Open Forum: August 15, 2020

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2,834 Responses to Open Forum: August 15, 2020

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  1. Zyconoclast

    Thank you linesman, thank you [email protected] boys

  2. ArthurB

    Whoopee!! Fourth. There are advantages in living in WA.

  3. Zyconoclast

    Pedro the Loafer
    #3548030, posted on August 14, 2020 at 11:35 pm
    Speaking of good looking aircraft:

    The F-104 Starfighter

    An absolute beauty to look at.

  4. Megan

    Made it into the first, can’t open the batting, though.

  5. Megan

    Firsts…stop it Samsung!

  6. Zyconoclast

    Another war in the ME. What a good idea…

    U.S. Seizes Iranian Fuel Cargo for First Time

    The Trump administration has for the first time confiscated cargo in vessels allegedly loaded with Iran fuel in violation of sanctions, U.S. officials said, as it steps up its campaign of maximum pressure against Tehran.

    Last month U.S. federal prosecutors filed suit to seize the four tankers of gasoline that Iran was sending to Venezuela, the latest move in the administration’s effort to stifle flows of goods and money helping to keep two of its top foes in power.

    At the time, it was unclear if U.S. authorities would successfully be able to take control of the tankers, after a similar effort to seize Iranian fuel through a U.S. forfeiture case was unsuccessful last year.

  7. Rex Mango

    10, F104 not as good as F105, looks or performance.

  8. Rex Mango

    For all those thinking of signing up, here is a great recruitment video:

  9. Zyconoclast

    Remember this?

    Court axes ‘Save James’ ruling, mom who wants gender ‘transition’ for 8-yr-old regains decision rights

    August 12, 2020 (LifeSiteNews) – Yesterday, a Dallas judge took away Jeffrey Younger’s say in his son James’ medical, psychological, and psychiatric care, giving that power to James’ mother, who wants to “transition” him into a “girl.” After receiving national attention in October 2019, the bitter parental dispute had ultimately resulted in both parents getting a say in decisions regarding James and his twin, Jude; this ruling effectively reverses that.

    James Younger’s mother, Dr. Anne Georgulas, will now be able to enroll the eight-year-old in school as a “girl” named “Luna” and subject him to transgender medical procedures.

  10. Bruce in WA

    Lying in bed, reading on the iPad, think one last look before nigh-nighs and lookee here, new Fred!

  11. Leigh Lowe

    Megan

    #3548069, posted on August 15, 2020 at 12:27 am

    Firsts…stop it Samsung!

    It’s not Samsung.
    It’s me.
    Subtle Blogwrecking.

  12. Rex Mango

    You can take a prostitute and her job is to give pleasure, you can take a military man and his job is to be the last one standing up.

  13. Megan

    You are the Grand Poobah of Blogwrecking, LL.

    It’s a gift and we all recognize your superior skills.

  14. Zyconoclast

    NATIONAL NUCLEAR LABORATORY TRAINING ON “WHITE PRIVILEGE” AND “WHITE MALE CULTURE”

    Last year, Sandia National Laboratories—which designs America’s nuclear weapons—hosted a 3-day reeducation camp for “white males,” with the goal of exposing their “white privilege” and deconstructing “white male culture.”

    I’ve obtained exclusive whistleblower documents revealing that last year, the national laboratory sent its white male executives to the La Posada luxury resort to undergo a mandatory training called “White Men’s Caucus on Eliminating Racism, Sexism, and Homophobia in Organizations.”

    In the opening thought-work session, the trainers demand that the men make a list of associations about white male culture. The trainers write “white supremacists,” “KKK,” “Aryan Nation,” “MAGA hat,” “privileged,” and “mass killings.”

    The trainers insist that white males must “work hard to understand” their “white privilege,” “male privilege,” and “heterosexual privilege.” They claim that white men benefit from positive stereotypes that “far outweigh the Tim McVeighs and Ted Kaczynskis of white maleness.”

    Next, the white male employees must expose the “roots of white male culture,” which consists of “rugged individualism,” “a can-do attitude,” “hard work,” and “striving towards success”—which sound good, but are in fact “devastating” to women and POCs.

    In fact, the trainers claim that “white male culture” leads to “lowered quality of life at work and home, reduced life expectancy, unproductive relationships, and high stress.” It also forces this “white male standard” on women and minorities.

    In a subsequent session, the white males must publicly recite a series of “white privilege statements” and “male privilege statements.” They must accept their complicity in the white male system and their role in creating oppressions.

    Finally, as the reeducation camp concludes, the white males must write letters “directed to white women, people of color, and other groups regarding the meaning of this Caucus experience.” They apologize for their “privilege” and pledge to become “better [allies].”

    Who is leading the struggle session? A company called “White Men As Full Diversity Partners.” This is no joke—their company is literally called White Men As Full Diversity Partners and they specialize in confronting those who “typically hold all the power”: namely, “white males.”

  15. stackja

    Rex – Beau Geste meets Sergeant Markoff.

  16. Rex Mango

    stackja, please don’t make fun of my favourite video ever. Those marching songs are to die for.

  17. egg_

    Rex Mango
    #3548101, posted on August 15, 2020 at 1:09 am

    Love the Thud.
    There’s anecdotes of (Mach 2.3 canopy rating) F-104 Starfighters out accelerating Mach 3 capable F-106 Delta Darts* during Nam(?).

    *Outside of the Lockheed SR-71, the Convairs were the speed demons of the era.

  18. stackja

    Rex – I will have to find mine. I only remember parts of Beau Geste.

  19. stackja

    B-36 in Jimmy Stewart movie. I will have find and view.

  20. Rex Mango

    Egg, real question is speed at sea level. From memory I think the F104 has the record, but it was stripped down version & not sea level, like 1000′ up in Nevada. F105 & F111 would beat F104 at sea level, although it is light weight with lot of power. I think the English Electric Lightning would beat a F104 in height to climb. F106 not far behind.

  21. Rex Anger

    Nuclear weapons have been used ruthlessly in the field, by terrorists, since 1983. And you all saw one being used about one week ago.

    Lolwut, troll?

    Where are all the flash blindness cases? The massed radiation burns and radiation poisonings? The cleanup crews running about in NBC kit? Why has Beirut not been completely evacuated to effect a cleanup? Do you really think so lowly of even the Arabs, that they would not take even the most basic precautions to safeguard their people? How about the masses of uniformed troops running about Ground Zero in nothing but their usual day kit?

    More importantly, do you honestly think Tel Aviv would suffer to have something like that go off so close to home? Or the Russians? Why would Iran bother nuking one of its top clients? Are.you so desperate for low energy outrage you’ll try something that stupid (and cheaply insult a bunch of servicemen into the bargain)? Or are you just stoned?

    So I’m sure you were all a bunch of tough guys far far away and a long time ago. But I show up and its like being caught in a Private Gomer Pyle reunion. Because you were all to gutless and softheaded to admit that there had been nuclear terrorism. Even though you saw the video. Not a smoking gun. But an actual video of the event.

    Get off the granola, son. Somebody has sold you a dud…

  22. Rex Mango

    6 turning & 4 burning:

  23. Rex Anger

    (And if you’re just doingnthis for shits and giggles cos it’s late and what the hell, them well played…)

  24. egg_

    There’s anecdotes of (Mach 2.3 canopy rating) F-104 Starfighters out accelerating Mach 3 capable F-106 Delta Darts* during Nam(?).

    Ditto F-4 Phantoms, but the Dart obvious;y had the legs to Mach 3.

  25. Rex Mango

    Great shot of B52’s taking off together, though Rock was on a sound stage:

  26. Rex Mango

    Egg, never heard of F106 getting close to Mach 3.

  27. NoFixedAddress

    Ricky Glazer
    #3548102, posted on August 15, 2020 at 1:11 am

    Its just small hat whitey attacking the rest of us. Making us the literal scapegoat by loading their own sins onto us. The leopard never changes its spots.

    yu tel em luv tel em rite gud n propa

  28. Rex Anger

    Righto champ…

    Have fun with making sure your anti-nuclear tinfoil hat fits, don’t forget to check under the bed twice for ICBMs before you go to sleep…

    …And maybe get your medications looked into. Your cheese nightmares are starting to manifest, and it makes you look mighty foolish.

  29. Rex Anger

    So lets take New York right? About 70 000 people dying of radiation related sicknesses

    Right, so 9/11 was actually a nuclear demolition. OK…🙄

  30. NoFixedAddress

    The leopard never changes its spots.

    apart from durrr.. if it changed its spots it wouldn’t be a leopard…. how come they live in Africa and India?

    the local tucker must be good.

  31. NoFixedAddress

    I want to know about the leopards

  32. NoFixedAddress

    were the leopards visiting New York?

  33. NoFixedAddress

    a leopard is a fairly big pussy

  34. Rex Anger

    OK, and you’re now accusing the Js of nuclear terrorism. 🤨

    You are pulling the piss, right?

    Next thing, you’ll be claiming it’s all part of some conspiracy involving a competition between the Reptilian Illuminati and the Grey Rothschilds Bankers to determine the tastiest way to cook human corpses in the name of Galactic fine dining…

  35. NoFixedAddress

    I’d reckon a few leopards would make short work of alien lizards

  36. NoFixedAddress

    can a glazer eye look deeply into it’s own eye

  37. Rex Anger

    It’s probably a 3 way between the International Leopard Mafia, the Reptilian Illuminati andnthe Grey Rothschild Banker Oligarchy.

    Having seen the size of the teeth leopards have, I think I’d expect the Leopard Mafia to win.

    It’s just a shame that they are a pack of Marxist arseholes…

  38. NoFixedAddress

    Palestinian Terrorists

  39. NoFixedAddress

    got to watch those glazed palestinian leopard terrorists

  40. NoFixedAddress

    don’t talk about the grays

  41. Rex Anger

    don’t talk about the grays

    Nope… They’re like the arsehole second cousins of the Greys. They randomly saucer in from parts unknown, gatecrash the party at just the wrong time, drink all the booze, ‘accidentally’ disintegrate the guest of honour, probe the cattle, abduct all the women after chatting them up about how much cooler they are, and the piss off again, leaving the Greys to cover up the mess.

    No wonder the Grays are not talked about.

  42. NoFixedAddress

    so you’ll be presenting all your evidence to the justice league

  43. NoFixedAddress

    Grey’s have a cross to bear

  44. Rex Anger

    @ Sinc-

    We got one of these anti-Semite trolls down here making a nuisance of themselves. And he’s being neither ironic nor self-referential.

