Open Forum: July 11, 2020

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2,144 Responses to Open Forum: July 11, 2020

  1. This is going from bad to worse.

    ABC Investigations understands the Zulu 1 patrol was involved in the shooting at the tractor where at least five Afghans were killed and that some members of the SAS patrol were unhappy about what happened.

    There were no weapons found on the victims after the shooting.

    Abdul Qadus was wounded in the raid and later evacuated by the Australians.

    “When I got injured, they took me to the Afghan National Army hospital at Kandahar airbase,” he said.

    “I was there two days and nights.”

    The Australian Defence Force has been contacted for comment.

    The Inspector-General of the Australian Defence Force (IGADF) has spent the past four years investigating rumours and allegations of war crimes committed by Australian special forces in Afghanistan.

    Investigators are looking into more than 55 separate incidents of alleged breaches of the rules of war between 2005 and 2016.

  2. rickw

    Daily dose of Vietnam!

  3. Knuckle Dragger

    1. Be somebody’s sister.
    2. Grab yourself some bolt ons.
    3. Hire a PR hack or two.
    4. Accept your membership to The Club with grace and dignity.

    ‘DANNII Minogue has reportedly received an exemption to bypass hotel isolation in Queensland after returning from a major COVID hotspot. The singer touched down on the Gold Coast over the weekend after flying in from the United States, where over 137,000 people have died from COVID-19, 7 News Queensland reports.

    ‘It’s understood Minogue received the isolation exemption from Queensland Health on the grounds of a medical certificate issued by her doctor. This exemption has allowed her to isolate at a private property on the coast, bypassing mandatory hotel isolation and the associated accommodation costs, according to 7 News.

    ‘Avoiding a hotel quarantine will see her escape the mandatory $2800 bill for hotel accommodation that all returning travellers have to pay under current Queensland quarantine laws.’

    I fail to see why Joe and Jane Citizen may be upset by this. After all, Dannii’s been on the telly.

  4. rickw

    ABC Investigations understands the Zulu 1 patrol was involved in the shooting at the tractor where at least five Afghans were killed and that some members of the SAS patrol were unhappy about what happened.

    The Taliban used a tractor in an attack on Kandahar. Right near the live firing area. It didn’t make any sense and it didn’t last long.

  5. Knuckle Dragger

    The general (and justified) view is that government are idiots, but it would help if they spread their idiocy around equally.

    Yes I am aware this has never happened.

  6. MatrixTransform

    Is Minogue still a hottie?

    I’d volunteer for security duty

    what ever you need … we can work something out

  7. calli

    No, Knuckles. He looked very dashing in his RayBans but can only see out of one eye. I wondered if he’s had a welding flash come home to roost.

    Anyways, he’ll (hopefully) let us know how he got on.

  8. Knuckle Dragger

    Minogue’s had that much work done she’s compromised.

    She must be conveyed from place to place in a confined, stable atmosphere heated to 23.4 degrees to avoid excess meltage and a costly rebuild.

    Any passing contact with the wrong coefficient will result in catastrophic deconstruction.

  9. Knuckle Dragger

    ‘No, Knuckles.’

    Good.

  10. Herodotus

    Rules of war? Since when did the Taliban or most of the ME abide by them?
    Stop being stupid.

  11. rickw

    I fail to see why Joe and Jane Citizen may be upset by this. After all, Dannii’s been on the telly.

    The only thing that’s strange about this is why, after having escaped idiocracy island, did she return?

  12. Knuckle Dragger

    Remember the scene in Indiana Jones and the Raiders of the Lost Ark at the end when the Nazis’ faces melt when confronted by whatever was in the Ark and kicked arse?

    That happened to Dannii Minogue in 2014 when she was let outside without seven layers of foundation and hair extensions.

  13. rickw

    Yup, in one sinking of a warship in 1941, Australia lost more war dead than in the entire Vietnam war.

    And in one pandemic in 2020, the Americans lost more dead than in Vietnam and Korea combined.

    So Vietnam’s now irrelevant?! Great!

  14. calli

    Oh dear. I missed it. How sad.

    Former prime minister Julia Gillard says you simply have to follow the science as she hits out at “strongman” leaders across the globe for their response to the coronavirus pandemic.

    The article then goes on to smear the US because Covid “caseload”. Whether the article called Gillard did the same remains unclear, but I’d put folding money on it. She could never resist a bit of ridiculous hyperbowl.

  15. rickw

    That happened to Dannii Minogue in 2014 when she was let outside without seven layers of foundation and hair extensions.

    Photo’s?

  16. Knuckle Dragger

    ‘Photo’s?’

    They’re in Anne’s bunker.

    @TheStorm

  17. Knuckle Dragger

    Slow news day.

    Stefanovic the Younger describes NSW residents’ reactions to a meteor sighted over the coast.

    Before the break, his ominous intonation: ‘Or, was it?’

    *commercial break*

    Answer: Yes it was.

  18. Fisky:

    Uh, Huawei is threatening Britain with *what*? ‘Sources close to the company say Huawei will not make an explicit threat to cease maintenance. It will … make the point that “without Huawei there will be blackouts” …’

    They really don’t give a shit any more, do they.
    Utterly convinced they can dictate to the world.
    Fine. Cease maintenance – it will be a massive lesson to the globalists who thought they could make their profits in the West, and their products in the East – see how much you can sell of the shoddy shit.

  19. 1735099

    Rules of war?

    The rules of war are the whole point.
    And they’re what separates our military from the thugs they fight.
    If we ignore those “rules” the moral justification for the intervention (restoring the rule of law) disappears.
    This issue should have been sorted way back, before the media had an opportunity to make a meal of it.

  20. Knuckle Dragger

    “without Huawei there will be blackouts”

    Translated:

    ‘Please take this opportunity to ostracise us further internationally, and beat to death while starving one of our few remaining markets.’

  21. notafan

    KD

    Maybe Daan!i isn’t the only one to bypass hotel quarantine with a medical certificate but no-one else got front page.

  22. sfw

    I like revolvers easy to maintain, not much to go wrong, have a few speed loaders and off you go.

  23. Knuckle Dragger

    Yeah, agreed nota. Forrest got a couple of free hits in WA IIRC.

    The important thing is, we’re all in this together.

  24. notafan

    If Afghanistan military wore uniforms these incidents wouldn’t occur.

    Probably on their RDO.

  25. custard

    ABC Investigations

    ROTFL

  26. notafan

    We of Melbourne know all about ‘we’re all this together ‘

    Thanks bonking security guards and all your friends and family!

  27. Mater

    We of Melbourne know all about ‘we’re all this together’

    As a friend of my wife said:

    “No, we are not! We’re all caught in the same storm, but we’re riding it out in different boats. Some are in Cabin Cruisers, others are in kayaks.”

  28. Cassie of Sydney

    Cardinal George Pell has a really good piece in today’s Oz…

    “George Pell: How I survived hell on earth

    There is a lot of goodness in prisons. At times, I am sure, prisons may be hell on earth. I was fortunate to be kept safe and treated well. I was impressed by the professionalism of the warders, the faith of the prisoners, and the existence of a moral sense even in the darkest places.

    I was in solitary confinement for 13 months, 10 at the Melbourne Assessment Prison and three at Barwon Prison. In Melbourne the prison uniform was a green tracksuit, but in Barwon I was issued the bright red colours of a cardinal. I had been convicted in December 2018 of historical sexual offences against children, despite my innocence, and despite the incoherence of the crown prosecutor’s case against me. ­Eventually (in April this year) the High Court of Australia was to quash my convictions in a unanimous ­ruling. In the meantime, I began to serve my sentence of six years.

    In Melbourne, I lived in Cell 11, Unit 8, on the fifth floor. My cell was 7m or 8m long and about 2m wide, just enough for my bed, which had a firm base, a not-too-thick mattress, and two blankets. On the left as you entered were low shelves with a kettle, television, and eating space. Across the narrow aisle was a basin with hot and cold water and a shower recess with good hot water. Unlike in many posh hotels, an efficient reading lamp was in the wall above the bed.

    Since both my knees had been replaced a couple of months before entering prison, I used a walking stick initially, and was given a higher hospital chair, which was a blessing. Health regulations require each prisoner to have an hour outside each day, and so I was allowed to take two half-hours in Melbourne. Nowhere in Unit 8 was there clear glass, so I could recognise day from night, but not much more, from my cell. I never saw the 11 other prisoners.

    I certainly heard them. Unit 8 had 12 small cells along one external wall, with the “noisy” prisoners at one end. I celled in the “Toorak” end, named for a rich Melbourne suburb, exactly the same as the noisy end but generally without bangers and shouters; without the anguished and angry, who were often destroyed by drugs, especially crystal meth. I used to marvel at how long they could bang their fists, but a warder explained that they kicked with their feet like horses. Some flooded their cells or fouled them. Once in a while the dog squad was called, or someone had to be gassed. On my first night I thought I heard a woman crying; another prisoner was calling for his mother.

    I was in isolation for my own protection, as those convicted of the sexual abuse of children, especially clergy, are vulnerable to physical attacks and abuse in prison. I was threatened in this manner only once, when I was in one of two adjacent exercise areas separated by a high wall, with an opening at head height. As I walked around the perimeter, someone spat at me through the fly wire of the open aperture and began condemning me. It was a total surprise, so I returned furious to the window to confront my assailant and rebuke him. He bolted from the front line out of my sight but continued to condemn me, as a “black spider” and other less-than-complimentary terms. After my initial rebuke, I remained silent, though I complained afterward that I would not go out to exercise if this fellow was to be next door. A day or so later, the unit supervisor told me that the young offender had been shifted because he had done “something worse” to another prisoner.

    On a few other occasions during the long lockdown from 4.30 in the evening to 7.15 in the morning, I was denounced and abused by other prisoners in Unit 8. One evening, I overheard a fierce argument over my guilt. A defender announced he was prepared to back the man who had been publicly supported by two prime ministers. Opinion as to my innocence or guilt was divided among the prisoners, as in most sectors of Australian society, although the media, with some splendid exceptions, was bitterly hostile. One correspondent who had spent decades in prison wrote that I was the first convicted priest he had heard of who had any support among the prisoners. And I received only kindness and friendship from my three fellow prisoners in Unit 3 at Barwon. Most of the warders in both prisons recognised I was innocent.

    The antipathy among prisoners toward the perpetrators of juvenile sexual abuse is universal in the English-­speaking world — an interesting example of the natural law emerging through darkness. All of us are tempted to despise those we define as worse than ourselves. Even murderers share in the disdain toward those who violate the young. However ironic, this disdain is not all bad, as it expresses a belief in the existence of right and wrong, good and evil, which often surfaces in jails in ­surprising ways.

    On many mornings in Unit 8, I could hear the Muslim prayer chants. On other mornings, the Muslims were a little slack and did not chant, though perhaps they prayed silently. Language in prison was coarse and repetitive, but I seldom heard cursing or blaspheming. The prisoner I consulted thought this fact was a sign of belief, rather than a token of God’s absence. I suspect the Muslim prisoners, for their part, do not tolerate blasphemy.

    Prisoners from many jails wrote to me, some of them regularly. One was the man who had set up the altar when I celebrated the final Christmas mass at Pentridge prison in 1996, before it closed. Another announced simply that he was lost and in the dark. Could I suggest a book? I recommended he read Luke’s Gospel and start with John’s First Epistle. Another was a man of deep faith and a devotee of Padre Pio of Pietrelcina. He had a dream that I would be released. It proved to be premature. Another told me that it was the consensus among the career criminals that I was innocent and had been “stitched up” — adding that it was odd that criminals could recognise the truth but not judges.

    Like that of most priests, my work had brought me into contact with a wide variety of people, so I was not too surprised by the prisoners. The warders were a surprise, and a pleasant one. Some were friendly, one or two inclined to be hostile, but all were professional. If they had been resolutely silent, as the guards were for months when Cardinal Thuan was in solitary confinement in Vietnam, life would have been much harder. Sister Mary O’Shannassy, the senior Catholic chaplain in Melbourne with 25 years of experience, who does a fine job — one man convicted of murder told me he was a bit scared of her! — acknowledged that Unit 8 is well-staffed and well-run. After I lost my appeal to the Victorian Supreme Court, I considered not appealing to the High Court, reasoning that if the judges were simply going to close ranks, I need not co-operate in an expensive charade. The boss of the prison in Melbourne, a bigger man than I and a straight shooter, urged me to persevere. I was encouraged and remain grateful to him.

