Tuesday Forum: August 11, 2020

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2,659 Responses to Tuesday Forum: August 11, 2020

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  1. sfw

    Well I thought it was Abbott, it seems I was mistaken. Still don’t like it.

  2. notafan

    Just to be clear JC. That further increase to 70 didn’t go through.

    Probably should have.

  3. woolfe

    Fitsimmians poll was turned. 75% said they hoped trump would win. Strangely the poll has now disappeared but i took a photo of it prior and avi talks about it here.

  4. Leigh Lowe

    No.
    I am asking where my elephant stamp is.

  5. William the Conjuror

    So many people here worried about how to say the name of Comma-la. And you don’t even get a vote. Not on her name, not on whether she becomes the next Vice Prez of the USA. Heck, you won’t even be polled about any of it.

    “lah” or some other imagined Indian or Jamaican emphasis on the last syllable? Negatory. That’s a Chinese familiarity, much used by the Hong Kongers. eg. Ruby-ah, Mary-ah, Cathy-ah.

    Bùshì ma?

  6. zyconoclast

    A bit like parents in the UK being told not to read to their children because it is unfair…

    If you had any doubt that hard-left ideologues run government school systems in many (most?) places, take a look at Fairfax County, Virginia’s most populous county, with over a million residents, one of the richest counties in the United States with an average household income well over one hundred thousand dollars.

    The educrats who run the Fairfax public schools have advised parents there not to hire tutors or organize informal homeschool “pods” to replace the shuttered schools because some parents cannot afford to do so, and that would be “unfair.”

  7. OldOzzie

    johanna
    #3546531, posted on August 13, 2020 at 3:11 pm

    Thanks for the good wishes, Lizzie.

    I picked up a bottle of Grant Burge sparkling pinot noir – on special at $20 – which is currently chilling in the fridge.

    To the person who made a crack about me being mistreated by public servants – if you read my comment you would see that I am particularly annoyed at the waste of public money and doctors’ time, which is much more important than the personal inconvenience.

    I am going to ask if we can do phone consultations, and then she can email the script straight to the pharmacy. I’ve been told that this is possible.

    johanna

    check if your GP uses – https://www.hotdoc.com.au/medical-centres – it comes as App on Android and iPhone

    I use it to get perscriptions reissued without having to visit GP and either mailed or faxed to Pharmacy and then get online delivery and also use HotDoc to make appointments

    I have been using Telehealth with my GP and Specialist

  8. Mater

    No.
    I am asking where my elephant stamp is.

    We are in the era of modern schooling.
    Everyone gets one, or no one does.
    You’re shit outta luck!

  9. sfw

    70 may sound good to someone who has never worked hard physically, someone who has spent their life behind a desk or similar. I still work hard everyday but I have noticed that I just don’t get through as much as I did even a few years ago. I’ve saved and will only be eligible for a part pension but I’m self employed and each year that passes my capacity for work reduces. I hate it when those who don’t know what hard work is tell me what I should be doing.

    I’m lucky in my game much of the work is operating heavy equipment, for those who do real hard work, bricklaying, fencing, plaster etc the end of their working life is around 50, I suppose that the desk jockey reckons that they’re bludgers.

  10. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Eastern Freeway crash: Porsche driver Richard Pusey disputes legality of rare charge

    Tessa Akerman
    Reporter
    @TessaAkerman
    An hour ago August 13, 2020

    The lawyer for a Porsche driver who allegedly taunted and filmed a dying police officer is quibbling over whether the charge of “outraging public decency” is legal before agreeing to a plea deal, a court has heard.

    Richard Pusey has been in custody since April following a horrific road crash which killed Leading Senior Constable Lynette Taylor, Constable Glen Humphris, Senior Constable Kevin King and Constable Joshua Prestney.

    It is alleged Mr Pusey was driving his $150,000 Porsche coupe on Melbourne’s Eastern Freeway at 149km/h but was pulled over by police who were then mowed down by a Volvo prime mover.

    Mr Pusey has been charged with a raft of offending including failing to render assistance at the scene of a collision, destruction of evidence, behaving in a indecent or offensive manner, speeding and drug offences.

    The manager of the trucking company was charged earlier this month with four counts of manslaughter.

    From the Oz.

  11. Leigh Lowe

    Mater

    #3546559, posted on August 13, 2020 at 3:27 pm

    No.
    I am asking where my elephant stamp is.

    We are in the era of modern schooling.
    Everyone gets one, or no one does.
    You’re shit outta luck!

    OK.
    Clickety, click.
    Ah.
    Here it is.
    ratemyteacher.com

  12. zyconoclast

    The University of California and The SAT: Speaking the Truth?

    Despite this evidence, in 2018, a lawsuit was filed against the University of California, claiming that the SAT is biased against certain racial/ethnic minority groups and therefore the use of the SAT in college admissions is a form of discrimination. In response, the University of California assembled a special task force to investigate how the SAT is used to make admissions decisions at UC schools. The task force was asked to provide a recommendation as to whether the UC should continue to use the SAT or drop the SAT requirement for admission to the UC.

    The empirical evidence clearly shows that the SAT is not biased, such that SAT scores are a valid predictor of college success regardless of your demographic background. In fact, the strength of the relationship between SAT scores and college performance appears to be getting stronger in recent years, whereas the strength of the relationship between high school GPA and college performance is getting weaker.

  13. woolfe

    RIP Jock Hutton. He was my RSM during training. (not SAS but infantry). Greatest generation, jumped into Normandy on DDay with paras. Man amongst men.
    https://sofrep.com/news/c-squadron-rhodesian-sas-sergeant-major-jock-hutton/

  14. feelthebern

    Looks like Fordham’s caller was full of shit.
    Hard to do what they accused Tangara of doing when the school is shut until then 24th August.
    Hopefully Fordham would do the honourable thing & apologise for the slur made on his show.

  15. Leigh Lowe

    check if your GP uses – https://www.hotdoc.com.au/medical-centres – it comes as App on Android and iPhone

    We used it when Mrs L booked a Kung Flu test.
    Not sure if it was the surgery website or the app or the gummint elf dept, but it was quite enjoyable entering name, address, medicare number etc five times.

  16. Leigh Lowe

    feelthebern

    #3546570, posted on August 13, 2020 at 3:35 pm

    Looks like Fordham’s caller was full of shit.

    Hi Alan.
    I am a student at …

  17. Neil

    God forbid, the liars ever won, coal and gas use in Australia would cease while coal and gas exports continued to their chunk masters.

    I think ALP/Greens want to stop coal/gas exports as well. Countries become poor by decisions made wrongly.

    Had a coffee this morning with some friends. Looking at the coffee cup made me understand that making coffee and services is what we now do. Our manufacturing industry has gone. Kmart shelves are empty until they are restocked from China.

  18. notafan

    Sfw

    The change is not to force people to continue working til they are 70, though many do anyhow, my mechanic was still working in his eighties, but for those that wish to retire earlier than the pension age to do so using their own funds.

    Australia

    Compulsory super since 1991

  19. Leigh Lowe

    Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    #3546564, posted on August 13, 2020 at 3:32 pm

    Eastern Freeway crash: Porsche driver Richard Pusey disputes legality of rare charge

    Much as I think Dick Pussey is a shifty xunt and an Olympic standard flog, VikPol have totally lost the plot here.

  20. JC

    While on that subject, Neil. Nice research piece explaining the benefits of trade liberalization with China and why it was a boon to both consumers and producers. Obviously, this is a piece about the US.

    Should take a looksee as not all international trade is bad.

    https://www.cato.org/publications/policy-analysis/testing-china-shock-was-normalizing-trade-china-mistake

  21. 132andBush

    Unlike your service (or existence) for that matter which you can’t verify.

    He certainly exists in your head.

  22. JC

    Porsche driver Richard Pusey disputes legality of rare charge

    And with a name like that one, you’re telling me The Simulation doesn’t exist?

  23. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    Despite this evidence, in 2018, a lawsuit was filed against the University of California, claiming that the SAT is biased against certain racial/ethnic minority groups

    no race is smarter or dumber than any other, to suggest that is imperialism, capitalism, racism, homophobia, transphobia, a micro aggression and absolutely poo poo

    long live the revolucion!

  24. DrBeauGan

    Happy birthday, Johanna.

    Grant Burge is awful. You’d be better with Jacob’s Creek at $10 for the Chardonnay pinot noir or $15 for the cool harvest sauvignon plonk, but enjoy it whatever it is. When your pension comes through, splash out on Fourny & Fils blanc de blanc. YMMV.

  25. Spurgeon Monkfish III

    Paul Murray – yet more evidence that commercial TV executives are among the stupidest people to have existed in human history, giving them unique insights into their audiences’ televisual tastes.

  26. sfw

    Notafan, you’re obsfuscating, super may be good for some but for most it isn’t that much, certainly not enough to live on in these days of 1% interest. My point is that for someone with a desk job going to 70 isn’t a problem for those who who work hard it’s very difficult. Do you understand that at 65 you just can’t be as physically productive as a 30yo? If you’re not productive you lose jobs or take longer for the same quote. You essentially earn less each passing year. I’m fit, active and no health problems but each year my productivity declines, no idea what it would be at 70 but nowheere near where I am now.

  27. johanna

    Thanks, Old Ozzie – I will inquire.

    Dr is as unimpressed as I am. Apart from anything else, every script needs a phone authorisation from the Health Dept, so she will be wasting a lot of time on hold, as I doubt that they have enough staff to cope. Even under the old system, she often has to listen to Vivaldi while time ticks by and the patient waits.

  28. Tim Neilson

    The change is not to force people to continue working til they are 70, though many do anyhow, my mechanic was still working in his eighties, but for those that wish to retire earlier than the pension age to do so using their own funds.

    That’s the only way compulsory super will ever save any significant money from the social welfare budget*.
    The vast majority of people will never accumulate enough from compulsory super to fund their retirement – their super just reduces their social welfare “entitlements”, and most people respond (rationally) by spending their super as soon as they can after retirement, even if that requires hand over fist splurging.
    Delaying the pension age means that people who really can’t keep working will use their super to bridge finance their retirement till they reach the pension age, and the government gets out of funding them during the bridging period.
    [* to be squandered elsewhere on profligate government vanity projects]

  29. Leigh Lowe

    132andBush

    #3546579, posted on August 13, 2020 at 3:44 pm

    Unlike your service (or existence) for that matter which you can’t verify.

    He certainly exists in your head.

    And all through merely serving up a couple of Spud’s own past musings and asking doing a little “compare and contrast”.

  30. sfw

    DrBeauGan, you don’t know what awful is till you drink cask wine put through a soda stream to make ‘sparkling wine’.

  31. 1735099

    The answer is, I can’t. No one can. After all, you fucked up the details of your fathers service (if indeed you are actually you), which is not a good indication.

