Wednesday Forum: October 28, 2020

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1,850 Responses to Wednesday Forum: October 28, 2020

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  1. mh

    I didn’t vote in the last Qld election. I know this because I got fined. Everything else was totally unmemorable, a very low energy election, which meant Labor held on to majority power.

    This one is a bit different. Labor have only got the Keeping Qlders Safe message, and I’m thinking everyone is getting a bit tired of that. Qld has the highest unemployment in the country, and the books are so bad the Treasurer refused to table a budget.

    And remember it was only last year that Qlders saved the Coalition Feds.

  2. Leigh Lowe

    Knuckle Dragger

    #3638106, posted on October 30, 2020 at 9:59 pm

    ‘Hanson’s fucking ridiculous “put the sitting member last” campaign’

    Steady on. If that keeps being mentioned often enough it might catch on and develop a following.

    No.
    No it won’t.
    One of the reasons is that Pauline pulled that last time (and promptly fucked off on holidays during the campaign).
    People religiously followed her bwilliant plan and elected at least three ALP duds.
    PHON are going down the gurgler and that is one reason for it, along with having that snake-oil salesman Ashby running the show.

  3. JC

    You gotta love the Orange Oaf. Wifey told me she either heard or read Trump said he was NEVER going to close the US economy again. NEVER AGAIN!

    Trump is god.

  4. Knuckle Dragger

    ‘MIA?’

    There’s a furniture van at a Goondiwindi truck stop.

    Waiting. Waiting.

  5. Zyconoclast

    WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The 500 largest American companies hold more than $2.1 trillion in accumulated profits offshore to avoid U.S. taxes and would collectively owe an estimated $620 billion in U.S. taxes if they repatriated the funds, according to a study released on Tuesday.

    The study, by two left-leaning non-profit groups, found that nearly three-quarters of the firms on the Fortune 500 list of biggest American companies by gross revenue operate tax haven subsidiaries in countries like Bermuda, Ireland, Luxembourg and the Netherlands.

  6. Arnost

    #Newspoll QLD State Primary Votes: ALP 37 (0) LNP 36 (-1) GRN 11 (0) ON 10 (+1) #qldvotes #auspol

    #Newspoll QLD State 2 Party Preferred: ALP 51.5 (-0.5) LNP 48.5 (+0.5) #qldvotes #auspol

  7. Leigh Lowe

    And remember it was only last year that Qlders saved the Coalition Feds.

    After which there was a two-week headless chook dance squawking about fast-tracking Adani, followed by 15 months of white-anting it, suddenly to rediscover that it needed ticking off three weeks ago.
    That sort of shadow-boxing doesn’t go unnoticed.

  8. Knuckle Dragger

    ‘People religiously followed her bwilliant plan and elected at least three ALP duds.’

    Including one unnamed clingy punter who wanted a Senate seat for The Cause.

  9. Arnost

    #Newspoll QLD State 2 Party Preferred: ALP 51.5 (-0.5) LNP 48.5 (+0.5) #qldvotes #auspol

    #Newspoll QLD State Primary Votes: ALP 37 (0) LNP 36 (-1) GRN 11 (0) ON 10 (+1) #qldvotes #auspol

  10. mh

    Arnost
    #3638123, posted on October 30, 2020 at 10:15 pm

    Newspoll doesn’t work in Qld anymore.
    Unless they have changed their methods.

  11. Leigh Lowe

    Arnost.
    What did Newspoll tell us about Queensland before the Federal election last May?
    Got to totally blind-sided.
    And the 2PP will be derived at least in part from that “sitting member last” thing that PHON pulled last time.
    Preferences in those seats are unlikely to flow that way again.

  12. Dot

    P how old were you selling tickets in Sydney? I mean, after Walgett, of course.

  13. Mark A

    Another oddity I came across, regarding some long term property rental in Sth Korea.