    On the morning of April 7, national television relayed the announcement of my verdict from the High Court. I watched in my cell on Channel 7 as a surprised young reporter informed Australia of my acquittal and became still more perplexed by the unanimity of the seven justices. The three other prisoners in my unit congratulated me, and soon I was released into a world locked down for coronavirus. My journey was bizarre. Two press helicopters followed me from Barwon to the Carmelite Convent in Melbourne, and the next day two press cars accompanied me all 880km to Sydney.

    For many, time in prison is an opportunity to ponder and confront basic truths. Prison life removed any excuse that I was too busy to pray, and my regular schedule of prayer sustained me. From the first night, I always had a breviary (even if it was out of season), and I received holy communion each week. On five occasions I attended mass, though I was unable to celebrate it, a fact I particularly lamented at Christmas and Easter.

    My Catholic faith sustained me, especially the understanding that my suffering need not be pointless but could be united with Christ Our Lord’s. I never felt abandoned, knowing that the Lord was with me — even as I didn’t understand what he was doing for most of the 13 months. For many years, I had told the suffering and disturbed that the Son of God, too, had trials on this earth, and now I myself was consoled by this fact. So, I prayed for friends and foes, for my supporters and my family, for the victims of sexual abuse, and for my fellow prisoners and the warders.

    George Cardinal Pell is prefect emeritus of the Vatican Secretariat for the Economy. This article was originally published on First Things.”

    No comments allowed.

  29. Cassie of Sydney

    Cardinal George Pell (7-0 upon him) has a really good piece in today’s Oz…

    “George Pell: How I survived hell on earth

    There is a lot of goodness in prisons. At times, I am sure, prisons may be hell on earth. I was fortunate to be kept safe and treated well. I was impressed by the professionalism of the warders, the faith of the prisoners, and the existence of a moral sense even in the darkest places.

    I was in solitary confinement for 13 months, 10 at the Melbourne Assessment Prison and three at Barwon Prison. In Melbourne the prison uniform was a green tracksuit, but in Barwon I was issued the bright red colours of a cardinal. I had been convicted in December 2018 of historical sexual offences against children, despite my innocence, and despite the incoherence of the crown prosecutor’s case against me. ­Eventually (in April this year) the High Court of Australia was to quash my convictions in a unanimous ­ruling. In the meantime, I began to serve my sentence of six years.

    In Melbourne, I lived in Cell 11, Unit 8, on the fifth floor. My cell was 7m or 8m long and about 2m wide, just enough for my bed, which had a firm base, a not-too-thick mattress, and two blankets. On the left as you entered were low shelves with a kettle, television, and eating space. Across the narrow aisle was a basin with hot and cold water and a shower recess with good hot water. Unlike in many posh hotels, an efficient reading lamp was in the wall above the bed.

    Since both my knees had been replaced a couple of months before entering prison, I used a walking stick initially, and was given a higher hospital chair, which was a blessing. Health regulations require each prisoner to have an hour outside each day, and so I was allowed to take two half-hours in Melbourne. Nowhere in Unit 8 was there clear glass, so I could recognise day from night, but not much more, from my cell. I never saw the 11 other prisoners.

    I certainly heard them. Unit 8 had 12 small cells along one external wall, with the “noisy” prisoners at one end. I celled in the “Toorak” end, named for a rich Melbourne suburb, exactly the same as the noisy end but generally without bangers and shouters; without the anguished and angry, who were often destroyed by drugs, especially crystal meth. I used to marvel at how long they could bang their fists, but a warder explained that they kicked with their feet like horses. Some flooded their cells or fouled them. Once in a while the dog squad was called, or someone had to be gassed. On my first night I thought I heard a woman crying; another prisoner was calling for his mother.

    I was in isolation for my own protection, as those convicted of the sexual abuse of children, especially clergy, are vulnerable to physical attacks and abuse in prison. I was threatened in this manner only once, when I was in one of two adjacent exercise areas separated by a high wall, with an opening at head height. As I walked around the perimeter, someone spat at me through the fly wire of the open aperture and began condemning me. It was a total surprise, so I returned furious to the window to confront my assailant and rebuke him. He bolted from the front line out of my sight but continued to condemn me, as a “black spider” and other less-than-complimentary terms. After my initial rebuke, I remained silent, though I complained afterward that I would not go out to exercise if this fellow was to be next door. A day or so later, the unit supervisor told me that the young offender had been shifted because he had done “something worse” to another prisoner.

    On a few other occasions during the long lockdown from 4.30 in the evening to 7.15 in the morning, I was denounced and abused by other prisoners in Unit 8. One evening, I overheard a fierce argument over my guilt. A defender announced he was prepared to back the man who had been publicly supported by two prime ministers. Opinion as to my innocence or guilt was divided among the prisoners, as in most sectors of Australian society, although the media, with some splendid exceptions, was bitterly hostile. One correspondent who had spent decades in prison wrote that I was the first convicted priest he had heard of who had any support among the prisoners. And I received only kindness and friendship from my three fellow prisoners in Unit 3 at Barwon. Most of the warders in both prisons recognised I was innocent.

    The antipathy among prisoners toward the perpetrators of juvenile sexual abuse is universal in the English-­speaking world — an interesting example of the natural law emerging through darkness. All of us are tempted to despise those we define as worse than ourselves. Even murderers share in the disdain toward those who violate the young. However ironic, this disdain is not all bad, as it expresses a belief in the existence of right and wrong, good and evil, which often surfaces in jails in ­surprising ways.

    On many mornings in Unit 8, I could hear the Muesli prayer chants. On other mornings, the Mueslis were a little slack and did not chant, though perhaps they prayed silently. Language in prison was coarse and repetitive, but I seldom heard cursing or blaspheming. The prisoner I consulted thought this fact was a sign of belief, rather than a token of God’s absence. I suspect the Muesli prisoners, for their part, do not tolerate blasphemy.

    Prisoners from many jails wrote to me, some of them regularly. One was the man who had set up the altar when I celebrated the final Christmas mass at Pentridge prison in 1996, before it closed. Another announced simply that he was lost and in the dark. Could I suggest a book? I recommended he read Luke’s Gospel and start with John’s First Epistle. Another was a man of deep faith and a devotee of Padre Pio of Pietrelcina. He had a dream that I would be released. It proved to be premature. Another told me that it was the consensus among the career criminals that I was innocent and had been “stitched up” — adding that it was odd that criminals could recognise the truth but not judges.

    Like that of most priests, my work had brought me into contact with a wide variety of people, so I was not too surprised by the prisoners. The warders were a surprise, and a pleasant one. Some were friendly, one or two inclined to be hostile, but all were professional. If they had been resolutely silent, as the guards were for months when Cardinal Thuan was in solitary confinement in Vietnam, life would have been much harder. Sister Mary O’Shannassy, the senior Catholic chaplain in Melbourne with 25 years of experience, who does a fine job — one man convicted of murder told me he was a bit scared of her! — acknowledged that Unit 8 is well-staffed and well-run. After I lost my appeal to the Victorian Supreme Court, I considered not appealing to the High Court, reasoning that if the judges were simply going to close ranks, I need not co-operate in an expensive charade. The boss of the prison in Melbourne, a bigger man than I and a straight shooter, urged me to persevere. I was encouraged and remain grateful to him.

    On the morning of April 7, national television relayed the announcement of my verdict from the High Court. I watched in my cell on Channel 7 as a surprised young reporter informed Australia of my acquittal and became still more perplexed by the unanimity of the seven justices. The three other prisoners in my unit congratulated me, and soon I was released into a world locked down for coronavirus. My journey was bizarre. Two press helicopters followed me from Barwon to the Carmelite Convent in Melbourne, and the next day two press cars accompanied me all 880km to Sydney.

    For many, time in prison is an opportunity to ponder and confront basic truths. Prison life removed any excuse that I was too busy to pray, and my regular schedule of prayer sustained me. From the first night, I always had a breviary (even if it was out of season), and I received holy communion each week. On five occasions I attended mass, though I was unable to celebrate it, a fact I particularly lamented at Christmas and Easter.

    My Catholic faith sustained me, especially the understanding that my suffering need not be pointless but could be united with Christ Our Lord’s. I never felt abandoned, knowing that the Lord was with me — even as I didn’t understand what he was doing for most of the 13 months. For many years, I had told the suffering and disturbed that the Son of God, too, had trials on this earth, and now I myself was consoled by this fact. So, I prayed for friends and foes, for my supporters and my family, for the victims of sexual abuse, and for my fellow prisoners and the warders.

    George Cardinal Pell is prefect emeritus of the Vatican Secretariat for the Economy. This article was originally published on First Things.”

    No comments allowed.

  30. calli

    Some are in Cabin Cruisers, others are in kayaks.

    Ha! I’m wearing these!

  31. Carpe Jugulum

    Cassie of Sydney
    #3512317, posted on July 14, 2020 at 7:53 am
    Cardinal George Pell (7-0 upon him) has a really good piece in today’s Oz…

    That is a seriously good article 👍

  32. Bruce of Newcastle

    We’re all caught in the same storm

    There’re five damp tails visible through my front flyscreen – rainbow lorikeets perched on the thin strip above the door, sheltering from the rain. Cold, wet and miserable, it’s our winter of discontent.

  33. Gab

    That is a seriously good article

    Cdl Pell has written a number of books over the years and they too are excellent.

  34. Dr Faustus

    In Well, You’re A Double Poo Bottom news:

    China warns citizens of ‘arbitrary’ searches in Australia and upgrades travel warning

    “Australia’s relevant law enforcement authorities arbitrarily search Chinese citizens and seize their items, and these circumstances could cause harm to Chinese citizens in Australia, as well as the safety of their assets,” said the Chinese foreign ministry.

    Happening all the time.
    What in God’s name is the AHRC doing?

  35. notafan

    Thanks Cassie for sharing Cardinal Pell’ S article.

    Prison is not ‘free board and lodging ‘ it is punishment, made very clear when the innocent are made to suffer it.

    Good on the Australian for publishing the article.

    In some ways it pleases me that prisoners are more objective and fair and decent than the media and the judiciary.

    I hope the article made a couple of appeals court judges uncomfortable.

  36. notafan

    All those Chinese on border force shows having their disgusting food confiscated. How mean of Australia to enforce the law!

    Stop emigrating here, your government loves you and wants you to stay home in China.

  37. Roger

    Former prime minister Julia Gillard says you simply have to follow the science as she hits out at “strongman” leaders across the globe for their response to the coronavirus pandemic.

    Still haunted by men in blue ties.

    Poor thing.

  38. notafan

    Prisoners are not blind to goodness and decency.

    The media should take a note.

  39. Candy

    Very interesting article by Cardinal Pell. But he doesn’t quite reveal his feelings about it all. He must have anger and deeper thoughts and was totally cheesed off with life and God and so-called friends and his thoughts on Louise Milligan would be fascinating. Does he have to maintain priestly demeanour. I would like to know what he really felt. He was “furious” with the spitter, ok but small incident, but how did he cope with what the media said about him.

  40. will

    In some ways it pleases me that prisoners are more objective and fair and decent than the media and the judiciary.

    Same with the Warders. It’s like those within the Victorian Justice system know how corrupt it has become since the Hull appointments. Outside this system, total ignorance, especially the know nothing “journalists”.

  41. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Palace letters released after 45 years

    Olivia Caisley
    Reporter
    @livcaisley
    9 minutes ago July 14, 2020
    No Comments

    Australians will today learn new details about the greatest constitutional crisis in the nation’s history when hundreds of letters between the Queen and former governor-general Sir John Kerr are released publicly.

    The decision follows a four-year legal battle by historian Jenny Hocking, who has fought for Australians to know the full story behind the dismissal.

    The letters had been deemed to be “personal communications” by the National Archives and the Federal Court, meaning they couldn’t be released until 2027, and even then only with the Queen’s permission. But a major­ity of the High Court’s full bench ruled in May that it was wrong to withhold them because they were commonwealth property.

    National Archives director-general David Fricker said at the time the letters would be released in full after staff had spent more than a month examining them to check whether any information should be redacted.

    The correspondence is made up of 212 letters and includes att­achments such as newspaper clippings, reports and copies of letters related to meetings and events att­ended by Sir John Kerr during his tenure as governor-general.

    Hocking believes the letters could support her theory that Kerr gave the Queen “advance knowledge” of his plan to dismiss Whitlam in November 1975 and received a “green light” from Buckingham Palace in response. The dismissal has always been a magnet for conspiracy theories.

    Kerr wrote in The Triumph of the Constitution that he was careful not to provide the Queen with “advance knowledge” his “intention to exercise the reserve power” of dismissal.

    There is considerable documentary and testimonial evidence that shows the Queen had no prior knowledge and did not approve of Kerr’s action, and edged him to an early departure from the vice-regal office.

    The release of the documents will finally expose the truth.

    From the Oz.