    Complete rubbish.
    As you discovered when you stalked my father by looking up his records, every detail, except his motivation, was exactly as I had posted.
    He volunteered in a war when the country was under threat.
    I was conscripted in peacetime when it wasn’t.
    My family believed (and continues to believe) that the prime motivation for his service was the first Japanese raid on Darwin.
    If you spent less time trying to find “gotchas”, and more time considering the moral justification for the smears you post, you’d be a much happier person.
    You’re like a wind-up clock with a broken spring, which tells the correct time twice every twenty-four hours.

  32. shatterzzz

    Labor introduced increases in pension age in 2009.
    Liberals wanted further increase but didn’t go through.
    Do you know from where to where age wise for both?

    Joe Hockey proposed the age increase to 70 in the 2014 budget ..
    Bradbury
    , officially, scrapped it circa September 2018.

  33. sfw

    I have saved, I have no debt, own my house and an investment property (motel), however thanks to Dan and wuflu the tenant is on half rent, he may drop further, and I’m sure the gov is going to screw us all tax wise, I can’t work as much and the part pension is further away than ever.

  34. Mater

    As you discovered when you stalked my father by looking up his records, every detail, except his motivation, was exactly as I had posted.

    Utter bullshit!

    Would you like to go another round in this arena?

  35. Neil

    Should take a looksee as not all international trade is bad.

    WE hardly make anything here anymore. We are even importing some foodstuffs. Not good from a security point of view

  36. sfw

    Everyone seems to imagine that all workers sit behind a desk, minimal physical work and can go on forever, our lives may be longer but maybe not our capacity for physical work.

  37. Leigh Lowe

    Good point Tim.
    And of course it affords a little budget sugar hit in the years the OAP eligibility deferrals take effect.
    It has always been my argument that the biggest budgetary threat isn’t a failure to tax the shit out of the relatively small number of $2 meg plus SMSFs.
    The issue is people who have funds of, say $350k to $500k who behave fairly irrationally, splurging to get under the full OAP threshold (which I think is $280k but not totally sure).

  38. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Would you like to go another round in this arena?

    Fifty quid on Mater, five bob on bin chicken.

  39. Leigh Lowe

    Mater!
    Dead Man Stalking!!
    How is that even possible?

  40. JC

    It’s to see myths totally destroyed.

    Notably, the United States was the final holdout among large industrialized nations to approve China’s WTO accession via bilateral negotiations, demanding ever more concessions from the Chinese government over a contentious 13‐​year negotiation. Contrary to allegations from President Trump and others, the United States did not simply “rubber‐​stamp” China’s WTO accession or base it on Pollyannaish dreams of Chinese democratization. In an interview about his book Schism: China, America, and the Fracturing of the Global Trading System, journalist Paul Blustein describes his research into the U.S.–Chinese bilateral accession negotiations:

    I did a lot of research on the negotiations leading to China’s entry into the WTO, interviewing many of the key players on both sides. I found that both sides played extreme hardball—if anything, it was the Chinese who felt bruised and humiliated by the way the talks were conducted. The Americans … were usually the ones to walk away from the table.… China had to agree to open its economy and reform in ways that exceeded the requirements imposed on other countries. For example, China had to promise that it would reduce its tariffs on [manufactured] goods to an avg of about 9% in 2005. China had to lower its tariffs to less than 1/3 the comparable figures for Brazil & other comparable countries. China also had to agree that its trading partners could use several unusual mechanisms that could restrict the inflow of Chinese products. All in all, it’s hard to imagine how the US could have driven a harder bargain on [economic] issues and still gotten a deal. Chinese officials are resentful to this day; they feel China was forced to accept 2nd class citizenship on a [number] of issues.60

    Beyond driving a hard bargain, U.S. trade representatives for multiple presidents from each major party also frequently consulted with Congress and the private sector, including labor unions, at every step (as required by U.S. law).

  41. Mother Lode

    My teachers from the 70’s and 80’s were obvious lefties and did everything short of wearing a “Vote Labor” t-shirt in class.

    I remember a geography teacher in school (in the 70’s) who ‘taught’ us about the glorious workers movement, the way it created the Labor party, and the underhanded strategy of the coalition meaning the Libs and the ‘National Country Party’ getting two bites in elections, and gaining an unfair advantage.

    I never really liked him after that.

  42. JC

    And

    With respect to the supposed U.S. dream of Chinese democratization, the Paulson Institute’s Neil Thomas has shown that creating a liberal democracy in China was not a primary reason for the U.S. government’s approval of China’s WTO accession. Instead, key Clinton administration speeches and policy documents demonstrate that U.S.–Chinese engagement “was a balancing act with multiple objectives”—most of them pragmatic—including “increasing bilateral dialogues, preventing [weapons of mass destruction] nonproliferation in East and South Asia, preventing the nuclearization of the Korean Peninsula, cooperating on disease and environmental issues, better market access [for U.S. companies] and intellectual property rules, fighting organized crime, ensuring stability in the Taiwan Strait, and WTO accession on ‘commercial terms,’ among others.” Democratization, on the other hand, was mentioned rarely. Thomas shows that the Clinton administration’s engagement policy with China was “neither a triumphant celebration of inevitable democratization nor a credulous declaration of China subsuming itself to American leadership,” and instead comported with “the dominant argument used by PNTR advocates to sway legislators” (i.e., that “engagement with China was not primarily aimed at changing China, but rather focused on benefitting America”).62

  43. cohenite

    Yeah – you’re afraid of me.

    Alright, hands up, who’s the wanker who is afraid of the vile, verminous, blotch-ridden and so far untouched by the chunk virus troll.

  44. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Joowish community slams Clive Palmer for ‘weaponising Holocaust’ with Nazi comments over WA mining court stoush
    Caitlyn Rintoul
    The West Australian
    Thu, 13 August 2020 1:42PM

    Clive Palmer has been labelled a “d***head” who is “spitting on the graves of diggers” after the Queensland billionaire likened the McGowan Government to Nazi Germany today.

    Australia’s Joowish community has rounded on Mr Palmer for “weaponising the Holocaust” during his spat with the WA Government over emergency legislation to block his $30 billion lawsuits.

    Speaking on Hit 92.9 radio this morning, Mr Palmer said he believed WA “could be” stepping stones away from having concentration camps.

    “If you go back to Nazi Germany, their law was eroded over seven years,” Mr Palmer said.

    Anti-Defamation Commission, Australia’s leading civil rights organisation chairman Dr Dvir Abramovich urged Mr Palmer to apologise for his anti-Semitic outburst.

    “Enough with weaponising the Holocaust to make a point,” Dr Abramovich said.

  45. Infidel Tiger King

    Anti-Defamation Commission, Australia’s leading civil rights organisation chairman Dr Dvir Abramovich urged Mr Palmer to apologise for his anti-Semitic outburst.

    “Enough with weaponising the Holocaust to make a point,” Dr Abramovich said

    Oh do shut up, yourself.

    What a nutball.

  46. sfw

    Clive’s a bit of a crazy (like a fox), but he has a point re Germany and its erosion of rights. He says they took seven years, if true our Diktator Dan leaves Hitler for dead. He’s done more in less than 7 months than the brown shirts would believe possible.

  47. incoherent rambler

    Masks? We don’t need your stinking masks!

  48. Mater

    As you discovered when you stalked my father by looking up his records, every detail, except his motivation, was exactly as I had posted.

    Let’s start off with a simple one.
    How do you explain this post:

    1735099
    #2962329, posted on March 18, 2019 at 9:37 am

    My father enlisted in the RAAF whrn he heard to news of the Darwin bombing. He served in PNG from 1942 until 1946.

    when, written in his own hand in his Service Record when claiming war service leave, he said this:

    “having embarked from Townsville on July 43 and disembarked at Townsville on 1st Dec 1944.”

    For the numerically challenged, mid 1943 through to end of 1944 is NOT 1942 until 1946.

  49. Eyrie

    A problem is that aero clubs and people who want to pilot for pleasure are dying off. I’ve heard more than a few amateur pilots lament the dwindling membership of their clubs. People under 30 just aren’t into it. Once it was the expense that put people off, now it’s unfashionable.

    PS like your pretentious use of aerodynes.

    Yes, that is happening. Most country aero clubs have essentially ceased to exist and gliding is rapidly dying with an aging membership (58% in Australia over 65 I’ve been told).
    There is however a keen homebuilt aircraft movement. See http://www.eaa.org There is also hope in the current craze to build VTOL intra city electric aircraft for commercial transport. evtol.news reckons 300 projects around the world. I have no faith in that as such but the technology to build a small, fast two seat VTOL light aircraft should emerge from this. VTOL will make small aircraft much safer and of far more utility. Modern electronic control systems will make piloting even easier.

    Aerodyne as distinct from aerostat which is balloons/airships although the line can blur when you start talking airships which generate some aerodynamic lift in forward flight.

  50. Leigh Lowe

    Clinton administration speeches and policy documents demonstrate that U.S.–Chinese engagement “was a balancing act with multiple objectives”—most of them pragmatic—including “increasing bilateral dialogues, preventing [weapons of mass destruction] nonproliferation in East and South Asia, preventing the nuclearization of the Korean Peninsula, cooperating on disease and environmental issues, better market access [for U.S. companies] and intellectual property rules, fighting organized crime, ensuring stability in the Taiwan Strait, and WTO accession on ‘commercial terms,’ among others.”

    And what does the scoreboard say about the success of all of those objectives?

  51. twostix

    “If you go back to Nazi Germany, their law was eroded over seven years,” Mr Palmer said.

    Anti-Defamation Commission, Australia’s leading civil rights organisation chairman Dr Dvir Abramovich urged Mr Palmer to apologise for his anti-Semitic outburst.

    “Enough with weaponising the Holocaust to make a point,” Dr Abramovich said.

    Comparing things to Nazi Germany is now anti-semitic.

    Did you know that?

  52. Frank

    DrBeauGan, you don’t know what awful is till you drink cask wine put through a soda stream to make ‘sparkling wine’.

    If you leave the bladder out in the sun for long enough it can induce a sort of fizz all of its own. Success probably depends more on choosing a Fruity Lexia type strain though. Verified by direct observation, not tasted though.

  53. Eyrie

    Dr Dvir Abramovich urged Mr Palmer to apologise for his anti-Semitic outburst.

    “Enough with weaponising the Holocaust to make a point,” Dr Abramovich said.

    Touchy, isn’t he?. I’d like to know what exactly he took offence to. Besides WA *is* a concentration camp right now, as is Victoria.

  54. Eyrie

    DrBeauGan, you don’t know what awful is till you drink cask wine put through a soda stream to make ‘sparkling wine’.

    Had to do that with a red once, many years ago. Problem was it was still undrinkable afterwards.

  55. Leigh Lowe

    Wow!
    The West Australian in lock-step with the WA Gummint!
    Un-fkn-believable.

  56. incoherent rambler

    Stage 6.
    Chains, shackles and striped uniforms for those returning a positive c1984 test.
    Vicpol to enforce curfew with cat o’ nine tails.

  57. Well done to DeVos on ending the Title IX injustice.

    Young innocent men have been treated worse than convicted, hardened criminals.