    And his humour is not absurd enough. He sounds a bit too serious…

  45. Rex Anger

    Welp, I’m out for the night.

    When the fuckwit has finished frothing, spinning and calling all around it cowards cos ‘Evilbad Jooish Mans done made things go BANGE! And Y0oz aLl ReFuZe 2 SeE iT,’ could it please turn out the lights?

    And not let the door concuss him on his way out?

  46. rickw

    Is there a bird strike in progress?

  47. rickw

    Asian tiger moms going to be pissed:

  48. Tom

    Piss off, Bird. Only cowards sneak around here in the middle of the night before the ban hammer comes down.

  49. rickw

    The CCP effects everyone:

  50. Ed Case

    Has it been reported anywhere that an Indigenous Security Company got the Melbourne Hotels Quarantine Contract?

  51. Mark M

    If only they had a carbon (sic) tax and meat free Mondays 6,000 years ago, the planet would be saved by now …

    6,600-year-old gravesites in Poland suggest wealth gap existed earlier than thought

    The work involved digging up skeletons in an ancient cemetery in Osłonki, Poland, along with associated artifacts. The researchers then studied the bones, looking for nitrogen and carbon isotopes. In all, the team studied the remains of 30 people, all adults between the ages of 18 and 45.

    As a final step, the researchers also studied the bones of cattle found in the same area from the same time period.

    The researchers also note that the carbon isotope ratio in the cattle suggests they grazed on open field grasses because it is the type of ratio typically seen with modern cattle with access to wide-open, sunlit fields, as opposed to cows who eat plants growing in partially tree-shaded areas.

    Taken together, the findings suggest that those people buried with trinkets who ate local beef likely belonged to land-owning families—families that had access to more of the good things in life than those people buried without trinkets, providing evidence of a wealth gap.

    https://phys.org/news/2020-08-year-old-gravesites-poland-wealth-gap.html

    >> Ireland to punish farmers, raise meat prices in pointless effort to change the weather.

    Ireland’s climate bill leaves cows twisting in the wind
    Cattle farmers will be encouraged to reduce the size of their herds as the state sets limits on agricultural emissions

    https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/ireland-s-climate-bill-leaves-cows-twisting-in-the-wind-hcnxpdv05

    >> Australian farmers need to wake up and speak up.
    You’re next.

  52. Bruce of Newcastle

    Taken together, the findings suggest that those people buried with trinkets who ate local beef likely belonged to land-owning families

    Isotope studies in the future will find exactly the opposite. The wealthy eating only tofu and broccoli and the plebs eating the good stuff. The archaeologists will be mystified.

  53. Ed Case

    Australian Pastoralists have been paid off with the recent Live Export Ban Class Action Settlement Judgement.
    They’ll just take it to Court, get a payout in ten years time, and buy a block of units.
    The issue is about access to cheap Beef and Lamb for Australians, not the exclusive welfare of farmer fleas.

  54. Ed Case

    China is claiming that a shipment of chicken wings from Brazil is contaminated with Covid-19.
    So, it’s happening before our eyes: The End Of Meat, unless it’s Factory Farmed to ”stringent” specs.

  55. Struth

    I see above what happens when business is slow for taxi driving sand monkeys.

  56. Bruce of Newcastle

    Hehe, Johannes Leak has made the Jerusalem Post!
    Sadly they wimped out on including his cartoon though.

  57. calli

    Choosing a PoC as a running mate because, and only because, they are a PoC is not racist.

    Pointing it out is racist.

    Riiiiight.

  58. calli

    This emoji is raaaaaacist! 💩

  59. Struth

    If you can utter the words, only whites can be racist, and not see the insanity in it, you’ve been brainwashed by the education department.
    If you believe in global warming now the rain has indeed filled the dams many times over, pouring down in record Flanneries, you’ve been brainwashed by the education department.

    If you are a disgusting left wing activist calling yourself a journalist, you have been brainwashed by the education department.
    If you believe all lives don’t matter, only black ones, you have been brainwashed by the education department.

    etc
    If you believe that old people didn’t die of catching colds and flus until this year, you have been brainwashed by those who were brainwashed by the education department.

    It all starts in our schools.
    As it was meant to.

  60. Bruce of Newcastle

    Biden in Leak’s cartoon can’t remember her name.
    That’s a riff on this story.

    Joe Biden baffles with promise to appoint ‘first African-American woman’ to Senate (28 Feb)

    He was actually standing on stage with Senator Harris at the time.

  61. Struth

    The Australian defended Leak, so that was good, and with quite a matter of fact approach.
    More of this needs to be done.

    Looks like we could be in for another war.
    I see it has always been white man’s privilege to go and fight and die.
    For the purposes of correcting these terrible wrongs of the past, I propose that we only send the ladies and the people of colour this time.

  62. Cardimona

    Firstborn’s column

    Workers being fleeced
    Vikki Campion

    COVID has provided governments, unions and employers the chance to tackle IR reform

    Whitney of western NSW goes to bed past midnight when the final guest checks in to the motel she manages.

    And is up before 5am to fry bacon. She spends all day turning the rooms herself and if you were to work out her mere $40,000 contract to an hourly rate it would decline to exploitative levels.

    That’s one extreme.

    On the other, a young woman who sells high heels in airconditioning took her boss to court for unfair dismissal. When her city shop shut down due to COVID, she was offered the same job selling pumps at a nearby store franchise but she rejected the 20-minute drive in favour of the $1500 JobKeeper payment and felt it a huge injustice she should be asked to drive that far.

    Meanwhile, a farm labourer, also on JobKeeper, drove four hours to do three days fencing in the rain and then went back to do shearing.

    Working Monday to Sunday as a casual, the shoe salesperson could have up to seven different pay rates depending on what time she walks in the door.

    Her age changes her pay even though born in 1999 or 2001, she sells the same shoes.

    The retail award pay guide is 36 pages long with special pay rates for fitting bras, while the pastoral award pay guide is 58 pages long with the shearer paid more than 100 different rates depending on factors such as what kind of sheep he is shearing and where.

    When John Howard was turfed out in 2007 with WorkChoices seen as a great evil, Australia was soon plunged into the GFC where work flexibility may have suited us better than the $1000 hand-out (which we are still paying back).

    We need simplified workplace laws.

    If a business is running retail, hospitality and logistics, they are forced to navigate a convoluted matrix of three different awards.

    The only ones who benefit from our complex system are huge corporates who have pockets deep enough to hire experts who can manipulate it, but even the majors make costly mistakes, such as Woolworths underpaying 5700 staff $300 million (joining a long queue of business including Qantas, the Commonwealth Bank, Wesfarmers, Super Retail Group, the ABC and Michael Hill Jewellers.).

    Tomorrow many motel beds will stay exactly how they were left by tonight’s guests. When Sunday’s shift is too expensive, the Sunday job ceases to exist.

    Whitney should have a cleaner to help but a Sunday casual costs the motel 175 per cent of a full time base rate per hour (up to $42.20) — and that’s money that a $120 a night rural motel doesn’t have.

    In order for the post-COVID economy to function we need to standardise more than 100 different awards, simplify them and pay a fair and in many cases, higher living wage.

    We need to get rid of, among other things, wages that change depending on age, Sunday loading — because worshipping the Sabbath is optional

    — and awards so complex that to avoid them overwhelmed businesses hire contractors who are exploited.

    COVID has taught us we do not need to do business Monday to Friday, 8am to 5pm but a full bench of the Fair Work Commission had to rush through changes to give those employed under the Clerks Award, for example, the flexibility to change the spread of hours to work from home from 6am to 11pm as many of those hired under the award were mums, struggling to cope with young children and an admin job without childcare under lockdown.

    An award is no good to anyone if it leaves them unemployed.

    Our whole system is based on an antiquated society — it begs for reform. Now is the time for governments, unions and employers to find the courage to tackle IR reform, beginning with Whitney.

  63. Struth

    The LGBTI navy could transport them to battle.

  64. Cardimona

    Firstborn’s column went into moderation!
    Only two vaguely religious words I can see in there…

    Workers being fleeced
    Vikki Campion

    COVID has provided governments, unions and employers the chance to tackle IR reform

    Whitney of western NSW goes to bed past midnight when the final guest checks in to the motel she manages.

    And is up before 5am to fry bacon. She spends all day turning the rooms herself and if you were to work out her mere $40,000 contract to an hourly rate it would decline to exploitative levels.

    That’s one extreme.

    On the other, a young woman who sells high heels in airconditioning took her boss to court for unfair dismissal. When her city shop shut down due to COVID, she was offered the same job selling pumps at a nearby store franchise but she rejected the 20-minute drive in favour of the $1500 JobKeeper payment and felt it a huge injustice she should be asked to drive that far.

    Meanwhile, a farm labourer, also on JobKeeper, drove four hours to do three days fencing in the rain and then went back to do shearing.

    Working Monday to Sunday as a casual, the shoe salesperson could have up to seven different pay rates depending on what time she walks in the door.

    Her age changes her pay even though born in 1999 or 2001, she sells the same shoes.

    The retail award pay guide is 36 pages long with special pay rates for fitting bras, while the pastoral award pay guide is 58 pages long with the shearer paid more than 100 different rates depending on factors such as what kind of sheep he is shearing and where.

    When John Howard was turfed out in 2007 with WorkChoices seen as a great evil, Australia was soon plunged into the GFC where work flexibility may have suited us better than the $1000 hand-out (which we are still paying back).

    We need simplified workplace laws.

    If a business is running retail, hospitality and logistics, they are forced to navigate a convoluted matrix of three different awards.

    The only ones who benefit from our complex system are huge corporates who have pockets deep enough to hire experts who can manipulate it, but even the majors make costly mistakes, such as Woolworths underpaying 5700 staff $300 million (joining a long queue of business including Qantas, the Commonwealth Bank, Wesfarmers, Super Retail Group, the ABC and Michael Hill Jewellers.).

    Tomorrow many motel beds will stay exactly how they were left by tonight’s guests. When Sunday’s shift is too expensive, the Sunday job ceases to exist.

    Whitney should have a cleaner to help but a Sunday casual costs the motel 175 per cent of a full time base rate per hour (up to $42.20) — and that’s money that a $120 a night rural motel doesn’t have.

    In order for the post-COVID economy to function we need to standardise more than 100 different awards, simplify them and pay a fair and in many cases, higher living wage.

    We need to get rid of, among other things, wages that change depending on age, Sunday loading — because wor ship ping the S a b b a t h is optional

    — and awards so complex that to avoid them overwhelmed businesses hire contractors who are exploited.

