Tuesday Forum: July 7, 2020

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2,209 Responses to Tuesday Forum: July 7, 2020

  1. Nick

    Don’t back the fire truck into Artie’s ambulance.

    It could use a firehose on the interior though, lots of tears and hurled excrement.

  2. Bruce of Newcastle

    Hyundai has begun delivering the first of 10 ground-breaking, commercially available, hydrogen-powered trucks to Switzerland.

    It’ll be fun when crooks start blowing ATMs out of walls with hydrogen tapped from green vehicles.
    I suppose Swiss banks are backing the cashless economy though.

  3. Knuckle Dragger

    ‘It’ll be fun when crooks start blowing ATMs out of walls with hydrogen tapped from green vehicles.’

    I like the cut of your jib, sir.

    Clearly it’s not all birds and bicycles and mince and Bunsen burners in the BoN household.

  4. 132andBush

    Miss John C’s JD harvester discussions.

    What do you need to know about them,Egg?

  5. egg_

    Miss John C’s JD harvester discussions.

    What do you need to know about them,Egg?

    You were a party to them too IIRC.
    I was National Technical Support for diesel engined equipment and also was involved in developing electronic control of underground loaders, i.e “offroad” vehicles.
    It was interesting when John was talking of a fire hazard from the legume dust.

  6. Zyconoclast

    Coronavirus: Moguls and lobbyists get millions in government aid

    The US government has distributed more than $521bn (£415bn) to businesses from its emergency coronavirus aid

    Recipients included businesses owned by the family of Jared Kushner, US President Donald Trump’s son-in-law; a shipping business owned by the family of Transportation Secretary Elaine Chao; and several members of Congress or their spouses.
    New York law firm Kasowitz, Benson & Torres, headed by Mr Trump’s long-time personal attorney Marc Kasowitz, also received a loan worth between $5 million and $10 million. It was among dozens of law firms that received PPP aid.
    Dozens of tenants of Mr Trump’s real estate company also received money, as did many powerful Washington lobby groups and political organisations, such as the Black Congressional Caucus.
    Mr Gotbaum said it was “scandalous” that firms tied to politicians were benefiting from the programme, which at one point ran out of money.

    Kanye West’s Yeezy apparel brand – which recently announced a long-term deal with Gap – got a loan worth between $2m and $5m, which was expected to help save 106 jobs.
    Several other high profile fashion figures also got funds in that range, including Oscar de la Renta and Vera Wang.
    The Nobu restaurants and hotels backed by actor Robert De Niro also received worth between $11m and $28m, while Francis Ford Coppola Winery, owned by the director’s family, received a loan worth between $1m and $2m.

    The Ayn Rand Institute received a loan between $350,000 and $1m, to retain 35 jobs, while Grover Norquist’s Americans for Tax Reform Foundation received $150,000-$300,000 for 33 jobs.

    Planned Parenthood affiliates also received more than $40m in loans. Republican lawmakers

    Some foreign companies also receiving relief including Korean Airlines, which received $5-$10m in aid to retain 500 US-based employees; and Chinese electric car maker Nio, which received $5-$10m in aid to retain 204 employees in America.

  7. cohenite

    Jeff Sessions on Tucker saying the US needs warriors and pollies who want to fight for the US; like him, who deserted Trump at a crucial moment. If Tucker has a weak spot it’s here because Sessions opposed the Afghanistan war at some stage, so Tucker respects him.

  8. Bruce of Newcastle

    Clearly it’s not all birds and bicycles and mince and Bunsen burners in the BoN household.

    KD – And possums. Photo from just now. The one on the left is mum, kid is in background.

    She vanished for a year until last night. I thought she had died. Never assume a brushtail possum is cactus until you see its spines.

    The white thing is half a slice of Coles bread. I was ready tonight, bought a pack of carrots from the IGA today, so she had one of them too.

  9. Leigh Lowe

    Nick

    #3507551, posted on July 8, 2020 at 8:14 pm

    Don’t back the fire truck into Artie’s ambulance.

    It could use a firehose on the interior though, lots of tears and hurled excrement.

    I’ve seen the inside of the ambulance.
    Swooning couch, scented candles, mood lighting, the lot.
    Ambulance with ambience for the fragile and sensitive.

  10. shatterzzz

    The Black Dilemma
    This is a different take on our cultural problem. This commentary gets
    better toward the end. Never thought that I would see this, this soon
    but I knew it was coming.
    From the Baltimore Sun – a pretty liberal paper
    The Baltimore Sun is definitely not known as a conservative newspaper.
    So this very well written assessment of the situation in the USA comes
    as something of a surprise…
    The Black Dilemma
    “For almost 150 years the United States has been conducting an
    interesting experiment. The subjects of the experiment: black people
    and working-class whites.
    The hypothesis to be tested: Can a people taken from the jungles of
    Africa and forced into slavery be fully integrated as citizens in a
    majority white population?
    The whites were descendants of Europeans who had created a majestic
    civilization. The former slaves had been tribal peoples with no written
    language and virtually no intellectual achievements. Acting on a policy
    that was not fair to either group, the government released newly freed
    black people into a white society that saw them as inferiors. America
    has struggled with racial discord ever since.
    Decade after decade the problems persisted but the experimenters never
    gave up. They insisted that if they could find the right formula the
    experiment would work, and concocted program after program to get the
    result they wanted. They created the Freedman’s Bureau, passed civil
    rights laws, tried to build the Great Society, declared War on Poverty,
    ordered race preferences, built housing projects, and tried midnight
    basketball.
    Their new laws intruded into people’s lives in ways that would have been
    otherwise unthinkable. They called in National Guard troops to enforce
    school integration. They outlawed freedom of association. Over the
    protests of parents, they put white children on buses and sent them to
    black schools and vice-versa. They tried with money, special programs,
    relaxed standards, and endless hand wringing to close the achievement
    gap. To keep white backlash in check they began punishing public and
    even private statements on race. They hung up Orwellian public banners
    that commanded whites to Celebrate Diversity! and Say No to Racism.
    Nothing was off limits if it might salvage the experiment.
    Some thought that what W.E.B. DuBois called the Talented Tenth would
    lead the way for black people. A group of elite, educated blacks would
    knock down doors of opportunity and show the world what blacks were
    capable of.
    There is a Talented Tenth. They are the black Americans who have become
    entrepreneurs, lawyers, doctors and scientists. But ten percent is not
    enough. For the experiment to work, the ten percent has to be followed
    by a critical mass of people who can hold middle-class jobs and promote
    social stability. That is what is missing.
    Through the years, too many black people continue to show an inability
    to function and prosper in a culture unsuited to them. Detroit is
    bankrupt, the south side of Chicago is a war zone, and the vast majority
    of black cities all over America are beset by degeneracy and violence.
    And blacks never take responsibility for their failures. Instead, they
    lash out in anger and resentment.
    Across the generations and across the country, as we have seen in
    Detroit, Watts, Newark, Los Angeles, Cincinnati, Ferguson, and
    Minneapolis and Atlanta, rioting and looting are just one racial
    incident away. The white elite would tell us that this doesn’t mean the
    experiment has failed. We just have to try harder. We need more money,
    more time, more understanding, more programs, and more opportunities.
    But nothing changes no matter how much money is spent, no matter how
    many laws are passed, no matter how many black geniuses are portrayed on
    TV, and no matter who is president. Some argue it’s a problem of
    culture, as if culture creates people’s behavior instead of the other
    way around. Others blame white privilege.
    But since 1965, when the elites opened Americas doors to the Third
    World, immigrants from Asia and India, people who are not white, not
    rich, and not connected have quietly succeeded. While the children of
    these people are winning spelling bees and getting top scores on the
    SAT, black youths are committing half the country’s violent crime, which
    includes viciously punching random white people on the street for the
    thrill of it that has nothing to do with poverty.
    The experiment has failed. Not because of white culture, or white
    privilege, or white racism. The fundamental problem is that American
    black culture has evolved into an un-fixable and crime ridden mess. They
    do not want to change their culture or society, and expect others to
    tolerate their violence and amoral behavior. They have become socially
    incompatible with other races by their own design, not because of the
    racism of others – but by their own hatred of non-blacks.
    Our leaders don’t seem to understand just how tired their white subjects
    are with this experiment. They don’t understand that white people
    aren’t out to get black people; they are just exhausted with them. They
    are exhausted by the social pathologies, the violence, the endless
    complaints, and the blind racial solidarity, the bottomless pit of
    grievances, the excuses, and the reflexive animosity. The elites explain
    everything with racism, and refuse to believe that white frustration
    could soon reach the boiling point.”
    “You can’t legislate the poor into freedom by legislating the wealthy
    out of freedom. What one person receives without working for, another
    person must work for without receiving. The government can’t give to
    anybody anything that the government doesn’t first take from somebody
    else. When half of the people get the idea that they don’t have to work
    because the other half is going to take care of them, and when the
    other half gets the idea that it does no good to work because somebody
    else is going to get what they work for, that my dear friend, is about
    the end of any nation.
    You cannot multiply wealth by dividing it.”
    Ian Duncan
    The Baltimore Sun

  11. 132andBush

    You were a party to them too IIRC.
    I was National Technical Support for diesel engined equipment and also was involved in developing electronic control of underground loaders, i.e “offroad” vehicles.
    It was interesting when John was talking of a fire hazard from the legume dust.

    I remember that.
    The 2016 season and very heavy chickpea crops in particular.
    We haven’t had that problem since, unfortunately.

    John C can come back anytime he wants. I’d love to read how he’d portray the bullshit that’s happening at present.

    …Comrades.

  12. Snoopy

    egg_
    #3507541, posted on July 8, 2020 at 7:59 pm
    More propaganda

    Kawasaki disease MkII.

  13. Boambee John

    shatterzzz

    And is there anything there that does not apply in general to Australian indigenes, and also to the bulk of our Mu esli and African immigrants and their families?

  14. MatrixTransform

    Call an electrician and chances are he makes more than you.

    Bear probably means plumber … but whatever

  15. Knuckle Dragger

    If you can summon murders of crows using mind power Bruce, I’m moving in next door just to be able to tell those stories to other people down the pub.

  16. Old Lefty

    Cases in the ACT and Merimbula: thanks Dan!

  17. Nick

    I’ve seen the inside of the ambulance.
    Swooning couch, scented candles, mood lighting, the lot.
    Ambulance with ambience for the fragile and sensitive.

    Hahahahahahaha. I’m envisaging a candle hurled at a large mirror that has a golden frame and claw marks on the swooning couch. The camomile tea tray upended.

  18. Bruce of Newcastle

    KD – No murder of crows, they tend to eat the Cafe Bruce clientelle, which is bad for business.

  19. William the Conjuror

    The white thing is half a slice of Coles bread. I was ready tonight, bought a pack of carrots from the IGA today, so she had one of them too.

    Carrots are good for her and the kid. So are other fruit and veggies. Bread is bad.

  20. Siltstone

    shatterzzz
    #3507567, posted on July 8, 2020 at 8:47 pm
    The Black Dilemma

    The Baltimore Sun says its a concotion (from 2015)

  21. Bruce of Newcastle

    Bread is bad.

    That’s an old wives’ tale. Bread is actually very good for wildlife given the protein content and nutrient supplements. I add carrots mainly for teeth cleaning, and that she likes them.

    Just about everything that Greens say about the natural world is wrong.

    The lady possum has been thriving on Coles bread and carrots for seven or eight years now, except for the recent sabbatical. Which means she’s probably at least 10 or 11. Not a bad innings for a wild creature.

  22. Knuckle Dragger

    ‘Bread is bad.’

    Here we go. Karate Poof’s a vet now.

    Or ‘veterinarian professional’, at least. This’ll be like when Liability Bob took the accomplished R and D scientist on over, well, science.

  23. cohenite

    shatterzzz
    #3507567, posted on July 8, 2020 at 8:47 pm

    In the 1990s a professor of law at Macquarie Uni proffered a similar view; boy didn’t he get cop it but he refused to resign and stayed on until 2006.

    Fraser’s more detailed ideological position is here.

    Shatterzzz, do you have a link to that article?

  24. Knuckle Dragger

    See?

    Fed the bloody thing bread for eight years.

    But no. Baaaaad.

  25. Steve trickler

    Keep an eye on this blokes channel. Another with impressive coverage of the internals in China. They are copping a flogging at the moment.



  26. Knuckle Dragger

    Next he’ll be saying that BoN isn’t from N.

    Oh wait.

  27. William the Conjuror

    The malady lingers on.

    The virus is like a tornado. When it lands, it swirls through the body, causing chaos, confusion, coughs, wreaking damage to each organ it touches. Some won’t survive its visit. For those that do, when it has gone, one surveys the damage to the human landscape and realizes it’s much greater than first thought. My symptoms were on the milder side: I never had breathing difficulties, or loss of sense or smell. I was wiped-out tired and I always had “the cough,” which has now returned.

    The Covid cough is not like your usual cough-it-up deep cough (what doctors politely call a “productive cough.”) It is very distinctive. It is a dry, raspy, wheezy, cough. In my case, lots of short, expelling gasps of air, followed by a long, deep, chest-wrenching expiration cough, that has standers by wondering if I am going to keel over.

    I have tested negative for the virus and positive for the antibodies, and my doctor says it won’t return. But there are days when I feel that it has.