  58. William the Conjuror

    How do you explain this post:
    when, written in his own hand in his Service Record when claiming war service leave, he said this:

    Easy. You have been stalking his father. Whether his father was dead or alive at the time is irrelevant. You are pretty obviously stalking him too.

  59. Leigh Lowe

    Who owns the West Australian?

  60. sfw

    Eyrie, you obviously didn’t really need a drink. The bubbles increase the effectiveness

  61. gafa

    Horse racing
    Massive source of employment and revenue.
    Plus the perks on race day are wonderful.

    Sounds just like much of the Public Service and overall just about as wasteful and useless!

  62. Clive Palmer is right.

    Nazi Germany brutalized many people of all backgrounds.

    We are only years away from tyranny.

    Right once again, Clive.

  63. feelthebern

    As you discovered when you stalked my father by looking up his records, every detail, except his motivation, was exactly as I had posted.

    Researching someones military record: stalking.
    Looking at webcams of WA beaches: not stalking.
    Welcome to 2020.

  64. Is this the same Dr Abramovich that’s always calling out antifa over their use of the word Nazi to describe their opponents?
    Scumbag collaborators.

  65. woolfe

    LL Lefty Kerry Stokes owns The Worst Australian.

  66. feelthebern

    Bill Kristol

    ⁦‪@BillKristol‬⁩

    Just an innocent thought: We’ve seen Biden in office for over four decades, and we’ve seen Trump nonstop for the last four years. We’ve seen enough to make up our minds about them. So let’s skip the presidential debates but have three vice-presidential debates.

    12/8/20, 9:32 am

    If he had any dignity, Bill Kristol would have done a Robin Williams or a Michael Hutchence.
    It would have resulted in less shame for this surviving family than what these tweets cause.

  67. JC

    And what does the scoreboard say about the success of all of those objectives?

    You work it out. You’d rather have had a massive nuclear power acting roguish or settling with the problems we now have. Most things are never absolute as there are trade offs and hypothetical comparisons. That’s because we can’t go back and recreate a different world. Perhaps we will be able to over time with massive doses of AI using powerful computing. We can’t now. Having said that, the world we’re living through is most likely a better world than one with a China acting like an Iran with lots of nukes.

  68. feelthebern

    For the numerically challenged, mid 1943 through to end of 1944 is NOT 1942 until 1946.

    numbers can count all the way up to potato.

  69. cohenite

    woolfe
    #3546552, posted on August 13, 2020 at 3:25 pm
    Fitsimmians poll was turned. 75% said they hoped trump would win. Strangely the poll has now disappeared but i took a photo of it prior and avi talks about it here.

    Got a link. I’ll ring up one of the anti Trump djs tomorrow and throw that at him.

  70. feelthebern

    If you weren’t a pilot, why would you rush to join an air force at a time of war?

  71. Farmer Gez

    New Zealand has recorded an additional 14 coronavirus cases, with 13 from community transmission.

    Perhaps Jacinda could hug it out.

  72. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    If you weren’t a pilot, why would you rush to join an air force at a time of war?

    Beat being conscripted into the Army.

  73. JC

    And while carmaking in Detroit has shrunk, car and components manufacturing in other US regions has thrived. These are most likely the right to work states.

    Many cities and towns in America that were once known for low‐​skill manufacturing and faced intense import competition in the 1990s and 2000s have since adapted and thrived. As previously noted, several studies show that most U.S. regions ended up better off following the China Shock, though some areas—particularly those with low human capital—struggled. A 2018 Brookings Institution report, moreover, finds that 115 of the 185 U.S. counties identified as having a disproportionate share of manufacturing jobs in 1970 had “transitioned successfully” from manufacturing by 2016 and that of the remaining 70 “older industrial cities,” 40 exhibited “strong” or “emerging” economic performance between 2000 and 2016.106 The “strong” localities, achieving high marks for growth, prosperity, and inclusion, include not only well‐​known success stories such as Pittsburgh and cities close to Boston and Manhattan but also smaller places such as Beaumont, Texas; Waterloo, Iowa; and Bethlehem, Pennsylvania.

    Anecdotal evidence reiterates these findings: towns that once depended on low‐​skill manufacturing, such as Greenville–Spartanburg, South Carolina; Hickory, North Carolina; Warsaw, Indiana; and Danville, Virginia, are now home to thriving companies that succeeded by adapting to the market, including through international trade and investment.107 Journalist James Fallows has documented many of these lesser‐​known success stories in his 2018 book, Our Towns: A 100,000-Mile Journey into the Heart of America, and in a regular column for The Atlantic.108

    Anyone still doubting such successes need only drive down Interstate 85 from Charlotte, North Carolina, to Montgomery, Alabama, to see the multinational factories firsthand.109 The Federal Reserve Bank of New York emphasized this region in its examination of the recent surge in U.S. manufacturing jobs:

    While job losses during the 2000s were fairly widespread across the country, manufacturing employment gains since then have been concentrated in particular parts of the country. Indeed, these gains were especially large in “auto alley”—a narrow motor vehicle production corridor stretching from Michigan south to Alabama—while much of the Northeast continued to shed manufacturing jobs.110

  74. Mater

    Easy. You have been stalking his father. Whether his father was dead or alive at the time is irrelevant. You are pretty obviously stalking him too.

    I’ve no interest in Bob (any more than your opinions), except for fact checking what he posts here to win arguments. He introduced his father into the discussions, not me.

    As for stalking his Dad, look at the RAAF Nominal role for WW2 and find any more than one person with Bob’s surname who fits this bill:

    1735099
    #3511750, posted on July 13, 2020 at 1:35 pm

    His RAAF number had 5 digits, the first a “7” and the last a “4”.
    I wouldn’t disclose it on this site, even though he died back in 1991, because of the lowlives who post here and would try to take advantage.
    There are some very sick people who frequent this site.

    Perhaps start here.

    Bob lied about him, and then handed us his details. Noble, but stupid.
    He fills these pages with barely believable anecdotes with the certainty that there truthfulness can’t be validated. On this occasion, he fucked up…and has been sooking about it since.

    He comes on here and righteously proclaims:

    1735099
    #3497240, posted on June 27, 2020 at 12:31 pm

    I have never told a lie on this blog

    And yet, here we are!

  75. incoherent rambler

    Clive Palmer is right.

    We’re arein more trouble than I thought.

  76. feelthebern

    Oh Zulu !
    You cut to chase of where my planned multi post thread was going.

  77. Exit Stage Right

    There’s much more. There is almost no topic on which Ms Harris has not at one point occupied a position designed to gain her maximum support with a particular constituency, only to reverse herself when a different and larger constituency hove into view.

    In her relatively short political career, she has demonstrated a rarely matched facility for dropping passionately held positions the moment they become politically inconvenient, faster than you can assemble a focus group.

    There is almost no topic on which Ms Harris has not at one point occupied a position designed to gain her maximum support with a particular constituency, only to reverse herself when a different and larger constituency hove into view.

    There are tennis balls that have travelled less frequently between different positions than Ms Harris.

    Definitely a woman of substance and conviction.

    I was waiting for Gerard Baker to roll out that old chestnut, “More positions than the Kama Sutra”, but he did not quite get to that one.
    Biden and Harris, a match made in heaven. They have zero chance of toppling the Orange One.

  78. feelthebern

    Whether his father was dead or alive at the time is irrelevant. You are pretty obviously stalking him too.

    I was going to look up Abraham Lincoln but then I released it was stalking.

  79. Chris

    Biden and Harris, a match made in heaven. They have zero chance of toppling the Orange One.

    Don’t get cocky, kid.
    I reckon Harris might tempt out the black voters deterred from voting Democrat by the leftist riots, foolishly hoping for a bit of law’n’order.
    Fact is the riots will be put down with prejudice as soon as a Democrat is back in power.

  80. JC

    This new mandate is identical to the one the Demon rats forced on the banking system in the late 90s and thereby making the GFC worse. I’ll never forget at the time the fed chairman “admitting” red lining was wacist.

    Congressional Democrats are proposing new legislation that would add an additional mandate to the Federal Reserve: promoting racial equality. According to the Washington Post, the legislation would seek “to minimize and eliminate racial disparities in employment, wages, wealth, and access to affordable credit.”

    This proposal has attracted some criticism, as it is not clear that the Fed has the tools necessary to achieve these objectives. To take the most obvious example, it seems unlikely that the Fed could eliminate disparities in employment, wages and wealth without first eliminating disparities in education, a field over which it has little or no authority.

    Another Demrat crisis in the making if it’s carried through.

  81. Dr Faustus

    SILENCED: MEDIA BANNED FROM REPORTING CORRUPTION

    It will become an offence to publish corruption allegations levelled against candidates for state and local government elections under new laws introduced into State Parliament.
    [Courier Mail: paywalled]

    Applies once writs are issued.

    They hate us.
    If the LNP does not scream the house down, vote for the Acid Trippers Party.

  82. Armadillo

    Fact checking is now stalking?

    Wow.

  83. Mick Gold Coast QLD

    Happy birthday Johanna.

    … I have long rather liked what they would say in my grandfather’s home town of Cork:

    May all God’s blessings descend upon you

  84. gafa

    Near 6 months down the track, no true freedoms restored anywhere, and Victoria under the worst tyranny of all, are there really still people who believe this is about a flu?

    No water restrictions for years in Victoria, now that’s freedom…so stick that in your pipe and smoke it rubber ducky.

  85. FARK!

    Stop fucking lying!

    https://www.climatecouncil.org.au/nuclear-power-stations-are-not-appropriate-for-australia-and-probably-never-will-be/

    Nuclear cannot compete on a cost basis with wind and solar, which are the cheapest forms of new generation. The cost of energy from the Hinkley Power station is significantly higher than large-scale solar, wind and offshore wind energy in the UK.

  86. Neil

    And while carmaking in Detroit has shrunk, car and components manufacturing in other US regions has thrived. These are most likely the right to work states.

    Fact is because we have large mineral resources we can survive without a manufacturing industry. If we could not sell them for some reason we would be cactus.

    We have to make some stuff here just from a security point of view

  87. Not Uh oh

    Armadillo
    #3546659, posted on August 13, 2020 at 4:46 pm
    Fact checking is now stalking?

    Apparently, so is looking at beach cam. Life just keeps getting more and more complicated.

  88. jupes

    Wow!
    The West Australian in lock-step with the WA Gummint!
    Un-fkn-believable.

    They are McGowan’s personal propaganda unit.

    Today the cover was Clive superimposed onto a cane toad. Yesterday he was Dr Evil.

  89. Dr Faustus

    Clive Palmer is right.

    It certainly is an awful fuck up.
    But the issues and course of conduct that led to the decision being made are also pretty hideous.

  90. cohenite

    woolfe
    #3546649, posted on August 13, 2020 at 4:32 pm
    Cohenite
    Try This

    Thanks, I listen to 2SM. There is not one fucking announcer on that station who supports Trump; some will tolerate comments supporting him. But laws, the vile old sod, actually banned me for arguing in support of Trump.

  91. JC

    FARK!

    Stop fucking lying!