    According to this source you can put down 60+% of the total value of the property as a deposit, don’t pay any rent for the duration of the contract and GET a full refund at the end of it. (they call this “chonse”)

    Apperently the landlord makes his money by investing the deposit.
    Googled it but nothing comes up, Carpe J might know about it?

    I have no idea if this can be true, as far as I’m aware I was never even enroute to Korea so have no knowledge of the place.

  14. Zyconoclast

    Walmart Pulls Guns, Ammo Displays in U.S. Stores, Citing Civil Unrest
    Retailer says move is a safety precaution but customers can still purchase firearms and ammunition

    Walmart Inc. has removed all guns and ammunition from the sales floors of its U.S. stores this week, aiming to head off any potential theft of firearms if stores are broken into amid social unrest.

  15. JC

    I didn’t vote in the last Qld election. I know this because I got fined.

    They keep tabs on you 24/7 these days. At least, the only decent thing going for the US is that they have the best soft&hardware but their public sector is so god awfully inefficient. Ours also have the best soft&hardware but because they hate the rest of us so much they try to keep tabs on every Australian even if it means working that little bit harder.

    Get this

    My kid left Australia around 2012 or so. She never worked here, so the ATO had no information on their system for her paying taxes or receiving income. She went to uni here for a semester before she took off and never returned permanently.

    About 5 weeks ago, she received a very polite letter from the ATO wondering why they hadn’t heard from her for the past several years. They wanted to just remind her, indirectly and very nicely of course that she needed to lodge returns for the past 8 or so years. It was so polite I almost vomited.
    She told them to fuck off (my paraphrase) as she hasn’t lived here all that time and no longer does.

    I’m guessing the arseholes are going through Medicare records and working it out that way as top who’s lodging.

  16. mh

    Fairfax

    Queensland’s decision to keep borders closed to Greater Sydney and Melbourne is “ridiculous”, the Qantas chief says.

    Qantas chief executive Alan Joyce has joined with Virgin Australia and the Business Council of Australia in condemning the Queensland government’s border decision revealed on the eve of the state election.

    “Frankly, this is ridiculous,” Mr Joyce said.

    “Sydney is the biggest city in Australia and it probably has one of the best track records globally of managing a virus that is clearly going to be with us for a very long time.

    “Keeping the doors bolted to places that you can’t reasonably call hot spots makes no sense from a health perspective and it’s doing a lot of social and economic damage as well.”

    Virgin Australia said the announcement was “disappointing for many of our customers and team members who we now want to return to work, do business and reconnect with family and friends”.

    The decision would deliver another hit to the tourism and hospitality industries, Business Council of Australia chief executive Jennifer Westacott warned.

    Ms Westacott said there was “no reason” why states couldn’t fully reopen with contact tracing, containment and quarantine.

    “The cost of this border closure has been monumental,” she said.

    “Reduced flights between Brisbane and Sydney airport alone have cost Australia’s economy $1.2 billion.

    “The impact has been particularly acute in Queensland’s tourism and hospitality industries.”

  17. Leigh Lowe

    Including one unnamed clingy punter who wanted a Senate seat for The Cause.

    Mmmyes.
    It was run for State, collect a bunch of AEC money, then put in a big run for the Senate, collect more AEC cash and hopefully jag a seat. Then a string of staffers can be applied to The Cause … fuck looking after constituents needs in accordance with the staffer’s job spec.
    Absolutely amazing that people who profess to be sticking it to The Uniparty Machine propose right at the outset to cynically use public resources to consolidate and advance their career and standing, just like a Big Party flunky might do.

  18. mh

    JC, your kid applied for a TFN. That means an income tax role is created, therefore a tax return becomes an expected lodgement.

    If your kid did want to address this, find a Non lodgement Advice form on the ATO website for 2012, or if not a 2012 ITR form, send that in and indicate final return.

  19. Entropy

    The ALP will lose North Queensland seats, and pick up a few in the Gold Coast, Brisbane and Sunshine Coast. Rabbit Bartholomew, for example, is running for the ALP in Burleigh. Plus retirees seem really scared by the invisible virus.