    COVID has taught us we do not need to do business Monday to Friday, 8am to 5pm but a full bench of the Fair Work Commission had to rush through changes to give those employed under the Clerks Award, for example, the flexibility to change the spread of hours to work from home from 6am to 11pm as many of those hired under the award were mums, struggling to cope with young children and an admin job without childcare under lockdown.

    An award is no good to anyone if it leaves them unemployed.

    Our whole system is based on an antiquated society — it begs for reform. Now is the time for governments, unions and employers to find the courage to tackle IR reform, beginning with Whitney.

  65. egg_

    never heard of F106 getting close to Mach 3.

    A dedicated Interceptor with a Mach 3 airframe*; a General Electric J93 version was proposed for Mach 3 flight.

    The delta wing craft had burning paint at Mach 2.43+ and accelerating after 11 miles when it set the record; F-14s and F-15s couldn’t match it in a dogfight at 40,000 ft.

    A Mach 3 F-4 Phantom was also proposed – with tail and inlet mods making it resemble an F-106.

  66. Cardimona

    Cats, I just had two attempts at posting my daughters column today and it has hit moderation both times.
    Buggered if I know why…
    Scroll back to 0652 later on when the mods finally clear it.

  67. Struth

    Look at words like J e w ellery…….sni gger , naughty words inside words.

  68. egg_

    WASP Feminazis like bashing WASP men, but do they realise they’re granted a platform for doing so and are better off than other cultures, Kamala Harris?

  69. feelthebern

    Jimmy Dore on fire.

  70. Cardimona

    Struth – amazing, it was that exact word causing the moderation.
    Sorry, Sinc, but I’m gonna have a third try at posting my daughters column from the Daily Telegraph and the Townsville Bulletin.

    Firstborn’s column went into moderation!
    Only two vaguely religious words I can see in there…

    Workers being fleeced
    Vikki Campion

    COVID has provided governments, unions and employers the chance to tackle IR reform

    Whitney of western NSW goes to bed past midnight when the final guest checks in to the motel she manages.

    And is up before 5am to fry bacon. She spends all day turning the rooms herself and if you were to work out her mere $40,000 contract to an hourly rate it would decline to exploitative levels.

    That’s one extreme.

    On the other, a young woman who sells high heels in airconditioning took her boss to court for unfair dismissal. When her city shop shut down due to COVID, she was offered the same job selling pumps at a nearby store franchise but she rejected the 20-minute drive in favour of the $1500 JobKeeper payment and felt it a huge injustice she should be asked to drive that far.

    Meanwhile, a farm labourer, also on JobKeeper, drove four hours to do three days fencing in the rain and then went back to do shearing.

    Working Monday to Sunday as a casual, the shoe salesperson could have up to seven different pay rates depending on what time she walks in the door.

    Her age changes her pay even though born in 1999 or 2001, she sells the same shoes.

    The retail award pay guide is 36 pages long with special pay rates for fitting bras, while the pastoral award pay guide is 58 pages long with the shearer paid more than 100 different rates depending on factors such as what kind of sheep he is shearing and where.

    When John Howard was turfed out in 2007 with WorkChoices seen as a great evil, Australia was soon plunged into the GFC where work flexibility may have suited us better than the $1000 hand-out (which we are still paying back).

    We need simplified workplace laws.

    If a business is running retail, hospitality and logistics, they are forced to navigate a convoluted matrix of three different awards.

    The only ones who benefit from our complex system are huge corporates who have pockets deep enough to hire experts who can manipulate it, but even the majors make costly mistakes, such as Woolworths underpaying 5700 staff $300 million (joining a long queue of business including Qantas, the Commonwealth Bank, Wesfarmers, Super Retail Group, the ABC and Michael Hill J e w e l l e r s.).

    Tomorrow many motel beds will stay exactly how they were left by tonight’s guests. When Sunday’s shift is too expensive, the Sunday job ceases to exist.

    Whitney should have a cleaner to help but a Sunday casual costs the motel 175 per cent of a full time base rate per hour (up to $42.20) — and that’s money that a $120 a night rural motel doesn’t have.

    In order for the post-COVID economy to function we need to standardise more than 100 different awards, simplify them and pay a fair and in many cases, higher living wage.

    We need to get rid of, among other things, wages that change depending on age, Sunday loading — because wor ship ping the S a b b a t h is optional

    — and awards so complex that to avoid them overwhelmed businesses hire contractors who are exploited.

    COVID has taught us we do not need to do business Monday to Friday, 8am to 5pm but a full bench of the Fair Work Commission had to rush through changes to give those employed under the Clerks Award, for example, the flexibility to change the spread of hours to work from home from 6am to 11pm as many of those hired under the award were mums, struggling to cope with young children and an admin job without childcare under lockdown.

    An award is no good to anyone if it leaves them unemployed.

    Our whole system is based on an antiquated society — it begs for reform. Now is the time for governments, unions and employers to find the courage to tackle IR reform, beginning with Whitney.

  71. Dettol Donny has been left like a shag on a rock by Lindsey Graham.

    Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) broke with President Trump on Friday by saying there is no debate over whether Sen. Kamala Harris is a U.S. citizen, remarks that came after the president encouraged a conspiracy theory that the California Democrat may not be eligible to serve as vice president because her parents are immigrants.

  72. Struth

    Australian history
    The Australian Nation lasted 119 years.
    From January the 1st 1901 until the 20th of March 2020.

    It informally surrendered to globalist powers on that March day, willingly and in fear of the Sniffles.
    An amazing nation and part of the great light that shone on humanity known as the “western world” it achieved many great things and produced many great people, it’s contribution to the world with music and the arts, invention through to amazing abilities in agriculture and mining, gifted a parliamentary style democracy, made it the envy of the world, and with a small population punched way above it’s weight.
    But evil forces, full of envy and with a visceral hatred of reward for effort, tore at the heart of the country, gradually corrupting all institutions and cultural practices.
    They destroyed it’s enabling religion, Christianity, and indoctrinated the children with insanities.
    The took the citizens weapons.
    They flooded young men with pornography.
    They flooded the population via immigration with those who openly declared their hatred of the western world.
    This was done over many years, so that by the end date March the 20th 2020, no one really even cared that what was once a shining star, had disappeared before their eyes.
    Darkness, misery and death ensued for many years.

  73. Steve trickler

    Captivating voice.



  74. Bruce of Newcastle

    Content of the character Numbers.
    She ain’t got it.

  75. Knuckle Dragger

    ‘Has it been reported anywhere that an Indigenous Security Company got the Melbourne Hotels Quarantine Contract?’

    Ah geez.

  76. notafan

    What’s a ‘higher living wage’?

  77. Knuckle Dragger

    The common spruiking phrase for London prostitutes during WW2 when trying to spark up a bit of business with US soldiers was ‘Have a go, Joe!’

    Sadly, history does not record whether the transaction was finalised with ‘Come on, man!’

  78. Shy Ted

    Sky News headline – 1700 Qlders fail to pay $2.2m in Covid fines. As that stupid, anorexic Qld CMO says, “well done, Queensland”. Well, 1700 of you anyway.

  79. Struth

    Sept 2 1945, 75 yeas ago, the end of world war two.
    What did those poor bastards give their lives for?

  80. notafan

    Isn’t the $40,000 contact Whitney freely entered into exactly what freeing up labour arrangements is all about ?

    The beauty of working for yourself.

    You can do very nicely or very badly.

    I used to open my shop seven days a week and worked thirteen day fortnight.

    Later days on Sundays I might make $60 gross.

    I finally got smart and closed Sundays.

    Then closed altogether.

    If rural motel can’t make a profit then it would close.

    That’s what happens.

  81. notafan

    Not you strutting, obviously.

  82. johanna

    Yikes! Birdpoo everywhere this morning.

    Hope the cleaning crew has the power washer in good trim. 🙂

  83. notafan

    Hopefully non fine payers get churned through legal mill and palacechook has the opportunity to put some in prison.

    It’ll be a fantastic look!

  84. notafan

    The only way things will get better is if the right people enter parliament.

    Go you constitutional experts go!

  85. Knuckle Dragger

    Mr Bird, although he can still provide intermittent flashes of brilliance when lucid, is losing whatever plot he had.

    These days you can take piss out of him and he doesn’t realise it. A bit like Liability Bob.

  86. Shy Ted

    Bayern Munich put 8 past Barcelona yesterday. That’s a big thing to soccer nuts.

  87. Knuckle Dragger

    ‘The only way things will get better is if the right people enter parliament.’

    Look nota that’s fine, but they’ll only ever get one term.

    Because of The Doctrine.

  88. Twostix

    In order for the post-COVID economy to function we need to standardise more than 100 different awards, simplify them and pay a fair and in many cases, higher living wage.

    We need to get rid of, among other things, wages that change depending on age, Sunday loading — because wor ship ping the S a b b a t h is optional

    Pay everyone the same and who cares about our christian roots – motel beds have to made.

    Sounds like a bolshevik to me.

  89. Struth

    Not you strutting, obviously.

    No, I just wanted to kill all the nannas when I retaliated against it.
    You screamed at me hysterically and at anyone and everyone, who didn’t agree with the lock down at the start.
    You forever stand condemned for your actions, so do not ever try to talk about anyone else’s behaviour little miss “I agreed with tyranny up until stage two”.
    You were an hysterical female, as many were, but you decided to shoot your mouth off bombastically, at those that could still see clearly.
    You’re a fucking disgrace, and I blame you and people like you for the fall of our nation.

    And to this day, while locked in your homes by your own hand, you still feel the need to offer your opinion?
    What a POS you are.

  90. notafan

    Presumably they get made if a new guest is arriving, otherwise who cares?

  91. notafan

    Lol much untruthing from strutting.

    I’m sick and tired of you enrolling world war two veterans in your pathetic diatribes.

    What they fought and sometimes died for has nothing to do with your cause of the day.

    Remember when you consumed a million pixels declaring you were moving to New Zealand?

    If only.

  92. lotocoti

    is losing whatever plot he had.

    All because of 18 down, Botany Bike (6) in last Tuesday’s crossword.

  93. notafan

    It’s true though, when I get home, after Ive been out, as I do, every day, I lock the door.

    It’s the prudent thing to do.

  94. calli

    Yapping wymynses on Seven Sunrise (Killeen one of them) discussing the Ruby Princess debacle, with a dash of aged care thrown in for extra flavour.

    Repeated ad nauseam – “We must have systems in place”. As if that’s the solution.