    Lol I thought that useless rattrap had closed down due to lack of funds. Flannery is still calling himself Chief Councillor.

    Get a load of the team!

  92. cohenite

    Caramela is one of the most evil pieces of work I’ve seen. I almost hope she wins.

  93. Feelthebern:

    If you weren’t a pilot, why would you rush to join an air force at a time of war?

    Because they weren’t Infantry Corps?

  94. johanna

    Thanks for birthday wishes!

    Dr BG, I took a punt on the Grant Burge because I am very fond of their reds and decided to try a white. Well, I just cracked it and it’s not terrible, but not wonderful either. Quaffer standard.

    Still, I can quaff with the best of them, so will soldier on. 🙂

  95. cohenite

    Stop fucking lying!

    https://www.climatecouncil.org.au/nuclear-power-stations-are-not-appropriate-for-australia-and-probably-never-will-be/

    Amazing. Every word a lie. If we had a decent press this sort of crap would be exposed. But we don’t. In fact the number one problem for the West, as Trump said, is the fucking media.

  96. feelthebern

    How many members of the RAAF died in WWII who were not pilots or navigators or flight crew?

  97. areff

    Cohenite: That poll is still up on the Fitzsimon’s twitter feed. Some of the comments are grimly amusing

    https://twitter.com/Peter_Fitz/status/1293337187916734464

  98. Bruce of Newcastle

    Nuclear cannot compete on a cost basis with wind and solar, which are the cheapest forms of new generation. The cost of energy from the Hinkley Power station is significantly higher than large-scale solar, wind and offshore wind energy in the UK.

    LOL. What rot!

    Offshore Wind: Definitely Expensive (12 Aug)

    Recently, some more hard evidence appeared showing that Hughes is correct. One of the low-bidding windfarms published its latest financial accounts, and these allow us to get a feel for whether the cost reductions are real. Moray East is a 100-turbine, 950MW behemoth that is currently under development off the Scottish coast. The developers have said that it will cost £2.6 billion to build, although this figure comes with caveats. It almost certainly doesn’t include the offshore transmission assets that the company has to build and the sell back to the grid. Moreover, announced costs for windfarms are invariably understated. Hughes thinks that the ultimate cost will be somewhere around £3.8 billion. If the windfarm is to make a profit at around £60/MWh, its costs need to be less than half that level (on an optimistic assumption about how much electricity it will generate) and more realistically a third of it.

    And a “950 MW behemoth” only gemerates about 300 MW averaged. So paying five billion Aussie for a 300 MW power station is just a trifle steep.

    And then there’re all the green subsidies the punters have to pay for the electrons.

  99. kaysee

    Trolls doll made by Hasbro makes disturbing sounds.
    The doll has now been pulled from sale.
     
    (Click the View button for video.)

  100. Boambee John

    It’s probably because I’m a real person with an actual life, unlike you and the majority who bloviate here.

    ROFLMAO!

    The bin chicken makes a joke (at least, I think it was meant to be a joke)!

  101. Farmer Gez

    Get a load of the team!

    I note a couple of nerd type chickie babes to keep the old blokes interested.

  102. JD

    Nuclear Power: Cheap, Clean and Safe. Can be done. We have people with brains in this country. Unfortunately, they don’t hold the levers of power. Instead, we have diversity.

    https://www.moltexenergy.com/

  103. Boambee John

    William the Conjuror
    #3546555, posted on August 13, 2020 at 3:25 pm
    So many people here worried about how to say the name of Comma-la. And you don’t even get a vote. Not on her name, not on whether she becomes the next Vice Prez of the USA. Heck, you won’t even be polled about any of it.

    Don’t tell the bin chicken, he will be soooo disappointed. He really, truly, wants to vote in a US election. Perhaps if he contacts the DNC, they will get him a Californoa driver’s licence as an illegal immigrant, then he will be able to vote multiple times!

  104. feelthebern

    If the DNC went with Tulsi or Yang, it would have been a game changer.
    Instead they went with another DC swampie.

  105. Carpe Jugulum

    Get a load of the team!

    A rogues gallery of spivs, shonks, grifters and swampies

  106. cohenite

    areff
    #3546676, posted on August 13, 2020 at 5:00 pm
    Cohenite: That poll is still up on the Fitzsimon’s twitter feed. Some of the comments are grimly amusing

    https://twitter.com/Peter_Fitz/status/1293337187916734464

    The anti Trump comments are endearing.

  107. feelthebern

    If I knew I was never going to be in an aeroplane (unless it was on the ground) & there was a clearly the threat of a draft that could have me end up in some infantry situation, the safest course of action would be to volunteer for the air force.

  108. Neil

    Amazing. Every word a lie. If we had a decent press this sort of crap would be exposed. But we don’t. In fact the number one problem for the West, as Trump said, is the fucking media.

    You need to get out more. I have been banned from many left wing blogs.

    Apparently according to lefties the media is totally controlled by Murdoch. They say Murdoch cost Rudd the 2013 election

  109. gafa

    If you need to hug someone, hug a truckie, obviously they’re immune to covid 19.

    White-Line fever treatments maybe working wonders against the chuna virus. The big question is, is immunity built up over time or can it be achieved immediately even by dispensing it to mere mortals?

    Now workers will be banned altogether. This is monumental stupidity!
    Locals feel they are being punished for a virus that is barely present in the areas.

    Good, truth is, the more people who feel the pain and stupidity of these Totalitarian Government policies the sooner the push-back may come. At this stage there’s not enough skin in the game by having too many essential or excluded people being given leave to dance around almost unaffected while others have to bear the brunt.
    We’re not all in this together, not even close.

  110. Boambee John

    As you discovered when you stalked my father by looking up his records, every detail, except his motivation, was exactly as I had posted.

    Apart from the enlistment date, and the period spent in New Guinea? Mere bagatelles!

  111. kaysee

    This is an opinion piece in USA Today.
     
    Defeat COVID-19 by requiring vaccination for all. It’s not un-American, it’s patriotic.

    Make vaccines free, don’t allow religious or personal objections, and create disincentives for those who refuse vaccines shown to be safe and effective.
     
    To win the war against the novel coronavirus that has killed nearly 163,000 people in this country, the only answer is compulsory vaccination — for all of us.
     
    And while the measures that will be necessary to defeat the coronavirus will seem draconian, even anti-American to some, we believe that there is no alternative. Simply put, getting vaccinated is going to be our patriotic duty.

  112. JC

    The anti Trump comments are endearing.

    Like this one

    I’m an Australian living in New York

    since 2008. I expected Trump to win in 2016. He will not win in 2020. Despite what you might see on Twitter and Fox/Sky most Americans – like everyone else in the world- are not ignorant, racist, religious extremists.

    The imbecile is oblivious to the fact he lives in the biggest leftwing bubble in the world. Fox and likely Sky show polls Trump to be losing the bike rider.

    Riding a bike is Sleepy’s campaign suggesting he’s not comatose.

  113. Boambee John

    My family believed (and continues to believe) that the prime motivation for his service was the first Japanese raid on Darwin.

    Strange that the bin chicken’s enthusiasm for demolishing myths does not extend as far as correcting this myth. News time, the dates do not match the myth.

  114. feelthebern

    except his motivation

    A wise, preemptive gamble to avoid being drafted into the infantry.

  115. MatrixTransform

    I see lots of fairy stories from the Brothers Tard today.
    truly something wrong in their heads.

    Mater, for the teacher.
    Genuinely thank them for presenting all the wonderful possibilities in this rich and diverse world.
    maybe express some ‘disappointment that its only 6 or so short hours at school.

    For the principal … ask explicitly why the curriculum is being replaced with ideological gibberish
    After all, there’s only 6 or so hours in a school day.

    With respect to whether pedestrian lights show men or women … write piece putting the case that the icons could equally be dogs … or tanks.

    or maybe pose the question …why is it assumed that just cos the icon doesn’t wear a dress, why assume their gender?

    tell the boy what a false dichotomy is.

    smart kid’ll work it out

  116. notafan

    Ftb

    Which is exactly why my father and his brother enrolled in the RAAF ( in a specialist support role)

    Zero shame in wishing to survive the war

    They already had a brother in the infantry.

  117. Makka

    The anti Trump comments are endearing.

    Some of the Creepy Joe comments are classic;

    https://twitter.com/ACresswick/status/1293681358963986438

  118. Harlequin Decline

    One advantage the Chinese and Russians have in developing a vaccine is their large prison populations and being not hampered by Western ethics.

    Apart from developing vaccines by fair means or foul they have have an advantage in testing.

    They could simultaneously trial a number of potential vaccines amongst the Gulag/Uyghur populations in controlled large scale experiments and get a result quicker than the West.

  119. Boambee John

    feelthebern
    #3546637, posted on August 13, 2020 at 4:26 pm
    If you weren’t a pilot, why would you rush to join an air force at a time of war?

    Not keen on carrying a pack and rifle?

  120. Armadillo

    This is going to be a really weird election. They have thrown everything at Trump. It has worked to some extent (as you would expect given the amount of shit they have thrown at him).

    Two small problems for the Democrats (the nominees). Hillary was apparently unbeatable. These pair are toast.

    It’s going to be a slaughter.

  121. feelthebern

    Zero shame in wishing to survive the war

    100% agree.
    If in the same situation, I would have have done a Bill Clinton to avoid any service.

  122. Armadillo

    I had to “Google” who Hillarys running mate was in 2016.

    I’d suggest most here would have to do the same.

  123. incoherent rambler

    Fact checking is now stalking?

    Fact check: True

  124. I dunno.

    We all react differently.

    Someone whose brothers died defending Singapore might get really angry and want to kill a lot of Japs.

    The RAF on the other hand was the (first) front line in the UK’s fight to survive.

  125. feelthebern

    The RAF on the other hand was the (first) front line in the UK’s fight to survive.

    & those pilots & air crews paid a heavy price.

  126. Teri Hatcher or Jennifer Aniston? More partial to Aniston but Hatcher I rather delicious.

  127. cohenite

    You need to get out more. I have been banned from many left wing blogs.

    Well done.

    The first place I was banned from was the fucking abc after jonathan green left the drum and that fucktard chip rolley took over.

  128. Infidel Tiger King

    100% agree.
    If in the same situation, I would have have done a Bill Clinton to avoid any service.

    Have sex with Hillary?

    I’d rather be shot in the jungle.

    Vietnam was a righteous war.

  129. notafan

    Sfw

    No obfuscation

    Tim Neilson explained it well enough.

    Retire whenever you wish.

    And you’re not the only one to have had retirement savings smashed by covid19.

  130. Armadillo

    The first place I was banned from was the fucking abc after jonathan green left the drum and that fucktard chip rolley took over.

    Bob Ellis was legendary. That left wing fruitcake knew how to ban people.

    Sinc could learn a few lessons.

  131. OldOzzie

    Coronavirus: Identity politics focus diverts attention from real issues

    BELLA D’ABRERA

    If you want to know what is going wrong in Victoria, all you need do is look at a job being advertised on Seek by the state’s Department of Justice and Community Safety. The department wishes to hire a “director, inclusion and intersectionality”, for which it is offering a generous salary of $192,800-$249,700 plus superannuation.

