Universities begin throwing army of casuals under the bus

Turns out that studying the humanities for “eight years or more” is not a smart way to secure your future.

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32 Responses to Universities begin throwing army of casuals under the bus

  1. bemused says:

    We should weep?

    On a somewhat similar note, it appears that Harvard is now providing most, if not all, lessons online, yet still charging the full US$50,000/annum or so fees. For some reason students are disgruntled.

  2. Watch Your Back says:

    This is what happens when payroll taxes bite and employment ‘rights’ make it impossible to lay off staff. The 72% figure is shocking though.

    I recall that Tony Blair decreed that 50% of 18 year olds should go to universities. This led to an expansion in university courses, and more staff were taken on. Around the same time, universities began taking on high-paying overseas students in large numbers. It was all so easy!

    Blair noticed that Male academics were retiring at 65, willingly or not, and females at 60. And so he ruled that university lecturers should be allowed to work until 70. The universities were unimpressed and they began to make staff around the age of 50-54 redundant 10 years early to avoid them being in post until they were 70. Pure genius.

    The economic model of today’s universities is the worst of all worlds, and the collapse in foreign student numbers is showing this up in stark relief.

  3. H B Bear says:

    Is this the beginning of The End?

  4. H B Bear says:

    Just a minute. I’ll get my tiny violin.

    There goes Chairman Dan’s core constituency in the DPRV.

  5. cuckoo says:

    I feel sorry for this lady, but it’s somehow ironic that her job at the University was coaching foreign [Racist comment deleted. Totally unnecessary Sinc] students to pass language accreditation, a job which, in a more rational world, wouldn’t have existed to begin with. She has lost her job for the very same reason it existed to begin with: gross overdependence on fee-paying foreign students.

  6. Shy Ted says:

    One industry figure said after “eight years or more” of advanced study many university educators found themselves in a “relatively insecure position”
    Not just 8 years of study but 8 years of advanced study. I look forward to reading more about their advanced insecurity.

  7. Eyrie says:

    Tap, tap. Nope. Still on the bottom stop. Sympathy meter must be broken.
    Break out the nano violin.

  8. Roger says:

    Turns out that studying the humanities for “eight years or more” is not a smart way to secure your future.

    Helps fill the universities’ coffers with tax payer $, though, which is all that really matters to their administrators.

  9. Terry says:

    “They [the teachers] have no financial security and that means it’s difficult to take holidays, get mortgages, plan a family but it’s also that chronic insecurity leads to stress and problems of emotional wellbeing,”

    Awwww, maybe use that “advanced” education to start your own business or find a job in a productive sector?

    Who, exactly, has real “financial security” in the current environment (other than coddled public servants)?

  10. Slim Cognito says:

    A while back at a party, I was speaking to a retired high level academic who had recently retired. During his career he had regularly trotted off overseas to some gab fest on the tax payers dime. He was aghast at the cost of first class travel now that he was having to pay for it himself. It didn’t bother him when someone else was paying for it.

  11. billie says:

    oh the pain, dr smith, the pain

    such bleating, so sad

  12. wal1957 says:

    Oh, the Humanity!!!!!

    Who woulda thunk it???

  13. Bronson says:

    Who gives a rats? Join the rest of us in the real world.

  14. Davey Boy says:

    Perhaps the casuals’ jerbs weren’t “sustainable”

    In more “we’re all in this together” news:

    Salary rise for staff but not for councillors

    COUNCIL staff will get a pay bump this month although there will be no pay rises for Cumberland’s 14 councillors this financial year.

    The Local Government Remuneration Tribunal (LGRT) classifies Cumberland as one of 11 Metropolitan Large councils and in a decision made last month, cited the impact of Covid-19 as a key factor in opting not to increase the annual fees paid to councillors and mayors.
    Each year the Tribunal issues a minimum and maximum range of fees payable to elected councillors, which they are then permitted to determine themselves, with Cumberland’s 14 councillors paid the maximum annual fee allowable of $30,410, while Mayor Steve Christou receives $88,600.
    It is better news for staff who will receive a pay rise effective from July 1 following months of negotiations between Local Government NSW (LGNSW) and industry unions.
    LGNSW President Linda Scott said the 1.5 per cent pay increase this year, with a two per cent increase in each of the following two years, was a “sustainable increase for councils to manage”.

  15. Scott Osmond says:

    Now, move on to the administrators and diversity, inclusion and equality people. In a merit based system they have no reason to exist. On another note has anyone else noticed that diversity, inclusion and equality equals die? Quite appropriate when the consequence’s of this insanity starts to influence outcomes in engineering, medical and other outcomes based disciplines. Tell me again academia what insites a stone age culture brings to physics and quantum mechanics? I’d think as much as my viking age ancestors would bring. Nothing.

  16. Spurgeon Monkfish III says:

    If these “universities” didn’t exist, these tragic sackings of utterly useless psuedo-intellectual dunderheads would not have been necessary.