    The “systems in place” is what got us here. The “system” is so labyrinthine, so Byzantine, it would give Dickens’ Circumlocution Office a run for its money. Process driven, consultative across departments, with no one making a decision that will stick. When trouble strikes, no one can be blamed because everyone is to blame.

    And so they survive to bumble on another day.

  95. Johno

    The Good Guys three stores in the ACT are all closed because they had a shipment of electrical goods delivered and a whacko beetle from Asia was found inside the cartons. All stores are being fumigated.

  96. Struth

    What they fought and sometimes died for has nothing to do with your cause of the day.

    They fought and died for the nation that people like you gave away.
    It has everything to do with what I’m saying, so let me put it another way.
    What did our Anzacs sacrifice for when hysterical Karens were going to give the country away seventy five years later.
    Hysterical Karens like you.
    And just remember, you again started on me this morning, as always.

  97. notafan

    Uh oh

    Cow herder might have to get very very angry.

    Oh and fantastic smack down of Roger and Dover Beach on the constitution yesterday.

  98. HT

    The investigation into ADF War Crimes in Afghanistan (a “bad” war) is about to released, and it’s apparently not a good look. Teddy Sheean this week is awarded a VC for action in WWII (a “good” war), timing for investiture yet to announced.

    Not a reflection on Sheean, heroic action and everything #utmost_respect. But anybody still not believe that the awards and honours system is more about politics than rewarding deserving recipients? Anybody really believe the timing of the award of a VC and that War Crimes report coming down is a coincidence?

  99. notafan

    Calli

    That dopey video gave it all away.

    It’s all consultation and stakeholders.

    Not boss and decision.

    What’s the purpose of quarantine you dills?

  100. notafan

    It was a good war because the enemy wore a uniform and more or less played by the rules.

    Afghanistan with supposedly friendlies actually turning on Australians and killing them playing cards.

    Not so much.

  101. Mick Gold Coast QLD

    The Australian headline:

    “Sydney Uni underpaid staff for six years

    The scandal could cost the financially troubled institution tens of millions of dollars”

    It’s good to start the day with fabulous comedy – underpaid? 😅 😂 🤣 plus news of well deserved consequences.

    It used be a proud achievement to have been admitted and to experience such a splendid education in fine surroundings. The sole architect of its decline and fall from the well earned position as the country’s best is the management of the institution itself. They are supposed to serve with honour as wise and careful custodians.

  102. calli

    What amazes me is that the nonsense is still being pushed, post Rydges and Ruby Princess.

    The women on Seven are just the noisy tip of the iceberg. They really believe that more process, more consultation, more checks and balances will deliver good, workable decisions. Fast.

    Anyone who’s ever owned a business knows it’s nonsense. You make a call and you take your lumps if you make it wrong. The responsibility definitely doesn’t cascade down to the cleaner when it all goes pear shaped.

  103. notafan

    Perhaps they could do it if they got a higher living wage Calli.

  104. notafan

    You’ve got sick people on the boat .

    Yes

    Tested negative for flu

    Yes

    Okay stay where you are

    No-ones going nowhere.

    Two people.

  105. Maj

    Adam Goodes all over again:

    ‘They’ve just watched their last game’: NRL greats call for life bans over alleged racist abuse

    Eight spectators were thrown out of Central Coast Stadium for yelling alleged racist abuse during the first half of Friday’s NRL game between Penrith and the Warriors.

    Fox League’s sideline commentator Steve Roach revealed Panthers winger Brent Naden was targeted with racial slurs. Naden scored the opening try of the game for the Panthers.

    He is a proud indigenous Australian. Naden reported the comments to a Penrith trainer and Fox League will hand vision over to police to investigate.

    “Guys, there’s been a bit of racial abuse down here on the sideline,” Roach said.

    “A couple of fans have been giving it to Brent Naden, they’ve been escorted out of the ground.”

    Fox League commentators Matt Russell and Braith Anasta both condemned the vile racist abuse.

    “Great to hear that they have been quickly dispatched, that might be one of the stories out of this game – why on earth someone would do that. Let’s hope they’ve been identified,” Russell said.

    Anasta added: “That’s disgusting, it’s crazy, Get them out and don’t let them back in ever.”

    “It’s a disgrace, it really is,” Alexander said.

    “These clowns should never get into an NRL game again, and their pictures should be up on every home ground to make sure they don’t enter the field.

    “If it’s true, and what they said, that’s the end of those blokes. They’ve just watched their last game.

    Warriors CEO Cameron George was quick to issue a statement condemning the spectators, who appeared to be supporting his team.

    “We do not condone any sort of racial remarks towards anyone playing rugby league or in general and we completely support a tough stance against against this behavior. The Warriors embrace all cultures and race and proudly promote inclusiveness of all cultures and race in our great game,” George said.

    Acting NRL boss Andrew Abdo also released a comment.

    We will work closely with NSW Police, stadium authorities and the clubs to determine the facts and take decisive action against anyone guilty of racial abuse. I will call any player involved to ensure they are receiving the support they need,” Abdo said.

    Cue the Cancel Culture:

    A man claiming to be the older brother of one of the ejected people contacted Fox Sports after this story went to site.

    He says his 22-year-old sibling is adamant he didn’t use any racist slurs or aim any abuse at Naden, citing his long-term support of the Panthers.

    He says his brother has already been threatened with losing his job as a tradie’s labourer over the incident.

    “He’s pretty upset. He goes ‘I’m going to lose my job, I told my bosses I’m not racist’. They’re going to speak to him on Monday when he gets to work anyway,” the man, who we’ve chosen to leave unnamed, told Fox Sports.

    “He promises, he says he’s done nothing. He’s not racist. He was with his mates, he told me they were yelling out stuff like ‘Brent Naden you’re a goose’ or whatever but football related things, not racist things.

    “He goes for Penrith. I said why would he do it? He’s going to lose his job over it. His boss was watching the footy like me.”

  106. Knuckle Dragger

    The truly believe their tears when it all goes to shit are justified, calli.

    We are ‘trying really hard here’. It was ‘well meaning’.

    It wasn’t the existing process where they felt the need to pander to interest groups and lobbyists to produce ‘deliverables’ in times of crisis that would look good on a CV. It was the LACK of processes. More processes are clearly required. Not their fault. Hence the tears.

    More processes. MOAR processes!

  107. The stray Cat watching me comment says:

    O hai Graeme!

  108. Cassie of Sydney

    This is great listening…one of my favourite commentators….Heather MacDonald, editor of City Journal, discussing BLM, cancel culture and wokeness….

  109. Knuckle Dragger

    Hoping Mr Andrews will spruik the runaway success of the Covid App in today’s pre-retirement due to ill health briefing.

    If it wasn’t for that well-thought-out, conceptually brilliant, efficiently procured, cost-efficient and effectively rolled-out app that worked a treat and exactly as intended, we’d be in a right pickle.

  110. Mark M

    Once we give up our hard-won freedoms to them, they never give them back. They just take more …

    Reporters face jail, fines under new Palaszczuk govt gag orders

    The Palaszczuk Government has introduced gag laws to stop the reporting of complaints made to the corruption watchdog during an election period.
    Journalists will face a $6000 fine or six months prison if they report corruption charges against candidates in the Queensland state election.
    Journalists will only be able to report on any allegations if they make a submission to the state Crime and Corruption Commission, three months ahead of publication.
    Candidates will not face the same restrictions.
    Queensland heads to the polls on October 31.

    https://www.skynews.com.au/details/_6180922974001?gclid=EAIaIQobChMIg6LCwo6Z6wIVBTdgCh1JOwfREAAYAiAAEgILevD_BwE

  111. calli

    What surprises me most is that the Diamond Princess in Yokohama provided them with a template.

    Sure, you don’t want a liner full of angry passengers parked in Circular Quay for a fortnight, but a forty eight hour delay in disembarkation would have given them plenty of time to organise quarantine and get preliminary results back. Those weren’t mystery ships suddenly arriving in our shores. What the hell were these public service types doing in the hiatus while they were at sea? The moment a problem appeared in Japan, they should have mobilised, knowing that it would strike here too.

    So many of these “decision makers” are a waste of food.

  112. notafan

    I remember many years ago an article in the local rag about the annual tender for a cleaning contract at Werribee library.

    Putting aside the cost of the tender process, every year for many years it had been won by the same person, an Italian lady iirc.

    Contract bids would be as high as $40,000 but she’d win every time with a bid of just over $4000.

    As you could imagine it was a couple of hours work, five days a week.

    Love to know what they are paying for it these days.

  113. Mater

    But anybody still not believe that the awards and honours system is more about politics than rewarding deserving recipients?

    Anyone who thinks modern honours and awards aren’t politically and/or personality driven, hasn’t really been a party to the process. Perhaps it’s always been so; Jacka’s story would indicate that as a possibility.

    I’ve seen recommendations for deserving individuals go straight in the bin because of personality differences. Conversely, I’ve seen other recommendations hugely embellished, for other reasons.

    As a consequence, I find myself treating all awards and post nominals with skepticism. It’s damaged it for the truly deserving individuals.

  114. Sean

    According to the age ‘110 Victorians died this week’ . Good news for all the non-covid deaths in the state who have apparently been resurrected…

  115. Mark M

    Studies of Surgical Masks Efficacy

    As a person who went to medical school, I was shocked when I read Neil Orr’s study, published in 1981 in the Annals of the Royal College of Surgeons of England.

    And for six months, from March through August 1980, the surgeons and staff in that unit decided to see what would happen if they did not wear masks during surgeries.
    They wore no masks for six months, and compared the rate of surgical wound infections from March through August 1980 with the rate of wound infections from March through August of the previous four years.

    And they discovered, to their amazement, that when nobody wore masks during surgeries, the rate of wound infections was less than half what it was when everyone wore masks.

    Their conclusion: “It would appear that minimum contamination can best be achieved by not wearing a mask at all” and that wearing a mask during surgery “is a standard procedure that could be abandoned.”

    I was so amazed that I scoured the medical literature, sure that this was a fluke and that newer studies must show the utility of masks in preventing the spread of disease.

    But to my surprise the medical literature for the past forty-five years has been consistent: masks are useless in preventing the spread of disease and, if anything, are unsanitary objects that themselves spread bacteria and viruses.

    http://12160.info/m/blogpost?id=2649739:BlogPost:2035264

  116. notafan

    Calli

    Exactly

    And we know how much public servants care about angry passengers, destroyed businesses, fractured families, people suffering from mental health issues etc

  117. custard

    It seems that not all Victorians currently under house arrest in Danistan are just doing so quietly.