    According to the ad, the incumbent “will be responsible for providing authoritative, strategic and innovative advice in relation to inclusion and intersectionality to justice ministers, DJCS executives and other senior stakeholders”.

    Furthermore, they “will be able to demonstrate an extensive knowledge of inclusion, intersectionality and society and understanding of historical and contemporary issues”.

    This ad epitomises everything that is wrong with the Victorian government. In a single job description, it explains the reason the government is incapable of running a quarantine program or looking after the elderly. Instead of doing what it should be doing, which is governing, it is putting all its resources into a vast social experiment based on an ideology of social justice, intersectionality, and identity politics.

    We are now watching as Victoria’s Department of Health and Human Services, as well as the Department of Jobs, Precincts and Regions, fails the Australian public. This is because they have put identity politics, and the concept of diversity and inclusion, before the health of the people, with deadly consequences.

    This has come to light in the past few days with revelations that the DHHS farmed out its responsibilities to the DJPR by putting it in charge of the hotel quarantine program. As revealed in The Age newspaper, the DJPR and its international trade agency, Global Victoria, were responsible for engaging private security firms for hotel quarantine. The reason for selecting Unified Security, an indigenous-owned security company that was not on the government’s preferred panel of security suppliers, was supposedly driven by an attempt to provide jobs under “social inclusion” policies.

    The bureaucratic elite in Victoria clearly did not see a problem in selecting a company for hotel quarantine based on where it ranked on the intersectionality pyramid. This should have been a strict police or military operation.

    According to the DJPR’s secretary, who states in the department’s Aboriginal Recruitment and Career Strategy 2020-23, “diversity in the workplace is not just a nice thing to have” . . . It is “the foundation of good business principles and will ensure the department is best placed to deliver on its purpose”.

    Under no circumstance would we want the pilot of our A380 or the surgeon performing open-heart surgery on a family member to be selected on the basis of diversity and inclusion rather than merit. Those in charge of the hotel quarantine approached the job at hand as if it were a lavish junket. They even made a self-congratulatory video in which they referred to the task as “one massive inbound super trade mission which keeps rolling … which has been a really exciting project” rather than a serious quarantine operation in which there was so much at stake.

    It is not difficult to see where priorities lie for these Victorian departments.

    Two years ago, the DHHS enforced “They Day” for all staff, which mandated that every first Wednesday of the month, its 10,000 employees were to use gender neutral pronouns such as “they” and “them” rather than he and she. Former Victorian deputy chief health officer Annaliese Van Diemen revealed her ideological leanings when she compared COVID-19 to James Cook with her ill-informed and notorious tweet.

    The DJPR even has its own deputy secretary for inclusion, which is extraordinary given that the main purpose of the department appears to be the promotion of business and trade. It clearly adheres to the utopian intellectual elite theory that the workforce of the private sector economy can and should be controlled by government.

    Victoria, indeed Australia, would not be in today’s predicament had these departments spent time and resources on real issues, not activism. We know from reports that the contact tracing and pandemic team in the DHHS was severely under-resourced.

    The government of Daniel Andrews appears to be operating in a different kind of reality in which it is blatantly more concerned with social engineering than it is healthcare. This is because most of the government departments are staffed and run by individuals who have spent years in the humanities departments of our universities, which, of course, are mired in identity politics, social justice, postmodernism and pseudo-Marxism.

    According the DHHS cultural and diversity plan, it not only has 18 diversity “deliverables” but it also claims that its commitment to diversity is “central to our goal of achieving better outcomes to all Victorians”.

    Tell this to the people of Victoria who are now living under the most draconian measures imposed on an Australian population since days of the penal colony, thanks to the hotel quarantine fiasco. Tell this to the thousands of Victorians who have lost their jobs — perhaps even family members.

    The real crisis we are facing is not being caused by COVID-19 but by the elite’s stubborn attachment to identity politics, which is obscuring the real problems and jeopardising the lives and livelihoods of mainstream Australians.

    Bella d’Abrera is the director of the Foundations of Western Civilisation Program at the Institute of Public Affairs.

  132. William the Conjuror

    one of the most evil pieces of work I’ve seen

    Were you working the night of The Star riot?

  133. cohenite

    Apparently the issue in the US election is how to pronounce caramela’s fucking name.

  134. notafan

    Ftb

    And dad did his best not to, survive that is.

    A close encounter with dengue fever, then malaria and finally many years later TPI and an early grave.

  135. Hi my name is Legalise.

    Hi Legalise

    My name is Legalise and I am addicted to Kirk Sorenson videos.

    2.36 hrs of the fat, glorious madman and techno saviour. 😎

  136. Bruce of Newcastle

    If the DNC went with Tulsi or Yang, it would have been a game changer.

    Purged.

    Andrew Yang Expresses Disappointment At Being Left Off List Of Speakers For Democratic National Convention (11 Aug)

    Despite there being a crowded field of Democratic hopefuls who announced running in 2019, Yang and Tulsi Gabbard are the only candidates who were still in the race through at least January 2020 and not set to speak next week.

    They are unpersons.

  137. cohenite

    Were you working the night of The Star riot?

    No, but I was there handing out legal aid cards.

  138. feelthebern

    And where you have the dignity that others lack, is you understand why a non-pilot would volunteer for the air force.
    Others make it sound like the most patriotic path an Australian could take.
    Not mentioning any names though…

  139. Cassie of Sydney

    Dr Dvir Abramovich…for a doctor he is….is a left-wing progressive DICK…who claims to represent the community….except he doesn’t. Most Jooooooish communal organisations have been captured by the far-left….like every other effing organisation in the west.

  140. Knuckle Dragger

    Karate Poof of the Hunter, 10.15;

    ‘Today is International Left Handers Day.’

    I knew there was a reason today started off badly, fell away in the middle and flat spun at the end.

  141. Cassie of Sydney

    Happy birthday Johanna. Oh and I don’t mind Grant Burge….I quite like their sparkling pinot noir.

  142. William the Conjuror

    If you weren’t a pilot, why would you rush to join an air force at a time of war?

    Stupid question. Like, if you weren’t Captain Remius, why would you join the navy at a time of war?

    Anyway, try this:

    Not many people get to be pilots in the RAAF. Lots more things to do to get them in the air and keep them there.

  143. feelthebern

    I quite like their sparkling pinot noir.

    Sounds like an abomination.
    I’d prefer a glass of rosé.

  144. feelthebern

    William was in the class with the special children.
    In a more harsh time, he would have been called a retard.
    But those times have passed.

  145. Maj

    LL Lefty Kerry Stokes owns The Worst Australian.

    I’m no fan of Kerry Stokes but he’s no lefty. He was part of the two man Papal Conclave (with Rupert) that set in train the end of Lord Turnbull’s Prime Ministership. For that I am eternally thankful.

  146. feelthebern

    Not many people get to be pilots in the RAAF. Lots more things to do to get them in the air and keep them there.

    Only a retard would think that wasn’t the case.
    As we’ve established, volunteering for the air force was a smart preemptive gamble for ones self preservation.
    Do try to keep up.

  147. feelthebern

    He was part of the two man Papal Conclave (with Rupert) that set in train the end of Lord Turnbull’s Prime Ministership

    Malcolm ended his own Prime Ministership.
    It took no external parties.

  148. Maj

    If the DNC went with Tulsi or Yang, it would have been a game changer.

    Trump should name Tulsi Secretary of Defense to replace that RINO Esper.

    Then sit back and watch the Left foam at the mouth.

  149. incoherent rambler

    On the bright side:
    C19 could have appeared when Trumble was PM (or Kirner was the Premier in Vik)

  150. feelthebern

    Tulsi isn’t standing for reelection in Nov.
    I wonder what the future holds for her.

  151. Neil

    The first place I was banned from was the fucking abc after jonathan green left the drum and that fucktard chip rolley took over.

    I have been banned from Twitter and The Guardian plus other places. I have lost my temper many times and have said things i could have said in a better way. But i was led by other comments against Howard and the Coalition which were very vile.

    With lefties in control the rules are Conservatives have to be polite while lefties are allowed to be as vile as they like

    What gets me i guess i was banned from Twitter and The Guardian because some leftie did not like my comments and protested. Hence i got banned. I have seen many comments i did not like and have never said those comments should be banned.

  152. Cassie of Sydney

    “Malcolm ended his own Prime Ministership.
    It took no external parties.”

    That’s right. After decades of knifing and stabbing others in the back…both in business and politics…Malturd knifed himself in the back. It was very sweet.

  153. feelthebern

    In 20 years the only members of the current SNL ensemble who’ll be remembered will be Kenan Thompson & Kate McKinnon.
    Compare that to the 90’s when they were all hilarious.

  154. Maj

    Tulsi isn’t standing for reelection in Nov.
    I wonder what the future holds for her.

    SecDef under President Trump, or Karmala critic on Fox News’ new prime time show called just Tulsi.

    I won’t say Biden critic becos I don’t expect a “President Biden” would actually be making any decisions.

  155. cohenite

    AS reported in the Murdoch:

    Donald Trump has been slammed over his criticism of Democrat rivals Joe Biden and Kamala Harris, after saying “suburban housewives” wanted “safety” and would cast their vote for him.

    Senator Harris, 55, a former California attorney general, yesterday became the first black woman in history to join a presidential ticket, after Mr Biden named her as his running mate.

    But Mr Trump claimed on Twitter that he would take the key demographic of suburban women because he had changed housing laws, saying that “low income housing” no longer “invade their neighbourhood” thanks to him.

    The slamming was done by a few left wing twitterers and assorted fucktards.

  156. woolfe

    Neil,
    Foul comments against conservatives even death and rape threats do not get the person banned on Shitter. I thought that was obvious.

  157. feelthebern

    I won’t say Biden critic becos I don’t expect a “President Biden” would actually be making any decisions.

    His only decision will be which nurse to sniff.

  158. zyconoclast

    The Poly-Parent Households Are Coming
    We’re on the cusp of a technological revolution in baby making. What it means to be a family could be next.

    Consider the following scenario: Anna and Nicole, 36 and 39 years old, have been close friends since college. They each dated various men throughout their 20s and 30s, and had a smattering of romantic relationships that didn’t quite work out. But now, as they approach midlife, both women have grown weary of the merry-go-round of online dating and of searching for men who might — or might not — make appropriate fathers for the babies they don’t yet have. Both Anna and Nicole want children. They want to raise those children in a stable, nurturing environment, and to continue the legacy of their own parents and grandparents. And so they decide to have a baby — a baby that is genetically their own — together.

    Such an idea may sound fantastical. But technologies that could enable two women (or two men, or four unrelated people of any sex) to conceive a child together are already under development. If these technologies move eventually from the laboratory into clinical use, and the history of assisted fertility suggests they can and they will, then couples — or rather, co-parents — like Anna and Nicole are likely to reshape some of our most fundamental ideas about what it takes to make a baby, and a family.