    I am also discovering new areas of damage: I have now become incredibly clumsy. I was never the most lissome person, no one ever called me graceful, but my clumsiness is off the chart. If I reach for a glass, or take something out of a cupboard, I will knock it, or drop it on the floor. I have tripped over the curb and gone flying. I fall over furniture. It is as if that part of my brain, which subconsciously adjusts hand and movement to obstacles it sees, isn’t working.

    At times there’s a sense of mild confusion. The micro delay in a thought, the hesitation with a word. Nobody would notice but me.

    My digestive system is peculiar, to say the least.
    It doesn’t matter whether I call them symptoms, traits, or wreckage — my body doesn’t feel quite right.

    The doctors try to reassure me, saying, this will wear off, but they can’t tell me when. Last week was bad. The cough has been with me for days, I have been tired and needed to take naps. I tripped over the camera tripod then fell over a chair! I am concerned but not panicked, yet. This week already feels much better.

    For those who have not had Covid, or witnessed the mess it leaves behind, again, I urge you, do whatever you can to avoid this tornado.

    It will roar through the body — kill some on the way — injure all in its path — and then when you think “well, thank God that’s gone,” look around, the damage is strewn everywhere and will be with you long after the crisis has passed.

    Covid is a tornado with a very long tail.

  28. Infidel Tiger King

    Grig’s expert on China Flu:

    A well-known CNN reporter has been arrested in New York’s Central Park with drugs in his pocket, a rope around his neck that was tied to his genitals, and a sex toy inside his boot.

    Richard Quest – who is known for his boisterous and quirky style – was arrested at 3.40am on Friday, almost three hours after the park’s 1am closing time.

    He was initially arrested for loitering, the New York Post said. However, a search by police uncovered the oddly configured rope, a sex toy inside Quest’s boot, and a small bag of methamphetamine in his left jacket pocket, the Post said.

  29. egg_

    Grig’s expert on China Flu:

    How’s BorisPenis mate on the ground in Wuhan faring?

  30. notafan

    Any chance the gentleman might also have HIV?

  31. egg_

    they tend to eat the Cafe Bruce clientelle, which is bad for business.

    Sounds like Danograd.

  32. Bruce of Newcastle

    Covid is a tornado with a very long tail.

    Not from the data.
    Notice how the death rate initially closely followed the infection rate, but in the recent spike has decoupled completely.

    The biggest danger is still the actions of government, especially here where the number of infections have been low. The number of deaths due to government edicts have be much much larger than fatalities due to the virus. If you don’t believe me just note the number of times the networks append the Lifeline phone number at the end of news reports about quarantine restrictions.

  33. Knuckle Dragger

    Snork. Chortle snicker. nnngnngnn

    AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAhaHAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA

    If that isn’t the greatest timing ever by anyone in the history of time. Oh My Lordy wordy yes it is.

    ‘Covid is a tornado with a very long tail’

    He intoned, with a rope around my neck and wrapped around his nuts in a park in the middle of the night.

    Gold doesn’t even describe this. There are no words.

  34. Knuckle Dragger

    *his neck*

    I don’t care. That was glorious.

  35. Cardimona

    From Zyconoclast’s link about the hydrogen-fuelled truck.

    There are no emissions, with water vapour the only substance emanating from the exhaust pipe.

    Wait, is it “no emissions” or does it emit “water vapour” – the major “greenhouse” gas?

  36. egg_

    For those who have not had Covid, or witnessed the mess it leaves behind, again, I urge you, do whatever you can to avoid this tornado.

    Herd immunity is 55%?
    I had a sore throat, dry cough and fever for about 2 weeks back in January here in chunk central.
    As did a flatmate before me.

  37. William the Conjuror

    Cuckles @ 9.39pm:

    He intoned, with a rope around my neck and wrapped around his nuts in a park in the middle of the night.

    Gold doesn’t even describe this. There are no words.

    Gold it was, and still is, Cuckles.

    Snork. Chortle snicker. nnngnngnn

    AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAhaHAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA

  38. Knuckle Dragger

    ‘do whatever you can to avoid this tornado.’

    Apparently the antidote is ice-fuelled choking out sessions with randoms in Central Park, with a bit of strappado thrown in for effect.

  39. miltonf

    The piece of shit that is Joe Bidet

  40. Knuckle Dragger

    Go on.

    Give us a bit of high-handed rhetoric, ‘William”.

    As you’re being loaded into the waaaaaaaaaambulance.*

    *Yes I know it’s a meme. Yet it’s hilariously apt.

  41. MatrixTransform

    The lock-downs will continue until moral improves

  42. William the Conjuror

    BoN and Cuckles = Bread and Circuses.

    Next up, saveloy stew.

  43. Steve trickler

    She’s excellent.



  44. Infidel Tiger King

    Is regional Victoria shut down?

    Can you got to the pub for a parmi in Moe this Satdee?

  45. Knuckle Dragger

    Hahahahaaaa. This pleases me.

    Inform us again on the dietary requirements of Australian mammalia, if you please, followed by a bit more geopolitical analysis.

    Time for a new handle, Karate Poof. This one won’t get out of the burns unit.

  46. Is regional Victoria shut down?
    Can you got to the pub for a parmi in Moe this Satdee?

    Spoke to a pub in regional Victoria (some town I’d never heard of & can’t pronounce) this arvo – in amongst the usual exchange of info & opinions, they revealed that they’re not locked down at all, but they expect Melbourne’s lockdown to “bloody well” make a helluva dent in things for them, & it is “just what they don’t need”

  47. Bruce in WA

    When we were in Vietnam back in January this year, staying at a fabulous boutique hotel in Hoi An Beach, I had three days in bed with a raging fever (burning up and sweating, but freezing, and under a doona with the air-con off), cough and rasp, diarrhoea and sleeping 18 hours out of 24 — plus what I can only call hallucinations when asleep. For the following 72 hours I could only manage 6 hours or so before I needed to crash and sleep.

    Never thought about it before, but now I wonder …

  48. MatrixTransform

    I hope this William tosser is a good sport

  49. notafan

    Mitchell shire to the north of Melbourne is the only rural one locked down.

    Wallan and all that.

  50. MatrixTransform

    The missus is all worried because she needs to travel to a doctor’s appointment tomorrow.

    I said, “just tell em you have cancer and yr late already”

    She said, “but what if they demand proof?”

    I said, “tell em to fuck off and that yr word is yr affidavit. Tell em to either book you, or leave you alone”

    your move copper

  51. Knuckle Dragger

    ‘I said, “tell em to fuck off and that yr word is yr affidavit. Tell em to either book you, or leave you alone”’

    Exactly. Let’s see who’s got the bottle to wrestle a ‘cancer patient’ out of her car on her way to essential medical treatment.

  52. William the Conjuror

    Sorry, Cuckles, still laughing about your little escapade:

    He intoned, with a rope around my neck and wrapped around his nuts in a park in the middle of the night.

    Ha ha ha. Priceless. Quest didn’t mention that in his follow-up interview.

  53. Knuckle Dragger

    Actually, and apropos of fake cancer patients:

    Karate Poof – you all good? Again?

  54. Infidel Tiger King

    is it legal for JobKeeper or any other federal stimulus to only include Victoria?

    Would be really good for me if WA was up and humming but the stimulus cheques kept rolling because of the zombie commies in Dannograd.

  55. MatrixTransform

    We actually do the automation controls on a few polis stations.

    Go on, book me.

    I’ll be remotely connected via the internet 5 minutes later making sure yr climate control is set for ‘winter’

    … if you know what I mean

    service call for a ‘fault’ ?

    freezing your copper nuts off?

    sorry mate, can’t travel … covid lock down and all that

  56. Knuckle Dragger

    Hey, listen to this guy talking about C19 with all the dramatic flair of Lorne Greene in Battlestar Galactica.

    Who, you say? This guy, from Karate Poof’s link:

    ‘The way it was reported at the time was with varying degrees of glee. The New York Post used the headline Kinky News Network. The Huffington Post straight-facedly reported the New York Post story. Gawker called him “CNN’s token Brit” and “a park-cruising meth-head”.’

    But he’s really credible. Not a drama queen at all.

  57. MatrixTransform

    does the polis commissioner have authority, or does everything go straight to the polis minister?

    VikGov should be careful about how this new fangled system works .

    …it aint 1916 anymore

  58. DrBeauGan

    The Black Dilemma
    This is a different take on our cultural problem. This commentary gets
    better toward the end. Never thought that I would see this, this soon
    but I knew it was coming.
    From the Baltimore Sun – a pretty liberal paper
    The Baltimore Sun is definitely not known as a conservative newspaper.
    So this very well written assessment of the situation in the USA comes
    as something of a surprise…
    The Black Dilemma
    “For almost 150 years the United States has been conducting an
    interesting experiment. The subjects of the experiment: black people
    and working-class whites.
    The hypothesis to be tested: Can a people taken from the jungles of
    Africa and forced into slavery be fully integrated as citizens in a
    majority white population?

    That the experiment has failed is obvious to everyone. But there are two possible explanations for this: one is the “Jungle Bunny” theory that 90% of blacks are just not up to the demands of civilised living. The other is that everything that has been tried was fundamentally flawed. Since the protagonists of the experiment are lefties, they naturally incline to the first explanation for their abject failure.

    But the second explanation has more credibility. If you tell a group of people that they have been oppressed since birth by systemic racism, some will be dumb enough to believe it. If you pay them sit-down money for doing bugger all, they aren’t much motivated to get work. If you pay single mothers, they’ll marry the government instead of a man. If you destroy the family, you won’t get good assimilation from the kids. If you pretend that their culture is deep and valuable instead of forty thousand years behind, you’ll make assimilate harder.

    The fact is that plenty of quite ordinary black Americans and aborigines have become quite conventional Americans and Aussies. I doubt if Blackball is a genius, but he seems an ordinary Aussie, with the ordinary Aussie’s interests. The same, mutatis mutandis, can be said about the American blacks who have appeared on videos here.

    The failure is in the stupid, or sometimes malicious, terms of the experiment. Affirmative action is wicked and corrosive, like the systemic patronising in pascoe’s pernicious lies. The fact is, lefty ideology is fundamentally racist; they have merely confirmed their insulting beliefs that they didn’t dare articulate, but were implicit in every strategy they tried.

  59. rickw

    Has Despicable Dan started dragging the tenants of the towers off to the specially built gas…. ahem, medical treatment facilities yet?

    I need to go to country Vic in two weeks to stay at my bolt hole and do some work there, what are my chances of running the gauntlet of the fascists road blocks?!

  60. Knuckle Dragger

    Matrix,

    In theory the Commish has the authoritah to tell the Minister the way they’ll do cop stuff.

    They don’t have the authoritah to tell gummint WHAT they’ll enforce and what they won’t.

    In practice, in recent times anyway, the Commishes just do what they’re told like overpaid lemmings who’ve done a knife and fork course.

  61. Mark A

    Early for my lame pics. I know, but I’m interested in the last few races at Cannington.

    Look away, scroll or suffer the consequences.

  62. Knuckle Dragger

    And now to retire.

    Sweet dreams, EJ, wherever you may be.

    Snork.

  63. MatrixTransform

    do what they’re told like overpaid lemmings

    Hmm … no balls among the brass

  64. MatrixTransform

    i said balls.

    tee hee

  65. Pedro the Loafer

    Matrix, WA went through this regional lockdown theatre a few weeks ago, now thankfully lifted and us proles are allowed to travel anywhere within WA without the chilling “Show us your papers” reminiscent of bad WW2 films about the Gestapo.

    The reality is that 99% of the wallopers manning the checkpoints were good humoured and patient with people who had a genuine need to travel across the “border” and provided you weren’t covered in tatts, wearing a Hells Angels vest and your nostrils coated in white powder you were allowed to proceed without drama.

    I got the distinct impression that most of the plod manning the barricades would have given anything to be elsewhere.

    Don’t sweat it.

  66. Steve trickler

    Enjoy the show.



  67. MatrixTransform

    and provided you weren’t covered in tatts, wearing a Hells Angels vest and your nostrils coated in white powder

    well, the missus is in trouble then …

  68. Pedro the Loafer

    well, the missus is in trouble then …

    LOL’d as the cool kids say, Matrix. 🙂

  69. Mark A

    Race 7 #7 at Cannington eaw. going out on a limb here 10*60

  70. Mark A

    And that was that, rough interference killed more of my bets than bad judgements🤢

  71. MatrixTransform

    LOL’d as the cool kids say

    I’m chuckling too but for a different reason.
    In the past, she deffo did too many drugs.
    Had dreadlocks and once or twice chained herself up a tree
    But now, she’s a complete nanna

  72. Mark A

    mh
    #3507651, posted on July 8, 2020 at 10:44 pm

    Yeah, those prehistoric skeletons are educational.

  73. mh

    #IStandWithDan is trending.

  74. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    My fave lame pic

    Dinosaur? What dinosaur? All I can see is two piglets, fighting under a blanket…

  75. Old School Conservative

    “Do you find this attractive?”
    Well Mark to be brutally honest – no.
    But I’m not the one to tell her.

  76. cohenite

    Laurel and Hardy in Liberty. The beginning demolishes BLM. After that Stan gets a crab down his pants and they end up on top of a half built sky-scrapper. One of their best.

  77. DrBeauGan

    Beaugan. An alternative source?

    I’ll try anything, Snoopy, but I’ve never seen it in Oz. Virginia tobacco is shit, so I’m not optimistic.

  78. rickw

    Dinosaur? What dinosaur? All I can see is two piglets, fighting under a blanket…

    Oh, I thought they were two dinosaur eggs in a blanket?!