  42. Boambee John

    Herodotus
    #3512294, posted on July 14, 2020 at 7:03 am
    Rules of war? Since when did the Taliban or most of the ME abide by them?
    Stop being stupid.

    And when did thecever eager pursuers of “war crimes” pursue any of the Taliban, ISIS, and the numerous other R o P perpetrators of atrocities? The evidence is incontrovertible, but the investigations never start.

  43. Bruce of Newcastle

    Prison is not ‘free board and lodging ‘ it is punishment

    At least Cdl. Pell was unlikely to be assassinated:

    Ghislaine Maxwell reportedly moved from ‘cell to cell’ to avoid assassins (12 Jul)

    Now insiders have told the Mail on Sunday that prison officials are so “terrified someone will try to kill her” that they are constantly moving her around inside the Metropolitan Detention Center in Brooklyn.

    “She is being moved from cell to cell and sometimes has a cellmate, sometimes not,” an insider told the UK paper.

    “Jeffrey Epstein died behind bars and they are terrified someone will try to kill Ghislaine,” the source said.

    Assassins? I wonder who would want to assassinate her? It’s a mystery.

  44. Dr Faustus

    That bloody thing is going to break the sound barrier as it augers into the dirt. Let’s hope it doesn’t take too much with it.

    TSLA 12 month chart.

    The bellhops are buying with their ears back.
    $4000/share by the end of July, $25,000/share in September.
    No worries.

  45. Cassie of Sydney

    “He must have anger and deeper thoughts and was totally cheesed off with life and God and so-called friends and his thoughts on Louise Milligan would be fascinating. “

    Candy, you really have no idea about people who have faith in God.

  46. Notafan:

    I hope the article made a couple of appeals court judges uncomfortable.

    Nah.
    They’re sitting on their human skin leather chairs, with the embroidered “The process is the punishment” headrest for when they are having a nap, all having a cackle and plotting for their next ‘gotcha.’

  47. Roger

    Outside this system, total ignorance, especially the know nothing “journalists”.

    Not mere ignorance, but an incuriosity that is tantamaount to complicity.

  48. Cassie of Sydney

    “Outside this system, total ignorance, especially the know nothing “journalists”.”

    Not just know nothing “journalists”…they are also “low life” activists. Many of Cardinal Pell’s inmates in that goal have more decency and more integrity that the germalists “reporting” outside.

  49. notafan

    Thank goodness Cardinal Pell is a Christian, not a Karen.

  50. Herodotus

    In WW2 allied soldiers (or suspected spies/resistance organisers) would be shot (and often tortured) if not in uniform.

  51. stackja

    Cassie of Sydney
    #3512317, posted on July 14, 2020 at 7:53 am
    George Cardinal Pell is prefect emeritus of the Vatican Secretariat for the Economy. This article was originally published on First Things.”
    https://www.firstthings.com/article/2020/08/my-time-in-prison

  52. notafan

    Yes Yes Jeffrey Epstein didn’t kill himself.

    When a meme becomes a fact.

  53. will

    The bellhops are buying with their ears back.
    $4000/share by the end of July, $25,000/share in September.
    No worries.

    Before the 1987 crash I was at a party and someone was telling me about the shares they were buying. Where do you get your share tips? Oh, the Greengrocer. When the greengrocer is handing out share tips, time to sell.

  54. notafan

    That is also very true, Will.

    Ordinary people without university degrees who don’t run with the pack in the public arena calling holy men ‘rock spiders.

    Right Monty?

  55. Nick

    All those Chinese on border force shows having their disgusting food confiscated. How mean of Australia to enforce the law!

    It’s one of my favourite shows. Week after week, the same thing. The Chinese are generally law abiding people, I often wonder why the ignorance at our Customs desks plays out like that day after day. I suspect that they aren’t scared of Western Police, knowing that they can lie and pretend not to know the rules.

  56. stackja

    Press Briefing by Press Secretary Kayleigh McEnany | 7/13/2020

    MS. MCENANY: I don’t have the exact details for you on that, but I can follow up. What I will say is that the Roger Stone clemency was a very important moment for justice in this country. You had a completely bogus Russia witch hunt that found nothing. And in order to justify the waste of taxpayer dollars, you had Robert Mueller charging people with process crimes.

    And it’s really curious to me that with Roger Stone — you know, he’s charged of false statements, but McCabe was charged of false statements, lying to federal investigators; Brennan, false statements to Congress; Clapper, false statements to Congress. But last time I checked, they didn’t have 29 FBI agents wearing tactical gear showing up there at their house in a pre-dawn raid wielding M4 rifles, sweeping across their lawn, as happened to Roger Stone. They didn’t have four agents using battering rams breaking down their front door over false statements. And they didn’t have helicopters hovering over their houses and two police boats that roared up.

    Instead, McCabe and Clapper and Brennan and these guys are given lucrative contracts, books, contributorships. So there are really two standards of justice in this country, as Adam Schiff noted. Fortunately, he doesn’t have the facts to back up the way he meant that term.

  57. Tel

    When a meme becomes a fact.

    Everyone knew it from day one … but the meme is there to ensure no one conveniently forgets that fact.

  58. notafan

    And then pay a small fine if they are caught out.

    No such leniency from the everloving Chinese government.

    They just roll over beloved citizens with tanks.

  59. Dr Faustus

    Uh, Huawei is threatening Britain with *what*? ‘Sources close to the company say Huawei will not make an explicit threat to cease maintenance. It will … make the point that “without Huawei there will be blackouts”

    Sounds like it’s BT’s CEO threatening Britain.

    …if you want to have no Huawei in the whole of the telecoms infrastructure across the whole of the UK, I think that’s impossible to do in under 10 years.

    Jansen said the industry would want to be given a seven-year window to remove Huawei from the 5G network, but said “we could probably do it in five”.

    So, that sort of impossible. The impossibility you get when 2/3 of your 5G build out is Huawei and you’re facing a write down in billions that ‘could be passed on to consumers‘.

    Captured.

  60. notafan

    Not everyone ‘knew’ it.

    It’s a meme believe by those who just adore a conspiracy theory.

  61. Bruce of Newcastle

    TSLA 12 month chart.
    The bellhops are buying with their ears back.

    Their cars aren’t selling well either.

    Demand Hell: Tesla Just Slashed The Price Of Its Brand New Model Y By $3,000 (12 Jul)

    The Tesla Model Y was supposed to be the next big thing for Tesla. But it looks as though things aren’t quite turning out exactly as the company had planned (or how Elon Musk suggested they would on conference calls).

    Like many Tesla delusions of grandeur, that idea seems to now be out the window, as Tesla is hurriedly slashing prices on its Model Y in what appears to be a rushed effort to create demand for a vehicle that has gotten nothing short of totally horrifyingly reviews.

    The pro-Tesla lot over at electrek noted that Tesla had slashed the price of its Model Y to under $50,000 in what it calls a “surprise move” and a “significant price drop”. We call it a “desperate move”.

    He’s going to have to sell a lot of $50,000 SUVs to support the current TSLA price.

  62. Nick

    China has warned its citizens they could be arbitrarily searched and have their property seized in Australia – the third escalation in its travel advice in as many months.

    Just like home

  63. Maj

    Corrupt doctors. Corrupt politicians. Corrupt system.

    One rule for them? Dannii Minogue AVOIDS hotel quarantine after flying back to Australia from COVID-19 hotspot

    While most travellers returning from overseas have been put into mandatory hotel quarantine, it’s been revealed Dannii Minogue was given an exemption.

    According to a report by 7NEWS on Monday, the 48-year-old singer and her 10-year-old son, Ethan, were granted an exemption on medical grounds.

    Dannii and Ethan are reportedly quarantining at a private property on the Gold Coast after recently returning from the United States of America.

    The pair will spend 14 days at the private home, instead of the usual 14-day stay at a hotel for returning travellers.

    The Queensland government granted the pair special permission, after they returned from the US over the weekend.

    According to 7NEWS, Dannii and Ethan went straight to the property after leaving the airport, and will remain there for the duration of their 14-day quarantine.

    The exemption was given after Dannii presented a letter from her doctor.

  64. Gab

    Very interesting article by Cardinal Pell. But he doesn’t quite reveal his feelings about it all. He must have anger and deeper thoughts and was totally cheesed off with life and God and so-called friends and his thoughts on Louise Milligan would be fascinating. Does he have to maintain priestly demeanour. I would like to know what he really felt. He was “furious” with the spitter, ok but small incident, but how did he cope with what the media said about him.

    He’s not a soy-boy manbun wearing beta male. He’s from that era where men were men and didn’t discuss their feelz ad nauseum, unlike most of the beta male sect of today. Additionally, he gave a considered account of his time in gaol and his feelings are kept out of it for good reasons. 1. To avoid scandal and leading others to sin. 2. Irregardless of his feelings, he offered up any suffering he felt – emotional, physical – for the love of God and didn’t complain about it all.

    And how did he cope with the media witch hunt? He tells us, he offered it up to God.

  65. Dave in Marybrook

    BiN
    Not surprising. Review of the Y in the Weekend Oz magazine a few weeks ago was so fawning, and so short of actual review, that it read like a paid puff piece.

  66. H B Bear

    Looking forward to the Whitlam papers today.

    Finally we will learn how the Queen and the CIA brought down The Great Man. Still Australia’s greatest PM.

  67. H B Bear

    Who does Danii think she is, Kerry Stokes?

  68. Geriatric Mayfly

    Yesterday it was Bald Eagles with Nazi affiliations. Today it’s the turn of the botanicals to be denounced.

    The Oxford Dictionary defines the phrase “low-hanging fruit” as “a thing or person that can be won, obtained, or persuaded with little effort.”
    But a college professor says no, it’s racist.

  69. Ed Case

    Teslas have a habit of catching on fire.

  70. shatterzzz

    Gotta luv sports journos .. for weeks they have been baying for the blood and sacking of Canterbury Bulldogs coach, Dean Pay, over the Dogs poor performances now he has quit the media is alive with cries of unfair, not on and sympathetic outrage …….

  71. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Looking forward to the Whitlam papers today.

    Finally we will learn that there was no grand conspiracy. Still Australia’s worst PM, who had his dismissal confirmed in a landslide.

  72. will

    Ed Case
    #3512369, posted on July 14, 2020 at 9:09 am
    Teslas have a habit of catching on fire.

    All batteries are flammable, and a fire hazard. The risk is that EVs have lots of them.

  73. Makka

    Former Vice President Joe Biden’s “dismal” support from black voters, now confirmed in two polls, is likely to force his campaign to choose a black woman as his running mate to shore up the key group, according to a Democratic pollster.

    In the latest John Zogby Strategies and EMI Research Solutions poll, Biden has the support of 77% of black voters while 14% back President Trump.

    GOP officials have told Secrets that if Trump maintains that level of support from blacks people, he will win reelection. South Carolina Sen. Tim Scott, a black Republican, said in February, “Game over if we get 14.”

    In the last 20 years, only George W. Bush, running for reelection in 2004 against then Sen. John Kerry, came close with 11% of the black vote. In 2016, against Hillary Clinton, Trump won 8% of the black vote.

  74. Tom

    No comments allowed.

    What a pity. I had wanted to post a comment that not even the godless J-school revolutionaries policing the Paywallian would have been able to reject — simply to thank Cardinall Pell for his bravery and the positive effect that his persecution has had on my evolution as a human.

    PS: we are both old boys of the same school.

    PPS: Many thanks to Davey Boy for posting that hilarious court report in ShakeMyHamas about the scheming Balmain Karen found guilty of defamation in a rare case of justice being seen to be done in the NSW Supreme Court.

    It was doubly pleasing because the frightbat reporting the story dared not inject a personal comment or a slander against the winner of the action as Justice Stephen Rothman would have run her out of his court.

  75. Ed Case

    That’s comforting to know, will.
    Never heard of a non EV battery catching on fire without an external spark though.

  76. MemoryFault

    Finally we will learn that there was no grand conspiracy.

    True, Zulu.
    But I somehow doubt that is how “our” ABC will spin it.
    It is going to be an interesting afternoon.

  77. mh

    A mob of Antifa fags have no answers

    Andy Ngô
    @MrAndyNgo
    Over the weekend, masked antifa in Portland opened a black man’s car door during a violent protest. Watch how he responded to them:

    https://twitter.com/MrAndyNgo/status/1282752376898834433?s=20

  78. stackja

    Jenny Hocking wants a republic.
    The Letters, much fuss about Whitlam “dismissal” but not the election.

  79. Roger

    Never heard of a non EV battery catching on fire without an external spark though.

    It’s known that the batteries can be contaminated during the manufacturing process.

    A foreign body or substance in a cell can cause a short in a charged battery leading to a fire.