  20. JC

    mh
    I’m guessing though, but she never needed to apply for a TFN.

  21. Steve trickler

    Big screen monitor and decent sound system are a prerequisite.



  22. JC

    New York City expected to go with Trump if this email is any guide. 🙂

    To: All Residents
    From: W…….Management Company, Inc.
    Re: November 3rd Elections – Potential Protests Date: October 28, 2020
    In preparation for potential protest activity concerning the upcoming elections on November 3rd, we are taking several proactive measures to maintain the safety and security of the building and its residents, including:
     Ensuring that all staff remain vigilant and on high alert with regard to the security of the building;
     Reminding the staff that although it is already normal practice, not to let any visitors into the building without strict authorization from a resident;
     On November 3rd, locking and securing all points of entry including the front doors during evening and overnight hours (and other times, if necessary);
    o The front doors will be locked and secured from 8:00pm through 5:00am the following morning.
    o Please note that building staff will be positioned at the front door to allow access to and from the building during these hours.
     Having an additional staff member on duty in the lobby during the evening and overnight hours on November 3rd (and other times, as necessary).
    We all recognize that emotions may be high during the next few weeks and, as such, Management, the Board and staff will continue to evaluate the needs for security in order to keep the building and its residents safe.
    To stay updated, we recommend that residents sign-up for alerts and/or regularly check the NotifyNY website at: http://a858-nycnotify.nyc.gov/notifynyc

    Be well and stay safe.

  23. Leigh Lowe

    “The impact has been particularly acute in Queensland’s tourism and hospitality industries.”

    Which has to have an impact tomorrow.
    The party machine types compartmentalise everything into marginal and safe electorates (either way), and forget the inter-connectedness of society.
    Good.
    Write off a seat in FNQ as a LNP stronghold and allow the tourism industry to cop it.
    Those unemployed tourism workers might have a lot of family and friends in marginal seats far, far away.

  24. JC

    Oh, maybe you could be right. She would have had a TFN because of the trust situation.

    Still, they love to keep track of you.

  25. Dot

    Someone mentioned this before.

    Great, just great, believe me!

  26. Dot

    Shit

    What if Tucker RFID’d the evidence, rope a dope.

    Cue chan: “IF TRUE!….”

  27. mh

    Doing a tax return form and advising of no income is a good idea. On that form you can indicate you are a non resident for tax purposes and don’t need to lodge future tax returns. Then the ATO won’t be expecting anything again.
    Make sure she has no Australian sources of income though.

  28. rickw

    Wow, new from 1978, in the grease that whole time courtesy of the US military:

  29. rickw

    “Frankly, this is ridiculous,”

    That’s Australia.

  30. Zyconoclast

    A small political party in South Africa is campaigning for the secession of the Western Cape province from the country and establishing it as an independent state called the Cape of Good Hope.

    The group said the Western Cape is different from the other provinces of South Africa based on what it described as “ideological, linguistic and ethnic differences.”

    The Dutch-based Afrikaans tongue is the most widely spoken language in the Western Cape, the statement said, unlike the other provinces.

    Critics of the CIAG believe it is following racist and white supremacist motives – a claim the group denies.

  31. Siltstone

    Metroliners were pencils with wings. Bloody noisy. Was always weighted “in public” on very small fixed wing and heli charters to remote sites, not on biggers craft. Happy days.

  32. mh

    The Courier Paywall says the Premier became emotional in today’s debate.

    That means the taxpayer funded polling the Labor government has been undertaking is indicating that the electorate is seeing Pony Girl as a cold hearted bitch.

  33. Bruce in WA

    My first born daughter is currently in Melbourne due to her husbands work. She has been diagnosed with breast cancer and needs a double mastectomy. that can not be done due to covid crap. I can not go to her thanks to Dan and the covid shit. But somehow i am not supposed to get angry with these clowns.