  79. rickw

    FMD, to many white people in the great outdoors:

  80. Top Ender

    Meanwhile, on a border somewhere down south….

  81. Infidel Tiger King

    Great vid Rick.

  82. Infidel Tiger King

    Lockdown could extend if things don’t improve: Andrews
    Victorian Premier Daniel Andrews appeared on Channel Ten’s The Project this evening, saying that the lockdown may extend beyond six weeks if conditions don’t approve.

    “That’s the advice from our chief health officer – that six weeks will give us the time we need,” he said.

    He is a dangerous lunatic.

  83. JC

    He is a dangerous lunatic.

    and 100% corrupt.

    In less than a decade the Australian left will be treating him as a saint.

  84. Top Ender

    Do we need some money from somewhere:

    Foreign Aid budget

    2018–19 2019–20 Budget
    (in millions)
    Papua New Guinea 519.5 512.3
    Bilateral program 427.9 427.9
    Joint Understanding1 62.0 67.0
    Coral Sea Cable System 29.6 17.4
    Solomon Islands 146.1 122.3
    Bilateral program 92.7 92.7
    Coral Sea Cable System 53.4 29.6
    Vanuatu 41.9 41.9
    Fiji 35.0 35.0
    Samoa 23.6 23.6
    Nauru 21.2 21.2
    Kiribati 20.2 20.2
    Tonga 17.6 17.6
    Tuvalu 6.6 6.6
    Cook Islands 1.9 1.9
    Niue and Tokelau 1.8 1.8
    North Pacific 5.0 5.0
    Pacific Regional 206.6 231.5
    Pacific total 1,047.0 1,041.0
    Indonesia 266.4 255.7
    Timor-Leste 73.0 73.0
    The Philippines 67.0 63.7
    Vietnam 58.4 58.4
    Cambodia 56.1 43.4
    Myanmar 42.1 42.1
    Laos 20.6 20.6
    Mongolia 5.9 5.9
    ASEAN and Mekong 32.6 33.7
    Southeast and East Asia Regional 14.6 14.6
    Southeast and East Asia total 636.7 611.1
    Afghanistan 80.0 80.0
    Bangladesh 42.1 38.5
    Sri Lanka 19.9 19.9
    Pakistan 39.4 19.0
    Nepal 15.6 9.1
    Bhutan 2.1 2.1
    Maldives 1.8 1.8
    South and West Asia Regional 19.8 14.8
    South and West Asia total 220.7 185.2
    Sub-Saharan Africa 31.8 31.8
    The Middle East and North Africa (includes
    the Palestinian Territories) 20.5 20.5
    The Middle East and Africa total 52.3 52.3
    Gender Equality Fund 55.0 55.0
    Health, Water and Sanitation 108.1 102.4
    Regional Scholarships and Education 101.8 84.8
    Infrastructure and Rural Development 46.0 46.0
    Innovation Fund 35.0 11.1
    Other sectoral programs 143.6 87.7
    Indo-Pacific sectoral programs total 434.5 332.0
    Country and Regional programs total 2,446.2 2,276.5
    Emergency Fund 150.0 150.0
    Global Humanitarian Partnerships 133.5 133.5
    Protracted Crises and Strengthening
    Humanitarian Action 87.2 115.5
    Disaster Risk Reduction, Preparedness and
    Response 39.0 51.0
    Humanitarian, emergencies and
    refugees total 409.7 450.0
    United Nations Children’s Fund 21.0 21.0
    United Nations Development Fund 12.7 12.7
    World Health Organisation 12.4 12.4
    United Nations Population Fund 9.2 9.2
    UN Women 7.8 7.8
    United Nations Program on HIV and AIDS 4.5 4.5
    Commonwealth Organisations 7.2 7.2
    Contributions to Global Health Programs2 65.0 128.4
    Contributions to Global Education
    Partnerships2 16.0 30.0
    Contribution to Green Climate Fund2 19.2 –
    Other ODA eligible contributions3 44.9 54.9
    UN, Commonwealth and Other
    International Organisations total 219.9 288.1
    Global NGO Programs 135.6 138.6
    Australian Volunteers Program 42.6 40.0
    Community Engagement and International
    Research 8.4 13.4
    NGO, volunteer and community
    programs total 186.6 191.9
    Cash payments to multilateral
    organisations 358.6 234.6
    Global programs total 1,174.7 1,164.7
    Departmental 255.2 259.0
    Other Government Departments4 365.1 444.1
    Adjustments -80.1 -100.3
    Total Australian ODA 4,161.1 4,044.0

    DFAT link

  85. a rope around his neck that was tied to his genitals

    Dick Quest by name, dick quest by nature.

  86. JC

    The hunchback may be misreading the mood in the street. It’s just anecdotal, but the sheilas are the ones who have had enough and want their kids back in school no matter what. The reading I’m getting is that everyone’s had enough, they want to place open, take the risk and move on with life.
    I get a morning coffee at a cafe just down the road nestled in a street with Art Deco flats filled with over the hill cat ladies. My good guess is they’re green supporters. Even these old gals have had enough.

  87. JC

    He’s endearing in an oafish sort of way. The dude just beats his own drum..

    Donald J. Trump
    @realDonaldTrump
    · 13m
    Economy and Jobs are growing MUCH faster than anyone (except me!) expected. Job growth is biggest in history. China Virus Mortality Rate is among the LOWEST of any country. Shaping up for a good third quarter, and a great next year! NASDAQ at new record high, 401k’s way up!!!!

  88. JC

    If white in chess is racist isn’t the White house called that racist too? If Kanye wins shouldn’t they paint it black and call it the Black House?

  89. JC

    I calling it bullshit. Kanye is running, if he does, to peel votes away from the Demonrats and insure an orange oaf victory. He will do that too…. take votes from biden.

    Also, he’s totally insane.

    Kanye West’s Fourth of July declaration, via Tweet, that he was running for president lit the internet on fire, even as pundits were trying to discern how serious he was. Over the course of four rambling hours of interviews on Tuesday, the billionaire rapper turned sneaker mogul revealed:

    That he’s running for president in 2020 under a new banner—the Birthday Party—with guidance from Elon Musk and an obscure vice presidential candidate he’s already chosen. “Like anything I’ve ever done in my life,” says West, “I’m doing to win.”
    That he no longer supports President Trump. “I am taking the red hat off, with this interview.”
    That he’s ok with siphoning off Black votes from the Democratic nominee, thus helping Trump. “I’m not denying it, I just told you. To say that the Black vote is Democratic is a form of racism and white supremacy.”
    That he’s never voted in his life.
    That he was sick with Covid-19 in February.
    That he’s suspicious of a coronavirus vaccine, terming vaccines “the mark of the beast.”
    That he believes “Planned Parenthoods have been placed inside cities by white supremacists to do the Devil’s work.”
    That he envisions a White House organizational model based on the secret country of Wakanda in Black Panther.

    https://www.forbes.com/sites/randalllane/2020/07/08/kanye-west-says-hes-done-with-trump-opens-up-about-white-house-bid-damaging-biden-and-everything-in-between/#5f419da47aab

  90. Fisky

    The Liberals can get at Dickhead Dan by reminding women voters that he is the kind of loser creep who set their hair on end when they were still young and attractive. He would sidle up to them when he thought they were wasted and put the moves on, but almost always get rejected. That’s got to be the under the radar messaging.

  91. C.L.

    Far out. How does the US keep bouncing back??

  92. Infidel Tiger King

    Kanye or Don would both be great.

    American can’t lose with either of them.

  93. C.L.

    That he envisions a White House organizational model based on the secret country of Wakanda in Black Panther.

    Ahahahahaha.
    He’s imbibed those trolling skills from Trump.

  94. Infidel Tiger King

    Meanwhile Mad Cat Lady Gladys is planning a paramilitary crackdown on cafes using shared salt and pepper shakers.

    This is a low point in human history. Not sure we can pull through.

  95. areff

    I like possums, BoN. I just wish they wouldn’t ringbark every single lemon when they could take all the zest off just one or two.

  96. Zyconoclast

    Putin mocks U.S. embassy for flying rainbow flag

    Putin said the U.S. embassy’s move to raise the LGBT pride flag “revealed something about the people that work there”.

  97. areff

    Agreed, JC. Nice gay guy who lives next to Mum and keeps and eye on her was telling me four weeks or so ago that Andrews had done a superb job. Bumped into him in the supermarket today, where he was busy panic-buying the things gay guys like to eat and he’d done a complete 180. Andrews is incompetent etc. Still won’t concede he’s corrupt, but incompetent is good enough.

    People are noticing the predicted dead in the streets haven’t appeared, and slowly the view is growing that we just have to put up with the China Virus.

  98. DrBeauGan

    Zyconoclast
    #3507708, posted on July 9, 2020 at 12:33 am

    Putin mocks U.S. embassy for flying rainbow flag

    Putin said the U.S. embassy’s move to raise the LGBT pride flag “revealed something about the people that work there”.

    I’m getting to like Putin. The fact that Boris hates him probably helps.

  99. JC

    I’m getting to like Putin.

    Don’t, Doc. He’s a thug and runs the country like a thug. Like some of the things he says, but don’t ever fall for liking the turd. Russia is a gangsta operation run for the benefit of the chief thug and his cronies. Putin is the richest man in the world. So wealthy in fact that he cannot afford to leave his position in case he’s found out.

  100. NoFixedAddress

    Trying to escape from Victoria across the racist Echuca-Moama Bridge

  101. NoFixedAddress

    Chairman Dan Andrews and his Victorian Communist Public Service Government are stopping honest people from traditional movement.

    You reckon BLM you white Communist elitists evil Zombie xunts.

    Open the border you bastards.

  102. NoFixedAddress

    So if I have this straight, The Port of Darwin is on 99 year lease with the CCP at the direct approval of the evil Liberal Party in Someones Pocket and Melbourne Ports is on a 99 year lease with the CCP at the direct approval of the evil communist Labor without U political party.

    Belt and Road baby.

  103. NoFixedAddress

    But don’t forget, ASIO will protect us from those right wingers.

  104. NoFixedAddress

    White elitist Communist Commonwealth Public Service Governments love enslaving normal people.

    No wonder the supine Communist ASIO organization is worried.

  105. NoFixedAddress

    The Victorian Communist Coppers from the Victorian Communist Public Service Government probably pushed poor old Bruce off the Bridge.

    Defund The Victorian Communist Coppers.

  106. H B Bear

    One should never be seen at a cafe that has pepper shakers and not pepper grinders.

  107. Nob

    Shatterz “Baltimore Sun” article seems to originate from Anthony Bryan at American Renaissance – “America’s premiere Race Realist site” .

  108. Tintarella di Luna

    Thank you Tom– found this little nugget in this mornings browse of the Oz, how could anyone forget Procter & Gambles foray into the woke arena with Gillett’s advertisement tarring all men as perpetrators of domestic violence – that was followed by a write-down of about $8 billion wasn’t it? Haven’t purchased a thing made by them since and there is a long list of their products – just one among many I guess.

    Tooth or fiction?

    Procter & Gamble took Colgate-Palmolive to the Federal Court on Wednesday alleging their rival was falsely claiming its new whitening toothpaste could remove 10 years of stains.

    Judge Jayne Jagot was being asked to expedite the proceedings.

    Procter & Gamble allege the marketing of Colgate’s Optic White Renewal whitening toothpaste breached Australian Consumer Law. The company is seeking to stop the sale of the toothpaste, which hit supermarket shelves around March with marketing that suggests it “removes 10 years of yellow stains”.

    Cate Nagy,from King & Wood Mallesons, is representing Colgate in the proceedings, with Procter being represented by Corrs Chambers Westgarth.

    Colgate also claims its product “whitens teeth inside and out”. “There is no reliable scientific data,” the lawsuit states, relying on an affidavit from Georg Heuer, who Margin Call gleans is a brand manager rather than a bashful dentist in a white lab coat.

    Procter & Gamble advised Justice Jagot that any continued advertising would see lost profits of its own Oral B whitening products.

  109. H B Bear

    Oh dear, David Rowe appears to have suffered a relapse of his TDS after only one day. Clearly this is not a problem at Australia’s leading anti- business daily. I have not bought a hard copy for months, are they still cost saving by producing a 48 page pamphlet masquerading as a newspaper?

  110. H B Bear

    Branco clearly gets it.

  111. Knuckle Dragger

    A ‘ring of steel’ around Melbourne.

    That’s how that ponce Stefanovic just described LockDan II. Anyone who’s lived in the joint for five minutes or more knows how to get around it*.

    A bit dramatic for something that’s (unless Melbourne-living Cats tell me different, in which case I’ll be happy to walk it back) a very expensive bit of window dressing.

  112. rickw

    Antifa arrests and Federal charges:

  113. calli

    Thanks Tom. Ramirez is a blast from the past – I’d forgotten about that.

    Leak’s is an amusing take on a genuine worry.

  114. Knuckle Dragger

    Surely New Guy Shane Patton must be a bit disheartened by being made to look like a fuckstick on TV by now.

    Cops called to noisy Airbnb party. 15 punters there. ‘Aha!’ Someone went, and gave the lot of them those $1600 blisters. Patton took to the cameras, and – suitably outraged for the occasion – said that ‘these people thought it was okay to have a party’ before lecturing the plebs again on how to comport themselves in times of [manufactured] crisis.

    Except they had to withdraw all the fines a day later, after they worked out that the joint in question was classed as a holiday home where you could have 20 people.