  80. Ed Case

    A foreign body or substance in a cell can cause a short in a charged battery leading to a fire.

    That’s not the reason for the high incidence of Teslas catching on fire though, is it.

  81. dover_beach

    They thought they could destroy Pell by putting him in a forge but he has returned purer and stronger. Never refuse a righteous struggle, even when you lose, you are victorious.

  82. calli

    Australia’s relevant law enforcement authorities arbitrarily search Chinese citizens and seize their items,

    Shocking! Fancy not permitting wodges of grandma’s favourite raw pork bites through the border! And you should see how they react to our delicious slimy fungus!

    Barbarians! Don’t visit. Aussies are good food ignoramii.

  83. stackja

    Canterbury Bankstown coach Pay for Castle time.

  84. The following vehicles (US based insurance study) are those most prone to catch fire –

    Mitsubishi Outlander Sport

    Mercedes sedans and SUVs made from 2015-2017

    Nissan 2016 and 2017 Murano and Maxima, 2017 Infiniti QX60, and 2017-2018 Pathfinder

    Kia Sorento and Optima, and Hyundai Santa Fe and Sonata manufactured from 2011-2014, and Kia Soul manufactured from 2010-2015

    BMW 1,3, and 5 series. Z4, X3, and X5

    Note than none of these are EVs.

  85. mh

    Another righteous American schools the Antifa bludger filming him

    https://twitter.com/mrdic/status/1281651031139549186?s=20

  86. calli

    Never refuse a righteous struggle, even when you lose, you are victorious.

    Dover, it’s the great reversal and stands all the laws of The World on their heads.

    Saint Paul wrote most of his epistles from his prison cell. Wherever we are is exactly where God places us to do His work.

    The worst thing (to my mind) would have been dealing with the double knee replacement and limited exercise, poor man.

  87. mh

    White SJW fag on plane starts screaming Jesus was a black man, then threatens to kill people.

    #[email protected]
    On Saturday night, a flight from Seattle-Tacoma to Chicago tested travelers. One of the passengers threatened another death 😧. Fortunately, there was a police officer 👮‍♂️on board who took care of the aggressive traveler along with several others.
    #alaskaairlines

    https://twitter.com/ASAPwings/status/1282684404649930752?s=20

  88. Bruce of Newcastle

    Never heard of a non EV battery catching on fire without an external spark though.

    Ed – You mean lead-acid batteries. Li-ion batteries catch fire in all sorts of devices. The famous one was the 787 Dreamliner batteries, which had to be put into steel boxes as a safety measure.

  89. Ed Case

    Note than none of these are EVs.
    Noted.
    How many of those fires in Diesel and Petrol vehicles were caused by battery fires?
    One hundredth of 1%?
    How many Tesla fires caused by the Battery?
    100%, including those where the parked vehicle catches on fire.

  90. Ed Case

    Li-ion batteries catch fire in all sorts of devices.
    Such as Teslas.

  91. Struth

    Got this put up and read out on Alan Jones on Sky last night

    If you have to go looking for a virus because people show no symptoms when they have it, testing thousands of them while your hospitals are empty,… because they are not dying from it, not even sick enough from it to need hospitalisation……….and then you demand the imprisonment and denial of liberty to millions of healthy people to control it, you are either absolutely certifiably insane, completely without brains, a tyrant , or d)all of the above.
    Either way, you are the one who should be imprisoned.

  92. candy

    Candy, you really have no idea about people who have faith in God.

    Cassie, I just think it would be interesting to know Cardinal Pell’s suffering and thoughts at the deeper level after given his cup of poison. He was in prison for years and demonised through the media terribly. He must have had great anger and anger at God and anger at Louise Milligan and the ‘victims’.

    I don’t think his doubts and anger would influence others to doubt. Maybe the opposite.

  93. Anne

    RedPill

    Melinda Gates is a man.

    Look at these damned creatures.

    https://youtu.be/MSWrKHAPV6o 31 seconds.

  94. calli

    They may be doing lots of tests, but one major Sydney hospital is processing them in batches of ten to save on reagent because there’s a shortage. Smart process, because it’s quick. If it comes up positive, then individual tests in the batch are processed to find the culprit. And even then there’s negatives.

    Apparently it’s really hard to pin down.

    Russian roulette.

  95. Makka

    Either way, you are the one who should be imprisoned.

    Amen.

    I think our mortality rate is around 0.011%. With 108 deaths. More than 70% of those over the age of 70 , predominantly people with existing conditions- cardio and respiratory or cancer patients.

    Whereas 2019 flu season;

    The Australian Department of Health’s 2019 Influenza Season summary affirmed what most people already knew: last year we endured very high levels of activity compared to previous seasons1 and those levels were high from earlier in the year – even during the summer months. This culminated in a total of 310,011 laboratory-confirmed flu notifications by the beginning of December1. On a more serious note, by October 6 more than 800 influenza-associated deaths had been officially recorded, the majority of these were due to influenza A (96%, n=782) and the ages ranged from under 12 months of age to 102 years. Where sub-typing information was available, 128 were associated with influenza A (H3N2), 29 with influenza A(H1N1)pdm09, and 30 with influenza B. The median age of deaths notified was 86 years (but ranged from under 12 months of age to 102 years)1.

  96. Tom

    Well done, Struth at 9.50am. You win today’s Cardimona award.

  97. calli

    I see Palacechook gas declared the “towns” of Liverpool and Campbelltown NSW “hotspots”.

    Twenty two cases.

  98. Dr Faustus

    Simple fact: stored energy = risk of ignition + fire.

    ICE’s: lots more around cf. EV’s = larger numbers of incidents

  99. Tom:

    PPS: Many thanks to Davey Boy for posting that hilarious court report in ShakeMyHamas about the scheming Balmain Karen found guilty of defamation in a rare case of justice being seen to be done in the NSW Supreme Court.

    What an amazing story – I’m glad the family of lawyers copped a bit of what they were trying to dish out.
    Unfortunately our society has a very large surplus of this kind of attitude in the entrenched elite.
    Mr Cosco should have rented the place out to a family of Middle Easterners who would have sorted them out – and won – because of the Haram bacon smell.
    Lawfare – AHRC would have funded the ME renters.

  100. JC

    You’re a virologist now, trades hall?

  101. Makka

    Nope numpty, I’m just not a weak as piss hypochondriac like you.

  102. How many of those fires in Diesel and Petrol vehicles were caused by battery fires?
    One hundredth of 1%?
    How many Tesla fires caused by the Battery?
    100%, including those where the parked vehicle catches on fire.

    If your car catches fire, you’re probably less concerned with the reason than the result.
    Bottom line is, even pro-rata, EVs are less likely to spontaneously combust than ICEs.

  103. Geriatric Mayfly

    Tom.

    Was your destiny sealed too, by Old Bill and his Viva Voceand the intricacies of the Meiji Restoration?

  104. cohenite

    The vile troll not dead yet.

    I see it endorsed the treasonous abc’s expose of Aussie troops killing innocent afghan civilians: based on innocent afghan civilian witnesses. They’d be as reliable as the troll, a proven liar and commie.

  105. Dr Faustus

    I see Palacechook gas declared the “towns” of Liverpool and Campbelltown NSW “hotspots”.

    New paradigm: Government by Hotspot.
    Flexible, scalable – political backup by don’t-argue experts.

    What’s not to love?

  106. Mater

    The following vehicles (US based insurance study) are those most prone to catch fire –

    Can you link to the source which says the list you provided is from a “US based insurance study”?

    The article you seem to have got it from, doesn’t support that statement. In fact, it says this:

    Some recent recalls and news reports include the following vehicles that are most likely to catch fire:

  107. Struth

    Never refuse a righteous struggle, even when you lose, you are victorious.

    Correctomundo.

    When this attack of fear propaganda occurred in March, the Australian people shit themselves.

    I decided to just ignore the lock down as best I could and pretend to myself I was free.
    I bought a smoker and I now smoke the best mullet in town and some of my American Heart attack smoked recipes are literally to die for…….

    However, I was just kidding myself, and the drinking increased rapidly, there was a week there where I went through five bottles of red to myself.
    Noticing in my life the same hopelessness I was feeling was the same socialist induced hopelessness the aboriginal people in socialist controlled communities suffer I have come to a joyous conclusion.
    And it is joyous and it is quite liberating.
    To fight regardless of outcome.
    I said to Mrs Struth, who was noticing my decline, that I just can’t pretend and ignore things, go fishing and say well I’ve done my bit, f…k Australia, it deserves all it gets.
    I’d drink myself to death from shame.
    I also said to her, and many of you here may wish to think about this as well, that just by commenting on catallaxy could one day have you hauled out and shot, so with my past activism I have really nothing to lose.
    Many of you may wish to think about that when you decide to do SFA about any of this.

    She now supports me in fighting as best I can, as she knows me well enough to know it will not be healthy for me to do otherwise.
    I’m leaving the grog alone, re-focussed and ready for action.
    Well once I lose the 10 kilos I have put on since this happened.
    Don’t fight for your country, they do not deserve it.
    Fight for yourself, as it will help you physically and mentally.

    “Tis better to die on your feet than live on your knees, not just for your sanity but you’re actual physical health I believe.

  108. will

    Never heard of a non EV battery catching on fire without an external spark though.

    How about this

  109. Leigh Lowe

    The “8 to 10 civil cases” against Pell which were “imminent” back in March.
    How are they going?

  110. mh

    BLM SUPPORTERS CELEBRATE DEATH OF MOTHER SHOT DEAD FOR SAYING “ALL LIVES MATTER”

    BLM has been raiding the public facebook of Jessica Whitaker, the White woman that they murdered in Indiana.
    They are celebrating her death and mocking her family members.

    https://twitter.com/de_dust2Blepe/status/1282775224807829505?s=20

  111. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    BLM SUPPORTERS CELEBRATE DEATH OF MOTHER SHOT DEAD FOR SAYING “ALL LIVES MATTER”

    how thoroughly modern, a virtual chimpout

  112. H B Bear

    Believe all Afghans.

  113. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    Melinda Gates is a man.

    windows man has morphed into woody allen

  114. Tom

    He’s such a school marm I normally don’t watch Hannity at 11am, but today I’ll make an exception as he has the first media interview with Roger Stone (Foxtel channel 606).

  115. Ed Case

    Bottom line is, even pro-rata, EVs are less likely to spontaneously combust than ICEs.
    Study done by the EV industry says EV safer, news at eleven.
    Here’s the facts: out of hundreds of millions of ICE vehicles on the roads, the odd one catches fire after a
    major collision.
    Teslas aren’t common at all, but it’s easy to find pics of Teslas that caught fire parked at the kerb, sitting in the garage, idling at the lights.

  116. notafan

    Grig candy still crapping on about Cardinal Pell?

    Load of tripe, being using this stupid anger meme for a while.

    How about moving on to a new angle?

    #grighatescardinalpell

  117. Dr Faustus

    “Bottom line is, even pro-rata, EVs are less likely to spontaneously combust than ICEs”.

    Moreover, of the 12 HEV/ PEV mod- els tested since IIHS incorporated a 2-week post- test observation period, none have caught fire.

    So, over a two week period, none of 12 EV’s caught fire? None!!
    That’s ball-tearingly good safety.

    Unfortunately, Cleantechnica fails to tell us exactly how many of a comparison group of ICE vehicles spontaneously burst into flames in a similar fortnight. Two? Three?

  118. Struth

    Gigs for me return at the end of the month unless we close down again, and I will have a microphone to my mouth.
    A gentle mocking of government is planned and although will be said as though off the cuff, every word I utter will be carefully planned before hand as an audience will have many different views on this.
    However, they are not allowed to dance, ……..FMD…..so I’ll be mocking that.
    If I see two feet tapping and not just the one, it’s against the rules…………….
    Smacking the hands together every two to three minutes at the end of each song , at least ten times, to help smack the virus from your hands is government mandated as of only hours before……

  119. dopey

    ABC: Kerr says he made decision without informing palace.

  120. Geriatric Mayfly

    how thoroughly modern, a virtual chimpout

    Not sure I know what this means, but an inadvisable comment to utter aloud during a normal Chicago weekend.

  121. thefrollickingmole

    1735099
    #3512266, posted on July 14, 2020 at 6:01 am
    Yup, in one sinking of a warship in 1941, Australia lost more war dead than in the entire Vietnam war.

    And in one pandemic in 2020, the Americans lost more dead than in Vietnam and Korea combined.

    The Coomer is back.

    Dead Americans, unh, unh, unh Im gunna COOOOMMM!!!