    I’ve just checked my email to find a terrific picture with a graffiti marked wall saying “VIKPOL=STASI
    #resist

  118. calli

    Here is a little example of how the bugs take over community developed and maintained organisations.

    Save Our Sailing Clubhouse

    They want the property for redevelopment, of course. The community that built it and uses it for the good of residents and visitors can go jump.

    Because “safety”.

  119. notafan

    Mater

    I couldn’t care less about
    awards and medals.

    Always been politics, even in war, as you say.

    Relative by marriage had a very high level medal from ww1.

    Only of interest because of the description of what he did to get it.

    Didn’t spend the rest of his life spouting about his moment of glory, (months actually of risking his life over and over under heavy fire, to get wounded men to safety as a humble stretcher bearer)

  120. notafan

    Masks and burkas

    Just dirty spit catchers.

  121. OldOzzie

    Australians have handed control of their lives “to a clown car packed with idiots who have wasted billions trying to defeat this virus,” writes Steve Waterson for Inquirer in The Australian today.

    Paying for an epidemic of stupidity

    We’ve handed control of our lives to a clown car packed with idiots who have wasted billions trying to defeat this virus. They will never admit it was all for nothing.

    By Steve Waterson

    Back in the good old days, the average person used to take pride in having a robust grasp of basic maths: enough mental arithmetic not to be overcharged at the shops, enough skill with pen and paper to make more complex calculations.

    Not any more, it seems. Many of our finest minds are infected with a new innumeracy that, in today’s fevered environment, distorts our understanding of, and response to, the coronavirus threat.

    In early April, as the disease was just beginning to bite, the team manning the ABC’s coronavirus news website promised to answer questions about the pandemic.

    When a reader asked for help in interpreting some infection-rate statistics, it provoked a cheerful response, broadcast to the world: “This just sparked a heated newsroom discussion in which we all outed ourselves as being terrible at maths.” You don’t say.

    They’re only — some might say barely — journalists, however. They don’t need the mastery of figures that our leaders display so magnificently. So for a moment of light relief, let’s examine the numbers that currently unnerve them. If we cancelled Victoria’s lockdown immediately, and its cases were permitted to grow at 1000 a day, the whole state would be infected in no time. By “no time”, of course, I mean 18 years. No wonder they’re frightened: at that rate it could sweep through the entire country in little more than 70 years. Luckily, in recent times we have been adding 1000 people to our population every day. Phew. Dodged a bullet there.

    Worldwide, excess deaths from COVID-19 (generously assuming every victim died from, rather than just with, the virus) are around 700,000. Given the roughly 60 million deaths the world records each year, it’s as though 2020 had 369 days in it, rather than 366.

    If that thought chills you, congratulations! A lavishly pensioned, undemanding and unaccountable career in politics beckons.

    The ultimate showcase of political innumeracy is the quasi-religious ritual of The Reading of the Cases. Witnessed and recorded by the faithful in the media (who love to have their work handed to them on a plate), it has become a farce within this bigger farce. The sombre, priestly arch-buffoon blesses reporters with fodder for their blog updates, sprinkling them with numbers that look like information but withstand no scrutiny.

    Cases, as a moment’s reflection reveals, do not equal sickness, much less hospitalisations. Until we are entrusted with the knowledge of how many are the results of tests on people who show no symptoms, they serve only to strike terror into the innumerate.

    Indeed, why do we need to hear these figures at all? We don’t get daily updates for any other diseases. They serve no useful purpose, as we are not given sufficient detail to make our own assessment of their significance, decide on the level of risk they represent and tailor our activities accordingly.

    Their primary purpose seems to be to post-rationalise our leaders’ devastating, simple-minded lockdowns and border closures, and to panic people into sporting their masks of obedience should they be sufficiently reckless as to leave their homes.

    Perhaps the announcements, if they must continue, could give us real information: “There have been 637 new cases today, but happily 480 were young people who had no symptoms and didn’t know they’d been infected. Oh, and only two of today’s cases were serious enough to need to go to hospital.”

    Maybe for context they could dilute their irresponsible scaremongering by including details of the other 450 people who die in Australia each day, including the victims of lockdown: the suicides and those who, too frightened to visit a doctor or hospital, are dying avoidable deaths through lack of screening and treatment (Britain anticipates as many as 35,000 extra deaths in the next year from cancer sufferers presenting late with correspondingly advanced tumours); and the people tumbling into despair, depression and other mental and physical illnesses.

    Perhaps the premier could hand over to the state’s treasurer, who would read out the number added daily to the jobless lists, the businesses forced into bankruptcy, the mortgages foreclosed.

    Then someone from social services could talk about the growth in homelessness, the “huge increase” in domestic violence reported by victim support groups, the marriage breakdowns.

    But they won’t because of a mathematical and behavioural curiosity we’re all familiar with, if not by name: the sunk costs fallacy.

    Imagine that last month you bought a ticket for a concert tonight. You’re tired, it’s pouring with rain, and you dread dragging yourself into town. The money’s gone whatever you decide, so logic says you should cut your losses and stay in, but instead you pull on your raincoat and call a taxi. The urge is irrational, but almost irresistible. The whole vile pokies industry is built on it.

    Now imagine how much harder to alter course if your investment was enormous and everyone was watching, poised to ridicule you for changing your mind.

    Here’s where our politicians find themselves, unable to admit their response to the virus — the ultimate blunt instrument of lockdown, brutally enforced — hasn’t worked, and will never work.

    They can’t do so because it would mean all they have done up to this point has been in vain. How could anyone who had wreaked damage on this cataclysmic scale ever admit to themselves, let alone to the nation, that it was all for nothing? Instead, like the pokie addict, they have doubled down to unleash a runaway epidemic of stupidity. They’ve destroyed our economy and put thousands out of work; they’ve refashioned many of our famously easygoing population into masked informers; and we’ve handed control of our lives to a clown car packed with idiots.

    If there is a clearer demonstration of the insidious overreach of the nanny state, infantilising and sinister, and the shameful acquiescence of its legions of time-serving bureaucrats, I’m not aware of it.

    What’s more insulting, each day we are chastised for “disappointing” our leaders, as though they are our superiors and it is the citizens’ duty to please them. The infected are singled out, vilified and shamed as sinners, their scandalous movements — three pubs on a Saturday night! — tracked and condemned. It recalls the attitude towards AIDS victims in the 1980s, a divine judgment visited on wicked libertines.

    But attempt to argue that the cost of our response has in any way outweighed the impact of the virus and expect to be labelled a virus denier. Then expect to be asked, accusingly, how many deaths you would find acceptable. No matter how often or how emphatically you declare “We should protect the vulnerable”, some will hear those words as “Let’s throw the old people to the wolves”.

    On April 4 in these pages I wondered when life moved from being precious to priceless. An exaggeration, but more than four months on we’ve set the opening bid pretty high. Turn the question around and ask what we are prepared to pay to protect the elderly with comorbidities. Let’s assume we’d let the disease run its course, as Sweden did, and had suffered the same death rate. We might have lost 10,000 of the old and sick earlier than in a normal year. We’ve kept that figure down, but at what cost?

    On this week’s numbers our governments have spent more than $220bn and put 750,000 people out of work; some of that burden would have been incurred whatever path we had followed, but most of it is self-imposed.

    Is it callous to suggest that’s too high a price to prolong what in some cases were lives of no great joy? What good might we have done with just a fraction of that $220bn, artfully applied? Would it not have been far better to spend a smaller, but still significant, sum on protecting and caring for the vulnerable and elderly to the very best of our abilities, and then, crucially, offering them the choice whether to accept that care?

    We could allow them, like sentient adults, to make a simple calculation: do I live a little longer in safe but miserable isolation, or do I spend my remaining days at some risk but embraced by the warmth of family and friends?

    That’s not a decision for any politician, even a wise one, to make. It’s a matter of choice for the individual, or, if incapacitated, for those responsible for them.

    Governments don’t exist to tell us how or when we can die; but if life is measured only by length, not quality, this is where we end up: imprisoned, supposedly for our own good, on the basis of flawed statistical modelling and even worse interpretations of that modelling.

    Undismayed by the models’ failure to predict the future when the virus first appeared, self-styled experts have now contorted their fears into absurd, illogical predictions of a parallel present: if we hadn’t acted as we did, they say, then tens, maybe hundreds, of thousands more would have died. How can anyone possibly know?

    As the statistics, and yes, bodies, pile up around the world, we are getting a clearer picture of the virus’s course and virulence, and the more data we have, the more similar the curves appear. If we accept Australians are not exceptional in their resistance to disease, then it appears we have some heartbreak ahead of us, no matter how hard we try to avoid it.

    New Zealand is lauded as the perfect example of how to crush the virus, but would anyone be surprised if it too has to pay the price somewhere down the line? Four new cases locked down the 1.6 million inhabitants of Auckland this week in a monstrously excessive overreaction that would be comical were it not so destructive.

    Meanwhile, the rest of New Zealand has shut down so completely it has effectively removed itself as a nation from the international community. It’s as though the country had never existed. Soon it will be reduced to a fading Cheshire Cat image of its Prime Minister’s saintly sad face.

    Let’s hope for the Kiwis’, and everyone else’s, sake a vaccine is found soon, although the World Health Organisation now warns we may never have one. It’s a tired line to repeat, but even after 40-odd years of searching we don’t have one for HIV-AIDS.

    Which, if anyone needs reminding, still kills 2600 people a day.

  122. Ladyredneck

    On facemasks, this link gives an excellent precis of where we are at with the “growing body of evidence”. Summarised, there is none that can scientifically support the efficacy of masks, and enough randomized controlled trials that show they are totally ineffective, or have negative effects. “>https://www.sott.net/article/439705-Facemasks-Lies-Damn-Lies-And-Public-Health-Officials-A-Growing-Body-of-Evidence

  123. Sir Michael Hardie Boys KCMG.

    That’s a sign we’re a in a simulation.

    Or my name is Sir Arthur Mongrel GCMG.

  124. Boambee John

    Cardimona

    Great column!

  125. Mater

    Always been politics, even in war, as you say.

    As I’ve always said, Nota:

    Thousands of VC’s were earned, a few were even awarded.

  126. OldOzzie

    Surprise, Surpise

    Firefighters go into battle for Daniel Andrews

    Remy Varga Reporter – Rachel Baxendale Victorian Political Reporter


    Victoria’s firefighters union is ­enlisting thousands of members to lobby the community to support the Andrews Labor government.