    *slow clapping*

  115. Knuckle Dragger

    areff overnight, on mincers:

    ‘Bumped into him in the supermarket today, where he was busy panic-buying the things gay guys like to eat’

    There’s a superfood that improves your dress sense and interior decoration skills?

  116. 132andBush

    Colgate also claims its product “whitens teeth inside and out”. “There is no reliable scientific data,” the lawsuit states, relying on an affidavit from Georg Heuer, who Margin Call gleans is a brand manager rather than a bashful dentist in a white lab coat.

    No reliable scientific data to back up claims made about off the shelf health and beauty products!!!

    NOOOOOOO!!

    As if 2020 could get any worse.

  117. rickw

    Ethiopian small arms treasure trove landed in USA.

  118. rickw

    Daily dose of Vietnam!

  119. rickw

    Surely New Guy Shane Patton must be a bit disheartened by being made to look like a fuckstick on TV by now.

    Isn’t that his job?!

  120. Picked up from the latest VETAFFAIRS, might be of interest to you.

    Of even greater interest is Made in Britain: The fantasy driving Australia’s involvement in the Vietnam War by Greg Lockhart (author of The Minefield) in The Vietnam Veterans’ Newsletter – July 2020.
    Lockhart served with the AATTV in Vietnam, the Pacific Islands Regiment in Papua New Guinea and then moved to Academia.

    He has written a flensing review of the official history (Fighting to the Finish: The Australian Army and the Vietnam War, 1968-1975by Ashley Ekins and Ian McNeill), and this article expands on the theme that Australia’s participation in the war was at least a naive mistake driven by Menzies’ Post colonial nostalgia, and at most a blundering tragedy.

  121. rickw

    ….. at least a naive mistake driven by Menzies’ Post colonial nostalgia, and at most a blundering tragedy.

    Funny how the Russians didn’t think that, did he look at the USSR’s perspective on Vietnam?

  122. rickw

    Whites cleaning up BLM shit stain is a hate crime:

  123. Knuckle Dragger

    Unsurprisingly:

    ‘Former police commissioner Ken Lay has been appointed to help deliver Melbourne’s controversial second supervised injecting room.

    ‘Mr Lay will lead the project to deliver the facility which is set to be set up across the road from Melbourne’s iconic tourist site the Queen Victoria Market.’

    He’s got the perfect background, having previously been in charge of implementing social experiments thought up by people who weren’t voted in by the punter.

    On previous form, I anticipate this facility will also be ‘supervised’ by heroin traffickers.

  124. Herodotus

    First they said Bolsonaro of Brazil was not taking the virus Seriously. Then they were delighted that he tested positive. They were dismayed when his symptoms were minimal as he had predicted, so shifted to saying this would give a false impression, and lead to not taking the virus seriously.

  125. Bruce of Newcastle

    Betcha he’s been taking HCQ.

  126. Herodotus

    Yes, Bruce, that’s the other thing they were commenting on negatively.
    In other news, Paul Murray says Victorians have been badly let down by their leaders and deserve our support. I think they let themselves in for all sorts of maladministration by voting idiotically, and should suffer for it.

  127. Michael Holding says a few well-chosen words.
    Go to 4.12 for the most impactful (and heartfelt) bit.

  128. Knuckle Dragger

    Olympic snowboarder (and snow-bunny-stat-collector par excellence, I might add) Alex ‘Chumpy’ Pullin drowned yesterday whilst spearfishing at Palm Beach. His passing was described as a ‘freak accident’ on the noos.

    I take issue with this. It wasn’t a freak accident at all. A freak accident is when you’re killed by an elephant falling from an aircraft and crushing you while you’re playing golf.

    This bloke went spearfishing on his own and ran out of air. The End.

  129. Knuckle Dragger

    Michael Holding, or ‘Whispering Death’ as he was appropriately known spent twelve years fracturing white skulls between 1975 and 1987 over 60 Tests and 102 one-day internationals, collecting 249 and 142 wickets respectively and putting white batsmen in hospital on three continents.

    I’m not saying he’s not a decent bloke, because he may well be. But he’s made a very decent living since his retirement in the commentary box, is a significant public figure in the cricketing world and now (naturally) he’s been sought out for comment because bleck and BLM. So, like the various climate flogs over time he’s just followed the money. Ensuring the uninterrupted arrival of his pay packet. That’s all.

  130. So, like the various climate flogs over time he’s just followed the money. Ensuring the uninterrupted arrival of his pay packet. That’s all.

    It’s called “the market” – the basis of a successful capitalist economy.
    His message is selling well – because, amongst other things, it’s a reflection of lived reality.
    And that annoys the shit out of the establishment, and many who post here.

  131. Bruce of Newcastle

    Momentum is a GetUp-style far-left activist group. Why should we watch anything from them?
    Do try to avoid blatant propaganda Numbers. Especially from a bunch who don’t like j ews.

  132. amortiser

    The story about Richard Quest being sprung in Central Park is 12 years old or has he been sprung again?

  133. Knuckle Dragger

    ‘It’s called “the market” – the basis of a successful capitalist economy.’

    I recall someone here moaning like an unpaid lady of the night about this sort of thing – ‘the market’ and ‘capitalism’ – being an unfair transfer of wealth, disadvantaging people or something.

    If Holding wants to abandon any principles he may have – in his case, to maintain the status quo – then he can, I suppose.

    It’s a topic – principle abandonment – in which you, Liability Bob, are an undisputed subject matter expert.

  134. stackja

    I gather the angry private is posting the usual.
    Scrolling, scrolling…

  135. mh

    Thanks Tom!

    Garrison today.

  136. MatrixTransform

    an undisputed subject matter expert.

    I bet numpty’s been gagging on that super-food again.

  137. It’s a topic – principle abandonment – in which you, Liability Bob, are an undisputed subject matter expert.

    Abandoning principles assumes you have some (any?) in the first place.
    Based on your postings (a mix of back bar gossip, concocted bullshit designed to impress the gullible, and the ravings of a pisspot) you lack any to start with.
    Your experience and horizons are sadly mundane.
    KD, the shopping trolley vengeance king…..

  138. notafan

    What lived reality?
    That doing more of the crime gives you more of the time?

  139. Mother Lode

    I noticed in Rowe’s drawing that the microphone has a little KKK hood on it.

    He may not agree (because he is idiotic at everything he does except being an idiot, of which he is past master) that the BLM riots have not helped blacks and only benefited the criminal element of the black community who have been ceded additional latitude and rights.

    But he is stuck with the fact that Trump’s support among blacks has grown, and grows still.

    He will be blind to the historical fact that Trump is in the abolitionist party while the people who claim to figuratively own the black demographic is the party that used to champion…literally owning the black – demographic – both times for these owners’ own benefit. If faced with the historical fact he will greedily bolt down the intellectual morsel that at some point the two parties ‘switched’ their attitudes to blacks, although unless they did so at the same time there would have been a point where they were in agreement, in which case you would expect to see an eruption of bipartisan legislation either for or against blacks.

    Perhaps it is the new deformed spawn of the left wing hive mind that Mt Rushmore is racist, even though nobody on the left seems to have noticed it before and they have decided that anyone who does not suddenly see it now they have said it must be a white supremacist. This just shows his lack of historical perspective.

    We have the people born today who have had all the answers given to them and for whom the past is fact (well, catchphrases they use instead of facts, but you know what I mean). They sit in judgement of people for whom what is now the past was still in the future, and of course there were myriad futures of which they could only hope to catch glimpses. Born into their own worlds they have made them a bit better, and the cumulative effect has led to our world. Are out left ready to stand condemned by their heirs who, in 25 years time, will have gripes with our age and will denigrate the current left for not being as enlightened as them?

    It is hard not to notice that these self-preening judges of generations before can’t even bear their own parents.

    They are blind to the reality that the only revolution that seems to have worked out was the American one. All the others have unleashed tyranny and blood lust that have eclipsed the horrors they were meant to cure.

    He has changed the POTUS seal to read ‘Procrastinator of the United States’ presumably alluding to some delay on Trump’s part leading to the cases in the US, but considering the occurrence of cases is concentrated in certain states (with certain political leadership) it is pretty hard to argue other than it is the state responses which led to the outbreaks. Other states responding to whatever circumstances the Federal Government created seemed to be able to manage quite well.

    Cartoonists are supposed to bring insight, packing a punch with brevity and absurdity that cannot be readily done with words.

    Rowe’s drawing inevitably are nothing more than collage of slogans you would find peppering the NYT.

    /rant

  140. notafan

    Stuff those good Vietnamese people who wished to live in freedom!

    Let them suffer and die, even if they are my brothers in Christ.

    It’s all about memememememe!

    The underlying racism that this view of the Vietnamese War reveals is stunning.

    One thing is for sure only brave men who volunteer should ever go to war.

  141. Zyconoclast

    Scientists Discover Gene That Predisposes Ashkenazi J00ws to Schizophrenia
    Variations of the DNST3 gene make Ashkenazi J00ws 40 percent more likely to develop schizophrenia and similar diseases.

    The study was conducted by Professor Ariel Darvasi, assistant dean of the Faculty of Life Sciences at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, in coordination with Dr. Todd Lencz from The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research in New York. The first portion of the study included the largest-ever sample group of Ashkenazi J00wa ever researched. Of the 2,500 Ashkenazi J00ws from Israel who contributed DNA samples for the study, 1,500 were healthy, while 1,000 were affected by mental disorders related to schizophrenia.

    The reason for choosing Ashkenazi J00ws as the subject for the study, of all groups available, is rooted in the fact that Ashkenazi J00ws are considered to be a an especially homogenous group, in terms of genetics. The limited genetic variation among Ashkenazi J00ws allows for easy identification of differences between healthy and affected individuals. Professor Darvasi has studied Ashkenazi J00ws for many years and employed the latest technology available to analyze the DNA samples he received for the study.

  142. Dave in Marybrook

    You missed the Coronavirus nipple tassels, ML!

  143. Dave in Marybrook

    Which was like totes speaking truth to power.

  144. Zyconoclast

    Take 2

    Scientists Discover Gene That Predisposes [email protected] J00ws to Schizophrenia

    Variations of the DNST3 gene make [email protected] J00ws 40 percent more likely to develop schizophrenia and similar diseases.

  145. Geriatric Mayfly

    CNN’s Don Lemon Says We Can ‘Fix’ Mount Rushmore By Adding Obama’s Face
    July 8, 2020,

    Just a small problem. The granite outcrop looks distinctively bleached and will actually defame the Magic Negro.

  146. notafan

    I’m not going to try and leave Melbourne though I shall get out and about as much as I can.

    Can’t leave Melbourne for exercise but I can drive one hour within the ring of steel to do so.

    Okay.

  147. calli

    Lode, Rowe is stuck in a rut, which is hell for a creative person. I think this is true for so many in the Yarts who have succumbed to TDS.

    There really is no way out for them apart from admitting it and walking away. Which is emotionally impossible. No wonder it all becomes more unhinged with each passing day.

  148. dover_beach

    ‘the establishment’
    Holding is not an outsider. It’s hilarious watching corporations, media personalities, celebrities, and the like pretending that their class and ideology are not that of the establishment.

  149. Zyconoclast

    Coronavirus: Belgrade protesters storm Serb parliament over curfew

    Far-right nationalists have been blamed for stirring up the unrest and storming the assembly building.

  150. lotocoti

    Speaking of concocted bullshit designed to impress the gullible, that FanFic bizzo is a bit of a doddle.
    “You know,” Jelly said very slowly , rubbing his chin, “a long time ago I met a man stopped me from hustlin.
    Convinced me ta get off the street. Taught me stuff. Told me ta get my shit inta a tight little ball.
    I been down. I been all the way down. Aint nothin there. A man taught me how ta get up.
    Thas where I at. Man taught me ya can’t get oh-vah on nothin.”
    “What man teach yo that?”
    “Bad man, Bro. Baaaad. Man named Mistah Blankie.”

    Jelly’s Been In The Blanket Store.

  151. Infidel Tiger King

    The story about Richard Quest being sprung in Central Park is 12 years old or has he been sprung again?

    No he hasn’t been caught doing that again, although I’m sure that freak has been up to much worse.

    The point was that Grig’s coronavirus expert of choice was a meth addict who sought rough trade in public parks while lynching his testicles with a noose.

    In Grig’s world this is normal behaviour.

  152. Damienski

    Can’t like because retard, but Michael Smith news website shows a banner over the Napean Highway – “F U Daniel Andrews. It’s your fault, not ours”. It appears the Victotiastanis are getting restless.

  153. Zyconoclast

    ‘Unthinkable’: UK unveils $54 billion stimulus as jobs cliff approaches

    VAT – the British equivalent of the GST – will also be cut from 20 per cent to 5 per cent on all food, accommodation and tourist attractions for the next six months, while pub-goers and diners will be able to enjoy 50 per cent off a meal in restaurants and cafes on every Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday in August – up to a limit of £10 per person, per session.

  154. Damienski

    Link. I DID say retard.

  155. Damienski

    Tom. Thanks for your daily toon duty. You are a champ. I look forward to WIP all week.

  156. notafan

    Looks like coronavirus is a progressive disease in Australia too.

    Largely confined to ‘safe Labor seats’.

    Zip cases in most of the eastern suburbs blue state seats.

  157. stackja

    Businesses have backs to the wall as steel trap locks city
    Melburnians and residents of Mitchell shire have woken to the first day of strict coronavirus restrictions, with police out in force to patrol the city perimeter. Motorists crossing the “ring of steel” have been warned to expect lengthy waits.

