The return of the Eureka Stockade

I don’t know if anyone else has commented on this, but I find it interesting that this protest was to be in Ballarat, the same city as The Eureka Stockade. I no longer expect the same result if it goes to court as the first time round, nor the same reaction of the people of Victoria, since we no longer seem to have the same kind of reaction to oppressive authority we were once famous for.

Thousands of Melbourne residents celebrated the acquittal of the rebels, and paraded them through the streets upon their release from the Victorian Supreme Court.

Of course, the miners were part of a tax revolt. The Covid adventure has been presented as a freebie to save us from a virtually non-existent death threat. You want to see what’s coming. This was the lead story at the Oz today: Josh Frydenberg’s plan to fight back from Covid collapse. The first para should strike terror into the hearts of everyone, but it won’t:

Josh Frydenberg is preparing a five-year plan to create millions of jobs and reignite business investment, to anchor Australia’s recovery from the most severe recession since World War II.

Tax revolt now to come, but good luck with that. Has the Dan Andrews economy gone national? Hope not, but maybe.

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18 Responses to The return of the Eureka Stockade

  1. stackja

    Did Keynes plan work previously?

  2. miltonf

    a five-year plan

    How very soviet. Fraudenberg, the man who called DJT a ‘dropkick’.

  3. H B Bear

    a five-year plan

    Should go down a treat at the tractor factory. Thank God for the Lieborals.

  4. Slayer of Memes

    Rumours are circulating that AGL have been out installing a generator at Peter Lalor’s grave to boost Victoria’s electric grid…

  5. Roger

    Seeing The Australian attribute the recession to covid & not the governmental response to covid reminded me of why I cancelled my subscritpion:

    I don’t appreciate being taken for an idiot and being charged a price for it.

  6. Squirrel

    “since we no longer seem to have the same kind of reaction to oppressive authority we were once famous for”

    They had Carboni – we have carbon tax zealots.

  7. Josh Frydenberg is preparing a five-year plan to create millions of jobs and reignite business investment, to anchor Australia’s recovery from the most severe recession since World War II.

    If there was a plan to create millions of jobs and reignite business investment, why hasn’t it been dragged out before?
    Admit it, Josh. You’re a lying bastard who hasn’t got a clue – so stop pissing in our pockets and telling us it’s raining.

  8. nb

    The Eureka Stockade was a pretty dumb exercise in radicalism, leading to nothing. The new constitution was already approved and onboard ship on its way to Victoria. The people in the colonial Office, and many in parliament were more radical and way more effective than Lalor and his crew. Lalor didn’t even support universal adult male franchise.
    This, on the other hand, is real oppression, real abuse of power, real tyranny.
    Here is how it is being reported on ol’ Blighty:
    https://unitynewsnetwork.co.uk/human-rights-groups-slam-australian-police-for-pregnant-woman-arrest/

  9. The Eureka Stockade was a pretty dumb exercise in radicalism, leading to nothing. The new constitution was already approved and onboard ship on its way to Victoria

    A source please, I have never heard of this, sounds interesting.

  10. nb

    1) Lalor voting for a property franchise for the new Electoral Bill brought in under the new constitution:
    ‘I would ask of these gentlemen what they mean by the term “democracy”? Do they mean Chartism, or Communism, or Republicanism? If so, I never was, I am not now, nor do I ever intend to be a democrat. But if a democrat means opposition to a tyrannical press, a tyrannical people, or a tyrannical government, then I have ever been, I still am, and I will ever remain a democrat.’
    Withers, History of Ballarat, 168, but it is a quote from parliament.
    I’ll post info on new constitution vs Eureka in a minute.

  11. I’m not a pure democrat either.

    Lalor had valid questions.

  12. nb

    2) Whoops. Not on the ship, but in Britain awaiting approval by parliament. Approval was assured.

    In 1853 the Duke of Newcastle invited the Victorians to forward a constitution to Britain for consideration, with the express statement that it could contain an elected upper house, and that it accommodate the possibility of responsible government. The Act sent to England had been passed by the Victorian Legislative Council on 24 March, 1854. The Eureka Stockade occurred on 3 December, 1854. The passage of the Victorian Constitution Act had been delayed by the Crimean War, but it was given royal assent on 16 July, 1855.

