a boy, and set off by ourselves
    At some peril to life and property.
    Our freedom to abuse our freedom thus
    Has since, I understand, been remedied
    By legislation. Now the authorities
    Arrange a perfectly safe public display
    To be watched at a distance; and now also
    The contribution of all the taxpayers
    Together makes a more spectacular
    Result than any could achieve alone
    (A few pale pinwheels, or a firecracker
    Fused at the dog’s tail). It is, indeed, splendid:
    Showers of roses in the sky, fountains
    Of emeralds, and those profusely scattered zircons
    Falling and falling, flowering as they fall
    And followed distantly by a noise of thunder.
    My eyes are half-afloat in happy tears.
    God bless our Nation on a night like this,
    And bless the careful and secure officials
    Who celebrate our independence now.

  2. Dr Faustus

    Getting good people into the Liberal Party, indeed into all parties, is not without merit as one part of the strategy. Just do not expect miracles, or a quick pay off. And the task IS rather urgent.

    He’s right.

    But it’s a major problem when the arteries of the party machine are clogged up with mediocre careerists, clinging like limpets to their personal ambitions – and gifting away power and position to advance their own special causes.

  3. John Smith101

    Great posting, Rafe. Paul Collits is on the money.

    I think it is a mistake to identify as “rightwing”

    I could not agree more. This leftwing/rightwing dichotomy divides us, making it difficult to talk with each other. It also makes it more difficult to come to an understanding of the problem if one takes a side and then defends that side. It results in a limited exchange of ideas, opens the gates to ideological viewpoints, and closes minds.

    New problems, eg the tyranny we are currently living under (Who’d a thought this would be our reality even six months ago?) requires an open-mindedness to, at the very least, do one’s own research, and realise that paradigms, perhaps even one’s we have built our ‘inner life’ around, do change.

    This has been amply exemplified here at the Cat for the last few months, whereby there has been considerable anger, annoyance and puzzlement expressed re Covid 19/politicians/you-name-it, most of which has operated in a closed loop through a left-right lens. Unless new ideas from outside the closed loop are researched and tested (always be sceptical) then the cognitive dissonance, as expressed in many of Catallaxy forums, will continue to exist. Divided we are weak and our cognitive dissonance simply serves the ideology that has brought us the tyranny we are seeing here in Australia.

    To see beyond the left-right dichotomy it helps to recognise that it is nuance and critical thinking, as well as the ability to hold two opposing thoughts at the one time, which allows us to step outside of ourselves, to reflect, and so come to reason or an understanding of a situation. This is the basis of an objective and considered, even empathetic, viewpoint. Most free-thinking people are capable of doing this, making them basically ‘centrists’ on the left-right political spectrum. I think most Cats are, in essence, centrists. It’s where most sensible people reside.

    Therefore, seeing oneself as a ‘centrist’ open to new but tested ideas frees us somewhat from the restictions imposed by a left-right dichotomy operating in a mostly closed loop. Until we realise: we can do this together, then nothing will change and the cycle will continue.

  4. Cassie of Sydney

    “Focus on culture, ever upstream from party politics. Speak boldly, like the original Apostles and Church Fathers once did, counter culturally and in the face of existing power structures, all those centuries ago. Meet in secret. Pressure groups like Advance Australia to get with the program and be way more visible. Engage Mark Latham, Australia’s only current politician who is focused on the main game and who thinks clearly about the things that count for those of us in struggle street. And the folks struggling are our friends. The working class has been abandoned by the New Class. The Marxists and progressive liberals absolutely HATE the workers. Make peace with One Nation, and collude with it, where this makes sense.”

    Amen Paul Collits.

  5. mindfree

    NSW still dogged by Mike? Mike now in aged care

    After helping himself to a few million at NAB after showing talent as a complete non-entity lightweight before riding off into the sunset.

    PS he got the job as a banker originally thanks to Daddy

  6. Iampeter

    The authentic, people-centred Australian “right”, again, noting “whatever that means”, has a series of urgent tasks if it is to break free of the consequences of its big mistake.