    This makes me so angry I don’t even dare take my BP for the cardiologist (which I’m due to do) because it will be off the fucking bracket! Don’t know how I would cope were this one of my daughters. As it is, I worry about the mental health of one in Sydney.

    Kudos to you for your strength. And deepest sympathies.

  34. Rex Anger

    @ JC-

    At tax time just gone, the ATO insisted I lodge a tax return for the year I turned 18. Never mind that I applied for my TFN as I was finishing High School and did not work until a year later. I did my nil return and shook my head in bemusement. Violence was idly contemplated- How stupid could these people possibly be?

    I think the bugmen are wise to have dispersed offices and have their functions mostly administered by software.

    The time and effort needed to locate and backhand every one of them by row and cubicle would dissuade all but the most dedicated, and buy the AFP enough time to attend and arrest anyone who was.

    To call them Vogons is an insult to Vogons…

  35. Rex Anger

    @ Mark A-

    Nice pick-up with the Kingfisher vs. Willie Wagtail.

    Cracking shot!

  36. Zyconoclast

    • Among the major race and ethnicity groups, median weekly earnings of Blacks ($813) and Hispanics ($785) working full-time jobs were lower than those of Whites ($1,008) and Asians ($1,392).
    By sex, median weekly earnings for Black men were $869, or 77.5 percent of the median for White men ($1,122). Median earnings for Hispanic men were $823, or 73.4 percent of the median for White men. The difference was less among women, as Black women’s median earnings

    were $768, or 84.4 percent of those for White women ($910), and earnings for Hispanic women were $722, or 79.3 percent of those for White women. Earnings of Asian men ($1,542) and women ($1,224) were higher than those of their White counterparts.

  37. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    How stupid could these people possibly be?

    Monumentally fvcking stupid, that’s how stupid. Phone call, from the A.T.O. a few years ago.

    “Your farm ran at a loss last year.”

    “We are in the middle of the worst run of drought and dry years, since 1914. Show me a farm in the Eastern Wheatbelt that ran at a profit.”

    “Oh. When does your business plan show your farm returning to profit?”

    “When the drought breaks. When it rains.”

    “Oh. What’s rain got to do with whether or not you make a profit?”

    Weapons grade stupidity.

  38. dover_beach

    @CNBC
    · 15h
    Apple now has $191.83 billion in cash on hand https://cnb.cx/3kH1sWj

    wow.

  39. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    interesting

  40. MatrixTransform

    fucking queenslanders are learning how to climb the victim totem I see.

  41. Entropy

    Oh. What’s rain got to do with whether or not you make a profit?”

    Well, I suppose the first year or two after the drought breaks for a beef producer is rebuilding. And let’s be honest it is a very bad year in the farming game when you make enough profit on the P&L statement to have to pay tax. You might need to sack the bookkeeper.

  42. JC

    The NYC fire truck is very close to making an appearance.

  43. Rex Anger

    @ ZK2A-

    That’s appalling.

    It sounds like these fools need to disperse out from Canberrastan. Keep a rump HQ for the sake of the ACT’s sake. And leave the building for RMC to practice room clearing drills.

    Regional offices in Mt Isa, Port Hedland, Leeton, Griffith, Jerilderie, Deniliquin, Beverly (or York if they must be somewhere nicer), Kevin, Whyalla, Port Pirie, Gladstone nd any other farming/mining locations in the Victorian, QLD and Taswegian regions you can think of.

    Regular mandatory field visits for all tax wonks.

    Then maybe the department might become halfway useful…

    (Or just abolish it and dole the job out to the States again. Either Or(.

  44. Lazlo

    Palachook is gone. Freckles will be Premier by Saturday night. It will be won in NQ with a couple of SEQ surprises.

    Likewise Trump will romp it in. Look to Minnesota as a litmus.

  45. Entropy

    SEQ will save the chook, Lazlo.