    The militant union has launched its campaign backing the government’s handling of the coronavirus pandemic amid increased scrutiny over the failures of hotel quarantine, believed ­responsible for the state’s deadly second wave.

    The powerful United Firefighters Union sent letter templates authorised by the union’s firebrand secretary, Peter Marshall, to its members this week.

    Comparing the decisions of well paid government frontbenchers to firefighters battling to save their communities from incineration, the letter pledges to reject reporting of the government’s handling of the pandemic.

    Allowing members to fill in their own names and rank as well as their preferred politician, it said:

    “As a member of the UFU and Fire Rescue Victoria, I know the characterisation of this government is untrue, and the attacks on social media unfair.

    “You have been facing the challenge that myself and my colleagues must always face — making decisions in the moment and under enormous pressure.

    “Rarely are these decisions perfect and just as with firefighting the consequences can be grave. The decisions made by the Andrews government have no doubt saved many lives.”

    Victoria’s coronavirus death toll rose by 14 on Friday, bringing the total to 289.

    Premier Daniel Andrews, who has repeatedly referred to the coronavirus pandemic as a public health bushfire, has come under renewed attack this week over what exactly went wrong under the hotel quarantine program, after he gave testimony at a parliamentary inquiry.

    The botched regime has been genomically linked to most if not all of the state‘s second wave coronavirus cases.

    The UFU letter template further pledges the unwavering support of the UFU and its families.

    “I know that your government cares about every Victorian,” the letter said.

    “This has been demonstrated by your unwavering commitment to community safety and professional firefighters.”

    Early last month the Country Fire Authority firefighters merged with the Metropolitan Fire Brigade to become a single, statewide organisation known as Fire Rescue Victoria.

    It came after years of lobbying by the UFU, and a heated industrial dispute between the union and CFA volunteers, which saw the resignation of Jane Garrett as Andrews government emergency services minister in 2016.

    The Andrews government also sacked the entire CFA board in 2016, with the CFA’s first ­female chief Lucinda Nolan and chief fire officer Joe Buffone resigning.

  127. amortiser

    More processes required?

    Looks like every government department in Victoria has a diversity executive and all decisions are put through that filter. As a result the commonwealth offer of assistance was rejected in favour of engaging an indigenous entity to provide hotel security.

    That’s a process and it worked a treat in accordance with diversity requirements. As for security against spread of the virus, not so much.

    What is really scary about this is that this process guides Victorian government decision making.

  128. Kneel

    “white privilege,” “male privilege,” and “heterosexual privilege.”

    “white privilege” – that’s where being “not coloured” means you get less and sees you at a disadvantage when all else is equal (see “affirmative action” et al).

    “male privilege” – that’s where you do more dangerous jobs, more physically hard jobs, are more likely to be in prison, less likely to gain custody of your kids, more likely to commit suicide, looked at like a pervert if you want to be a teacher, or a nurse.

    “heterosexual privilege” – because being part of the 97+% that isn’t homosexual makes you “privileged”.

    Those privileges? The ones that I had no control over “inheriting”? The ones that are “assigned” to me because of my sex, skin colour and sexual preferences, regardless of what I think about any of it?

    So remind me again – who’s doing the discrimination thing here?

  129. Knuckle Dragger

    ‘Maybe for context they could dilute their irresponsible scaremongering by including details of the other 450 people who die in Australia each day, including the victims of lockdown: the suicides and those who, too frightened to visit a doctor or hospital, are dying avoidable deaths through lack of screening and treatment (Britain anticipates as many as 35,000 extra deaths in the next year from cancer sufferers presenting late with correspondingly advanced tumours); and the people tumbling into despair, depression and other mental and physical illnesses.’

    Yes. Context. Like muppets making judgments on seven seconds of close-up video footage and ignoring the wider frame, the parallel activities and what happened for the previous and following ten minutes.

    The current 2600 AIDS/HIV deaths per day at the end. BAM.

    This is priceless stuff. A Grade, by any proper analysis. Bravo, Mr Waterson.

  130. OldOzzie

    New York Times

    A Geopolitical Earthquake Just Hit the Mideast

    The Israel-United Arab Emirates deal will be felt throughout the region.

    By Thomas L. Friedman
    Opinion Columnist

    For once, I am going to agree with President Trump in his use of his favorite adjective: “huge.”

    The agreement brokered by the Trump administration for the United Arab Emirates to establish full normalization of relations with Israel, in return for the Jewish state forgoing, for now, any annexation of the West Bank, was exactly what Trump said it was in his tweet: a “HUGE breakthrough.”

  131. notafan

    Great article thanks old Ozzie.

    Yes Dan is never going to admit he’s wrong and what better than an occassional dead man in his twenties to keep dragging the covid19 carcase along.

    Every person I see with a mask tucked under their chin, or sitting on a bench drinking their coffee is an up yours to Dan and his team of Karens in uniform.

    Why I’m so exercise about denying labouring women showers, even if the midwife got covid19 so what?

    A couple of weeks paid to stay home and be not sick, in most cases, bit unwell for a couple.

  132. MatrixTransform

    So remind me again – who’s doing the discrimination thing here?

    only bigoted people ask questions like that

  133. mh

    Bird shit on the blog this morning.

    What a nuisance Birds can be.

  134. OldOzzie

    Israel-UAE breakthrough proves Trump’s critics wrong — again

    BY RICHARD GRENELL, OPINION CONTRIBUTOR

    and from the New York Times Article above

    But this deal is right in Iran’s face. The tacit message is: “We now have Israel on our side, so don’t mess with us.” The vast damage Israel inflicted on Iran through apparent cyberwarfare in recent months may have even given the U.A.E. more breathing room to do this deal.

    But there is another message, deeper, more psychological. This was the U.A.E. telling the Iranians and all their proxies: There are really two coalitions in the region today — those who want to let the future bury the past and those who want to let the past keep burying the future. The U.A.E. is taking the helm of the first, and it is leaving Iran to be the leader of the second.

  135. Roger

    Reporters face jail, fines under new Palaszczuk govt gag orders

    Not widely known that after her 2017 election win Palaszczuk hired several high profile journalists, including the ABC’s chief state political reporter, to run her government’s media office.

    The enticements must have been substantial.

    I haven’t heard of any resignations in protest.

  136. Mark M

    “Legalise Sedition
    #3548267, posted on August 15, 2020 at 8:43 am
    Thanks for your wisdom, MarkM.”

    LS, I am just trying to understand it all.

    I read these and am allowed to link them here.

    It seemed well researched to me.

  137. Mark M

    U.S. Woefully Unprepared for a Blackout Like India’s: Analysis

    “Two major blackouts last week left hundreds of millions of Indians in the dark. PM contributor Glenn Harlan Reynolds says despite its advanced grid, the U.S. needs major improvements in infrastructure and preparedness to be ready for a major power loss.

    Last week, India suffered two huge blackouts.
    Tuesday’s cut power to 370 million people; another one on Wednesday blacked out 670 million people, making it the worst blackout in the history of humanity.

    The specific causes of India’s blackouts aren’t likely to be a problem in the United States. India’s electrical grid was brought down in part by state governments drawing more power from the grid than they were supposed to;”

    https://www.popularmechanics.com/technology/infrastructure/a7984/us-woefully-unprepared-for-a-blackout-like-indias-analysis-11413652/

  138. Boambee John

    Turn the question around and ask what we are prepared to pay to protect the elderly with comorbidities.

    At least in Victoria, and possibly elsewhere, they are not “protect(ing) the elderly”, they are sedating them, and leaving them to die while possibly infecting their fellows in their nursing homes.

    But the high financial cost continues.

  139. WTF?

    The fat commie Karen from Queensland has gag orders?

    The only thing she should be worried about gagging on is a ham sandwich.

    This stupid cow ought to be thrown in prison. She is violating civil liberties.

  140. mh

    Jared on UAE deal

    A deal between Israel and the United Arab Emirates to normalize diplomatic ties should be celebrated as a “historic step,” despite the lack of support from Saudi Arabia, according to White House senior advisor and U.S. President Donald Trump’s son-in-law Jared Kushner.

    Under the accord announced Thursday, which the U.S. helped to broker, Israel agreed to suspend plans to annex some areas of the occupied West Bank. It also shores up opposition against Iran, a regional power in the Middle East which the U.S., Israel and the United Arab Emirates all view as the main threat to stability.

    Saudi Arabia, a close U.S. ally and a hugely influential power when it comes to regional policy toward Israel, has remained eerily quiet on news of the accord.

    “I do think that we have other countries that are very interested in moving forward,” Kushner told CNBC’s Hadley Gamble in an exclusive interview on Friday, referring to diplomatic ties with Israel.

    “And then, as that progresses, I do think it is an inevitability that Saudi Arabia and Israel will have fully normalized relations and they will be able to do a lot of great things together,” he added.

    When pressed on Saudi Arabia’s silence following the announcement of the deal, Kushner replied: “We just had the first peace agreement in 26 years and now you’re saying: ‘Well, we want to get somebody else on board right away’.” In 1994, Israel and Jordan agreed a peace deal.

    “Saudi Arabia has obviously been a great leader in making (modernization) but you can’t turn a battleship around overnight,” he added.

    The deal makes the United Arab Emirates the first Persian Gulf state to normalize ties with Israel and only the third Arab country, after Egypt and Jordan, to have open diplomatic ties with the country.

  141. rickw

    Just released this morning:

  142. OldOzzie

    Ridiculous trigger warning for ‘Blazing Saddles’ shows how far culture has gone off rails

    Say, kids, did you know “Blazing Saddles” is “an overt and audacious spoof on classic Westerns”? Well, now you do, thanks to the trigger warning that has just been slapped on the movie by HBO Max, which hired University of Chicago professor Jacqueline Stewart to set things up for anyone who might be clicking on the Mel Brooks comedy thinking they’re in for Swedish drama about the lingonberry harvest.

    Stewart informs us that the movie features “racist language and attitudes” but “Those attitudes are espoused by characters who are explicitly portrayed here as narrow-minded, ignorant bigots. The film’s real and much more enlightened perspective is represented by the two main characters.”

    You don’t say. Stewart’s intro should be called “Blazing Obviousness” since everyone already knew all of that, and always has, for the 46 years the movie has been in release. Next week, HBO Max will be gravely informing us that the “Springtime for Hitler” musical in Brooks’ “The Producers” should not be construed as a celebration of the Third Reich, and that the song-and-dance number about the Spanish Inquisition in Brooks’ “History of the World, Part I” is not meant to glorify the practice of disemboweling non-Christians.