  122. cohenite

    The blm bastards who killed the young white mum and then gloated about it are the same as the troll. More from this sewer of humanity:

    Portland Protester Taunts Officer: ‘I Hope Someone Kills Your Whole F**king Family’

    One-Year-Old in a Stroller Shot to Death in Mayor de Blasio’s NYC
    Chicago: 60 Shot, 10+ Dead over Weekend

    And its an old one but still a goodie:

    George Soros Pouring $220 Million into ‘Racial Justice’ Movement

  123. Ed Case

    How about this

    Samsung sealed a sizable 3,500mAh lithium-ion battery into a 7.9mm thin smartphone, but half of the Note 7 batteries were made by its subsidiary Samsung SDI and didn’t properly fit into the Android phone.

    What’s the 0-60 kph on your lithium-ion Samsung Smartphone, will?

  124. Jesus Christ man.

    BLM defending shooting babies.

    They’re black Nazis, basically.

  125. miltonf

    The last five years have been the great unveiling- the Liberal Party, John Howard, the Democratic Party, the Bushes, the RINOS, Downer. It’s a long list.

  126. Cardimona

    Had a great laugh this morning, Cats; inside my PO box I found a personally-addressed copy of the Green Left Weekly!

    Presuming it was one of my vast personal army of leftarded followers who read newspaper opinion pages and inside whose heads I live full-time and rent-free, I’ve just fired off this missive…

    The Editor

    I’d like to sincerely thank the person who anonymously gifted me a subscription to the print edition of Green Left Weekly; the first copy arrived this morning.

    With the demise of print newspapers in regional areas this Marxist agitprop rag fills an important role.

    You see, Green Left Weekly is printed on newspaper and while I wouldn’t lower myself to [email protected] on it my budgies have no such hesitation.

    (69 words)

  127. Makka

    Poll pawn;

    Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden’s lead over President Trump has shrunk to seven points, 46%-39%, dropping five points since last measured in the Just the News Daily Poll with Scott Rasmussen a month ago, when Biden had surged to a 12-point lead.
    Trump’s position improved by a net 8 points among Republicans and 13 points among independents in the new poll.
    All of the gains came from male voters, Rasmussen noted. In both polls, Trump trailed by 14 points among women. However, a month ago, he trailed among men by nine. This month, he leads by two (45% to 43%).

    https://justthenews.com/politics-policy/polling/trump-rises-13-points-among-independents-june-shrinks-bidens-lead-overall

  128. miltonf

    I believe one Susan Rosenberg is one of the BLM string pullers.

    Rosenberg’s sentence was commuted by President Bill Clinton on January 20, 2001, his last day in office, to the more than 16 years’ time served. Her commutation produced a wave of criticism by police and New York elected officials.

  129. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Palace letters: John Kerr did not inform Palace ahead of Gough Whitlam dismissal

    Troy Bramston
    Senior Writer
    @TroyBramston
    5 minutes ago July 14, 2020
    79 Comments

    In a letter Sir John Kerr wrote to Buckingham Palace notifying them of his dismissal of Prime Minister Gough Whitlam, he said he had made the decision without informing the Palace in advance.

    “I decided to take the step I took WITHOUT informing the Palace in advance … it was better for Her Majesty NOT to know,” he wrote.

    Breaking, from the Oz. Anyone hear the sound of Lefty sobbing, in the distance?

  130. Bruce of Newcastle

    The problem with EV batteries is the need for more and more stored energy for larger heavier models like the Tesla Y SUV and for longer and longer range. “Range anxiety” is a big problem so the manufacturers have a strong incentive to increase the size of the battery.

    Each Tesla battery is made up of thousands of individual cells (7,104 for the Model S 85 kWh pack). So as each cell has a failure rate more cells means increased probability of failure. Therefore going up in capacity again to 200 kWh further multiplies the probability of a short circuit.

    The way to minimise the chance of a short is to be insanely careful in the manufacturing process and purity of the ingredients. Which then adds to the cost.

    The temperature sensitivity of the cell chemistry is another problem. Below about 0 C the anode plates out lithium metal, which is doubly dangerous in that metallic lithium will explosively react with water, if it gets in, and metallic lithium dendrites can be formed – like wires bridging the anode and cathode and causing a short. Once you start forming dendrites in a cell it’s hard to stop it happening.

    The Li-ion chemistry really isn’t a good one to use for such things, but it’s the most compact and powerful we have. So we’re stuck with it until someone cracks rechargeable aluminium battery chemistry or some such.

    All this doesn’t affect ICE cars, since increasing range just means increasing the size of the single fuel tank. So there’s no real probability multiplier for failure the way bigger batteries have.

  131. Cardimona

    Also, I’ve been sending this out to newspapers, and radio and TV stations.
    Cats are welcome to cut’n’paste and trigger the meeja numpties in their areas.

    ATTN: Editors and journalists – We need answers to these questions on the COVID-19 “pandemic”.

    Dear Editors and journos

    We, the paying customers, need answers to some obvious questions on the COVID-19 “pandemic”.
    We’ve been told ad infinitum how contagious and deadly COVID-19 is, and we have a lot of very well-paid experts involved, so these pertinent questions should be easy for them to answer.

    How many COVID-19 patients are in ICU right now in Australia?
    What percentage of ICU Aussie beds are presently occupied by COVID-19 patients?

    How many COVID-19 patients have used Aussie ICU beds?
    Why weren’t our ICUs swamped as predicted back in March?

    How many Aussies have been tested for COVID-19?
    What percentage of our population is that?

    How many Aussies have tested positive for COVID-19?
    What percentage of the population is that?
    What percentage of those tests were false positives?

    How many Aussies have had COVID-19 but weren’t tested as they thought they only had a cold?
    How many Aussies have had COVID-19 but experienced no symptoms?

    How many Aussies have tested positive for COVID-19 but experienced no symptoms?
    If you test more people will more positives be found?

    Of the 108 COVID-19 deaths in Australia, how many contracted it overseas?
    Of those 108 COVID-19 deaths, how many had existing comorbidities?

    Of the 108 COVID-19 deaths, why were none aged under 55?
    Of the 108 COVID-19 deaths, why were only 14 aged under 70?

    What percentage of Aussies have been hospitalised with COVID-19?
    What percentage of Aussies have died with COVID-19?
    What percentage of Aussies have died solely of COVID-19, with no comorbidities?

    Why is the term “flatten the curve” no longer used?
    “Flatten the curve” meant spreading cases over a longer period, so why didn’t we see those cases?
    Why are politicians now talking about “elimination” and not “curve flattening”?

    Why didn’t the “life-saving COVID-Safe app” work?

    The virus was here for two months before* the first lockdown, so how did lockdowns help?
    Given everyone used supermarkets before interventions began, why didn’t the virus spread?

    How does COVID-19’s ‘rate of spread’ and ‘case fatality rate’ compare to that of tuberculosis (TB)?
    Given TB has a similar death rate to COVID-19, why has there never been a TB lockdown?

    Can COVID-19 be eliminated?
    When will there be a vaccine?

    Why are politicians sure COVID-19 is a risk worth crashing the economy for?
    How much is the COVID-19 panicdemic costing individuals, companies and taxpayers?

    Finally, dear editors and journos, a couple of questions for you to answer.

    How many COVID-19 cases do you and your colleagues know of from your own friends and family?
    Of those, how many died solely because of COVID-19?

  132. miltonf

    It’s been said Bruce that if we were looking for an energy source with high energy density, that is easy to store and transport we would come up with…. petrol and diesel!

    Electric cars have taken on a religious hue for the feeble minded. I’m thinking of those repulsive sus ex royals. A bit of doublethink with that too- cheap, reliable electricity bad. Electric cars good.

    I’m sorta coming around to Toyota hybrids I must admit after conversations with taxi drivers in Melb and LA.

  133. miltonf

    Bruce, how are those battery powered trams going in Newie? I wonder how long the batteries will last i.e. degrade after too many charge/re charge cycles?

  134. calli

    Are you hoping to find an “investigative” journalist, Cardi?

    I remember them, back when dinosaurs roamed the earth. They got wiped out by the Marxist Meteor.

    All that remains are small, furry survivors hiding in their burrows.

  135. Bruce of Newcastle

    So, over a two week period, none of 12 EV’s caught fire? None!!
    That’s ball-tearingly good safety.

    I know of two car transporter semis that have burned down on the road from the Tesla manufacturing plant. Which isn’t a surprise since if you have a battery defect in a transported new EV, and you are bouncing along a highway on the back of a truck, the fault is more likely to manifest itself with the vibration.

  136. William the Conjuror

    No comments allowed.

    Those who might wish to can keep shtum, as he did during all of the court proceedings.

  137. Old School Conservative

    What a wonderful start to the day.
    Reading how George Pell survived 13 months in solitary confinement, and his commitment to his faith, was uplifting.

  138. Ed Case

    ***and metallic lithium dendrites can be formed – like wires bridging the anode and cathode and causing a short. Once you start forming dendrites in a cell it’s hard to stop it happening.***
    Lithium filaments ignite the battery fluid to explode the battery?
    If this issue was occurring in ICE vehicles, Depts of Transport would be ordering all units of that model
    off the road immediately.

  139. Bruce of Newcastle

    Milton – No idea, I haven’t been keeping track. The battery trams are the same as the newest ones in Sydney afaik. The Chinese bat crud emergency would’ve kept people out of the Ncl city centre where the trams run.

  140. stackja

    Zulu – Letters leaving Left deflated.

  141. miltonf

    Interesting thing about the Newie ones is that they don’t have any external electric feed to them- they charge and re charge via inductive pick up at each tram stop.

  142. Cardimona

    Are you hoping to find an “investigative” journalist, Cardi?

    Nah, I’ve given up on that, Calli.
    One young local journo who’d shown potential to be flipped has instead slipped into the collectivist groupthink.
    I sent him a news tip on something inconvenient to leftists recently, the local windmills hanging motionless, and he sent back a picture of a large naked black man – who I could only assume was his boyfriend.

    No, now I’m into carpet-bombing the media with cognitive dissonance devices.
    The best I can hope for is to cause them some mental anguish.
    I doubt they’ll risk ejection from the collective for something as irrelevant as facts.

  143. calli

    Feeling socially isolated and disconnected because of the stupid “rules”?
    Try this.

  144. Knuckle Dragger

    mh’s link at 9.46:

    ‘Fortunately there was a police officer on board who took care of the aggressive traveler along with several others.’

    No! Defund them!

  145. I’m sorta coming around to Toyota hybrids I must admit after conversations with taxi drivers in Melb and LA.

    I recommend a really long talk with a cabbie who knows his car & pays attention to how the fleet is run.
    They work better for taxi fleets than for individuals.
    Battery packs are not cheap.
    As I understand it, each “battery pack” in a Prius (or whatever) has several modular cells.
    From time to time an individual cell will chuck it in.

    If an individual’s hybrid has battery strife:
    New battery pack…. lotsa $$$$ 😢
    This is a killer for private owners.
    Goodbye super & holiday savings.

    Taxi loses a cell? No worries, the taxi fleet is of a scale that they use the surviving (perfectly good) cells from a dud battery to make into new ones (sorta like lego bricks) If a taxi fleet has Ten cars each lose a cell? The fleet has to buy only one new battery pack, & makes up Nine others from the surviving cells.

  146. Knuckle Dragger

    ‘Keep shtum, as he did during all of the court proceedings.’

    As is his right.

    And as yours will be, once they get around to pinching you for vagrancy, viz a viz lying on Ricky Slater’s grave all night crying.

  147. Cassie of Sydney

    “Those who might wish to can keep shtum,”

    Okay then..how about you lead the way.

  148. calli

    And, in a further effort to make Cheshire Cats of all of youse…

    Struth mentioned his CovidKilos.

    It could be worse.

  149. Bruce of Newcastle

    Ed – If you search the dendrite problem there’re plenty of articles on it, and it’s a core area of Li-ion R&D.

    But remember when the airlines talked about banning carry-on laptops and phones? There was a revolt by the passengers and the issue was quietly dropped. People weren’t going to be parted with their devices, so the safety issue suddenly became a non-issue. It’s amazing how convenience overrides safety when there are ‘millions of registered voters’ in the equation.

    We’re starting to see the same thing with bat crud as people get completely fed up. So I think the authorities will take CSL’s vaccine, no matter how efficacious, and wave it around saying “we’re saved” so they can open up society and quiet the revolting voters.

  150. miltonf

    I recommend a really long talk with a cabbie who knows his car & pays attention to how the fleet is run.

    which is what I said – conversations with taxi drivers in Melb and LA.

  151. Old School Conservative

    I’m warming to Troy Bramston.
    As a dyed-in-the-wool Labor supporter he is doing a very even handed job in The Australian to summarise the Palace Letters.
    Even though it hurts Labor.

