Ennio Morricone: 1928 – 2020

 

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31 Responses to Ennio Morricone: 1928 – 2020

  1. Arnost

    He did had some magnificent music… a loss.

  2. Bruce of Newcastle

    Sad to hear it.
    A fine composer.
    Ninety one years is a good innings.
    Clint Eastwood, spring chicken of only 90 years, has outlived him, which is a fine thing.

  3. Natwally

    The music from The Mission was also amazing.

  4. TPL001

    Yes, a fine composer: delicate, intense, moving.

    That last scene in “The Good, the Bad and the Ugly” reaches an intensity (for a movie) that resolves the tension that developed throughout the movie. Leone and Morricone did a fine job. I am sure that Clint was happy!

  5. marc

    “..in this world there are only two types of people.
    Those with loaded guns, and those that dig..”
    thus has it always been.

  6. Arnost

    Sarah Brightman begged Ennio to put lyrics to Daniel’s Oboe for years. And eventually he did. It is one of my most fave pieces of music. Now – while Sarah’s various versions are superb – the version by Celtic Woman sung by Chloe Agnew with her dad on the oboe is simply sublime.

  7. Infidel Tiger King

    Movie moments don’t get better than that final duel scene.

  8. mem

    Arnost,
    Many thanks for that introduction. Celestial. Have saved it to my favourites. wow.

  9. calli

    Gabriel’s Oboe.

    Posted the original scene on the OT. I never tire of hearing it.

  10. calli

    Forgot to add…the sweetness of a simple tune and the profound effect on the soul.

    Morricone held the key.

  11. Arnost

    Yes Calli – saw that, but then I saw this thread. And whilst Daniel’s Oboe is stirring in the clip you posted – the full orchestral / choir version is awesome.

    Morricone conducts Morricone:

  12. Megan

    All that amazing music. Play on in the great wherever, Maestro!

  13. Bruce

    A pretty good innings. He began writing film scores in the 1950’s.

    Knocked out some impressive scores; not just the ones mentioned, but things as diverse as “The Battle of Algiers”, “Exorcist ll”, “Once Upon a Time in America”, “The Untouchables”, “Cinema Paradiso” and “La Cage au Folles”.

    His compatriot, Nino Rota notched up some epic scores, as well.

    And if people like John Huston, Pedro Almodovar and Brian De Palma ask you to write a film score, you have some serious “cred”.

    The soundtrack for “The Mission” is a ripper, with “Gabriel’s Oboe” being one of the stand-outs. Much of his stuff was “atmospheric”, but carefully crafted to be part of the film, not just “audio wallpaper”.

  14. Astrid van den Akker-Luttmer

    Sadly we all come to an end. Yet his music will go on forever.

  15. Arnost

    Much of his stuff was “atmospheric”,

    Yes … but he didn’t rely on electronic gimmicry. He did it with natural sounds, whistles, harmonica and voice. Whilst people rave over John Williams scores [who borrowed (ripped off!) Sibelius, Dvorak, Rachmaninov, Mussorgsky and other clasics] Morricone was truly original.

  16. stackja

    Another:

    Dimitri Tiomkin

    In 1929, after the stock market crash, he moved to Hollywood, where he became best known for his scores for Western films, including Duel in the Sun, Red River, High Noon, The Big Sky, Gunfight at the O.K. Corral, and Last Train from Gun Hill.

    Tiomkin received twenty-two Academy Award nominations and won four Oscars, three for Best Original Score for High Noon, The High and the Mighty, and The Old Man and the Sea, and one for Best Original Song for “The Ballad of High Noon” from the former film.

    Television: Rawhide (1959)

  17. nb

    It’s a pity. I was thinking of getting Morricone to write a score for the demise of Victoria.

  18. Bruce

    @ Arnost:

    By “atmospheric” I meant that the music was scored to the scenes, not just “bits” dropped in to fill the gaps.

    That posted scene from “Once Upona Time in the West”, with the flashbacks and final “duel” is a great example of the music, or lack thereof, being an integral part of the structure of the scene.

    Time to spina few “retrospective” CDs. (Yes, I like “physical media”) and crank up the KEFs.

  19. stackja

    nb
    #3505304, posted on July 6, 2020 at 7:41 pm
    It’s a pity. I was thinking of getting Morricone to write a score for the demise of Victoria.

    South of the border, down Mexico way – Songwriters: Michael Carr / Jimmy Kennedy, could have.
    But the Dan told me, that I must stay South of the border, down Victoria way.

  20. Arnost

    That posted scene from “Once Upona Time in the West”, with the flashbacks and final “duel” is a great example of the music, or lack thereof, being an integral part of the structure of the scene.

    A lot of that is from Sergio though… that was his art.

  21. Two of the best version I’ve watched and listened to:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=enuOArEfqGo

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=efdswXXjnBA

    And not many know that Sergio Leone usually had the music produced first and then the screen play to his movies and, in Once Upon a Time in the West, played the music on set while the actors were in motion (notably the scene where Claudia Cardinale was walking from the train).

  22. stackja

    bemused
    #3505352, posted on July 6, 2020 at 8:10 pm
    And not many know that Sergio Leone usually had the music produced first and then the screen play…

    High Noon (1952)
    Following his work for Fred Zinnemann on The Men (1950), Tiomkin composed the score for the same director’s High Noon (1952). His theme song was “Do Not Forsake Me, Oh My Darlin'” (“The Ballad of High Noon”). At its opening preview to the press, the film, which starred Gary Cooper and Grace Kelly, did badly. Tiomkin writes that “film experts agreed that the picture was a flat failure… The producers hesitated to release the picture.”[12] Tiomkin bought the rights to the song and released it as a single for the popular music market, with singer Frankie Laine. The record became an immediate success worldwide.

    Based on the song’s popularity, the studio released the film four months later, with the words sung by country western star Tex Ritter. The film received seven Academy Award nominations and won four awards, including two for Tiomkin: Best Original Music and Best Song. Walt Disney presented him with both awards that evening.[14]

    According to film historian Arthur R. Jarvis, Jr., the score “has been credited with saving the movie.”[8] Another music expert, Mervyn Cooke, agrees, adding that “the song’s spectacular success was partly responsible for changing the course of film-music history“.[12] Tiomkin was the second composer to receive two Oscars (score and song) for the same dramatic film. (The first was Leigh Harline, who won Best Original Score for Disney’s Pinocchio and Best Song for “When You Wish Upon a Star”. Ned Washington wrote its lyrics as he did for “Do Not Forsake Me, Oh My Darlin”.)

  23. An explanation of how Sergio Leone worked:

  24. duncanm

    The music from The Mission was also amazing.

    sure was.

    This was another corker.

  25. William the Conjuror

    Vale Maestro.

  26. Mark M

    Vale Ennio Morricone.

    Another just departed is Charlie Daniels …

    Keith Urban- “The Devil Went Down To Georgia” 1993 (Midday show)

  27. Herodotus

    I started to watch The good, bad and ugly Movie a while back (how does one stop those random capitalisations from IPAD?) but stopped after a while because it was just stupid.

  28. duncanm

    Herodotus
    #3505613, posted on July 7, 2020 at 6:24 am
    I started to watch The good, bad and ugly Movie a while back (how does one stop those random capitalisations from IPAD?) but stopped after a while because it was just stupid.

    yeh – its a true spaghetti western. A bit of a mess with good and bad bits.

    Try “One upon a time in the West” instead. A true epic.

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