    Three months prior to Eureka, Sir Frederic Rogers wrote in a private correspondence:
    The successive Secretaries of State have been bidding for popularity with [the Australian colonists] by offering to let them have their own way. And in professed pursuance of these offers they (New South Wales, Victoria and South Australia) have sent home laws which may be shortly described as placing the administration of the colony in a Ministry dependent on the representative assembly, and abolishing the Queen’s right of disallowing Colonial acts. What remains to complete colonial independence except command of the land and sea forces I don’t quite see. I shall be interested to see what comes of it. It is a great pity that, give as much as you will, you can’t please the colonists with anything short of absolute independence, so that it is not easy to say how you are to accomplish what we are, I suppose, all looking to – the eventual parting company on good terms. (George Marindin, ed. Letters of Frederic Lord Blachford : Under-Secretary of State for the Colonies, 1860-1871 (London: John Murray,1896), 157-8.)

    The Bill provided for:
    An upper and lower house.
    Thirty members in the upper house, and sixty in the lower house.
    A 500 pound annual rent value, or 5,000 pounds value of property, to stand for the upper house.
    A 200 pound annual rent value, or 2,000 pounds value of property, to stand for the lower house.
    A 100 pounds value of property, or to be a member of nominated professions, to vote for the upper house.
    A 50 pounds value of property, or 5 pound annual rent value, or a leasehold estate of 10 pounds, or occupation of a building of value of 10 pounds a year, or an income of 100 pounds per year, to vote for the lower house.
    Members of the upper house to retire from the house at a rate of one member for each electoral district per two years.
    The lower house to be returned every five years.
    ———————————————–
    Several good sources:
    Melbourne, ACV, Early Constitutional Development in Australia, St Lucia: University of Queensland Press, 1963
    Sweetman, Australian Constitutional Development
    A.C.V. Melbourne, “New South Wales and Its Daughter Colonies,” in Australia, ed. Ernest Scott (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1988
    ————————————–
    Henry Chapman was one of the defence barristers for the Eureka accused. He subsequently wrote the secret ballot legislation (arguably first in the world). He corresponded with John Stuart Mill, with whom he had worked in London, along with John Roebuck. Mill wrote a letter to Chapman after the passing of the secret ballot legislation arguing for women’s franchise. This group (philosophical radicals) was light years ahead of broader political thought. Chapman wrote Parliamentary Government; or Responsible Ministries for the Australian Colonies,
    http://adb.anu.edu.au/biography/chapman-henry-samuel-3193
    Henry Samuel Chapman, 1803-1881. Parliamentary government; or responsible ministries for the Australian colonies / by H. S. Chapman. Hobart : Printed and published by Pratt and Son, 1854.
    https://viewer.slv.vic.gov.au/?entity=IE4852262&mode=browse
    ——————————————–
    A good read is Richard Mills’ The Colonization of Australia, 1915.

  13. nb

    Legalise Sedition, #3571103: ‘I’m not a pure democrat either. Lalor had valid questions.’
    These questions exercised many thinkers right through the 19C. It was a huge leap of faith to advocate for full adult male franchise, and later for women’s franchise. All in all I think the experiment has worked, but who knows how it’ll work out in the end. Much of the criticism of democracy stemmed from the idea it would lead to tyranny. George Grote (a banker, and another philosophic radical) helped dispel this with his pro-democratic history of ancient Greece. Prior to Grote ancient Greek democracy had been painted as wholly disastrous.

  14. Colonel Crispin Berka

    a five-year plan

    Je suis Charlie.

  15. The funny thing is I want MORE democracy and LESS at the same time.

    I idealise four principles:

    1. Sortition. 2. Subsidiarity. 3. Confederalism. 4. Direct democracy.

    I think that is actually much in line with what happened in Greece.

  16. nb

    Can you explain 1, 2 and 3. I don’t know 1 and 2. 3 has had a shifting definition – I understand it currently refers to a federation with very limited or no central authority, but I believe it once was used as a term for what we now think of as federalism.

  17. nb

    Legalise Sedition, #3571183: Would it be fair to say you have some sympathy for the Swiss model?

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