  152. Snoopy

    Palace letters: John Kerr did not inform Palace ahead of Gough Whitlam dismissal

    All very well, but we don’t yet have a transcript from the CIA’s miniature radio that was secretly embedded in Kerr’s head.

  153. Rex Anger

    Pardon my appalling histprical ignorance Cats, but what was the significance of correspondence between GG Kerr and the Queen? Were they trying to prove some sort of vast, centrally co-ordinated right-wing conspiracy to unseat Saint Gough?

    And has that delusion again been punctured by cruel reality or something?

    What is this thing with centrally-planned conspirators, that they see massive centrally-planned conspiracies against them?

  154. Tintarella di Luna

    Very interesting article by Cardinal Pell. But he doesn’t quite reveal his feelings about it all. He must have anger and deeper thoughts and was totally cheesed off with life and God and so-called friends and his thoughts on Louise Milligan would be fascinating. Does he have to maintain priestly demeanour. I would like to know what he really felt. He was “furious” with the spitter, ok but small incident, but how did he cope with what the media said about him.

    Yes he does eloquently and with the stoicism of a holy man, he told us exactly what he felt — he suffered and he offered up that suffering to God. As children, in our catechism class, we were urged to offer up our hardships, our feelings of being hurt or maligned, we were urged to offer them up to God as a way to relieve our distress and to ameliorate and release us of our suffering. Cardinal Pell did not become a Cardinal because he was a snowflake.

  155. Ed Case

    *** As a dyed-in-the-wool Labor supporter he is doing a very even handed job in The Australian to summarise the Palace Letters.
    Even though it hurts Labor. ***

    It doesn’t hurt Labor at all.
    Rightly or wrongly, the Labor version is that the CIA didn’t want Whitlam, Marshall Green was sent as Ambassador, and the rest is history.
    What it does do is whitewash the Official Version and the Labor Version, neither of which are likely to be true.

  156. Top Ender

    Tin foil hats work!

    Ghislaine Maxwell refused to open the front door to the FBI when they raided her $1million home and fled to another room in the house, prosecutors claimed today.

    The alleged chief recruiter for Jeffrey Epstein fled to another room and was seen ‘quickly shutting a door behind her’.

    The FBI smashed down the door and discovered a mobile phone wrapped in tin foil which prosecutors called a ‘seemingly misguided effort to evade detection’ by law enforcement.

    Daily Mail

  157. Geriatric Mayfly

    Shocking says Hocking.

  158. Cardimona

    Reading back-thread…
    Struth at 1013
    + 10

    I’ve decided I’m going to fight for myself, for my Beautiful Bride, for my descendants, and for the legacy of my forebears.
    I’m thinking seriously of contesting the state election in October, most likely as an independent.

    Given we have a two-party system, I had hoped to try to drag the party right-thinking people used to own back from the centre-left to the reasonable right.
    I even have considerable local branch-level support from that party.
    But the party’s Brisbane-based urban bugmen don’t like me because I’ve used the “n-word”.
    In this case, that’s “National”.

    I’d have thought I was a shoo-in because they need a candidate and I have “local profile” plus “famous in-law” plus “zero social media ever” plus being retired and not having to work and therefore being available full-time to campaign.
    But the bugmen are still saying no, so it just might be independent I go.

    Fvck it; I can’t stand back and do nothing.

  159. Eyrie

    BoN, do the numbers on a fleet of a million vehicles with 7000+ cells in each.

  160. Cassie of Sydney

    “Pardon my appalling histprical ignorance Cats, but what was the significance of correspondence between GG Kerr and the Queen? Were they trying to prove some sort of vast, centrally co-ordinated right-wing conspiracy to unseat Saint Gough?

    Yes

    And has that delusion again been punctured by cruel reality or something?

    Yes

    What is this thing with centrally-planned conspirators, that they see massive centrally-planned conspiracies against them?

    Because they won’t accept truth and they won’t accept reality.

  161. Cardimona

    Struth at 1027

    RE; your gigs – can you play “The Safety Dance”?

  162. Farmer Gez

    288 WuFlu in Vic today.
    80 cases in aged care. That’s really unforgivable. The only places that should be highly secure even with the quarantine stuff ups.
    How they laughed at Sweden. How the Woomba Wang poked fun at the septics.

  163. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Pardon my appalling histprical ignorance Cats, but what was the significance of correspondence between GG Kerr and the Queen? Were they trying to prove some sort of vast, centrally co-ordinated right-wing conspiracy to unseat Saint Gough?

    That’s exactly what they were looking for – the Queen, Kerr, the CI.A. all plotting to remove Saint Gough, and they can never handle the fact that when the Australian people had their say, they confirmed the dismissal of their idol in a landslide.

  164. Old School Conservative

    Ed, I refer you to the great Gerard Henderson who wrote recently:

    Professor Jenny Hocking is one of a number of academics that has been seeking access to the material. They include Professor Anne Twomey who requested this material from the (then) attorney-general in October 2012 – some four years before Jenny Hocking sought this material. However, Professor Hocking is the applicant who took the matter to the Federal Court and then the High Court which eventually allowed the access before the scheduled date of release in 2027.

    Interviewed last night on ABC Sydney Radio 702 “Drive with Richard Glover”, Dr Hocking (for a doctor she is) referred to Queen Elizabeth’s letters to Kerr. It’s unlikely that the Queen herself would write to a governor-general in 1975 or now. But we shall see. Professor Hocking is also on record maintaining that Buckingham Palace was somehow involved in a conspiracy to have Mr Whitlam dismissed by Governor-General Sir John Kerr. There is not a skerrick of evidence to support this view – so far, at least. Again, time will tell.

    In his 1978 book Matters for Judgment, John Kerr described why and how he resolved the constitutional deadlock in 1975 when a determined Opposition leader Malcolm Fraser blocked supply and a determined Prime Minister Gough Whitlam wanted to govern without supply.

    It seems that Kerr used his correspondence with the Palace as the source for the material on this issue in Matters for Judgment. If this is the case, then there will be little news in Tuesday’s release of the Palace Letters. In which case, Professor Hocking could always revive the left-wing theory of old that it was all the work of the CIA. Stay tuned.

    Gerard Henderson – 5 Paws.

  165. Cassie of Sydney

    “and they can never handle the fact that when the Australian people had their say, they confirmed the dismissal of their idol in a landslide.”

    That’s right…because fundamentally they loathe democracy and they hold the electorate in contempt.

  166. William the Conjuror

    The worst thing (to my mind) would have been dealing with the double knee replacement and limited exercise

    2 months prior, already recovered.

  167. Old School Conservative

    William, you will have to do better than puerile attacks on George Pell to make an impression on Cat readership.

  168. Farmer Gez

    Neil Mitchell had Nicholarse Reece on this morning salivating at the possibility of a royal embarrassment.
    Oh dear, busted flush again.

  169. dover_beach

    The worst thing (to my mind) would have been dealing with the double knee replacement and limited exercise, poor man.

    I was shocked to read this; I can’t remember a single report of this occurring until reading the article above. What a mensch. God bless him.

  170. Old School Conservative

    I have a red wine affected memory of Alan Jones last night predicting today’s Palace Letters nothingburger.
    Unfortunately I dozed off just before Struth’s letter.

  171. Nick

    Palace knew of Whitlam’s sacking = calls by FitzSimons as proof of a need for a Republic

    Palace did not know about Whitlam’s sacking = calls by FitzSimons as proof of a need for a Republic

  172. William the Conjuror

    270 new COVID-19 cases in Vic today, only 28 connected to known outbreaks. 81 in hospital, 25 in Intensive Care (up 9 from yesterday), 21 on ventilators.

  173. Cassie of Sydney

    “Old School Conservative
    #3512499, posted on July 14, 2020 at 11:45 am
    William, you will have to do better than puerile attacks on George Pell to make an impression on Cat readership.”

    It’s his shtick…he can’t help himself. However he really should follow his own advice which he casually offered upthread and that is he should keep shtum but again…he just can’t help himself.

  174. Nick

    William, the only thing you can conjure is to pull a hair from your arse.

  175. Tintarella di Luna

    It was doubly pleasing because the frightbat reporting the story dared not inject a personal comment or a slander against the winner of the action as Justice Stephen Rothman would have run her out of his court.

    What a miracle — no feelings, just the facts.

  176. Bruce of Newcastle

    What is this thing with centrally-planned conspirators, that they see massive centrally-planned conspiracies against them?

    The alternative to that is that holy St. Gough of the immaculate order of Lenin was actually an incompetent who was caught trying to borrow money from a shifty Middle Eastern used-camel saleman. Quite punctures the mystique, it does.

  177. Cardimona, recently I had a stern conversation with one of the movers & shakers in the party in that electorate.
    They were dismissive to the extreme of your potential candidacy, they actually snorted (like a horse) at the thought. Your connection to the anti-christ (the member for New England) was enough, they hadn’t looked any deeper.

    There was total & complete stunned silence to my follow up question: “So what’s the alternative plan to regain the electorate?”
    Supplementary question: “Don’t you pricks want government? Do you actually like opposition?”
    ….. total & complete embarrassed silence….

    They haven’t a clue how to regain the electorate.
    That they see ya-know-who as the anti-christ is very telling.
    These blokes make Republican never-trumpers look like loyalists.

    Parting comment: “It doesn’t matter who or how, one of your blokes in that seat is better than one of theirs – ffs don’t you want to win?

    They were looking down in embarrassment by this stage – some careful introspection lies ahead, coz the bloke I was talking to certainly wants to win & wants government, he’s just been seduced by the Liberal party influence in the new combined party.

    Remember, this is the electorate where a few election cycles ago the key quote from one of their candidates was: “We don’t want development here, we want jobs!

  178. Ed Case

    Old School Conservative said
    ***Ed, I refer you to the great Gerard Henderson who wrote recently:***
    [If you’ve read one of Henderson’s screeds, you’ve read them all]
    OSC:
    Henderson is a gatekeeper and nothing Hocking says can be taken at face value.
    What was she looking for?
    A telegram reading: Dear Queenie, am considering arseholing Gough, your thoughts?
    regards, your heteronormative friend John.
    , perhaps?
    Even if that happened, does anyone seriously believe it would be part of the Official Correspondence?
    The only plausible explanation is that Hocking and her backers knew what was going to be there and
    had their own reasons for wanting to confirm the Official Version.

  179. Leigh Lowe

    The letters …

    9th November 1975,
    Government House,
    Canberra.
    .
    Dear Queen Betty,
    I am thinking about rissoling Gough.
    He is close to tumbling to the fact that I am a CIA operative intent on undoing his noble social justice policies.
    I seek your approval to give him the flick forthwith.
    Your faithful servant.
    Sir John Kerr.
    Governor General of Straya.
    .
    .
    .
    10th November 1975,
    Buckingham Palace,
    London (England).
    .
    Dear John,
    Oh, yes please.
    I encourage you to give that pompous git Whitlam the arse at the earliest opportunity.
    Horrid man.
    And his wife looks like my last winner at Ascot, from all angles.
    Do it.
    This could see the beginning of the revival of Empire.
    .
    Yours sincerely,
    Betty Windsor

  180. incoherent rambler

    As confirmed by the vote, the quiet, sane, rational majority were about to revolt and lynch Gough unless he was banished from the political scene at high speed.

    That’s right, Sir John saved Gough from a lynching.

  181. Makka

    270 new COVID-19 cases in Vic today, only 28 connected to known outbreaks. 81 in hospital, 25 in Intensive Care (up 9 from yesterday), 21 on ventilators.

    ______________________________________________________
    Don’t Panic!

    A further 300 intensive care unit beds have also begun to be commissioned at the Alfred Hospital, Austin Hospital and Monash Medical Centre in Clayton – as part of a massive boost to establish an extra 4,000 ICU beds across Victoria to respond to the coronavirus pandemic.

  182. Boambee John

    Nick
    #3512509, posted on July 14, 2020 at 11:51 am
    William, the only thing you can conjure is to pull a hair from your arse.

    More likely a hare.

  183. Tintarella di Luna

    “and they can never handle the fact that when the Australian people had their say, they confirmed the dismissal of their idol in a landslide.”

    Whenever the Dismissal of Whitlam is discussed I always say — but what happened just 6 weeks later? What happened. Weeeellll there was a general election and the Australian people voted and it was a complete and utter rejection of Whitlam — Whitlam lost 29 seats!!! the biggest bloodbath ever — so the Australian people were quite happy with getting rid of Whitlam sooner rather than later.

    Always love telling that story. Though Fraser was a complete and utter indisputable meathead a complete waste of landslide.

  184. I see NSW is suddenly realising that all those kick-a-Vic comments are going to come back to bite them, as they are the new epicentre of the plague. Completely unsurprising to anyone but them.