    Yea, but if you don’t know what “people-centred Australian right” even means, then you’ve hit a dead end.
    Also, what “big mistake?”
    Generally speaking when people know what they are talking about they are very clear and precise, not vague and whatever this is.

    I think it is a mistake to identify as “rightwing” but if people want to go with that, then so be it, just get on with all the other things that need to be done. And don’t be surprised if we keep losing.

    If you can’t even clarify what you identify as politically then how do you hope to identify what “things need to be done?”
    It’s almost like people are trying to discuss topics they don’t really understand but want to proceed anyway, as if this lack of knowledge isn’t a show stopping problem.

    It results in a limited exchange of ideas, opens the gates to ideological viewpoints, and closes minds.

    In order to exchange ideas about politics you need to first have an ideology, so good luck with this.

  7. Anonandon

    Generally speaking when people know what they are talking about they are very clear and precise, not vague and whatever this is.

    Oh, the irony!

  8. Pete of Freo

    “…. la plus belle des ruses du Diable est de vous persuader qu’il n’existe pas!” Similarly, the conservative totalitarians and their fellow travelers have done the same thing with the “Left-Right” ruse in convincing people that there is a difference between the various totalitarian faiths and that these fictional differences can be described by the mythical dichotomy.
    It is refreshing to see people, however late in the battle, beginning to wake up to the power of language. There is nothing more conservative that the mis-named “radical” who wants to return humanity to the shackles of totalitarian tyranny, to the primitive , collectivist mentality as described by the Austrians. Monarch or dictator, there is no difference, and for much of our existence on this Planet the vast majority of human beings have suffered under the whims of one or the other.
    There is nothing more radical that the secular libertarian who believes in the eminence of the individual and the right of the individual to live as free from the whims of governments and commissars and to confine said agents of oppression into only activities which ensure that our garbage and shit are safely taken care of.
    The extremes of the Left and Right have more in common with each other that differences, the are the same thing, the only immediately apparent secular dichotomy is Libertarian – Totalitarian, and as has been said, most “Cats” (such as they are) exist somewhere close to the centre of the poles, which is probably a good thing when one considers that largely due to their secular nature the two aren’t “poles”, they are either ends of a snake, which, as observed by Alexis Charles Henri Clérel, has a decided tendency to swallow it’s tail.
    We are faced with a conundrum and it’s secular nature makes it unsolvable, and the most likely solution, a return to something spiritual and truly radical…..

  9. Megan

    Oh, the irony!

    Anonanon: I wrote the identical comment on another thread in response to the same troll’s dumb ramblings. I deleted it because the repeated cognitive errors just pile up like dirty laundry in the overconfidence corner, where he is utterly certain he is the only one with the intellectual wherewithal to understand and write about complex topics. So far away from reasoned debate he may as well be on Mars. Less intelligent than a rock and with the same inflexibility of rational thought.

  10. egg_

    Yea*, but if you don’t know what “people-centred Australian right” even means, then you’ve hit a dead end.

    If it’s bipartisan, what does it matter, BorisPeter*?

    *The illiteracy tell tale.

  11. NoFixedAddress

    I see Hilary the IAP has thrown the rock that sank without a ripple into the Pool of Thoth

  12. mindfree

    Oops..My last comment re: Mike Baird was in regard to the linked cv post from last May so not relevant here

  13. Cassie of Sydney

    “mindfree
    #3503294, posted on July 4, 2020 at 3:49 pm
    Oops..My last comment re: Mike Baird was in regard to the linked cv post from last May so not relevant here”

    I thought your comment re. Baird was very relevant here….Baird was your typical left-wing Liberal that Collits talks about in his piece….who can forget Baird’s greyhound ban…I still shake my head when I think about it.