  143. Rossini

    Ladyredneck
    #3548275, posted on August 15, 2020 at 8:54 am

    Read most of the article referenced
    BUT what would the author know.
    Know it all dan the man knows bests
    Wear a mask or the cops will beat the shit out of you!

  144. rickw

    Give us your house! (Oops, we trashed it). Give us another house! etc.

  145. OldOzzie

    China Means to Take Over the World

    China’s reach (In Victoria) is far more widespread than many people have understood, and China’s ultimate goal is total control of the world and its economy.

    By Angela Kelley • August 10, 2020

    China means to take over the world. That is not hyperbole or overstatement. That is their intention. Whether the U.S. public hears them or not, the Chinese are broadcasting this intention loudly.

    China (Victoria) is a communist country. In order to run (Victoria) a communist country, there must be total control of every aspect of the lives of a populace. There can be no dissent (in Victoria) because people must behave to please the structure of communism (Dictator Dan).

  146. cohenite

    Some real laughs today in Tom’s toons; my thoughts are Leak is as good as his dad, rowe should be taken out and bashed to within an inch of his warped life, the brits are swamp bastards, the yanks are great and these 2 today are just brilliant:

    https://media.townhall.com/Townhall/Car/b/cb081420dAPR20200813044507.jpg

    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/EfZCHMPU0AA7hP2?format=jpg&name=small

  147. rickw

    Scotland and a Justice Minister that’s….

  148. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Nice comment from Lisa Benson today featuring the dove of peace.

  149. cohenite

    And shrillary; the latest from the great Lou Dobbs and Tom Fitton: the higher court, full of the magic negro’s activists has overturned the ruling that shrillary must testify to her emails and Benghazi. Fitton makes the point that the higher court applied Mandamus relief to shrillary while another higher court also full of the magic negro’s appointees is still toying with giving the same relief to Flynn:

    https://videos.whatfinger.com/2020/08/14/ag-barrs-betrayal-doj-blocked-fitton-and-judicial-watch-to-protect-hillary-not-good-folks/

    The 2 tiered system of justice continues.

  150. Joe Biden to Kamala Harris:

    YOU AIN’T BLACK!

  151. feelthebern

    Finally.
    FBI lawyer who sexed up the Carter Page investigation to plead guilty.
    WSJ.

  152. The SCOTUS wrote their last decision, last weekend. At Ruth’s house of course.

  153. feelthebern

    RBG died two years away.

  154. rickw

    Grace Community Church standing up to Los Angeles County.

  155. Bruce of Newcastle

    Scotland’s Justice Minister Humza Yousaf wants to criminalize thoughts

    From the story:

    Scotland’s Justice Minister, Humza Yousaf, recently gave a shocking speech in the Scottish Parliament where he complained about how many white people there are in Scotland.

    Celts not wanted. Will the last true Scotsman make an orderly exit from the country please.

  156. rickw

    One for Arky, good to not be alone in an addiction:

  157. feelthebern

    His name was Cannon Hinnant.
    In death he has a name.

    h/t Chuck Palahniuk.

  158. Nick

    A Cat unmasked? SMH:

    CANAL THERAPY

    I am not one to normally involve myself in a tit for tat exercise but I cannot help but reply to P. Reynolds of Gilmore in the ACT (Traveller Letters, August 8), who makes the assumption that because we own a narrowboat in England we must be wealthy. As we found when considering our retirement options it is far cheaper to buy and run a narrowboat than a car and caravan in Australia. And we love doing it and working the canal system with its locks and bridges, which is quite physically demanding. Never a cucumber sandwich or strawberries and cream in sight.

    As a recently-retired registered nurse I understand about infection control and viruses. And to the other respondent, I am quite aware of what “selfish” means. I could also make the assumption that P. Reynolds of Gilmour is a public servant as he comes from the ACT but I won’t. Assumptions are dangerous .

    Shelley Johnston, Allanson, WA

  159. rickw

    Opposition of the knowledge of The Truth:

  160. Roger

    Scotland’s Justice Minister, Humza Yousaf, recently gave a shocking speech in the Scottish Parliament where he complained about how many white people there are in Scotland.

    I wonder what the Yousaf tartan is?

  161. Anne

    The Swift System is being phased out… whatever that means.

  162. feelthebern

    I think it’s no coincidence that Trump mentioned Snowden in the context of his mistreatment on the feast day of Maximilian Kolbe.

  163. feelthebern

    The Swift System

    Are you referring to the financial system Anne?

  164. Mick Gold Coast QLD

    RBG? Died? The internet colour code thingy? Eh?

  165. Oh come on

    The New York police unions are endorsing Trump. Wow. I mean, not surprising given the circumstances, but wow. If others follow, that could be a big deal. Voters generally aren’t big on defunding the police and tend to want more policing, not less.

  166. woolfe

    Thud Pilots, great movie

  167. What is NSW/VIC/SA solar power generation right now? And wind? 😑🗑️🐐💩🤯😏🤥🤭😅😂🤣🐸👼😎

  168. Leigh Lowe

    Nick
    #3548321, posted on August 15, 2020 at 9:56 am
    A Cat unmasked? SMH:

    Shelley conveniently doesn’t say how narrow her boat is.
    Is it really that narrow?
    If it was wouldn’t she say so?
    Our friend’s boat is very narrow.
    The narrowest.
    Think water ski with the edges shaved off.
    So narrow.

  169. rickw

    Great reporting, what MSM should be doing:

  170. rickw

    I wonder what the Yousaf tartan is?

    Western Voters need to engage in a concerted campaign to remove goat lovers from office.

    Again and again their sole mission is to take as large a dump in office as is possible.

  171. johanna

    Queensland govt has backflipped on the legislation to gag corruption allegations prior to State elections, so calm down, folks.

    Still, that they came up with it in the first place is instructive.

  172. Australian data would be nice; but this article suggests US subsidies for solar can be as high as 88 c/kWh.

    Up to 88 c/kWh for solar.

  173. incoherent rambler

    Many of our finest minds are infected with a new innumeracy that, in today’s fevered environment, distorts our understanding of, and response to, the coronavirus threat.

    Steve Waterson – Huzzah!
    Nails it.

  174. I am having difficulty grasping the full extent of the subsidies to solar in Australia.

    I understand the LGCs now, but what else gets doled out?

  175. Leigh Lowe

    johanna

    #3548338, posted on August 15, 2020 at 10:22 am

    Queensland govt has backflipped on the legislation to gag corruption allegations prior to State elections, so calm down, folks.

    Still, that they came up with it in the first place is instructive.

    Yes.
    It makes you wonder about namby pamby, jelly-backed, lily-livered soft-cock Queenslanders, just accepting that jackboot on the throat of Democracy without a whimper.
    If it wasn’t for people down south standing up for them she would of got away with it.

  176. mem

    amortiser
    #3548283, posted on August 15, 2020 at 8:59 am
    More processes required?

    Looks like every government department in Victoria has a diversity executive and all decisions are put through that filter. As a result the commonwealth offer of assistance was rejected in favour of engaging an indigenous entity to provide hotel security.

    Given this was in Victoria my guess is that there are numerous “indigenous” companies set up by Labor mates to by-pass tender requirements. You would think by now that a decent journalist might have gotten to the bottom of this to do a big expose, but there are few decent journalists around these days. The other thing is that the group that won the gig is a registered charity thus exempt from all sorts of taxes and reporting requirements. Also I am still waiting for someone to define the make-up of an indigenous company or am I racist for asking this question. There will be big dollars in here being socked away for sure all without scrutiny.

  177. Roger

    Queensland govt has backflipped on the legislation to gag corruption allegations prior to State elections, so calm down, folks. Still, that they came up with it in the first place is instructive.

    This is a long running issue here, joh.

    It will be revisited.

  178. Cassie of Sydney

    “It makes you wonder about namby pamby, jelly-backed, lily-livered soft-cock Queenslanders, just accepting that jackboot on the throat of Democracy without a whimper.”

    Any names that come to mind?

  179. I’ve seen recommendations for deserving individuals go straight in the bin because of personality differences. Conversely, I’ve seen other recommendations hugely embellished, for other reasons.

    It was ever thus.
    The existence of a currency of awards and decorations is only slightly more rational than going to war to keep time expired governments in power.
    If you look at our military history, soldiers have always been collateral, to be used by their governments, the media and mythology.
    The war in the Pacific is probably the only exception.
    Teddy Sheean was fighting in a war when the country was under existential threat.
    Look at how long it took for him to be recognised, although Harry Smith’s work was probably the breakthrough.

  180. Nick

    Shelley conveniently doesn’t say how narrow her boat is.

    I’m wondering if it’s polite code for something else

  181. Old School Conservative

    Anybody really believe the timing of the award of a VC and that War Crimes report coming down is a coincidence?

    Me.
    With the VC nearly 8 decades in the making and the report only 4 years, I doubt the timing was arranged.

  182. Anne

    Are you referring to the financial system Anne?

    Yes, Bern. It’s being replaced by the Quantum Financial System.

    A Global Currency Reset is happening so probably part of that.

    #GESARA

  183. Makka

    There will be big dollars in here being socked away for sure all without scrutiny.

    Indeed. There was no money to be made bringing in the ADF. Hence the hasty backtracking. Someone lifted the phone and gave instructions to Dan. That would mean his union maaates had a solution available. That it didn’t work was never even a consideration.

  184. NESARA and GESARA are communism for rednecks.

    Not paying your loans back is theft.

  185. Frank

    Was that birdstrike above not a verbatim channelling of Joe Vialls with his Israeli micro nukes theorising. Should have included a citation really.

  186. Leigh Lowe

    Queensland govt has backflipped on the legislation to gag corruption allegations prior to State elections, so calm down, folks. 

    What was also instructive was the attitude of veteran civil rights lawyer Terry O’Gorman.
    Up in arms?
    Furious?
    Press freedom is not negotiable?
    Nah.
    Terry was cool with it.

    We don’t want frivolous complaints against ALP crooks being made for political purposes during election campaigns.

    Mind you, I don’t remember Terry running up the portest flag when Blight lodged a non-event CAC complaint against Campbell Newman last time aroumd.

  187. Roger

    The states are getting uppity lately.

    With their own borders, constitutions, governors, flags, parliaments, capitals, agents-general and commissioners representing their competinng interests abroad, court sytems, police forces, prisons & powers of extradition it’s as though they imagine themselves to be sovereign entities.

    It’s unconstitutional I tells ya.

    ScoMo should do something about it!