  185. calli

    LL’s back, baby!

    Careful now boy-o. You’ll be working a tough room.

  186. Teslas aren’t common at all, but it’s easy to find pics of Teslas that caught fire parked at the kerb, sitting in the garage, idling at the lights.

    Yep – the Harpic media in the US is full of them – mostly one or two incidents repeated ad nauseum.

    The reality is different –

    More than 200 000 Nissan Leaf electric vehicles have been sold during the last 5
    years of production. So far the authors are only aware of one vehicle fire incident
    which indicates a very low fire risk for Nissan Leaf. Even if data still is very limited
    there seems to be a potential that electric vehicles can be less prone to fires than
    combustion engine vehicles.

    And

    The number of EVs on the road is still too low to conduct reliable statistical
    studies of incidents and accidents. Anyhow, the limited data on incidents up to
    now, presented in this chapter, give an indication that electric vehicles might be
    less prone to fire incidents than vehicles with internal combustion engines. The
    numbers of EVs sold are steadily increasing and with that also the possibility to
    conduct different safety studies which will foster development of even safer EVs.

  187. incoherent rambler

    LL’s back, baby!

    The blog is a better place for Reigh’s presence.

  188. If Whitlam was so revered, where’s all the Australian men in their middle forties sporting the christian name “Gough”?

    (Eggzackerly)

  189. Boambee John

    Zulu

    Given your interest in the Second Boer War, and southern Africa in general, you might find “Ghosts of the Past” by Tony Park interesting. Built around an Australian, Edward Presgrave, who served in the Boer War, and was later killed in SW Africa while supporting the Hama and Herero rebellion against the Germans, with a fictional first part to bring Kruger’s lost gold into the story.

  190. thefrollickingmole

    We need gunners input on this one.
    Is Comic writer game particularly powerful??

    Nothing illegal takes place.
    But the man must bend the knee to the chicks he rooted because they feel like they were sluts*

    https://www.theguardian.com/books/2020/jul/13/women-speak-out-about-warren-ellis-transmetropolitan
    Now, more than 60 women have come together to launch the website So Many of Us, to document their concurrent relationships with Ellis and encourage others to come forward. They allege that Ellis has pursued sexual relationships with a staggering number of his female fans, all the while deceiving them about the number of relationships he was in; based on the account of these women, it appears he was maintaining at least 19 relationships simultaneously at one point in 2009.

    Jhayne Holmes, a writer and photographer whose relationship with Ellis lasted eight years, initially set up a server for women to talk to each other. She says that roughly 100 women have come forward, while 33 of them have composed written statements, supported by emails and text messages, which have been seen by the Guardian. In individual interviews, several of the women allege that Ellis was sending identical text and photo messages to them at the same time. He would tell them they were “bewitching” or “hypnotising” and extend his friendship, sometimes offering mentoring and advice. Eventually, he would ask them to send him sexually explicit photos. Some of them did. In some instances, if they said no, he’d stop talking to them.

    “Ellis’s public harem presented a blueprint for others’ behaviour,” Greene writes in her statement for the website. “‘Get big enough,’ it invited, ‘and you too will deserve your own sparkling audience of sexy young women.’ This behaviour provided a model and smokescreen for destructive patterns built atop the idea of women as currency.” Consent, these women are arguing, must be understood more broadly than the letter of the law – without knowing about each other, Greene says, “full and informed consent was impossible”.

    These women do not accuse Ellis of illegal behaviour. But they describe their shock at the sheer magnitude of his pursuits, feeling heartbroken when he stopped talking to them, or angry after discovering he was sending many of them identical messages. What they want now is to start a conversation about how men with power and influence treat young women as part of a culture of impunity granted to celebrities **– and not merely those who appear in Hollywood blockbusters or play Madison Square Garden.

    *Spoiler, they were.
    ** But I thought I was Speeeecialll!!! they weep through the runny mascara and snot.

  191. H B Bear

    Whitlam papers are about as big a bust as the Mueller investigation.

    Stupid f*cking Leftists.

  192. Makka

    Stupid f*cking Leftists.

    Let’s see how the Bandana Fkwit spins this lot. Like all leftists, he’ll assume folk are as dumb as he and lie his arse off.

  193. Fisky

    Well done to the Greens on this! Great to see principled opposition to the CCP across party lines. Decoupling is both desirable and inevitable.

    When parliament returns, the Greens will try to capitalise on broad anger at the Chinese government’s crackdown on Hong Kong, pressing for a Senate committee inquiry into the free trade agreement.

    Greens leader Adam Bandt told the ABC that Beijing seemed intent on stifling dissent in Hong Kong, and Parliament should reconsider whether the free trade deal could still stand.

    “If the Government is prepared to say that it is willing to stand up for democracy and human rights in Hong Kong, then that has to be consistent. It can’t be business as usual,” Mr Bandt said.

    “Even if you agree with free trade agreements in general, it’s time for a rethink about whether entering into a [free trade] agreement with Hong Kong is giving a tacit stamp of approval to the crackdown.”

  194. calli

    Leaving aside the difference between “centre” and its oogga-boogga big brother, “epicentre”, here are today’s stats. Scroll down for By State and Territory.

  195. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Given your interest in the Second Boer War, and southern Africa in general, you might find “Ghosts of the Past” by Tony Park interesting

    My compliments, and thank you. I’ll bag a copy. Looks interesting.

  196. Cardimona

    Dirk at 1127

    Thank you, sir, for those additional covid questions.

    Dirk at 1200

    Cardimona, what about a “Lockdown Justice” party?
    Run on a platform that every politician and health bureaucrat responsible for imprisoning people will be imprisoned themselves. Businesses that agitated for lockdowns (media, social media and the pharmaceutical industry) would be forced to pay reparations to those businesses who suffered from them.
    Get rid of the term “public health” in all forms of legislation.

    Mate, I bloody love it!
    I’ll definitely use that.

  197. Cardimona

    Salvatore, Social Distance Martyr at 1156

    Wow, Sal; thank you.

    I hadn’t imagined the rot was quite that bad.
    My bet had been on my past public criticisms of the party in question for being cucks.
    I’d thought they were still stinging from those letters because I can be quite direct and I’m told that such directness can “hurt the feelings” of grown, mature men.

    My poor bloody s-i-l; no wonder he’s frustrated and angry…

  198. Nick

    I see NSW is suddenly realising that all those kick-a-Vic comments are going to come back to bite them, as they are the new epicentre of the plague. Completely unsurprising to anyone but them.

    God knows why they would kick a Vic. The wave only started there because of Government mismanagement.

  199. Ed Case

    *** Whenever the Dismissal of Whitlam is discussed I always say —
    but what happened just 6 weeks later? ***

    4 weeks + 4 days, Tinta.
    The Whitlam Government was unpopular by September 1975. Whitlam asked Bill Hayden to take his job, but Hayden wasn’t interested.
    There has never been any question that a GG can’t sack a Government, the question that never gets
    asked is why Whitlam didn’t call an Election immediately he lost the Supply vote.
    Delusions of grandeur/ Totalitarian Dictator? Pull the other one.

  200. thefrollickingmole

    A real letter, from a real karen, in a real newspaper.
    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/jul/13/britains-imperfect-past-needs-to-be-acknowledged

    The Black Lives Matter movement has had a wonderfully positive impact on the removal of racist icons across the world. So for our family, and no doubt for the people of Norwich, it is great news that a street in the city, named after the DNA scientist James Watson, will now be named after my aunt, Rosalind Franklin, about whom Watson was patronising and sexist. The University of Portsmouth has a similar plan for its James Watson hall of residence.
    Shirley Franklin
    Brockenhurst, Hampshire

    SMOD can come soon enough.

  201. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    If Whitlam was so revered, where’s all the Australian men in their middle forties sporting the christian name “Gough”?

    Changed their names by deed poll, to avoid dying from shame.

  202. Cardimona

    Monty! Great to see you!

    Monty, I don’t know if I’ve mentioned this, but I can see the reverse slopes of the Daintree rainforest from my back paddock.
    I still haven’t seen the smoke from the “constant bush fires in rainforests like the Daintree”.
    Can you explain that?

  203. incoherent rambler

    woofloo total deaths

    NSW 49
    VIK 24

    AU total 108

    Nothing to help funeral parlour share prices in those numbers.

  204. Leigh Lowe

    calli

    #3512523, posted on July 14, 2020 at 12:05 pm

    LL’s back, baby!

    Careful now boy-o. You’ll be working a tough room.

    With my comments restricted to ten per week, I have to pick my mark.

  205. Sorry to hear about your cognitive impairment, Cardi.

  206. dopey

    Guardian: Hocking asked if she could present the official release to the media. Bloody hell!

  207. Top Ender

    where’s all the Australian men in their middle forties sporting the christian name “Gough”?

    Don’t think I’ve ever met a Gough in all those years since….

  208. caveman

    After this recent shark attack up North , surfers calling for a cull on the Great White.
    An old article but Vic Hislop did have ideas as to why sharks eat people.

  209. duncanm

    Cassie of Sydney
    #3512317, posted on July 14, 2020 at 7:53 am
    Cardinal George Pell (7-0 upon him) has a really good piece in today’s Oz…

    That article speaks volumes for the inner strength and compassion of the man. Although its all about his experiences with prisoners and guards, it reveals much about him.

  210. Cardimona

    Monty, I think any impairment might lie in your inability to accept reality.
    There is no bushfire without smoke, mate.
    Incomplete combustion, you see.
    But still no bushfire smoke from the Daintree despite your certain knowledge –
    There have been bushfires in the Daintree and Iron Ranges in the past few years, areas which were supposed to be immune.

  211. Mater

    where’s all the Australian men in their middle forties sporting the christian name “Gough”?

    If people were inclined to name their kids after someone who’s prime notability comes from his ability to hand out free shit, half the country’s males would be called ‘Santa’.

  212. duncanm

    Much mirth and laughter from the release of the palace letters. A big fat nothingburger for the conspiracy theorists.

    Yesterday:

    Monash University professor Jenny Hocking said the papers would highlight the “problematic” claim that the Palace had no part in the dismissal despite hundreds of letters to and from former governor-general Sir John Kerr.

    “But it’s our history and it’s about our knowledge of that history. It has been a distorted history, one for which the true details have emerged crab-like over decades after strong research work to unravel what really happened.

    “So the release of these letters is in itself momentous but also typical of the way the history of the dismissal has come to light – gradually, after great effort, and with quite volcanic repercussions.”

    While the initial focus will be on the contested events of November 1975, Professor Hocking said the details in the letters would raise questions over “royal secrecy” claims for the Queen and whether Australia should become a republic.

    “Inevitably, it will reflect upon how we feel having, as our head of state, a queen who is resident elsewhere and is not an Australian citizen,” she said.

    “If we see that the system that we are told is not broken actually was broken in 1975, then I think people will think about whether we can do it better – without that murky, quasi-imperial notion of royal secrecy.

    Today, we find out Sir John Kerr acted in the most proper way.

    Queen Elizabeth was not explicitly told Australia’s governor-general was about to sack Gough Whitlam as prime minister, but she was aware he was considering the option.

  213. Nick

    Much mirth and laughter from the release of the palace letters. A big fat nothingburger for the conspiracy theorists.

    It’s so crucial to the Left that it’s currently running as the 5th story at the SMH online, below a story on sexual harassment….

  214. cohenite

    The troll’s vomit today appears to be EV; stupid things, like the troll, although they have good torque. But the key point is the stupid things must be powered by being connected to the grid which is powered by fossils; or at least 85% of it is in NSW right now, dropping back from 100% at 5am; hydro has kicked in a bit and a bit of wind. The real electric cars (ie not connected to the grid) are showcased every now and then in The World Solar Challenge – a 3,000-kilometre car race from Darwin to Adelaide to showcase the future of solar-powered vehicles. Last year none of the stupid things could finish despite going through some of the hottest, most cloudless God forsaken land on Earth.

    Let’s all chip in and put the troll in one of the useless EVs for the next race and maybe he’ll face his glory in the middle of the Simpson.

  215. Yeah Cardi, you should get that looked at by a medical professional, the wound is starting to weep.

  216. incoherent rambler

    Liberty Quote

    The anti-climate science nonsense being promulgated by ratbag groups such as Quadrant, the IPA and the utterly degenerate and despicable Catallaxy blog depend on the rantings of a handful of so-called ‘sceptics’.
    — Harry Clarke

    Keep up the good work fellow cats.

  217. H B Bear

    You wouldn’t hear Doris Bagshawe calling for an enquiry into the CCP.

  218. duncanm

    Here’s a range of left thought on Kerr and Whitlam before today’s release.