  14. Faye

    The first thing to be a politician is to have a sincere heartfelt love for the people of Australia.
    Second is to never stray from truth, fact and empirical evidence.
    Third is to have commonsense, be a straight shooter and openly admit mistakes.
    Fourth is to have core beliefs and values of love of country, pride in the Australian flag and passion for Western civilization and any threat to these, no matter how minute, gets immediately removed.
    Fifth is to lay out the Water, Energy, Defence, Education, Etc, Etc Plan for Australia and bring it to fruition on the ground in quick time.
    Sixth politicians, instead of watching their backs, should aim to be heroes to keep their seats.

  15. NoFixedAddress

    Faye
    #3503400, posted on July 4, 2020 at 5:50 pm

    And to be a Green, National, Labor Liberal you ignore your base and suck up to the porn brokers of whichever party you can crawl into.

  16. Spurgeon Monkfish III

    What these supporters have not yet but one day will have to confront is the fact that Boris is not one of them. Not on immigration, not on climate change, not on the culture wars.

    Anyone who didn’t pick that staggeringly stupid narcissistic mop headed collectivist imbecile as exactly that is an even bigger knobhead than he is.

  17. Old Lefty

    Dan Tehan is the epitome of the intellectual bankruptcy of the modern Coalition. Tempting as it is to drain the swamp in the universities, they won’t win the battle of ideas if they aren’t in it. ‘only commo bludger wanker pooftas read airy-fairy arty-farty bullshit in useless bloody books mate’ (including books written by dead dago ponces like Aristotle) won’t do it. But to engage in the battle, you have to know what you stand for, and they don’t stand for anything much.

  18. Iampeter

    Oh, the irony!

    LOL, who are you kidding?

    Anonanon: I wrote the identical comment on another thread in response to the same troll’s dumb ramblings. I deleted it because the repeated cognitive errors just pile up like dirty laundry in the overconfidence corner, where he is utterly certain he is the only one with the intellectual wherewithal to understand and write about complex topics.

    I never get tired of weirdos at the Cat who have no arguments and no idea what they are talking about projecting their own behaviors onto me.

  19. Iampeter

    His appeal to right-wing voters is based on his promise to ‘get Brexit done’ and the demented, 30-tweet-thread rage-pain he stirs in the hearts of some progressives. What these supporters have not yet but one day will have to confront is the fact that Boris is not one of them. Not on immigration, not on climate change, not on the culture wars.

    The Brexiteers don’t want to leave Europe to re-instate a rights protecting government, or something. They support exit because they want to regulate trade and immigration. They want big government. In short, they are leftists too.

    This is what I mean, today’s conservatives have way bigger issues then worrying about whether Boris is a “right-winger” since none of them really know what that means anyway.

  20. Boris

    What these supporters have not yet but one day will have to confront is the fact that Boris is not one of them. Not on immigration, not on climate change, not on the culture wars.

    I respectfully disagree. Putting chills down the lefts throats is the best strategy in culture wars.

    Boris Johnson has won the election for the tories and now they have a huge majority and can do whatever they like with it. that’s the biggest boost for the conservative side of politics, regardless of his personal views on any specific issues (I actually doubt he has any).

  21. The BigBlueCat

    The Brexiteers don’t want to leave Europe to re-instate a rights protecting government, or something. They support exit because they want to regulate trade and immigration. They want big government. In short, they are leftists too.

    So, in your view, should the UK have remained in the EU? And if so, why?

  22. Lee

    They support exit because they want to regulate trade and immigration. They want big government. In short, they are leftists too.

    Any government has, and should have the right to restrict immigration to whom they choose, and regulate trade with foreign countries; after all, it’s in their own country’s self interest.
    Anyone arguing otherwise is adopting a left wing viewpoint.

  23. The BigBlueCat

    Anyone arguing otherwise is adopting a left wing viewpoint.

    Trigger alert! (You’ll see)

  24. Lee

    LOL

    You Know Who is the only so-called right winger or conservative I have ever known to be in favour of open borders.
    Every other one, without exception is left wing.

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