    Brianna Travers, Lucy Callander and Ashley Argoon, Herald Sun
    July 9, 2020 7:50am

    Melburnians are waking up to day one of the second round of strict stay-at-home orders.

    Restaurants, beauty parlours and gyms are all closed as metropolitan Melbourne and the Mitchell shire begin the six-week lockdown.

    Police are out in force patrolling the perimeter, ensuring those in the quarantine areas are only leaving for one of the four approved essential reasons.

    There are checkpoints at seven major arterials this morning.

    Motorists can expect lengthy waits if they need to cross the “ring of steel” as part of their commute.

  158. calli

    Everyone’s really looking forward to getting back to church in early August. Now Glad is sabre rattling over “gatherings”.

    Watch her pull the pin on that one.

  159. Nick

    Sigh, churches and their end of Ramadan celebrations. Oh wait.

  160. Infidel Tiger King

    All good in WA.

    We are debating whether to allow 30,000 to attend the footy or 60,000.

  161. Shelley

    Why didn’t one of those numpties under the bridge think to stop the fire truck from coming through – it seemed to be going quite fast. Looked like not one of them had any other spatial awareness aside from looking up.

  162. duncanm

    So the (union-controlled) funds are now more open about their social engineering..

    First State Super is dumping all (thermal) coal, and admits to openly pressuring boards. It may explain the idiotic statements coming out of some of these CEO’as these days

    Along with increasing its investment targets for renewable energy, First State said its goals would be achieved first through engaging with boards of heavy-emitting companies about their plans to decarbonise and then through further divestments where necessary.

    The only way to fight this is to de-fund the activist funds — SMSF.

    https://www.smh.com.au/business/the-economy/top-super-fund-dumps-coal-miners-as-emissions-cuts-intensify-20200708-p55a1c.html

  163. Leigh Lowe

    We are debating whether to allow 30,000 to attend the footy or 60,000.

    My dream of Karma for Dickhead Dan.
    It’s a Collingwood-Richmond Grand Final.
    Played in Brisbane.
    The Pies are coming with a rush in the last quarter.
    A wind-farm failure trips the grid and the power goes out.

  164. Leigh Lowe

    Burning question.
    Does Shane Patton dye his hair?
    I’d say no.
    It looks like Stevie Wonder dyes Shane Patton’s hair.

  165. mh

    The late Charlie Daniels with Alex Jones (2012)

  166. twostix

    with police out in force to patrol the city perimeter. Motorists crossing the “ring of steel” have been warned to expect lengthy waits.

    2020 is like a bad 1980’s action / scifi movie.

  167. Top Ender

    Rules on classes are ‘back to front’
    NATASHA ROBINSON ANGELICA SNOWDEN

    Infectious diseases experts have criticised Victorian Premier Daniel Andrews’s decision to allow senior secondary students to return to school while younger students stay home, saying older teenagers carry the highest infection risk while primary school children are far less likely to transmit the virus.

    Prominent infectious diseases doctor and microbiologist Peter Collignon said the policy did not make sense and younger students were being needlessly disadvantaged, with remote learning looking a likely possibility for them for much of term 3.

    “My view is they’ve got it exactly the wrong way around,” said Professor Collignon, who works at the ANU Medical School.

    “If you’re going to stop people going to school, it should be the ones more at risk of spreading this virus, which are older students.

    “We don’t have a lot of data on children and transmission, but there’s something about being over 15 that seems to suddenly start rapidly increasing the risk.

    “I can’t see the point of closing schools to children under 15.”

    The risk of COVID-19 transmission among senior students is highlighted by the Al-Taqwa College cluster, in which 102 students and staff members are now infected with COVID-19. The cluster is likely to become Victoria’s biggest, overtaking Cedar Meats.

    Authorities are alarmed by the number of cases of COVID-19 that have been detected in young people since the second surge of infections in the state began. Almost 50 per cent of diagnosed cases in the past seven days have been among those aged under 30.

    Twice as many cases have been diagnosed in young people aged between 10 and 19 as those under 10. There were 141 cases diagnosed in teenagers aged between 15 and 19, 115 cases among 10 to 14-yearolds and 75 cases in those aged between five and nine years.

    Most of the children acquired the infections from outside the school setting, whereas Al-Taqwa College has highlighted the high risk of transmission among older students at secondary schools.

    Professor Collignon said older teenagers and adults had higher numbers of receptors in their nose, to which the coronavirus binds. “That’s probably the reason children under 15 aren’t anywhere near at the same risk as adults,” he said.

    Professor Collignon said that despite the importance of year 12 studies, older students were more likely to succeed at remote learning than younger students.

    “Perversely, the people who have got more of a chance of being able to do homeschooling and elearning are the older ones, the 17-and 18 year-olds,” he said. “And the ones who can’t do it very well at all are the five- and six-year-olds. So I think they have got this exactly around the wrong way.”

    More than 20 schools have been linked to COVID-19 cases in Melbourne in recent weeks. In early June, Victorian health authorities reported a student from Newbury Primary School in Craigieburn had tested positive and attended class while they were infectious on May 29.

    Since then, several clusters have been associated with schools across the state.

    After the Al-Taqwa cluster, the second largest outbreak was at Albanvale Primary School which has recorded 15 cases.

    Aitken Hill Primary School in Craigieburn has been linked with 10 cases. Other clusters have sprung up at Camberwell Grammar School and Ascot Vale Primary School.

    University of NSW epidemiologist Mary-Louise McLaws urged health authorities to consider asking older students to wear masks in the classroom and to step up messages of social distancing among all teenagers. “There is a need for a wider resetting of the messaging that they are young adults and their bodies may respond in the same way as older adults,” she said.

    Print edition of the Oz

  168. notafan

    Another woke super fund.

    There are plenty of these.

    Simon says only 7.7% of super needs to be invested in renewables for Australia to be 100% fossil free.

    Of course what super funds ‘investing ‘ in renewables are actually looking for is taxpayer subsidies, not the other way round.

    Because otherwise they are simply destroying superannuants’ nest eggs, one solar panel at a time.

  169. Tel

    There really is no way out for them apart from admitting it and walking away. Which is emotionally impossible. No wonder it all becomes more unhinged with each passing day.

    The main reason I quietly hope Trump wins, is to watch these nutters finally go fully unhinged. It might be dark joy but it’s also somehow deeply poetic.

  170. Cassie of Sydney

    “ruce of Newcastle
    #3507782, posted on July 9, 2020 at 7:58 am
    Momentum is a GetUp-style far-left activist group. Why should we watch anything from them?
    Do try to avoid blatant propaganda Numbers. Especially from a bunch who don’t like j ews.”

    Yes indeed BoN…clearly the Toowoomba cane toad spends his days trawling through the internet looking for unsavoury stuff to confirm his very ugly prejudices.

    The fact is that the deplorable state and unelectability of British Labour party (which saw its vote collapse back in December) has been due to the insidious and sinister influence of the far-left progressive Momentum (mainly populated by affluent middle class scum)…which the new leader of UK Labour, Sir Keir Starmer, is desperately trying to rid British Labour of….particularly its toxic Joooo hatred..but clearly the cane toad from Toowoomba approves wholeheartedly of Momentum and its very nasty ideology. Among Momentum’s membership are RoP Holocaust deniers and assorted peddlers of conspiracy theories such as Jooos control the world banks etc.

    Says a lot about the cane toad…doesn’t it?

  171. Nick

    The ring of steel. It sounds like something dreamed up by a PR hack from Yarraville, ‘in touch with his feminine side’.

  172. Maj

    She’s going to lose, and she deserves to lose.

    Sen. Collins refuses to say whether she’ll vote for Trump, signals she won’t campaign against Biden

    The self-proclaimed moderate said she does not campaign against former colleagues

    Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine, refused to say whether she’ll vote for President Trump in November and signaled that she would not campaign against presumptive Democratic nominee Joe Biden.

    The self-proclaimed moderate Republican from Maine told the New York Times this week she does not campaign against former colleagues. Biden and Collins worked together in the Senate.

    “I do not campaign against my colleagues in the Senate,” she said of Biden, adding that she knows him “very well” from their days in Congress together.

    “My inclination is just to stay out of the presidential and focus on my own race,” she added.

    Collins publicly announced that she would not be voting for Trump ahead of the 2016 election.

    Collins, who has represented Maine in the Senate since 1997, may face one of the toughest reelection campaigns of her career as Democrats from outside the state pour in money for her likely Democratic opponent, Maine House Speaker Sara Gideon, in an effort to take control of the Senate.

    The race has been rated a toss-up by the nonpartisan Cook Political Report.

    Collins was considered a swing vote in both the confirmation of Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh and the impeachment of Trump. She split with Trump more than any other Republican senator in the 116th Congress, but she drew the ire of Democrats when she voted to confirm Kavanaugh and acquit Trump.

  173. Mater

    Why didn’t one of those numpties under the bridge think to stop the fire truck from coming through – it seemed to be going quite fast. Looked like not one of them had any other spatial awareness aside from looking up.

    Looking at the angles, hitting him may have broken his fall.
    Might have saved his life.
    I’m going to attribute it all to a cunning plan, well executed. I mean, hasn’t the recent efforts of Victorian authorities and the emergency services convinced you of their competence and nuance in dealing with unusual situations?
    😉

  174. notafan

    Point LL

    Needs to ask for the same shade of brown.

    #consistenthaircolourmatters

  175. Struth

    But don’t forget, ASIO will protect us from those right wingers.

    Dear ASIO.
    I have a confession to make and I am sure it will help you in recognising the threat I am to the country.
    I thought I’d better be upfront about it, noting the trouble you have in working out the reason for Islaaaaaamic Terrorism.

    I am …………………….er, ..well, I’ll just come straight out with it, I am right wing.

    We were once known as conservative voters, so I hope that makes it easier for you work out who you need to round up.

    However, I confess that from where you are sitting, and that is to the left of Stalin, I may seem an extreme distance from you,which would make me an extreme right winger.

    I can no longer live with myself, and the stress of my criminal, terrorist ways ,plays on my conscience daily.

    My sworn affidavit to you would be something like this.

    I have been silently obeying all directives by left wing government even when it has decided the constitution it is supposed to follow can be thrown out the window, abandoning rule of law, decimating the economy, taking people’s jobs and livelihoods, their liberty and freedom, imprisoning the innocent, and keeping loved ones separated and ruled by force of armed police, using nothing more than the catching of a none deadly cold virus as an excuse.

    I have stood by while racist left wing young people in their thousands, brainwashed by radical leftists, in our left wing education system and taught to hate our country,..(what a joke) marched through the streets while an obviously politicised police force gave them a free pass to spread the virus they knew was no problem anyway, and sent messages prior to the organisers of the marches that they were not going to be fined for breaking covid self distancing “decrees.”
    Then to be confronted by one lonely mum protesting the lock down, must have been very troubling to the entire nation, and I think I can speak for all of us right wing terrorists when I apologise and say we understand why she needed to be crash tackled by a platoon of your storm troopers.

    I personally had two jobs taken from me by the imposition of tyranny, and had no ability to get to my sick and old parents living interstate.

    And that’s where you should be concerned about myself being a danger to the nation.

    I felt very frustrated.
    I have been carrying this guilt about feeling frustrated for some time.
    I may have done nothing about it, and let you guys FUCK the country……..oops sorry about that, see what I mean, I have done nothing but, yes I am frustrated and right now I still am.
    I also have feelings of confusion because what is given is taken and what is taken is given now by unlawful decree, so I also admit to feelings of despair.
    This may be alarming to you and I can totally understand your concern for right wing terrorism.
    But that is not all.
    I also believe in Nations and borders because without them, you can’t have democracy.
    It seems we can look at Australia and conclude that it is no guarantee of democracy anyway, but without a nation there can never be democracy.
    Democracy to me, REPRESENTATIVE (oops there I go again) parliaments means peace and prosperity, and so I am guilty of what you have long suspected , and you guys have been right all along, I love Australia and this nation, and the values it stood for.
    I am ashamed of myself, that’s for sure.

    When it comes to racism, I also confess to being an individualist.
    I am not from the god like left wing collectivists who believe all people of the same skin colour think the same and have the same experience and believe that anyone can be a racist but first, you must be a collectivist.
    I am an individualist, like, I know this may be shocking to read, but I confess, like ….Martin Luther King Jr.
    I, sniff, am just so ashamed of myself.

    There’s much more I need to confess to, some other terrible stuff I believe in, like low taxes, representative government, free speech, rule of Law, individual responsibility and respect, and the shameful list goes on.

    This letter will be confronting to all in ASIO, and the stark reality will now be apparent.
    If you don’t come around and collect us soon, we may commit a terrible terrorist act such as speaking up.

  176. Bruce of Newcastle

    Of course…

    Traffic Signals are Racist (8 Jul)

    A few months back, before Covid-19 kept us in our homes and George Floyd made us take to the streets, I was walking with a friend, her daughter, and my twin sons. My friend is White and I’m not — something I’d never given a second thought until we reached a crosswalk. “Remember, honey,” she said to her daughter as we waited for the light to turn green, “we need to wait for the little White man to appear before we can cross the street.”

    I realize that White people like to exert control over nearly everything everyone does, I thought, but since when did this literally include trying to cross the street?

    I wonder what she’d say if someone pointed out that a black traffic signal isn’t especially visible.