  17. Bruce of Newcastle says:

    A bit of financial Chinese crud discipline of the universities is a good thing, I agree. But unfortunately they are so solidly captured by the Marxist left that nothing short of Armageddon will ever make them worth their cost ever again.

    The best thing that can be done is develop an on-line platform for a degree, with no input from leftist professors and administrative staffers. With examination only passing criteria. When that is developed (think a higher level International Baccalaureate) then the political colonization by the Marxists can potentially be controlled. I am sure they will attempt to subvert such a system too, but if the on-line platform is low cost it would be feasible for a righty baccalaureate to be set up in competition. Then we would see whether realist degrees do better in the job market than lefty soft ‘degrees’.

  18. BoN:

    A bit of financial Chinese crud discipline of the universities is a good thing, I agree. But unfortunately they are so solidly captured by the Marxist left that nothing short of Armageddon will ever make them worth their cost ever again.

    The best part of all this, Bruce, is that a system that cannot endure will not endure.
    And when the whole rotten, parasite class goes tits up and they have to actually justify the food they get fed, I shall have great delight in kicking these bludgers out of bed at 4am to milk the bloody cows.
    Mao was certainly on a winner when he made the intellectuals go out and pull ploughs in the depths of winter.

  19. Old Lefty says:

    The perfect solution, Bruce, would be for Campion College to go on line.

    The universities these days are self-serving carnivorous bureaucracies with a bit of incidental teaching and research attached.

  20. JohnJJJ says:

    Isn’t there a ruling coming up in the next few weeks about casuals actually being full time? Hence the employer will have to make good all the back payments. “regular, certain, continuing, constant and predictable”. The Universities may have a hefty bill to pay.

  21. Paul says:

    Time to get a real job …. The ABC is looking for unattractive sign language experts to help with distracting deaf leftards . Give them a call . Hope that helps !

  22. a happy little debunker

    WE’RE ALL IN THIS TOGETHER

    I love this blog at times.

  23. Lawrence Ayres says:

    Naturally the casual 8 year degree types will never be able to repay their HECs and if they are female and hitch to a good provider they will never have to worry about it either. It is time to introduce the Ayres funding formula to universities. It is my contention that universities are not places of learning but are commercial enterprises selling a product, degrees. Just like Coles or the car dealership they have products that some people want and like Coles or the dealership they have the onus of collecting the money. If universities were responsible for collecting the course fees they would be careful to ensure that the student was capable of gaining the degree, the degree would lead to a well paid job and the lecturing staff were good enough for the student to gain the degree at minimum cost. There would be little incentive to indulge in ephemeral subjects that lead nowhere so available courses would be slashed along with the sandal wearing staff. Students would be fully engaged in learning and so have little time to indulge in activism and the spreading of Marxism. Degrees would be directly related to the demands of prospective employers so that there would be no delay in gaining employment. The university could fund the student and would demand repayment starting immediately upon graduation.

    Might as well get the kiddies used to the real world rather than cosset them in a paid for Disneyland.

  24. Squirrel says:

    There’s a grim irony in the fact that many of the people who will be angry and distressed at this news (even if not directly affected) will be those who have made the most noise about the need for the strictest of lock-downs and restrictions and who are now baying for elimination/eradication – which, of course, would mean that the overseas student trade would be even further squeezed.

  25. Rohan says:

    Just ask Dan, he got his BA in Karl Marx in six.

  26. Rohan says:

    Social distancing?

  27. Rabbi Putin says:

    Sacked employee may want to try a job at Deliveroo, sure they’ll fit right in

  28. It is my contention that universities are not places of learning but are commercial enterprises selling a product, degrees. Just like Coles or the car dealership they have products that some people want and like Coles or the dealership they have the onus of collecting the money. If universities were responsible for collecting the course fees they would be careful to ensure that the student was capable of gaining the degree, the degree would lead to a well paid job and the lecturing staff were good enough for the student to gain the degree at minimum cost. There would be little incentive to indulge in ephemeral subjects that lead nowhere so available courses would be slashed along with the sandal wearing staff. Students would be fully engaged in learning and so have little time to indulge in activism and the spreading of Marxism. Degrees would be directly related to the demands of prospective employers so that there would be no delay in gaining employment. The university could fund the student and would demand repayment starting immediately upon graduation.

    University ought to be so cheap it can be simply paid off in advance or arrears like a second hand car from the earning of a second job or a part time job.

    The costs and expenses that universities tolerate is deplorable.

  29. yarpos says:

    Cant be healthy hiding in academia all your life, you would get a pretty warped view of the world. I guess that’s why the ABC always lurches towards a bad hair academic when they want commentary on a topic.

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  31. kae says:

    Bemused

    Do you have any idea how much the School, which actually pays all the course related costs, receives out of the fee charged per course for each domestic student?

    It is around 25%.

    Full-fee paying students bring more money into the Schools. There is a lot more money for universities in Aus from postgraduate study.

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