NHS fantastic apart from keeping people alive

Don’t you just love it.  (Thanks Jim Rose)

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16 Responses to NHS fantastic apart from keeping people alive

  1. Roberto

    It’s just like the Yes Minister episode, where the civil service staffers assure the Minister that the hospitals would be superbly efficient if it wasn’t for all of the patients.

  2. Farmer Gez

    A round of applause is in order.

  3. Lee

    Reminds me of the old witticism “the operation was a success but the patient died.”

  4. Lee

    It’s just like the Yes Minister episode, where the civil service staffers assure the Minister that the hospitals would be superbly efficient if it wasn’t for all of the patients.

    The then Labor (of course) government in Victoria built a new, not overly large, state-of-the-art hospital (in the western suburbs of Melbourne, from memory) about ten years or so ago.
    The only problem was it couldn’t be opened, because there wasn’t the funding for staff!

  5. Delta

    But it’s true. The NHS is strongly influenced by social and economic factors such as this: Muslim staff escape NHS hygiene rule.

    But never mind, NHS thanks the Muslim staff who worked through Ramadan and grovelling Prince Charles pays respects to Muslim NHS workers...

    That’s the way it is!

  6. a reader

    Lee, the new Royal Adelaide was very much like that episode of Yes Minister too. Couldn’t believe it at the time, then I realised it was done by that half wit Weatherdill

  7. Rob MW

    THE ONLY SERIOUS BLACK MARK ADAINST NHS WAS ITS POOR RECORD ON KEEPING PEOPLE ALIVE.

    THE AUTHORS SAY THAT THE HEALTHCARE SYSTEM CANNOT BE SOLELY TO BLAMED FOR THIS ISSUE,…………

    (is that all it is, an “Issue” – FMD is a bigger issue)

    Dear Authors,

    The NHS is all ONE SYSTEM, from cradle to early grave.

    Thank you.

    Kind regards.

  8. Peter Greagg

    Thanks for this Judith.

  9. Dave in Marybrook

    this issue… is strongly influenced by social and economic factors
    What’s needed is a behemoth and exclusive state health service to ensure that these social and economic outliers are provided with the healthcare that they don’t know that they need and/or can’t afford!
    Oh wait, hang on…

  10. MACK

    Yes I’ve been banging on about this excellent report for a couple of years. Countries that have done a root and branch review of health systems (Netherlands, Singapore) have all come to the same conclusion: carefully managed compulsory private insurance with a government supported safety net for the poor is the best system. No objective analysis has ever supported a totally government funded and operated system like the NHS. Minister Hunt should do something about it.

  11. Squirrel

    Seeing a sad-looking Duke and Duchess of Cambridge celebrating the 72nd anniversary of the (rejoice, clap hands, and sing on your doorstep) NHS today was so sad – but not quite as sad as the thought of that pair rolling up on the solar-powered mopeds in 2048 to celebrate the centenary.

  12. I first thought this was a Babylon Bee piece.

  13. Sam Duncan

    An old one, but it still holds true. The second-worst death rate from the Wuhan virus of any major country, but we’re all expected to troop out and applaud the monopoly that’s supposed to keep us alive like performing seals.

    And Rob MW, yes. That’s precisely the sleight-of-hand they’re using right now. The death toll can’t be the NHS’s fault, because it’s perfect. It must be the Prime Minister’s, or the Health Secretary’s, or “underfunding” (the NHS budget has doubled in real terms over the last 20 years; and it’s even higher in Scotland and Wales, where the death rate is worse than in England), or the stupid public’s for not adhering to the Rules. But never the flawed healthcare system we’re all lumbered with. Let’s have a party for its birthday!

  14. James Hargrave

    Do your patriotic duty: die before the NHS can kill you.

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