  177. Top Ender

    Mind you, he still agrees with lockdown…

    SO DEMOCRACY IS SLOWLY ECLIPSED
    GREG SHERIDAN

    This virus fiasco proves Daniel Andrews answers to no one, not even his own party

    Consider this astonishing reality. If, as it is only reasonable to believe, the absolute fiasco of the Melbourne hotel quarantine mismanagement is the main cause for the COVID-19 outbreak and the subsequent lockdown, then it is the most damaging state government failure in modern Australian history.

    So which minister has accepted direct responsibility for it?

    Answer: none.

    Which minister has apologised and resigned over a mess that will cost countless billions of dollars to the Victorian and national economies and have as yet unknowable health consequences?

    Answer: no one.

    The Victorian government has not even told us which minister was chiefly responsible for deciding to use untrained security guards. Instead, it established a judicial inquiry that it exploits to say it has no responsibility to provide any public information. Yet the inquiry report is months away.

    Who are we to think that we have a right to know such things? We are mere citizens. What business is it of ours?

    I make these points not as a rhetorical device but to draw attention to one aspect of the Victorian catastrophe that is not getting enough consideration and that signifies a larger failure of political culture. The performance of the Andrews government has been so disastrous partly because there is no effective democracy in Victoria.

    Let me be clear. Victoria is not a tyranny. And I am not objecting to the necessary lockdown provisions caused by the resurgence of the virus. What I mean is that all the normal mechanisms of democratic deliberation and accountability have been diminished or erased in Victoria. This is true of state jurisdictions around Australia, but it is extreme in Victoria.

    Bizarrely, and for no good reason, the Victorian parliament is not sitting and is not due to sit until next month. When asked about the opposition this week, Andrews said he didn’t have time for silly political games. That is exactly the tone that non-democratic leaders take. Politics is a distraction from their greatness.

    The only chance of any useful accountability or scrutiny for the hotels fiasco lay with the Victorian parliament’s public accounts and estimates committee. The committee has 10 members: five Labor, three Coalition, one Green and one Liberal Democrat. Every non-Labor member voted to hold an inquiry that would call senior bureaucrats and ministers. The Labor chairwoman used her casting vote to ensure no hearings were held.

    When Andrews was asked about this, his response was contemptuous. He knew nothing about the committee, no concern of his, he hadn’t been briefed on it and didn’t intend to give it a moment’s thought. It was a response Fidel Castro would have been proud of.

    Andrews is no dictator. He is a democratically elected Premier who operates entirely within the law. Nor is he extreme in his rhetoric or most of his policies. But he has contrived a circumstance in which almost all mechanisms of democratic scrutiny and accountability have disappeared.

    This is not just wrong in principle. It produces really bad government. The judicial inquiry was entirely unnecessary. The government has to hand all the information and all the people that could possibly be required.

    The obvious political purpose of the inquiry is to allow Andrews to refuse to answer any question, or provide any information at all, about how this colossal policy failure came about.

    In a properly functioning democratic culture, Andrews would come under irresistible political pressure to answer the questions and provide the information. But under the emasculated political culture that surrounds state governments — and is so exaggerated in Victoria — there is no way the political culture can bring that pressure to bear.

    The Victorian Premier does not even face the constraints of his own party. Adem Somyurek was a minister in the Andrews government who was caught on film using very bad language and was accused of ethnic branch stacking. I feel like the police chief in Casablanca — “Branch stacking in the ALP?” (or, in Casablanca, “Gambling in a casino?”) I am shocked, truly shocked.

    So the federal ALP intervened in the Victorian ALP, and it will now be run by administrators until 2023. There will be no state conference, no internal democracy, no motions or resolutions. Nothing. The Andrews government is free even of its own political party.

    The government rides roughshod over any democratic politics.

    The NSW ALP, with all its scandals from Sam Dastyari to Kaila Murnain and now to ASIO and federal police inquiries about alleged improper Chinese government influence, does not apparently justify federal intervention. But the Victorian party and its 14,000-odd members do. Why? In six months, the federal ALP could easily have checked the membership rolls of the Victorian party. But, you see, the NSW party provides no factional problems, whereas the Victorian party had shown disturbing signs of independent life and thought.

    Not least was the deep disquiet many Victorian Labor members, and a number of unions, left and right, had about the Andrews government’s slavish pro-Beijing policies and especially its embrace of Beijing’s Belt and Road Initiative, contrary to Australian national policy. Andrews requires his ministers to visit China quite a bit. Somyurek refused because of his objection to Chinese mistreatment of Uighurs. He went to India instead. Now there will be no Victorian ALP conference and no resolutions on the Belt and Road policy, which there would have been without federal intervention.

    What are Victorian rank-and file ALP members now but donkeys, required only to pay their dues and show up on election day to distribute how to vote cards? And what is the Victorian government now other than an unconstrained collection of careerist, empire-building politicians and apparatchiks on the payroll?

    The ABC has also failed us. For a long time its 7.30 Report was state-based. This provided an invaluable service to Australian democracy. The ABC routinely argues that because it doesn’t need to pursue profits it can do things that commercial media can’t. Australian political culture is gravely deficient right now because of a lack of sustained scrutiny of state governments. The state-based newspapers do a good job but have never been more leanly staffed.

    The state press gallery in Melbourne is a ghostly chamber. Digital media companies have destroyed the public square except at the national level.

    If the ABC was serving the nation, it would make sure it covered state politics properly. I could bear the loss of quite a lot of ABC comedy in return for good state political coverage. A state government should not get scrutiny only when its mistakes — such as those of the Andrews government — are so egregious as to demand national attention.

    Democracy has collapsed in Victoria. So has good government.

    Print edition of the Oz

  178. Nick

    My dream of Karma for Dickhead Dan.

    Mine is for a collision of wokeness.

  179. rickw

    Mind you, he still agrees with lockdown…

    He’s not the sharpest tool.

  180. Struth

    It’s called “the market” – the basis of a successful capitalist economy.

    It’s not called the market you fucking moron, it’s called blackmail.
    Which is very appropriate in this case.

  181. MemoryFault

    One thing is for sure only brave men who volunteer should ever go to war.

    Good morning Notafan.
    + 100

  182. Nick

    I realize that White people like to exert control over nearly everything everyone does, I thought, but since when did this literally include trying to cross the street?

    Well, white people invented it. Perhaps we could have an African model, a couple of palm fronds waved on each corner. That should work.

  183. Infidel Tiger King

    “we need to wait for the little White man to appear before we can cross the street.”

    How weird.

    All my life it’s been a green man telling me to go and a red man telling me to go faster.

  184. rickw

    Looking at the angles, hitting him may have broken his fall.
    Might have saved his life.

    If he didn’t die, it’s one of the funniest things ever.

    The police report must have read like a Benny Hill script!

  185. Boambee John

    No reliable scientific data to back up claims made about off the shelf health and beauty products!!!

    NOOOOOOO!!

    Get the Ponds Institute in the witness box!

  186. Spurgeon Monkfish III

    he’s made a very decent living since his retirement in the commentary box, is a significant public figure in the cricketing world

    Holding’s the only cricket commentater* who doesn’t make me instantly feel like doing one of two things:

    Grabbing the remote
    Taking to the TV with a sledgehammer (if the first option takes longer than about two seconds)

    *Deliberate.

  187. rickw

    The ring of steel. It sounds like something dreamed up by a PR hack from Yarraville, ‘in touch with his feminine side’.

    You know when the metaphors switch from iron to steel that you’ve transitioned from Prussian Militarism to full blown Nazism. The Nazi’s really loved the “stahl” metaphor. Obviously the historically illiterate morons in spring street don’t know that.

    “Do you think red arm bands on the black uniforms of our COVID-19 police might look nice?!” Will be the next iteration.

  188. Boambee John

    It’s called “the market” – the basis of a successful capitalist economy.

    And suddenly, just like that, the bin chicken becomes enthusiastic about capitalism!

  189. duncanm

    I realize that White people like to exert control over nearly everything everyone does, I thought, but since when did this literally include trying to cross the street?

    Easily fixed – we’ll put a blacklight up there.

    Crossings in Australia must be martianist. They’re green.

    All these idiots do is whine. You can just imagine the committee trying to decide what a pedestrian signal should look like.

    Shape – can’t be man, woman, or identifiable as hetero or normal.
    Colour – not white, definitely not red (American Indians), green might be ok.
    What about the ‘don’t walk’ ?

  190. Mater

    Rickw,
    If you’re heading to your country ‘bolt hole’, be aware, my sources tell me a road block has been established at the abandoned Route 66 petrol station on the Calder, between Sunbury and Gisborne.
    Pillboxes are still under construction…apparently!

  191. Spurgeon Monkfish III

    Michael Smith news website shows a banner over the Nepean Highway

    Seeing that has made me feel slightly better.

  192. Infidel Tiger King

    I watched Holding’s whole piece they put on during the rain break.

    He was quite restrained.

    He said yes he did experience racism during his playing days from spectators but always considered them to be the ones with the problem not him.

    They Also had some chick on who cried the whole time. I think she played cricket but she was too emotional so I didn’t listen.

  193. duncanm

    Someone makes a very good point in the comments on that traffic light saga:

    rob • 8 hours ago
    Well, traffic lights are concentrated in urban areas, as are blacks. So traffic lights stop disproportionately more blacks than whites. Ergo, traffic lights are racist. Or something.

  194. thefrollickingmole

    The point was that Grig’s coronavirus expert of choice was a meth addict who sought rough trade in public parks while lynching his testicles with a noose.

    In Grig’s world this is normal behaviour.

    Tuesday, thats Tuesdays outfit.

    It saves the really freaky stuff for the weekends.

  195. Spurgeon Monkfish III

    Ring of Steel

    Because “Iron Curtain” is so last millennium.

  196. Menadue is always worth a read –

    There is a belief that the US is powerful, superior and therefore a different country to all others. A culture of exceptionalism has encouraged ignorance, such that it is difficult for Americans to imagine a different society from the one they already have. The same trend prompted Socrates’ centuries-old warning that the unexamined life is not worth living.

    A mode of thought that life’s purpose is to foster individual wealth, carries the demand that governments should facilitate this goal by not standing in the way. Under decades of US governments’ worship of free-market individualism, almost any endeavour called public has faced fierce opposition.

    Senator Bernie Sanders crafted visions of a more equitable society built around principles of democratic socialism, but the stigmatising of any policy labelled left, let alone socialistic provoked opposition which insisted that collective endeavour was not the American way.

    R H Tawney and J K Galbraith’s observations about private affluence co-existing with public squalor are confirmed by US disdain for policies to promote a common good, nationally and internationally.

    In his incisive Ill Fares the Land, Tony Judt showed that on a ‘common good’ test, the US failed miserably. Broken highways, bankrupt cities, collapsing bridges and failed schools exist alongside features of economic disadvantage, ill health, missed educational opportunities and familiar symptoms of depression, alcoholism, opioid poisoning, obesity, gambling and criminality.


    The progress of the virus
    in the USA virus is simply these chickens coming home to roost.
    Australian deaths per million – 4
    US deaths per million – 407
    The proof is in the pudding*.

    *Correct use of the aphorism.

  197. William the Conjuror

    Trump is a gift to cartoonists and satirists. He is the Rubbery Figures of the 21st Century.

  198. I watched Holding’s whole piece they put on during the rain break.

    Yep – Apparently BoN and Cassie thinks he works for Getup.
    There are some very strange people posting here.

  199. Knuckle Dragger

    ‘the shopping trolley vengeance king’

    That’s King with a capital K. Which achieved its aim, because the front lawn trolley-hoarders moved out.

    And I’m claiming the win. Justifiably.

    *moonwalks*

  200. Old School Conservative

    There’s a superfood that improves your dress sense and interior decoration skills?

    Kale.

  201. egg_

    BEN ZIMMER: Well, the proof is in the pudding is a new twist on a very old proverb. The original version is the proof of the pudding is in the eating. And what it meant was that you had to try out food in order to know whether it was good.

    Verification and validation.
    Duh!

    Way up there with the Grigs hick “I could care less!”.

    I couldn’t care less.
    I do not care.
    Logic.

  202. Farmer Gez

    South Australia has completely lost the plot by now making truck drivers from Victoria wear masks, quarantine and have no contact with anyone in the state.

    Stop the trucks and let them starve.

  203. rickw

    Rickw,
    If you’re heading to your country ‘bolt hole’, be aware, my sources tell me a road block has been established at the abandoned Route 66 petrol station on the Calder, between Sunbury and Gisborne.
    Pillboxes are still under construction…apparently!

    I’ve got people inbound running recon for me!

    The old section of the Hume that has reverted to gravel might be the go, but I’m not sure it gets me out far enough. I’ve used it in the past when there have been outbound prangs on the Hume.

  204. thefrollickingmole

    A culture of exceptionalism has encouraged ignorance, such that it is difficult for Americans to imagine a different society from the one they already have.

    Mmmmyeeeesss,/drinks bongwater
    Soooo deeeep maaaan/huffs grated cane toad nutsack
    Those exclusionaaaary Yanks/injects bath salts into eyeball…
    And so backwards and regresssssiiiiive/ steals morphine from cancer patient for an enema

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Nobel_laureates_by_country#Australia

    So xenophobic, no poor immigrant can make anything of themselves..