  188. incoherent rambler

    Steve Waterson again:
    Maybe for context they could dilute their irresponsible scaremongering by including details of the other 450 people who die in Australia each day, including the victims of lockdown: the suicides and those who, too frightened to visit a doctor or hospital, are dying avoidable deaths through lack of screening and treatment; and the people tumbling into despair, depression and other mental and physical illnesses.

    Our politicians who can’t count, think that the peasants also can’t count.
    They may be right.

  189. William the Conjuror

    What surprises me most is that the Diamond Princess in Yokohama provided them with a template.

    Qu’elle surprise? The Diamond Princess did indeed provide a template. For Princess/Carnival Cruise Line management. Do not provide an updated manifest. Get all the passengers off the ship asap.

    The Commissioner must have missed that.

  190. johanna

    Roger
    #3548345, posted on August 15, 2020 at 10:30 am

    Queensland govt has backflipped on the legislation to gag corruption allegations prior to State elections, so calm down, folks. Still, that they came up with it in the first place is instructive.

    This is a long running issue here, joh.

    It will be revisited.

    Roger, as I understand it, the restriction already applies to local government elections, following a spate of BS allegations prior to LG elections a few years ago. They were looking to extend it to State elections.

    I can see the problem, but there must be more creative ways of dealing with it, such as making sure there are no impediments to suing the living heck out of false and malicious accusers and those that publish them under the libel laws.

  191. Mater

    It was ever thus.
    The existence of a currency of awards and decorations is only slightly more rational than going to war to keep time expired governments in power.

    Thanks for your input, Bob.
    I’m sure in your two years as a baggyarse, you were privy to many inside discussions about medals and decorations. Making the connection between them and the utility of our numerous wars, was especially insightful. Genius, even.
    You should do a PhD.

  192. pbw

    Three ticks for Kamala Harris: black-ish, woman-ish and pro-Israel.

    This from The Debka File Weekly Review – An Israeli security-focussed and hawkish newsletter.

    Sen Kamala Harris is Joe Biden’s choice as running mate
    Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden names California Sen. Kamila Harris as his running mate. A former California attorney-general, Harris who is of Indian-Jamaican heritage, is the first African-Asian woman to fill the number two slot in a US presidential race. Ending her own bid for the presidential ticket, she is seen as a political centrist in keeping with Biden’s worldview rather than “progressive.” With a record of support of Israel, Harris addressed the AIPAC conference in 2017, and recently visited Israel and the West Bank with her Jewish husband Doug Emhoff. Like Biden, she favors a two-solution for the Israel-Palestinian dispute but is against exerting pressure on Israel for a peace deal. She has also publicly endorsed Israel’s “right of self-defense” from Hamas attacks.

  193. Mick Gold Coast QLD

    From Leigh Lowe at 10:28 am:

    ” johanna

    #3548338, posted on August 15, 2020 at 10:22 am

    Queensland govt has backflipped … .

    Still, that they came up with it in the first place is instructive.

    … namby pamby, jelly-backed, lily-livered soft-cock Queenslanders … jackboot on the throat of Democracy without a whimper.
    If it wasn’t for people down south standing up for them she would of got away with it.”

    Would of of she?

    Ha! Must pay attention to our diseased but better educated betters from down south eh? 😁 ♫ … and this goes for that sheila that’s with yer too!

  194. Roger

    Roger, as I understand it, the restriction already applies to local government elections, following a spate of BS allegations prior to LG elections a few years ago.

    Correct, joh, following a CCC recommendation.

    Before that there were Anna Bligh’s false accusations about Campbell Newman during the 2012 election campaign.

    There are some truly despicable people in politics.

  195. Sean

    If china took over Victoria perhaps it would increase personal freedoms…

  196. OldOzzie

    Donald Trump Donates Quarterly Salary to Repair National Monuments

    From the Comments

    Biden takes his quarterly $$$ from China kick backs to pay his son’s coke habit…..

    The Clairster SPANGLER the Deplorable • 2 hours ago
    Hhuuuge difference between these two men. I know who I’d want as President, and it’s NOT the guy who’s name rhymes with slow.

    Jedimaster Trump✓ᵀʳᵘᵐᵖˡᵒʳᵃᵇˡᵉ The Clairster • 2 hours ago • edited
    Or his running mate Blow…

    Fiodora Fyodora Jedimaster Trump✓ᵀʳᵘᵐᵖˡᵒʳᵃᵇˡᵉ • an hour ago
    LOL!
    Slow/Blow 2020
    AMERICA FIRST/TRUMP 2020

  197. Farmer Gez

    A couple of things this morning.

    The UFU letter template further pledges the unwavering support of the UFU and its families.

    “I know that your government cares about every Victorian,” the letter said.

    The Labor government would have provided GP’s and specialists to fill the big shortage in country areas if this was the case well before Covid.

    CFA members like myself are pissed off at Chairman Dan and his blatant disrespect for our organisation and history. UFU take over of former CFA stations have seen them take down CFA awards and trophies and put them in store rooms. It will not be forgotten or forgiven.

    Have you noticed the change in timing of Covid announcements in Vic. It’s now early in the morning instead of around lunchtime. Fiddling stats no doubt.

  198. mem

    40% more rain than average out in the north east of Melbourne for this time of year. That will mean increased bush fire risk if we get a dry spell over summer. Fire breaks, road access and on the ground knowledge essential. Iv’e lost track, do we still have a fire fighting service or will that be contracted out to an “indigenous” company like the quarantine. After all Dan the Dictator is constantly referring to the Corona virus as being a “public health bushfire”.

  199. incoherent rambler

    Fiddling stats no doubt.

    Things are getting critical for Dan.
    He needs more deaths.
    Will he call for volunteers?

  200. cohenite

    rickw
    #3548336, posted on August 15, 2020 at 10:18 am
    I wonder what the Yousaf tartan is?

    Western Voters need to engage in a concerted campaign to remove goat lovers from office.

    Again and again their sole mission is to take as large a dump in office as is possible.

    Absolutely. Is there one goat fucker/female equivalent in a position of power in the West who doesn’t continually denigrate and undermine the country he/she is in.

  201. Makka

    If he gets a plea deal, hopefully he will implicate Comey, Clapper and Brennan with evidence. Looks like he’s been set up as a flunky;

    Kevin Clinesmith, Corrupt FBI Attorney Who Falsified Carter Page FISA Warrant, Expected To Plead Guilty
    Kevin Clinesmith, a former top lawyer in James Comey’s FBI, is expected to plead guilty on Friday to falsifying a federal spy warrant against Carter Page.

    Kevin Clinesmith, who is expected to admit to deliberately fabricating evidence in a Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act warrant application, used to spy on a former campaign affiliate of President Donald Trump, was a top attorney in the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s Office of General Counsel (OGC) and a key agency attorney under fired former FBI Director James Comey.

    “I’m just devastated,” Clinesmith texted to Moyer shortly after Trump won the presidential election in November of 2016. “Plus, my god damned name is all over the legal documents investigating his staff,” Clinesmith wrote.

    “Is it making you rethink your commitment to the Trump administration?” Moyer later asked Clinesmith, ostensibly referring to Clinesmith’s plan to remain at the FBI after Trump’s inauguration.

    “Hell no,” Clinesmith responded. “Viva le resistance.”

    https://thefederalist.com/2020/08/14/kevin-clinesmith-corrupt-fbi-attorney-who-falsified-carter-page-fisa-warrant-expected-to-plead-guilty/

  202. JC

    China (Victoria) is a communist country. In order to run (Victoria) a communist country, there must be total control of every aspect of the lives of a populace. There can be no dissent (in Victoria) because people must behave to please the structure of communism (Dictator Dan).

    “Hyperbowl” much, Oldozzie.

    Here, I can send this and nothing will happen.

    @DanielAndrewsMP
    Hunchback, you’re a CCP groveling, lying, incompetent sack of shit.

    Don’t over-egg the omelette.

  203. Okay

    Met a young lady from near the western side of Blackheath recently.

    She said re the fires, the politicisation and centralisation of command meant no one knew what to do and there was a lack of a chain of command. The changes in the NSW RFS over the last 20-25 years have made it useless except for last ditch efforts to save homes.

    Also funny that people who are apolitical blame the lack of backburning and locking up fire trails as another major reason for the catastrophe. Also agreed that people who never get out of the city “urban bugmen” are fairly clueless. She reckoned many years ago the roads were fire breaks but clearing near verges has also reduced significantly.

  204. “Hell no,” Clinesmith responded. “Viva le resistance.”

    What an arsehole. Resisting an elected administrator so he can free the little people by taxing and regulating them more.

  205. incoherent rambler

    Right JC.
    But the police are dangerous and under direct political control.
    No rule of law.

  206. I’m sure in your two years as a baggyarse

    Yep – two years that are completely verifiable.
    Whereas, if you had any service at all, it is unverifiable and likely non-existent.
    Have a nice day…..

  207. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Whereas, if you had any service at all, it is unverifiable and likely non-existent.

    Rakes on special at Bunnings, I see.

  208. cohenite

    What a horrible, self centred arsehole the troll is.

  209. incoherent rambler

    The ABC breathlessly announces: NSW has recorded 9 new cases of COVID-19 from 27,389 tests in the past 24 hours.
    FYI 0.000323287 or 0.0323287%
    The symptomatic count? No idea.

  210. 1735099

    Dan Andrews is making the media, and the concerted effort to destabilise him look stupid.
    He fronts up every day, plays them like a fiddle, and the people of Victoria are overwhelmingly in support of the measures according to polling three days ago.
    That really gets on the wick of the usual suspects here.
    Suck it up…

  211. Bruce of Newcastle

    Kevin Clinesmith, Corrupt FBI Attorney Who Falsified Carter Page FISA Warrant, Expected To Plead Guilty

    The art of the deal is to sentence him to 50 years, reduced to 25 for the guilty plea.
    Then negotiate for making like a canary.
    That way the next guy would warble like an opera singer.

  212. incoherent rambler

    Is that a big juicy bait that I see?

  213. JC

    incoherent rambler
    #3548375, posted on August 15, 2020 at 11:41 am

    Right JC.
    But the police are dangerous and under direct political control.
    No rule of law.

    That’s because the opposition is not doing it’s job. Sinclair made a point of this the other day.

    The opposition could neuter Vicpol by coming out and saying that any officer up and down the ranks caught flagrantly abusing human rights will be prosecuted with the full weight of the law once the Libs are back in government and there will be no immunity. If it was seen they really meant it, watch vicpol scurry for cover.

    If there ever was a case of defunding the police Vicpol would be your number one target.

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