  46. thefrollickingmole

    Interesting little detail on Bidens campaign.
    They had an ABC spokesthing covering the election mention it was near impossible for foreign journous to get access to the campaign in the way they were used to.
    Apparently the reason given was to prevent “ fake news” and foreign interference.

    Sounds a lot more like they are worried a not 100% catamite reporter might spot Joe Nadlering himself

  47. Lazlo

    Right here mh. I am simply extrapolating from the result in 2019. I don’t think there is much distinction between Federal or State issues when it comes to NQ. They don’t like Greenies. My prediction for SEQ is based on the havoc wrought on the GC and SC.

  48. mh

    I’ll be voting LNP.
    Hoping to turf out the Minister for Sports Rorts Mick De Brenni.

  49. Pedro the Loafer

    There are two airstrips in Singleton omn the Army base there. I have rellies who live nearby.

    Dochra YDOC and Singleton YSGT

  50. mh

    A Green Labor coalition will be a disaster for Townsville.
    Put Labor last lads.

  51. Knuckle Dragger

    Ed.. ED!

    For you and your endless supply of capital letters:

    Sensible use of these is the difference between helping your Uncle Jack off a horse, and helping your uncle jack off a horse.

    h/t FB, still good for something

  52. Lazlo

    No mh. Always put the Greens last.

  53. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    (Or just abolish it and dole the job out to the States again. Either Or(.

    Should have been done years ago. The Federal Government responsible for defence, immigration, foreign policy and trade. All else, including the right to levy income tax, to the States. The mendicant States can sink or swim as they please.

  54. Steve trickler

    Hello Basil. XX XY.



  55. “Oh. What’s rain got to do with whether or not you make a profit?”

    Dunno what I’d say to that.
    When you get a question like that, where your jaw hangs open – just like in the cartoons, a question so utterly stupid it blindsides you, coz you don’t expect it in a serious formal adult conversation (we all get a few of these in our lifetimes)

    You’re just not prepared for it, nobody is.

    If it ever happens a second time you’ve got an answer ready (eg, “Well, would you work in the rain?”) It never comes a second time.

  56. dover_beach

    David Quinn
    @DavQuinn
    ·
    17m
    In the West we kill the unborn, and now, increasingly the old, infirm and disabled, in the name of ‘compassion’ and personal freedom.

    Pretty much.

  57. mh

    Lazlo
    #3638184, posted on October 30, 2020 at 11:39 pm
    No mh. Always put the Greens last.

    Why?

  58. Lazlo

    Reflecting on what I said, I realise I am avoiding the problem.

    As James Allan has observed, the real problem is Compulsory Preferential Voting. It means that, unless your first preference candidate gets 50% of the primary vote, you are forced to vote for someone you don’t want. So, no matter whether you put Labor or the Greens last, you will end up voting for them in the end.

    We need first-past-the-post voting or, at least, Optional Preferential (as in NSW, The Sensible State).

  59. JC

    No one is prepared for it because the ATO would never make a call like that to the filer. The ATO may call the preparer but never the filer especially with questions like that.

  60. mh

    Michael Moore once again states the obvious, but for a liberal sack of shit he looks like a genius.

    Polls are “fake news” to Trump supporters, he said.

    “So it is not an accurate count. I think the safe thing to do, this is not scientific… whatever they’re saying the Biden lead is, cut it in half, right now, in your head. Cut it in half, and now you’re within the four-point margin of error. That’s how close this is! That’s how desperately close this is!”

  61. mh

    Monty should listen to his fellow sack of shit Michael Moore.

  62. Rex Anger

    Should have been done years ago. The Federal Government responsible for defence, immigration, foreign policy and trade

    And minus all the Fed. bureaucracies that exist to administer everything, these functions would probably all be covered perfectly by GST.

  63. Lazlo

    Michael Moore was picking this up when the riots were on. He is sounding warning bells to the comfortable, lightly-educated Democrat staffers. They will ignore him, as they did with Planet of the Humans.