    To date, most major advances in assisted reproduction have been tweaks on the basic process of sexual reproduction. Artificial insemination brought sperm toward egg through a different, nonsexual channel. I.V.F. mixed them together outside the woman’s body. Little things, really, in the broader sweep of life.

    And yet even these have had profound consequences. Humans are reproducing in ways that would have been truly unimaginable just several decades ago: Two men and a surrogate. Two women and a sperm donor. An older woman using genetic material from a much younger egg.

    Each turn of the technological screw has been generated by the same profound impulse — to allow people to conceive babies they desperately want, and to build families with those they love. Each development has, in many ways, been deeply conservative, intended to extend or re-create life’s most basic process of production. But as these technologies have expanded and evolved, their impact has become far more revolutionary; they’ve forced us to reconceptualize just what a family means, and what it can be.

    For most of human history, after all, families across the Western world were defined in largely biblical terms: one man, one woman, with children conceived through sex and sanctified by marriage. Everyone else was just a bastard.

    Things first began to change in the 1960s, as a combination of shifting mores, accurate paternity tests and greater access to contraception prodded courts in the United States and elsewhere to expand the legal definition of parenting to include a genetic relationship, regardless of marital status.

    Then, in the 1990s, as reproductive technologies became better and more widely available, the legal norms shifted again, allowing parents to be defined in many cases as those who had desired to create a child, regardless of either their marital status or the child’s genetic origins. In the infamous case of Baby M, a New Jersey judge ruled that a married couple who had employed a surrogate to carry their child had full parental rights to the baby, even though the surrogate was the child’s genetic mother and had gone to extreme lengths to retain custody. Subsequent cases upheld and expanded this precedent, increasingly paying less attention to the underlying biology of a child’s conception — whose eggs, whose sperm, whose womb — and more to the contractual terms that had initiated their birth.

    The most recent shift — and arguably the most crucial — occurred in 2015, when the U.S. Supreme Court famously extended the right of marriage to same-sex couples. The implications of this decision are well known, as is the long history of activism that prompted and preceded it.

    What’s less well known is the role assisted reproductive technologies played in the fight for marriage equality. Because much of what drove the court’s decision in the landmark case of Obergefell v. Hodges was the right of the plaintiffs to give their children the benefits of being raised in a “loving and nurturing home.” Or as the California Supreme Court similarly stated in striking down that state’s ban on same-sex marriage: “[A] stable two-parent family relationship … is equally as important for the numerous children in California who are being raised by same-sex couples as for those children being raised by opposite-sex couples.” What the Court didn’t say was that the vast majority of these children had been conceived via assisted reproduction. They were the children of technology, and it was the circumstances of their births that helped propel their parents’ marriages.

    Urged by technology, therefore, we have already changed how we procreate, and with whom. We have separated sex from reproduction, and multiplied the various pairings that can together produce a child. And soon, a technology known as I.V.G. (in vitro gametogenesis) could push this process even further along. In theory, I.V.G. could allow individuals like our fictional Anna and Nicole to manufacture their own eggs and sperm, mixing and matching between genders and genes, and enabling more than two people to create a child together. And in the process, our basic notion of families is liable to get upended as well.

    Here’s how I.V.G. works. Under natural conditions, the body produces gametes — eggs and sperm — at puberty, taking nondifferentiated stem cells (with 46 chromosomes) and instructing them to split into more specialized cells, each containing just 23 chromosomes. In young men, the process occurs in the testicles and these specialized cells become sperm. In women, it takes place in the ovaries and the cells become eggs. Both these processes are known as gametogenesis. In vitro gametogenesis, therefore, is precisely that: creating gametes outside the body, and in the laboratory instead. More specifically, over the past decade scientists have begun to find ways of coaxing human stem cells to produce eggs and sperm. To put it more bluntly: I.V.G. can theoretically allow anyone to manufacture an egg or sperm cell from a tiny sliver of their own skin.

    Thus far, I.V.G. has worked only in mice. And making the leap to humans will not be easy or straightforward. Human cells are more complicated, and researchers are understandably wary of the ethical complexities. Under current U.S. law, such research might even be deemed illegal.

    But, with very few exceptions, recent history suggests that advances in reproductive technologies nearly always jump eventually from the animal world to humans. If we can figure out how to make babies, and to configure their creation in more precise ways, we do it. We did it with I.V. F., despite howls of biothethical criticism; we’ve pressed on even when things have gotten messy — when we’ve discovered sperm donors who have fathered hundreds of children, for instance; and we are likely to do the same again with I.V.G.

    If the techniques of I.V.G. prove feasible, therefore, would-be families could theoretically begin by creating their own gametes. A single woman, for example, might mix her egg with sperm fashioned from the genetic material of her two best male friends; the resulting child would have three genetic parents. Or, she might mate her egg with a carefully selected donor sperm, using genetic testing to eliminate any risk of the cystic fibrosis that runs in her own family. Stem cells derived from the resulting embryo could then yield a next generation egg to be paired with her best friends’ similarly well-conceived sperm, yielding a child with four parents. And so on. The implications are enormous.

    Taken individually, each case of assisted reproduction is its own tiny marvel — a child born to parents who could not have otherwise conceived them. Taken together, though, the impact is far wider and more profound. Because once we no longer need the traditional family structure to create children, our need for that traditional family is likely to fade as well.

    If the revolution of I.V.F. was to liberate reproduction from sex, then the even bigger revolution of I.V.G. is to dismantle completely the reproductive structure of heterosexuality. Once upon a time, defenders of heterosexual marriage could argue that marriage was intrinsically a sexual union of husband and wife, because those were the only unions that could produce a new life. If I.V.G. comes to pass, that will no longer be true. Instead, two men could make a baby. Four sexually unconnected housemates could make a baby. And that changes everything we’ve ever known about sex and babies and marriage.

    In the early days of I.V.G.’s adoption, the most obvious users of the technology are likely to be same-sex couples who, for the first time in history, could conceive children who are wholly and genetically “theirs.”

    But single women could also choose to employ it, creating eggs to match with sperm derived from friends or family members. Platonic friends might become parents together, sharing lives and families that are not linked to sex. Older couples could conceive and raise their own grandchildren.

    I.V.G. will never replace sexual reproduction of course. And poly parenting, as I like to call it, will never become the norm for most families. But once we start imagining, and then living in, a world of fluid parenting, it becomes increasingly likely that we will also undo or at least revise our centuries’ old conviction that procreative unions — like Noah’s animals — come only in pairs. Maybe our species’ new ark is composed of a motlier crew; of threesomes and foursomes, old and young, men and women and those across the spectrum of gender identity, reproducing with whomever they choose and loving as they desire.

    I.V.G. alone, of course, can’t create that world. And it will take a long time to dismantle norms of marriage and parenting that have been around for millenniums. But the history of assisted reproduction is powerful and clear: Once we create new technologies for conception, we embrace them. Yes, we go through some stages along the way: We worry about mucking with nature. We fret about designer babies or the possibility of some madman hatching Frankenstein in his backyard.

    Then we discover that it’s just the nice couple next door, using an increasingly common technology to create children they love; children who become far less scary as they move out of the world of scientific abstraction and into the realm of the real. Over a remarkably short period of time, we have grown accustomed to those nice parents in our neighborhood being a couple of men, or women, or a single one of any sex. We will get used to them being a threesome or foursome as well. And then we’ll see the new normal as simply the real, and we’ll forget that it was technology that changed this world.

  159. Tom

    I’ve just tasted and am imbibing the best pinot I have ever had — Mermerus 2018, Bellarine Peninsula (Drysdale), a wine-growing region that has lots of new vines, but has a reputation for immature rubbish. This one is a cracker.

    Such a great climate/handscape for top-range plonk. It could end up being as good as the Coonawarra.

  160. Tom

    I’ve just tasted and am imbibing the best pinot I have ever had — Mermerus 2018, Bellarine Peninsula (Drysdale), a wine-growing region that has lots of new vines, but has a reputation for immature rubbish. This one is a cracker.

    Such a great climate/handscape for top-range plonk. It could end up being as good as the Coonawarra.

  161. johanna

    Can someone provide a succinct explanation of the legal issues in the WA Clive Palmer case? The compensation one, not the border one.

    Thanks in advance.

  162. JC

    I don’t get your criticism of Trump, Cronkite. What’s wrong with appealing to soccer mums?

  163. Neil

    Foul comments against conservatives even death and rape threats do not get the person banned on Shitter. I thought that was obvious.

    The country i grew up in is totally different to the people i meet online. I guess people do not discuss religion and politics unless you can do it online.

  164. William the Conjuror

    As we’ve established, volunteering for the air force was a smart preemptive gamble for ones self

    In your dreams. Who is “we”?

  165. Tom

    There is the spaminator and then there is censorship by AI: the Cat’s primitive software just ate my post.

    Such a pity. I was just trying to recommend a spectacular new local pinot.

  166. feelthebern

    Who is “we”?

    5 separate posters commented.
    Do try to keep up.
    Otherwise the embargo on calling you a retard will be lifted.

  167. jo

    Black Ball
    #3546715, posted on August 13, 2020 at 5:34 pm

    Teri Hatcher or Jennifer Aniston? More partial to Aniston but Hatcher I rather delicious.

    Teri’s are real.

  168. JC

    I read a piece about Canada the other day, and I think it doubly applies here.

    It described Canadians followers of rules or rule based and a society that always ask permission. That’s Australia too.

  169. How much was this pathetic waste of money subsidised? I cannot figure out how the LGCs are doled out, they’re about $40 per certificate now though. It has just started to operate. I loathe to link renew economically illiterates but ugh:

    https://reneweconomy.com.au/bomen-solar-farm-near-wagga-wagga-now-operating-at-full-capacity-32350/

    The $180 million solar farm is expected to generate annual revenues of approximately $13.5 million per annum on average for the first five years, and won’t be faced with the same constraints that are likely to be imposed on more and bigger solar farms on the weaker part of the grid on the other side of Wagga Wagga.

    The payback period is 13 years if it had interest free loans (on top of subsidies).

  170. incoherent rambler

    Pussy is back in the news.
    Competing with woo floo for top spot.

  171. feelthebern

    JC I was trying to find a stat showing how many Australians are genuinely self employed versus the US.
    But I couldn’t find anything that I thought was reliable.

  172. feelthebern

    Dot, I’ve invested in a couple of renewable projects in the US.
    Based on those metrics, I would not be touching any renewable projects in Oz.

  173. Leigh Lowe

    The first place I was banned from was the fucking abc after jonathan green left the drum and that fucktard chip rolley took over.

    I can’t remember if it was the ABC or Cricinfo but I used to look at a cricket forum in the early 2000’s which was not moderated.
    It was chockfull of sub-continental criggit fans.
    This was my first experience of seeing sock-puppets and blog-wrecking first hand.
    These two characters popped up, one identifying as Indian, the other as Paki.
    A little bit of discussion for a few days about who should bat 3 or 4, or who should bowl into the wind, and whether this player or that was suspect against the outswinger.
    Then it came.
    The Indian made accusations of a homosexual orgy among the Pakistani test team. The Paki responded with allegations of sister-love involving an Indian player.
    Then it was on like Donkey-Kong as KD might say.
    All in with high dungeon and threats flying.
    Everyone banned.
    Forum moderated.
    Back to batting orders and bowling averages.