    The ever reliable nutbag John Pilger at Nobby’s-central – New Matilda openly calls it an American coup:

    There is an historical amnesia among Australia’s polite society about the catastrophic events of 1975. An Anglo-American coup overthrew a democratically elected ally in a demeaning scandal in which sections of the Australian elite colluded

    The ever-so thoughtful bag of assorted nuts at The Conversation. We even have a string for future conspiracy theorists.. the important stuff has already been removed from the letters!

    Jenny Hocking (the author), is much more reasonable about the whole thing:

    Whatever the palace letters may reveal, the most important thing is that now we can know it. With that knowledge, the full history of the dismissal of the Whitlam government can finally be told.

  219. H B Bear

    Not even the ALPBC could take Pilger seriously?

  220. Boambee John

    m0nty
    #3512563, posted on July 14, 2020 at 12:45 pm
    Yeah Cardi, you should get that looked at by a medical professional, the wound is starting to weep.

    Kung Flu virus can be transmitted by electrons. You should return to your basement, without any electronic devices.

    It’s for your sake, to protect your health. We really do care!

  221. Cardimona

    Dunno if I’ve mentioned it, Cats, but I actually met St Gough at my then-girlfriend’s house at Freshwater back in the day.
    Her Dad was ALP state Member for Barron River.
    We teens were recruited to clean the house for St Gough’s visit.
    I was tallest, so I polished the sliding glass doors.
    Gough walked into one like a giant moth.
    Left a magnificent faceprint on the glass!

    Also, he had a handshake that felt like was grasping a wet, dead fish.

  222. thefrollickingmole

    Gough walked into one like a giant moth.
    Left a magnificent faceprint on the glass!

    That made me laugh, well done.

  223. Cardimona

    Monty, come on, man – admit you were wrong.
    Make a mouth shape as if you’re about to inhale a delicious baked product and say “I was wrong”.
    That, or link me to the “random bushfires” in the Daintree rainforest.
    FMD, you’ve had six months to dredge the links up.

  224. Farmer Gez

    Word is Stage 4 lockdown for Danjing tomorrow.

    Victorian Cats will keep you posted on what having a dose of Covid is like. City types fled to their bush blocks during the holidays and are roaming the supermarkets. You can spot them by the way they avoid eye contact.

  225. Cassie of Sydney

    “Cardimona
    #3512579, posted on July 14, 2020 at 1:05 pm
    Monty, come on, man”

    Cardi…that’s a stretch….calling Monty a “man”.

  226. Makka

    Dunno if I’ve mentioned it, Cats, but I actually met St Gough at my then-girlfriend’s house at Freshwater back in the day.

    There was a Member for Cook living in Freshwater, back in the day.

  227. You may need to return to grade 1 to relearn the meaning of the word “like”, Cardio.

  228. Gab

    Oh the sanctimony of the left.

  229. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    Let’s all chip in and put the troll in one of the useless EVs for the next race and maybe he’ll face his glory in the middle of the Simpson.

    cut the top off so his comb-over can flap in the wind

  230. Top Ender #3512550, posted on July 14, 2020 at 12:29 pm

    where’s all the Australian men in their middle forties sporting the christian name “Gough”?

    Don’t think I’ve ever met a Gough in all those years since….

    Exactly.
    As a control for any such experiment, there’s no real shortage of African-American boys in the USA aged between Five & Ten who’re named “Barack”

  231. Top Ender

    Outrage as remote supplies left to rot
    EXCLUSIVE
    AMOS AIKMAN

    Outback Stores, a federal agency managing remote shops for almost 40 indigenous communities, allegedly wasted at least $550,000 in a single year by ordering fresh fruit and vegetables that locals did not want, according to an analysis of its records.

    The practice, which involved sending stores hundreds of kilograms more of some heavy items, such as watermelons and potatoes, than store managers had ordered made it appear Outback was selling enormous quantities of fresh produce out bush. Instead, the produce likely ended in landfill.

    The scheme also allegedly earned Outback about $67,000 in “kickback”-like incentives. Impoverished communities, however, had to wear the cost in terms of inflated prices on other items and forgone profits.

    The analysis was done by Aboriginal Investment Group, a subsidiary of the Northern Land Council, using records from the Barunga store, 80km southeast of Katherine, in the Northern Territory.

    AIG took over management of that outlet from Outback in December 2018. To come up with the figures, AIG combed through hundreds of invoices, store sales and other records, concluding that almost half of all fresh fruit and vegetables sent by Outback to Barunga in 2017-18 was never on-sold to customers.

    Much of the excess produce was “allocated” by head office rather than being ordered by local managers with direct knowledge of community demand. Pictures taken when AIG took control of the store showed crates of rotting cabbages, pears and tomatoes left behind.

    AIG chief executive Steve Smith said remote stores should prioritise increasing the amount of fresh produce that indigenous people consume and Outback’s public claims based on the amount of fresh produce it shipped were deeply misleading.

    “When Barunga store was managed by OBS, as much as 48 per cent of all fresh produce purchased by the store went to waste,” Mr Smith said.

    “If we use that store as an example across all of OBS’s network, we estimate that about $550,000 per year of produce ends up in landfill.”

    Invoices reviewed by The Australian show that in the three months to the end of March 2018, Barunga ordered 8kg of watermelons but received 100kg.

    It ordered no cherries but was allocated 40kg of them and also got 20kg of grapes, despite asking for just 3kg.

    “None of the watermelon orders resulted in any sales, while only 1 per cent of the cherry order and 25 per cent of the grapes order were sold,” a memo by AIG reads.

    “The remainder was food waste … AIG has been informed that in the case of the watermelon, there were greater order allocations for bigger stores, resulting in 200kg and 300kg watermelon order allocations.”

    In many cases, Outback is not only the supplier but takes a fee from the community to manage stores. Because it is a government agency, communities expect the organisation to act in good faith by minimising prices and costs and maximising profits returned to them.

    Store profits are an important source of income in many communities and, as in many other towns, indigenous people are often eager to see economic gains from consumption remain close to home.

    “The benefit here is going directly to OBS through rebates on fresh produce, while the stores are incurring significant losses,” Mr Smith said.

    Barunga prices dropped by more than 8 per cent on average after AIG took control and the store returned a modest profit.

    In previous years under OBS management, store losses had averaged around $94,000 per annum, Mr Smith said.

    Earlier this year, Outback drew scrutiny for sending receivers into the remote West Australian town of Balgo’s only store on New Year’s Eve, forcing locals to scramble to ensure their families did not run out of food.

    The dispute escalated an 18-month battle that has brought claims of bribery, stealing and unconscionable conduct before the courts.

    Mr Smith, a former Australian Competition & Consumer Commission investigator, has previously accused Outback of forcing remote shoppers to pay “double margins”, or mark-ups of as much as 65 per cent on top of the retail price of items it onsold from outlets like Big W.

    Outback did not respond to multiple requests for comment made by The Australian.

    The ACCC has previously declined to investigate Outback, passing complaints on to the Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet. In May, Indigenous Australians Minister Ken Wyatt asked the house standing committee on indigenous affairs to launch an inquiry into food prices and food security in remote communities amid outrage among families forced to pay inflated costs during the coronavirus pandemic.

    A statement Outback issued to the inquiry said it would be “excited” to participate. Outback, founded in 2006, grew rapidly in the wake of the Howard government’s 2007 Northern Territory Emergency Response, intended to address market failures that led to an undersupply of healthy produce in the bush.

    Oz print edition

  232. JC

    Monster

    Get back in the basement. You’re not allowed out.

  233. Boambee John

    m0nty
    #3512583, posted on July 14, 2020 at 1:11 pm
    You may need to return to grade 1 to relearn the meaning of the word “like”, Cardio.

    When m0nty uses words, they mean just what he wants them to mean, and nothing else.

    So when he says “like the Daintree”, he doesn’t actually mean the Daintree, he means every other rainforest in the world.

    It’s a bit like (there’s that word again) his inability to accept that the murder of millions by communists was really, like, you know, actual murder!

  234. Dr Faustus

    Ghislaine Maxwell must stay in jail due to ‘extreme flight risk’, prosecutors say

    Maxwell is a citizen of France, prosecutors pointed out, saying that the country “does not extradite its citizens to the United States pursuant to French law”. Maxwell also has US and UK passports.

    The filing added that “the defendant has not only the motive to flee, but the means to do so swiftly and effectively. The defendant appears to have access to extensive sources of wealth.”

    Her focal position in the FBI/DoJ investigation has hardly been a secret for the past 12 months. So she must also be exceedingly dim if she hadn’t taken already taken the opportunity to flee to France if she thought that were necessary.

    Looking increasingly like the FBI/DoJ want to keep her under a glass for a couple of months to maximise the collateral damage to the Orange Man when they float the Epstein/Mar-a-Lago/Virginia Guiffre Roberts/Prince-Andrew-extradition-imbroglio warhead into the courts in September/October.

    “Mr Trump, as presumptive President, you need to tell the American people What You Know and When You Knew It…”

    Very swampy.

  235. thefrollickingmole

    cut the top off so his comb-over can flap in the wind

    one of the times Ive been closest to death/disaster most of my fear was calmed by the sight of a shitty combover flapping in the breeze like a demented cocker spaniels tail.

    On the boat and a lifeboat container hatch blew off in really shitty weather. Colin the Skipper sent me up on the roof of the trawler to get it back down and it was taking a while (hinges snapped and trying to tie down) so he set the boat into the seas and came up to help/shout at me more.
    While he was doing it the boat went side on to the big waves and hit us, the skipper grabbed my legs so he didnt go over and I ended up grabbing onto an engine room breather pipe as we both pedulumed back and forward into the side of the boat..
    Old Colin had a terry toweling hat that never left his head, it got belted off and flew away and his god awful combover was flapping back and forth over and over as we swung back and forth.
    Even in the near gale force winds it kept its shape.
    Only afterwards i realized how close we had both come to going overboard, no one else on the boat and Colin had it just making headway against the waves so we would never have caught up to it again.

    Geez he was shitty about losing his hat though.

  236. Cardimona: The LNP adherents in that electorate (we’re talking the urbanites, not the tablelands dairy farmers or Cape York battlers/bull-throwers) believe Barnaby Joyce is the worst thing to ever befall the National Party, and that Michael McClintock (new leader & Deputy PM) is repairing the damage done by BJ.

    Too many sea-change Victorians among ’em. They’re unable to grasp that the psychology of the electorate is not as it would be in the Melbourne ranges (or whatever that tree-change area that keeps burning itself down is called).
    The dripping-wet Federal member isn’t much bluddee help to the situation either.

  237. McCormack I mean (there’s a message there re his cut-through & brand name recognition)

  238. Farmer Gez

    The winning continues.
    Vics have passed NSW in Covid cases and we only need get another 1500 and we’ll outdo the entire tally of other states.
    You watch us go.

  239. Dr Faustus

    Maximum Leader Andrews talks sternly to the virus:

    “If you don’t want Stage 4, if you don’t want the lockdown to last a moment longer, then please follow the rules,” he said.

    It’s unclear what Stage 4 restrictions would look like, but New Zealand’s Stage 4 restrictions included the closure of all businesses except essential services such as supermarkets and pharmacies.

    And, of course, the Public Service.

    This is what ‘losing control’ looks like.

  240. Knuckle Dragger

    mole’s link, 12.08:

    ‘What they want now is to start a conversation about how men with power and influence treat young women as part of a culture of impunity’

    That is not the funniest shit I’ve ever read, but by Christ it’s in the top 40.

    Millionaire industry giant, in between jetski runs – ‘Well, I was going to drop by the club and pick up a couple of Nordic lingerie models to bang. Now I’ve thought about it though, I have too much power and influence to do this all the time.

    ‘Instead, I might just go home and self-pleasure, assisted by Target catalogues.’

  241. thefrollickingmole

    Knuckle Dragger

    The hamster rationalization wheel was working overtime on how to spin this to make ladies flinging their flanges at this bloke into victims.
    The best they could manage was ‘” I thought i had hooked a high status gentleman my hoo-haa went berserk and i wasnt responsible”.

  242. Cassie of Sydney

    I love British comedian Andrew Lawrence….

  243. Herodotus

    Via Mark Latham: Play School now schooling toddlers about racism.

    Have they crossed another line? Should the ABC be truncated?

    Check out this special episode of Play School urging toddlers to help “put a stop to racism” by “using their big strong voices”. The presenter says, “Not all people get the same opportunities as everyone else, that’s not fair and that unfairness can feel very painful and frustrating”.

    “For all those little white privileged toddlers having morning tea, sipping their poppers, eating their Tiny Teddy biccies”, says a concerned grandmother.

    What happened to not interfering with childhood innocence? (As studies have shown too much information at an inappropriate age can cause damage).

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