    Abhijit Banerjee, born in India, Economics, 2019
    Esther Duflo, born in France, Economics, 2019
    Michael Kremer, Economics, 2019
    John B. Goodenough, born in Germany, Chemistry, 2019
    M. Stanley Whittingham, born in United Kingdom, Chemistry, 2019
    Jim Peebles, born in Canada, Physics, 2019
    William Kaelin Jr., Physiology or Medicine, 2019
    Gregg L. Semenza, Physiology or Medicine, 2019
    Paul Romer, Economics, 2018
    William Nordhaus, Economics, 2018
    George P. Smith, Chemistry, 2018
    Frances Arnold, Chemistry, 2018
    Arthur Ashkin, Physics, 2018
    James Allison, Physiology or Medicine, 2018
    Richard H. Thaler, Economics, 2017
    Joachim Frank, born in Germany, Chemistry, 2017
    Rainer Weiss, born in Germany, Physics, 2017
    Kip Thorne, Physics, 2017
    Barry Barish, Physics, 2017
    Michael W. Young, Physiology or Medicine, 2017
    Michael Rosbash, Physiology or Medicine, 2017
    Jeffrey C. Hall, Physiology or Medicine, 2017
    Bob Dylan, Literature, 2016
    Oliver Hart, born in United Kingdom, Economics, 2016
    Fraser Stoddart, born in United Kingdom, Chemistry, 2016
    F. Duncan M. Haldane, born in United Kingdom, Physics, 2016
    John M. Kosterlitz, born in United Kingdom, Physics, 2016
    Angus Deaton, born in United Kingdom, Economics, 2015
    Paul L. Modrich, Chemistry, 2015
    Aziz Sancar, born in Turkey, Chemistry, 2015
    William C. Campbell, born in Ireland, Physiology or Medicine, 2015
    William E. Moerner, Chemistry, 2014
    Eric Betzig, Chemistry, 2014
    Shuji Nakamura, born in Japan, Physics, 2014
    John O’Keefe*, Physiology or Medicine, 2014
    Robert J. Shiller, Economics, 2013
    Lars Peter Hansen, Economics, 2013
    Eugene F. Fama, Economics, 2013
    Arieh Warshel, born in Israel, Chemistry, 2013
    Michael Levitt, born in South Africa, Chemistry, 2013
    Martin Karplus, born in Austria, Chemistry, 2013
    Randy Schekman, Physiology or Medicine, 2013
    Thomas C. Südhof, born in Germany, Physiology or Medicine, 2013
    James Rothman, Physiology or Medicine, 2013
    Alvin E. Roth, Economics, 2012
    Lloyd S. Shapley, Economics, 2012
    Brian K. Kobilka, Chemistry, 2012
    Robert J. Lefkowitz, Chemistry, 2012
    David J. Wineland, Physics, 2012
    Christopher A. Sims, Economics, 2011
    Thomas J. Sargent, Economics, 2011
    Saul Perlmutter, Physics, 2011
    Brian P. Schmidt, Physics, 2011
    Adam G. Riess, Physics, 2011
    Ralph M. Steinman, born in Canada, Physiology or Medicine, 2011
    Bruce Beutler, Physiology or Medicine, 2011
    Peter A. Diamond, Economics, 2010
    Dale T. Mortensen, Economics, 2010
    Ei-ichi Negishi, Japanese citizenship, Chemistry, 2010
    Richard F. Heck, Chemistry, 2010
    Elinor Ostrom, Economics, 2009
    Oliver Eaton Williamson, Economics, 2009
    Barack H. Obama, Peace, 2009
    Venkatraman Ramakrishnan, born in India, Chemistry, 2009
    Thomas A. Steitz, Chemistry, 2009
    Willard S. Boyle, born in Canada, Physics, 2009
    Charles K. Kao, born in China, Physics, 2009
    George E. Smith, Physics, 2009
    Elizabeth Blackburn, born in Australia, Physiology or Medicine, 2009
    Carol W. Greider, Physiology or Medicine, 2009
    Jack W. Szostak, born in United Kingdom, Physiology or Medicine, 2009
    Paul Krugman, Economics, 2008
    Roger Yonchien Tsien, Chemistry, 2008
    Martin Chalfie, Chemistry, 2008
    Osamu Shimomura, Japanese citizenship , Chemistry, 2008
    Yoichiro Nambu, born in Japan, Physics, 2008
    Leonid Hurwicz, born in Russia, Economics, 2007
    Eric S. Maskin, Economics, 2007
    Roger B. Myerson, Economics, 2007
    Al Gore, Peace, 2007
    Mario R. Capecchi, born in Italy, Physiology or Medicine, 2007
    Oliver Smithies, born in United Kingdom, Physiology or Medicine, 2007
    Roger D. Kornberg, Chemistry, 2006
    John C. Mather, Physics, 2006
    Edmund S. Phelps, Economics, 2006
    George F. Smoot, Physics, 2006
    Andrew Z. Fire, Physiology or Medicine, 2006
    Craig C. Mello, Physiology or Medicine, 2006
    Robert Aumann*, as an Israeli citizen, Economics, 2005
    Robert H. Grubbs, Chemistry, 2005
    Richard R. Schrock, Chemistry, 2005
    Thomas Schelling, Economics, 2005
    John L. Hall, Physics, 2005
    Roy J. Glauber, Physics, 2005
    Irwin Rose, Chemistry, 2004
    Edward C. Prescott, Economics, 2004
    David J. Gross, Physics, 2004
    H. David Politzer, Physics, 2004
    Frank Wilczek, Physics, 2004
    Richard Axel, Physiology or Medicine, 2004
    Linda B. Buck, Physiology or Medicine, 2004
    Peter Agre, Chemistry, 2003
    Roderick MacKinnon, Chemistry, 2003
    Robert F. Engle, Economics, 2003
    Anthony J. Leggett, born in United Kingdom, Physics, 2003
    Paul C. Lauterbur, Physiology or Medicine, 2003
    Alexei Alexeyevich Abrikosov, born in Russia, Physics, 2003
    Daniel Kahneman*, born in Israel, Economics, 2002
    Vernon L. Smith, Economics, 2002
    Jimmy Carter, Peace, 2002
    John Bennett Fenn, Chemistry, 2002
    Raymond Davis Jr., Physics, 2002
    Riccardo Giacconi, born in Italy, Physics, 2002
    Sydney Brenner, born in South Africa, Physiology or Medicine, 2002
    H. Robert Horvitz, Physiology or Medicine, 2002
    William S. Knowles, Chemistry, 2001
    K. Barry Sharpless, Chemistry, 2001
    Joseph E. Stiglitz, Economics, 2001
    George A. Akerlof, Economics, 2001
    A. Michael Spence, Economics, 2001
    Eric A. Cornell, Physics, 2001
    Carl E. Wieman, Physics, 2001
    Leland H. Hartwell, Physiology or Medicine, 2001
    Alan Heeger, Chemistry, 2000
    Alan MacDiarmid, born in New Zealand, Chemistry, 2000
    James J. Heckman, Economics, 2000
    Daniel L. McFadden, Economics, 2000
    Jack Kilby, Physics, 2000
    Paul Greengard, Physiology or Medicine, 2000
    Eric Kandel, born in Austria, Physiology or Medicine, 2000
    Ahmed H. Zewail, born in Egypt, Chemistry, 1999
    Günter Blobel, born in then Germany, now Poland, Physiology or Medicine, 1999
    Walter Kohn, born in Austria, Chemistry, 1998
    Horst Ludwig Störmer, born in Germany, Physics, 1998
    Robert B. Laughlin, Physics, 1998
    Daniel C. Tsui, born in China, Physics, 1998
    Robert F. Furchgott, Physiology or Medicine, 1998
    Louis J. Ignarro, Physiology or Medicine, 1998
    Ferid Murad, Physiology or Medicine, 1998
    Paul D. Boyer, Chemistry, 1997
    Robert C. Merton, Economics, 1997
    Myron Scholes, born in Canada, Economics, 1997
    Jody Williams, Peace, 1997
    Steven Chu, Physics, 1997
    William D. Phillips, Physics, 1997
    Stanley B. Prusiner, Physiology or Medicine, 1997
    Richard E. Smalley, Chemistry, 1996
    Robert F. Curl Jr., Chemistry, 1996
    William Vickrey, born in Canada, Economics, 1996
    David M. Lee, Physics, 1996
    Douglas D. Osheroff, Physics, 1996
    Robert C. Richardson, Physics, 1996
    Mario J. Molina, born in Mexico, Chemistry, 1995
    F. Sherwood Rowland, Chemistry, 1995
    Robert Lucas, Jr., Economics, 1995
    Martin L. Perl, Physics, 1995
    Frederick Reines, Physics, 1995
    Edward B. Lewis, Physiology or Medicine, 1995
    Eric F. Wieschaus, Physiology or Medicine, 1995
    George Andrew Olah, born in Hungary, Chemistry, 1994
    John Harsanyi, born in Hungary, Economics, 1994
    John Forbes Nash, Economics, 1994
    Clifford G. Shull, Physics, 1994
    Alfred G. Gilman, Physiology or Medicine, 1994
    Martin Rodbell, Physiology or Medicine, 1994
    Kary B. Mullis, Chemistry, 1993
    Robert W. Fogel, Economics, 1993
    Douglass C. North, Economics, 1993
    Toni Morrison, Literature, 1993
    Russell A. Hulse, Physics, 1993
    Joseph H. Taylor Jr., Physics, 1993
    Phillip A. Sharp, Physiology or Medicine, 1993
    Rudolph A. Marcus, born in Canada, Chemistry, 1992
    Gary S. Becker, Economics, 1992
    Edmond H. Fischer, born in China, Physiology or Medicine, 1992
    Edwin G. Krebs, Physiology or Medicine, 1992
    Ronald Coase, born in the United Kingdom, Economics, 1991
    Elias James Corey, Chemistry, 1990
    Merton H. Miller, Economics, 1990
    William F. Sharpe, Economics, 1990
    Harry M. Markowitz, Economics, 1990
    Jerome I. Friedman, Physics, 1990
    Henry W. Kendall, Physics, 1990
    Joseph E. Murray, Physiology or Medicine, 1990
    E. Donnall Thomas, Physiology or Medicine, 1990
    Sidney Altman, born in Canada, Chemistry, 1989
    Thomas R. Cech, Chemistry, 1989
    Hans G. Dehmelt, born in Germany, Physics, 1989
    Norman F. Ramsey, Physics, 1989
    J. Michael Bishop, Physiology or Medicine, 1989
    Harold E. Varmus, Physiology or Medicine, 1989
    Leon M. Lederman, Physics, 1988
    Melvin Schwartz, Physics, 1988
    Jack Steinberger, born in Germany, Physics, 1988
    Gertrude B. Elion, Physiology or Medicine, 1988
    George H. Hitchings, Physiology or Medicine, 1988
    Charles J. Pedersen, born in Korea, Chemistry, 1987
    Donald J. Cram, Chemistry, 1987
    Robert M. Solow, Economics, 1987
    Joseph Brodsky, born in Russia, Literature, 1987
    Dudley R. Herschbach, Chemistry, 1986
    Yuan T. Lee, born in Taiwan, Chemistry, 1986
    James M. Buchanan, Economics, 1986
    Elie Wiesel, born in Romania, Peace, 1986
    Stanley Cohen, Physiology or Medicine, 1986
    Rita Levi-Montalcini, born in Italy, Physiology or Medicine, 1986
    Jerome Karle, Chemistry, 1985
    Herbert A. Hauptman, Chemistry, 1985
    Franco Modigliani, born in Italy, Economics, 1985
    Michael S. Brown, Physiology or Medicine, 1985
    Joseph L. Goldstein, Physiology or Medicine, 1985
    Bruce Merrifield, Chemistry, 1984
    Henry Taube, born in Canada, Chemistry, 1983
    Gérard Debreu, born in France, Economics, 1983
    William A. Fowler, Physics, 1983
    Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar, born in India, Physics, 1983
    Barbara McClintock, Physiology or Medicine, 1983
    George J. Stigler, Economics, 1982
    Kenneth G. Wilson, Physics, 1982
    Roald Hoffmann, born in then Poland, now Ukraine, Chemistry, 1981
    James Tobin, Economics, 1981
    Nicolaas Bloembergen, born in the Netherlands, Physics, 1981
    Arthur L. Schawlow, Physics, 1981
    David H. Hubel, born in Canada, Physiology or Medicine, 1981
    Roger W. Sperry, Physiology or Medicine, 1981
    Walter Gilbert, Chemistry, 1980
    Paul Berg, Chemistry, 1980
    Lawrence R. Klein, Economics, 1980
    Czesław Miłosz*, born in then Russian Empire, now Lithuania, Literature, 1980
    James Cronin, Physics, 1980
    Val Fitch, Physics, 1980
    Baruj Benacerraf, born in Venezuela, Physiology or Medicine, 1980
    George D. Snell, Physiology or Medicine, 1980
    Herbert C. Brown, born in the United Kingdom, Chemistry, 1979
    Theodore Schultz, Economics, 1979
    Steven Weinberg, Physics, 1979
    Sheldon Glashow, Physics, 1979
    Allan M. Cormack, born in South Africa, Physiology or Medicine, 1979
    Herbert A. Simon, Economics, 1978
    Isaac Bashevis Singer, born in then Russian Empire, now Poland, Literature, 1978
    Robert Woodrow Wilson, Physics, 1978
    Arno Penzias, born in Germany, Physics, 1978
    Hamilton O. Smith, Physiology or Medicine, 1978
    Daniel Nathans, Physiology or Medicine, 1978
    Philip Anderson, Physics, 1977
    John H. van Vleck, Physics, 1977
    Roger Guillemin, born in France, Physiology or Medicine, 1977
    Andrew Schally, born in then Poland, now Lithuania, Physiology or Medicine, 1977
    Rosalyn Yalow, Physiology or Medicine, 1977
    William Lipscomb, Chemistry, 1976
    Milton Friedman, Economics, 1976
    Saul Bellow, born in Canada, Literature, 1976
    Burton Richter, Physics, 1976
    Samuel C. C. Ting, Physics, 1976
    Baruch S. Blumberg, Physiology or Medicine, 1976
    Daniel Carleton Gajdusek, Physiology or Medicine, 1976
    Tjalling C. Koopmans, born in the Netherlands, Economics, 1975
    Ben Roy Mottelson*, Physics, 1975
    James Rainwater, Physics, 1975
    David Baltimore, Physiology or Medicine, 1975
    Renato Dulbecco, born in Italy, Physiology or Medicine, 1975
    Howard Martin Temin, Physiology or Medicine, 1975
    Paul J. Flory, Chemistry, 1974
    George E. Palade, born in Romania, Physiology or Medicine, 1974
    Wassily Leontief, born in Germany, Economics, 1973
    Henry Kissinger, born in Germany, Peace, 1973
    Ivar Giaever, Norway, Physics, 1973
    Christian Anfinsen, Chemistry, 1972
    Stanford Moore, Chemistry, 1972
    William H. Stein, Chemistry, 1972
    Kenneth J. Arrow, Economics, 1972
    John Bardeen, Physics, 1972
    Leon N. Cooper, Physics, 1972
    Robert Schrieffer, Physics, 1972
    Gerald Edelman, Physiology or Medicine, 1972
    Simon Kuznets, born in then Russia, now Belarus, Economics, 1971
    Earl W. Sutherland Jr., Physiology or Medicine, 1971
    Paul A. Samuelson, Economics, 1970
    Norman Borlaug, Peace, 1970
    Julius Axelrod, Physiology or Medicine, 1970
    Murray Gell-Mann, Physics, 1969
    Max Delbrück, born in Germany, Physiology or Medicine, 1969
    Alfred Hershey, Physiology or Medicine, 1969
    Salvador Luria, born in Italy, Physiology or Medicine, 1969
    Lars Onsager, born in Norway, Chemistry, 1968
    Luis Alvarez, Physics, 1968
    Robert W. Holley, Physiology or Medicine, 1968
    Har Gobind Khorana, born in India, Physiology or Medicine, 1968
    Marshall Warren Nirenberg, Physiology or Medicine, 1968
    Hans Bethe, born in then Germany, now France, Physics, 1967
    Haldan Keffer Hartline, Physiology or Medicine, 1967
    George Wald, Physiology or Medicine, 1967
    Robert S. Mulliken, Chemistry, 1966
    Charles B. Huggins, born in Canada, Physiology or Medicine, 1966
    Francis Peyton Rous, Physiology or Medicine, 1966
    Robert B. Woodward, Chemistry, 1965
    Richard P. Feynman, Physics, 1965
    Julian Schwinger, Physics, 1965
    Martin Luther King, Jr., Peace, 1964
    Charles H. Townes, Physics, 1964
    Konrad Bloch, born in then Germany, now Poland, Physiology or Medicine, 1964
    Maria Goeppert-Mayer, born in then Germany, now Poland, Physics, 1963
    Eugene Wigner, born in Hungary, Physics, 1963
    John Steinbeck, Literature, 1962
    Linus C. Pauling, Peace, 1962
    James D. Watson, Physiology or Medicine, 1962
    Melvin Calvin, Chemistry, 1961
    Robert Hofstadter, Physics, 1961
    Georg von Békésy, born in Hungary, Physiology or Medicine, 1961
    Willard F. Libby, Chemistry, 1960
    Donald A. Glaser, Physics, 1960
    Owen Chamberlain, Physics, 1959
    Emilio Segrè, born in Italy, Physics, 1959
    Arthur Kornberg, Physiology or Medicine, 1959
    Severo Ochoa, born in Spain, Physiology or Medicine, 1959
    George Beadle, Physiology or Medicine, 1958
    Joshua Lederberg, Physiology or Medicine, 1958
    Edward Tatum, Physiology or Medicine, 1958
    Chen Ning Yang, born in China, Physics, 1957
    Tsung-Dao Lee, born in China, Physics, 1957
    William B. Shockley, Physics, 1956
    John Bardeen, Physics, 1956
    Walter H. Brattain, born in China, Physics, 1956
    Dickinson W. Richards, Physiology or Medicine, 1956
    André F. Cournand, France, Physiology or Medicine, 1956
    Vincent du Vigneaud, Chemistry, 1955
    Willis E. Lamb, Physics, 1955
    Polykarp Kusch, born in Germany, Physics, 1955
    Linus C. Pauling, Chemistry, 1954
    Ernest Hemingway, Literature, 1954
    John F. Enders, Physiology or Medicine, 1954
    Frederick C. Robbins, Physiology or Medicine, 1954
    Thomas H. Weller, Physiology or Medicine, 1954
    George C. Marshall, Peace, 1953
    Fritz Albert Lipmann, born in then Germany, now Russia, Physiology or Medicine, 1953
    E. M. Purcell, Physics, 1952
    Felix Bloch, born in Switzerland, Physics, 1952
    Selman A. Waksman, born in then Russian Empire, now Ukraine, Physiology or Medicine, 1952
    Edwin M. McMillan, Chemistry, 1951
    Glenn Theodore Seaborg, Chemistry, 1951
    Ralph J. Bunche, Peace, 1950
    Philip S. Hench, Physiology or Medicine, 1950
    Edward C. Kendall, Physiology or Medicine, 1950
    William Giauque, born in Canada, Chemistry, 1949
    William Faulkner, Literature, 1949
    T. S. Eliot*, Literature, 1948
    American Friends Service Committee (The Quakers), Peace, 1947
    Carl Ferdinand Cori, born in Austria, Physiology or Medicine, 1947
    Gerty Cori, born in Austria, Physiology or Medicine, 1947
    Wendell M. Stanley, Chemistry, 1946
    James B. Sumner, Chemistry, 1946
    John H. Northrop, Chemistry, 1946
    Emily G. Balch, Peace, 1946
    John R. Mott, Peace, 1946
    Percy W. Bridgman, Physics, 1946
    Hermann J. Muller, Physiology or Medicine, 1946
    Cordell Hull, Peace, 1945
    Isidor Isaac Rabi, born in Austria, Physics, 1944
    Joseph Erlanger, Physiology or Medicine, 1944
    Herbert S. Gasser, Physiology or Medicine, 1944
    Otto Stern, born in then Germany, now Poland, Physics, 1943
    Edward A. Doisy, Physiology or Medicine, 1943
    Ernest Lawrence, Physics, 1939
    Pearl S. Buck, Literature, 1938
    Clinton Davisson, Physics, 1937
    Eugene O’Neill, Literature, 1936
    Carl Anderson, Physics, 1936
    Harold C. Urey, Chemistry, 1934
    George R. Minot, Physiology or Medicine, 1934
    William P. Murphy, Physiology or Medicine, 1934
    George H. Whipple, Physiology or Medicine, 1934
    Thomas H. Morgan, Physiology or Medicine, 1933
    Irving Langmuir, Chemistry, 1932
    Jane Addams, Peace, 1931
    Nicholas M. Butler, Peace, 1931
    Sinclair Lewis, Literature, 1930
    Frank B. Kellogg, Peace, 1929
    Arthur H. Compton, Physics, 1927
    Charles G. Dawes, Peace, 1925
    Robert A. Millikan, Physics, 1923
    Woodrow Wilson, Peace, 1919
    Theodore W. Richards, Chemistry, 1914
    Elihu Root, Peace, 1912
    Albert A. Michelson, born in then Germany, now Poland, Physics, 1907
    Theodore Roosevelt, Peace, 1906