  174. JC

    Found it.

    Interesting piece about Canada vs the US. Australia and Canada don’t have an entrepreneurial class of any great shape. Neither country has a global brand that dominates a sector. Lets exclude mining.

    This is the pertinent comment.
    It should be a freedom quote.

    Docility and obedience are admirable qualities in a dog but do not form the basis of an entrepreneurial culture. David Brown offered a devastating critique: “We’ve become a society of rule-followers and permission-seekers. Despite our can-do self-image, what we really want is to be told what to do. When the going gets tough, the tough get consent forms.”

    Here’s the piece.

    https://www.nationalreview.com/2020/08/what-canadas-response-to-the-pandemic-says-about-canada-and-the-u-s/

  175. feelthebern

    So many asset classes in Australia are so out of whack when compared to global peers.
    A few are justified due to the closed ecosystem some industries operate in here in Australia.
    Others are just disasters weighting to happen.

  176. Armadillo

    Most Jooooooish communal organisations have been captured by the far-left….like every other effing organisation in the west.

    Why is that, Cassie? I’m interested to know, as it doesn’t make any sense.

    I sort of understand “German Guilt”, but I also realise sons shouldn’t be held accountable for the sins of the father. The Japanese successfully managed to collectively throw it into the “forgettery” for many years.

    In the US and Australia, I’m now hearing calls for “reparations”. WTF? Many Irish and Englishmen were held in chains for many years.

    I wasn’t there. Swear to God I wasn’t.

    It’s a bizarre situation when you think about it.

  177. notafan

    Aged care, disability care, smallgoods and chicken processing, Woolworths distribution centre and Linfox warehousing.

  178. Leigh Lowe

    The payback period is 13 years if it had interest free loans (on top of subsidies).

    How so Sedation?
    Their revenue is $13 meg a year, not net profit.

  179. feelthebern

    Example.
    Last week, Telstra announced the sale & leaseback (30 years) of one of it’s data centres.
    The winner bidder paid 20% more than the nearest bidder.
    The winning bid was around a 40% premium to comparable assets in the US.
    & their interest rates are lower than ours.
    Australia is an odd place.

  180. MatrixTransform

    smallgoods and chicken processing,

    thanks for the chicken by the way.

  181. Bruce of Newcastle

    Bern – Telstra announced their results today which were very decent, and they maintained both their dividend and special dividend.

    Their shares fell 8%, third worst in the ASX50.

    As you say Australia is an odd place. 😀

  182. Bruce of Newcastle

    Oops, 3rd worst in the ASX200, not the ASX50.

  183. cohenite

    Then we discover that it’s just the nice couple next door, using an increasingly common technology to create children they love; children who become far less scary as they move out of the world of scientific abstraction and into the realm of the real. Over a remarkably short period of time, we have grown accustomed to those nice parents in our neighborhood being a couple of men, or women, or a single one of any sex. We will get used to them being a threesome or foursome as well. And then we’ll see the new normal as simply the real, and we’ll forget that it was technology that changed this world.

    Complete and utter bullshit. Technology may exist but 4 million years of evolution is still growling in the background. The prohibition experiment is a case in point not because technology was involved but a relevant social context was whereby a bunch of karens thought they could just prescribe human nature and force abstinence. The net result: a black market in alcohol bigger then the previous legal one and corruption throughout the legal and political system which still exists today.

    The vast majority of people still want to reproduce in a heterosexual situation. We’ve already seen how fiddling with reproduction can warp society in India and chunk land where girl foetuses were aborted en masse creating a major disparity in gender numbers and a large pool of disaffected young men.

    On the other hand when they perfect pantropy I’ll be in the queue for super hearing and eyesight.

  184. Their revenue is $13 meg a year, not net profit.

    Oh dear.

  185. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Activist investor group Market Forces tells coal miners to prepare for own demise

    Nick Evans
    Resource Writer
    2 hours ago August 13, 2020
    23 Comments

    Anti-fossil fuel activist investor group Market Forces plans to use upcoming annual general meetings to force votes to get major energy companies to plan for their own wind-down and closures.

    Market Forces executive director Julien Vincent said on Thursday the group had support from enough Whitehaven Coal investors to put a resolution to the company’s AGM later this year. The resolution would be aimed at directing the miner to establish a plan to wind up the company to reduce its carbon footprint. He said Market Forces was seeking investor support for similar motions at New Hope Corporation, Beach Energy and Cooper Energy.

    “Unless these companies are proactively planning for their own decline, massive wealth destruction and social instability loom for the producers of coal, oil and gas, their investors and their workforces,” Mr Vincent said.

    “These resolutions marry the goals of protecting the climate, preserving capital and supporting workers in companies that have chosen to not particulate in the decarbonised economy. It’s the most sensible conversation we can imagine investors having with directors of fossil fuel companies.

    “Investors must take this opportunity to manage the necessary decline of the fossil fuel sector.”

    A spokesman for Whitehaven said the company still saw a role for high-quality thermal coal “as part of the global energy transition”.

    “Whitehaven is the first pure play coal company in the world to comply with the recommendations of the Financial Stability Board’s Task Force on Climate-Related Financial Disclosures,” he said.

    “Based on our analysis, which includes testing our resilience against the International Energy Agency’s published energy scenarios, we assess our portfolio as being resilient. This reflects informed judgments about the continuing demand for high quality coal given trends toward electrification and urbanisation in our region and consideration of other factors including reliability, cost-effectiveness and the limitations of renewables as dispatchable fuel sources.

    “We, and our customers, shareholders and financiers, continue to see a role for high-quality coal as part of the global energy transition, including as a key input to electricity generation in a more carbon-constrained world. High-quality coal can contribute to meaningful carbon reductions today, and we will continue to meet the strong and growing demand for higher quality coal that exists in nearby export markets.”

  186. Armadillo

    Despite our can-do self-image, what we really want is to be told what to do. When the going gets tough, the tough get consent forms.”

    No.

  187. Cassie of Sydney

    “I sort of understand “German Guilt”, but I also realise sons shouldn’t be held accountable for the sins of the father.”

    I was always taught that “blaming the sons for the sins of their fathers” is wrong…according to Jooooish law. In fact the Torah is full of lines where it is explicitly forbidden to blame the children for the crimes of their fathers.

  188. notafan

    Matrix

    No problemo.

    Went to Woolies today, not Coles.

    Loads of meat, loads of chicken including whole ones from the place with a covid outbreak.

    Yum.

  189. Mitch M.

    We’ve already seen how fiddling with reproduction can warp society in India and chunk land where girl foetuses were aborted en masse creating a major disparity in gender numbers and a large pool of disaffected young men.

    That’s a cultural issue. Enhancement of prospective children will be mostly in the hands of the well off who will be aiming for intelligence and attractiveness. Given the wokeness of our times though they might even opt for LGBTQi+ASD combo. 😆

  190. feelthebern

    Bruce, considering the prices being paid for data centres in Australia, Telstra should do a sale & lease back of the lot of them.

  191. JC

    Enhancement of prospective children will be mostly in the hands of the well off who will be aiming for intelligence and attractiveness.

    It’s very likely you can’t have both, Mitch. I’ve always wondered what mums would want as they would be doing most of the choosing.
    The choices are:

    1. A very geeky looking genius
    2. Hollywood/ sportsman looks and okay-ish smarts.

    I take a bet that 95% of mother’s would choose 2.

  192. notafan

    It’ll be just like living in an Elizabeth Moon novel.

  193. 1735099

    In your dreams. Who is we?

    On this allegedly libertarian blog, there is a very strong odour of collectivism.
    Hence “we” – a transparent Freudian slip.
    BTW, my father doesn’t need me to defend his memory, but the goons attempting a smear him forget that he volunteered for aircrew. He believed that his education made him eligible.
    He failed the medical, and could at that point have gone back to his job and his bride.
    He didn’t, and went on to operational service in PNG as an LAC.
    His experience, and mine as the eldest, was probably the main reason why my large family have voted against Coalition governments all their lives, and why two of them became endorsed Labor candidates.
    Smearing the service of those who don’t share the orthodoxy of this blog is ugly, but it is a measure of the complete lack of integrity routinely displayed here.

  194. Zyconoclast

    The Japanese successfully managed to collectively throw it into the “forgettery” for many years.

    And good on them for that.

  195. mh

    Sean Hannity and Alex Jones got Trump elected in 2016

    And they are still going strong. Well done Sean, you’re good at it.

  196. Carpe Jugulum

    Were you working the night of The Star riot?

    My oldest brother was there, he is in the film clip. (i think)

  197. MatrixTransform

    shut up numpty, you retard.

    you threw his dead bones in as a gambit

    you’re a fucking idiot

  198. Mater

    His experience, and mine as the eldest, was probably the main reason why my large family have voted against Coalition governments all their lives, and why two of them became endorsed Labor candidates.

    More bullshit. According to you, it had nothing to do with your service. He was a rusted-on and you (and the other siblings) are the result of nurture.

    1735099
    #2978993, posted on April 4, 2019 at 7:53 am
    I wish my Dad (a lifelong Labor voter) was alive to see it.

  199. Makka

    Smearing the service of those who don’t share the orthodoxy of this blog is ugly, but it is a measure of the complete lack of integrity routinely displayed here.

    Lies. The smearing is directed at you for your constant lying here.

  200. feelthebern

    He failed the medical, and could at that point have gone back to his job and his bride.

    & run the risk of a draft?
    Not bloody likely.

  201. Cassie of Sydney

    “Mater
    #3546808, posted on August 13, 2020 at 7:00 pm
    His experience, and mine as the eldest, was probably the main reason why my large family have voted against Coalition governments all their lives, and why two of them became endorsed Labor candidates.

    More bullshit. According to you, it had nothing to do with your service. He was a rusted-on and you (and the other siblings) are the result of nurture.”

    Just like bin chicken’s father-in-law was a rusted-on communist and member of the Communist party until the mid-1960’s….well after news of all Soviet Union atrocities surfaced…its gulags, its slave labour, its mass murders and all the other pleasantries communism inflicted on the world.

  202. Steve trickler

    Half way through. Check out the opening few minutes until you come to the World Economic Forum / Strategic Intelligence / Global Governance referrals.

    Global Governance – Curation: Blavatnik, University of Oxford

    Police State Australia Banned by Youtube

  203. Roger

    Activist investor group Market Forces tells coal miners to prepare for own demise

    Onwards and upwards to Year Zero, comrades!

  204. MatrixTransform

    trickler … how you do that?

  205. MatrixTransform

    oops .. forget it … loosing my shit here … stress

  206. JC

    Activist investor group Market Forces tells coal miners to prepare for own demise

    They’re not an Investor group. They wouldn’t have a cent to their name. They’re basically they’re a Greens astroturf smear group posing as investors.

    Get a load of the team. They look like they share offices with the Gerbil Council.

    https://www.marketforces.org.au/about-us/

  207. cohenite

    Zulu Kilo Two Alpha
    #3546790, posted on August 13, 2020 at 6:38 pm
    Activist investor group Market Forces tells coal miners to prepare for own demise

    Nick Evans
    Resource Writer
    2 hours ago August 13, 2020
    23 Comments

    This mob, get-stuffed, mad fucking witches, extinction rebellion etc; all clones of the same useless parasitic life form are really getting out of hand.

  208. Mark A

    Armadillo
    #3546780, posted on August 13, 2020 at 6:25 pm

    Most Jooooooish communal organisations have been captured by the far-left….like every other effing organisation in the west.

    Why is that, Cassie? I’m interested to know, as it doesn’t make any sense.

    There are daily or weekly demonstrations against B Netanyahu in Israel drawing thousands, the Haaretz news organiasion is to the left of Lenin.

    Why is it so?
    The left has taken over the media, that’s why.

  209. dover_beach

    This is possibly even more strange than fatherless babies.

    Motherless babies:

    Come in Dr Mengele.

  210. Cassie of Sydney

    “There are daily or weekly demonstrations against B Netanyahu in Israel drawing thousands, the Haaretz news organiasion is to the left of Lenin.”

    Yep.

  211. JC

    Activist investor group…They can’t help themselves lying and bullshitting all the time.

  212. Herodotus

    “Let all the poison that lurks in the mud, hatch out.”
    Robert Graves.
    One of the memorable lines from “I, Claudius”.

    We are certainly seeing that happen now. The swamp, the deep state, the various activists, the elected or appointed officials in state and city administrations. The teachers unions!
    “There’s a lot of ruin in a nation”.
    And it ends up approximately where we are now.

  213. Leigh Lowe

    Get a load of the team. They look like they share offices with the Gerbil Council.

    They are an affiliate of Friends of The Earth.

  214. cohenite

    Big Clive on Bolta gives a good overview of the WA’s illegal theft of his mining company. What WA is doing is extraordinary: basically a government can confiscate or destroy a legitimate business and be exempt from legal redress. This has got HC all over it. Clive makes the valid point that the iron ore deposit was owned by a company with over 5000 private shareholders who lost all their dosh when the previous lnp premier, fucktard colin barnett, unilaterally closed down the project.

  215. MatrixTransform

    Police State Australia Banned by Youtube

    about a quarter of the way through … that’s a take down

  216. Zatara

    Activist investor group Market Forces tells coal miners to prepare for own demise

    Are they going to run around Asia blowing up all the power plants that burn Australian coal?

    I thought not.

  217. Leigh Lowe

    Largest shareholders in Whitehaven.
    Top six control 60% of shares on issue.
    The Market Forces group doesn’t feature.
    .
    .

    NAME. SHARE HOLDING. SHARES HELD (%)
    Farallon Capital Management LLC and associates. 146,007,208. 14.23%
    Kundrun, Fritz. 124,042,252. 12.09%
    Mende, Hans and Ingrid. 114,190,086. 11.13%
    Lazard Asset Management Pacific Co. 90,304,489. 8.80%
    AMCI Group. 86,170,596. 8.40%
    Prudential PLC. 52,580,134. 5.12%

  218. Makka

    Some great low altitude strafing and bombing camera work in the PNG campaign; Lae, Wewak, Salemoua, Alexis etc.

  219. Bruce of Newcastle

    It’ll be just like living in an Elizabeth Moon novel.

    Maybe more like Melissa Scott, who is a fine SF writer but qwerty. Some really good ideas, and she doesn’t decline into wokeness (although I haven’t read anything of hers for some years). Speed of Dark is Ms Moon’s tribute to her kid, who is full autistic. Tough gig. Her Vatta, Suiza/Serrano and Paksenarrion series are good reads!

  220. Boambee John

    He failed the medical, and could at that point have gone back to his job and his bride.
    He didn’t, and went on to operational service in PNG as an LAC.
    His experience, and mine as the eldest, was probably the main reason why my large family have voted against Coalition governments all their lives, and why two of them became endorsed Labor candidates.

    Did he blame Menzies for his failing the aircrew medical? Pourquoi?

    PS, his civil career might not have lasted long, had he not taken tbe non-aircrew option. The Army and New Guinea swamps beckoned, and thanks to Curtin, his service could have been outside Australian and Australian administered territory.

  221. You may laugh but seriously, how many CEOs will Market Forces rope in? We know that many are already under the thrall of climate action. Consider Australia fucked.

  222. Mark A

    It’ll be just like living in an Elizabeth Moon novel.

    I actually liked some of her work, spec the ones in collaboration with Ane McCaffrey.

    Anne’s son lost me though, total plodder.

  223. Farmer Gez

    I like this in Herald Sun comments.
    Barb from Brighton East:

    ‘Dear Dan, when all is said and done, there’s a lot more said than done.’

  224. Leigh Lowe

    Makka

    #3546841, posted on August 13, 2020 at 7:39 pm

    Some great low altitude strafing and bombing camera work in the PNG campaign; Lae, Wewak, Salemoua, Alexis etc.

    Are we still allowed to say Fuzzy Wuzzy Angels?

  225. miltonf

    We know that many are already under the thrall of climate action.

    They’re not very bright are they?

  226. BoN

    I don’t know about your author but designer babies created via ectogenesis, for the elite are a major feature in the Serrano series

  227. Mitch M.

    It’s very likely you can’t have both, Mitch. I’ve always wondered what mums would want as they would be doing most of the choosing.
    The choices are:

    1. A very geeky looking genius
    2. Hollywood/ sportsman looks and okay-ish smarts.

    I take a bet that 95% of mother’s would choose 2.

    Of course both are possible. Eg. Dolph Lundgren, Ashton Kutcher. IQ 140+, make panties wet. Remember that link on silver foxes I put up here? It doesn’t take long for selection pressures to have measurable population effects, something which raises troublesome inheritance questions(cue Nicholas Wade, go on I dare you to cue him!) about populations that have not been exposed to the types of selection pressures both environmental and cultural that select for higher intelligence and less violent people.

    Parents want more intelligence in their children though not of the Aspie type(Average Aspie IQ higher than NTs).

    I know people have concerns about GE but tough luck for them because it is coming and nothing is going to stop it. I welcome it because evolution is too imprecise leading to dangerous idiots in the world. In 100 years time designer babies will be a common reality. We transcend evolution in most areas and our bodies are next.

  228. I haven’t read any McCaffrey, got some somewhere.

    Might.

  229. zyconoclast

    Racial disparities in psychotic disorder diagnosis: A review of empirical literature

    Abstract

    Psychotic disorder diagnoses are common in the United States and internationally. However, racial disparities in rates of psychotic disorder diagnoses have been reported across time and mental health professions. This literature review provides an updated and comprehensive summary of empirical research on race and diagnosis of psychotic disorders spanning a 24-year period. Findings reveal a clear and pervasive pattern wherein African American/Black consumers show a rate of on average three to four higher than Euro-American/White consumers. Latino American/Hispanic consumers were also disproportionately diagnosed with psychotic disorders on average approximately three times higher compared to Euro-American/White consumers. In addition, a trend among international studies suggests that immigrant racial minority consumers receiving mental health services may be assigned a psychotic disorder diagnosis more frequently than native consumers sharing a majority racial background. Potential explanations for this phenomenon are discussed, including possible clinical bias and sociological causes such as differential access to healthcare and willingness to participate in mental health services. Directions for future research should include the exploration of disproportionate diagnoses according to race through qualitative interviewing as well as empirical investigation.

  230. Diogenes

    I don’t know about your author but designer babies created via ectogenesis, for the elite are a major feature in the Serrano series

    When I first read them I thought 1984 and Brave New World (which features ectogenesis) described 2 very different futures for mankind. Now that I am older I can see they are not so different, and we are hurtling towards an insane fusion of both.

  231. JC

    Possible doesn’t mean likely/probable.

    Nobel prize winners aren’t walking around with Hollywood starlets and finding an exception doesn’t make it the rule.

  232. Cassie of Sydney

    Anne McCaffrey..one of my favourite writers.

  233. Bruce of Newcastle

    Nota – That’s a pretty common theme (BNW!), along with gene editing. I think I saw something today on the latter. Ah, here it is:

    Why Deaf People Oppose Using Gene Editing to “Cure” Deafness (12 Aug)

    Researchers have figured out how to use a gene-editing tool called CRISPR 2.0 to prevent and treat deafness. But many deaf people are happy the way they are.

    Lots of interesting ethical and philosophical considerations which are far above my pay grade, even before you get into religious questions. But I suspect edited kids will still be kids.

  234. notafan

    I’m sure it is Bruce.

  235. zyconoclast

    There are some strange sounding books out there.

    The Delectable Negro: Human Consumption and Homoeroticism within US Slave Culture (Sexual Cultures (34)) Paperback – June 27, 2014

    Winner of the 2015 LGBT Studies Award presented by the Lambda Literary Foundation

    Scholars of US and transatlantic slavery have largely ignored or dismissed accusations that Black Americans were cannibalized. Vincent Woodard takes the enslaved person’s claims of human consumption seriously, focusing on both the literal starvation of the slave and the tropes of cannibalism on the part of the slaveholder, and further draws attention to the ways in which Blacks experienced their consumption as a fundamentally homoerotic occurrence. The Delectable Negro explores these connections between homoeroticism, cannibalism, and cultures of consumption in the context of American literature and US slave culture.

    Utilizing many staples of African American literature and culture, such as the slave narratives of OlaudahEquiano, Harriet Jacobs, and Frederick Douglass, as well as other less circulated materials like James L. Smith’s slave narrative, runaway slave advertisements, and numerous articles from Black newspapers published in the nineteenth century, Woodard traces the racial assumptions, political aspirations, gender codes, and philosophical frameworks that dictated both European and white American arousal towards Black males and hunger for Black male flesh. Woodard uses these texts to unpack how slaves struggled not only against social consumption, but also against endemic mechanisms of starvation and hunger designed to break them. He concludes with an examination of the controversial chain gang oral sex scene in Toni Morrison’s Beloved, suggesting that even at the end of the twentieth and beginning of the twenty-first century, we are still at a loss for language with which to describe Black male hunger within a plantation culture of consumption.

  236. Bruce of Newcastle

    Nota – I’d settle with them not actually killing the kid a microsecond before he or she enters the world.

    French National Assembly Approves Abortion up to Birth (10 Aug)

    By a vote of 60 in favor and 37 opposed, the legislators agreed to permit abortion at any time for a mother undergoing “psycho-social distress,” a nebulous term that allows healthcare workers total leeway to approve the procedure.

    The French seem to have a callousness beyond many other Europeans, but this one is ghastly even for them.

  237. Spurgeon Monkfish III

    LOL – Alan Jones losing his shit with Blabbersack.

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