  205. H B Bear

    Greg Sheridan was on the money – right up to the point where he says the ABC could have saved Victoriastanis from themselves and The Hunchback. The ALPBC has no record of successful investigative journalism in the last 20 years and is increasingly part of the problem – think Louise Milligan and George Pell, Four Corners and live cattle. There is no reason to think having more people like Jon Paine housed at Southbank would have made an iota of difference.

  206. Bruce of Newcastle

    Yep – Apparently BoN and Cassie thinks he works for Getup.

    Numbers – Thanks for demonstrating once again that you are a liar.

  207. JC

    Well, white people invented it. Perhaps we could have an African model, a couple of palm fronds waved on each corner. That should work

    I think the traffic light was actually invented by a black man in the US.

  208. MemoryFault

    Good morning Boambee John –
    assumimg you’re around somewhere.

    Strongly suggest you read the article here at the ABC.
    Then you might like to read the post and links by Duncam at 8.51 am.
    A towering semi-government edifice honouring the glory of the New Order, and an article on yet another super fund sinking its money into ruinable projects, which will do nothing but line the pockets of the crony corporatists who oversee it, backed by ever increasing subsidies, paid for by ever suffering households and taxpayers.

    Right now the survey takers and the focus groups will be testing and sampling to see how well these two announcements are received, so the federal government can decide when to come out in the open about “repurposing” our super. Watch this space.

    So, one project with all the trappings of a conquering Dictator in the mold of Bonaparte, and another in the best green traditions of the Thule Society in Hitler’s day.

    Somebody remind me how all this is all a left wing, commie socialist plot by the Chinks.

    Time to do some paid work.

  209. egg_

    The point was that Grig’s coronavirus expert of choice was a meth addict who sought rough trade in public parks while lynching his testicles with a noose.

    If you’re a nong who works in the abstract anything is possible.

  210. notafan

    Robbed of meaning isn’t very useful.

    Apparently pointing out the different infection rates between Australia and the US is a zingers.

    We (making bold assumption) are actually very pleased Australia has not had high death rates.

    There are probably lots of reasons for the difference.

    One is clearly not, mostly, living in high rise towers.

  211. Knuckle Dragger

    rickw,

    The bloke was largely unhurt, and yes it was piss funny.

    If you’re going to perform vanity falls for attention, make sure a fire truck’s rolling underneath you.

    That sort of thing’s the stuff that keeps you getting out of bed.

  212. Mater

    The old section of the Hume that has reverted to gravel might be the go, but I’m not sure it gets me out far enough. I’ve used it in the past when there have been outbound prangs on the Hume.

    No!
    The Hume runs right through Mitchell Shire, the only regional Shire under lockdown. Too much heat.
    You need to come West and bypass that entire area.
    Perhaps Bulla, Sunbury, Riddells, and then the back roads through Axedale and beyond.

  213. notafan

    No cycling out on a rail trail either!

  214. Knuckle Dragger

    Einstein would have loved to stay in Chermany.

    Instead he went to the US, where he made nothing of himself. Stupid Yanks.

  215. Farmer Gez

    notafan
    #3507818, posted on July 9, 2020 at 8:33 am
    does Shane Patton dye his hair?

    He’s also got the Shane Warne hair plugs going as well.
    I’ve talked to him in the past and he now looks to have had a makeover for the top job.

  216. Cassie of Sydney

    “There are some very strange people posting here.”

    Written by the strangest of the strange. Very nice to see him engaging is some form of self analysis. Baby steps. Perhaps he could refrain from posting links to anti-Semitic organisations.

  217. notafan

    Farmer He’s!

    Oh that’s what it is.

    There was a weirdness I couldn’t put my finger quite on.

    #onlywomenshouldbeallowedtodyetheirhair

  218. Old School Conservative

    The bloke was largely unhurt

    Thanks for the update.
    I’ve been holding in great peals of laughter for decency’s sake but now…I’ll share it around.

  219. Traffic flows on Göögle Maps may indicate queues at checkpoints.

  220. Perth Trader

    It’s time West. Aust. cut all ties with the rest of Aust. and said goodbye. A very hard border closure and a end to east coast interference.

  221. dopey

    End of the road for Qantas 747s. Joy flights next week sold out within 15 minutes apparently.

  222. Mother Lode

    CNN’s Don Lemon Says We Can ‘Fix’ Mount Rushmore By Adding Obama’s Face
    July 8, 2020,

    What did Obama actually achieve?

    His own party don’t speak of his legacy. Many things he did went tits up of their own accord. Obamacare was a disaster. There was no evidence of things improving and had absurd consequences like forcing religious orders to insure for abortions. Medical insurance prices ballooned and people had to drop it.

    The economy was foundering and his only response was to say that this was as good as it would ever be again.

    An American embassy was overrun and the ambassador (and others) were killed by a mob in spite of pleas for help, and the worm could not even admit it. American sailors were kidnapped by Iran and, after humiliating themselves and denouncing America on world media, ransomed for pallets of cash and a nuclear deal that gave Iran a free hand while binding America’s.

    He dismissed the constitution, spurned its restrictions on his desire for power, and overrode law with Executive Orders.

    But what ought to damn him most among Democrats is that he prepared the way for Trump. He had the nation begging for a Trump. He would not have been summoned into existence after Bill Clinton, or GWB. Only an Obama.

    Obama on Mt Rushmore would just be more affirmative action.

  223. Autocorrect can work in mysterious ways, Notafan! 🙂

  224. notafan

    How do people of colour cope with zebra crossings?

    Go lights in the US can be green* blue or white.

    *Making things difficult for the colour blind?

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