    It’s going to be a Trumpslide.

  64. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Dunno what I’d say to that.
    When you get a question like that, where your jaw hangs open – just like in the cartoons, a question so utterly stupid it blindsides you, coz you don’t expect it in a serious formal adult conversation (we all get a few of these in our lifetimes)

    If you ran a farm, and had an off farm income, and the farm made a loss, you were required to pay tax on the off farm income, while carrying the farm loss forward until you made a profit. (It was designed to catch the “Pitt Street farmers” who brought ten acres and a few cows, and used it as a tax write-off.) You could apply to the Commissioner for a special ruling to allow you to write off the farm loss, against the off farm income.

    I made such an application, one year. The phone rang.

    “Fred Nerk, A.T.O. You have an application for a special ruling from the Commissioner? Reference ######”

    “Indeed, I do.”

    “We are refusing that application.”

    “Indeed. Allow me to point out that I will be appealing that decision.”

    “You are wasting your time. Appeals are almost never successful. How does the department know that you aren’t running a hobby farm as a tax loss?”

    “Hobby farmers don’t farm #### thousand hectares in a marginal area. They don’t crop two thousand hectares of wheat a year and they don’t run two thousand sheep.”

    “I’m sorry, I have no idea of what you are trying to say.”

    The appeal was successful. KA- CHING!!

  65. Steve trickler

    In the thick of it.



  66. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    there was lots of wriggle room in the CHO directives, you just had to exploit them.


    Same for when Sydney was in lockdown, although you could go further than 5km. I used to travel into Surrey Hills from Vaucluse with toilet paper and other goods displayed on the passenger seat, delivering to needy rellies, and was never stopped to test out my excuse. Mainly they needed cheering up and human contact rather than loo paper.

    Also braved trips over the bridge to see friends on the upper Northern Beaches, meeting in Mona Vale park in two groups of ten – we drifted between groups, so people did get to see each other. We shared plates of goodies we had brought, and purchased coffees at the take-away bar by the beach. It was all very civilised and there were no snitches, nor any police around. We even took our own fold up chairs.

    Hairy tells me he feels that Palacechook will lose tomorrow. Why? Just looking at what’s going on, he murmurs vaguely at me. He’s also strong on the Trump landslide so beloved of Rowan Dean. It will happen, he says to me, as we look at the rallies on Fox and see Joe chasing Trump into the once-were-blue states. We will be at CPAC on the day that the results come in from the US. Should be interesting. Any Cats going come and say hello, we know IRL a few who are already: the rest of you know more or less from Gravatars what I look like. 🙂

    On the avian front, the biggest little birdie is standing on the edge of the nest pecking at the twigs above and making revving motions with his neck forward and wings spread. Don’t you dare, I say to him. The mother bird seems so far to be discouraging it, sitting firmly on them when they get too obstreperous. The nest actually has a verandah of bigger twigs within which the little cup sits, and they four of them spend time out there looking around now their eyes are open and glinting in the light. Various neighbours have been up for photographic expeditions. One of them was unprepared; his phone battery ran out.

    I am running an appointment book for the viewings now. I can fit you back in on Tuesday, I say. 🙂

    Hairy’s oldest friend who has a very bad throat cancer is coming for arvo tea tomorrow with his wife; a week out from a hefty chemo dose, he can only eat mashed sponge cake and ice cream. I will serve it all in gold plated bowls and matching gold-rimmed cups and saucers, the full shebang. Least I can do.
    I am hoping the little birdies will be a joy for him to see.

    On BBC News tonight (watch for info on how things are there) we saw a report on a major exodus by car of residents from Paris as the lock down there was due to start at midnight. Everyone trying to get out. Seems somewhat to defeat the purpose. Big crowds in the streets saying that they refuse to lock down.
    Lots of craziness about Covid happening again in Europe but much more resistance to it as well. High immigrant areas in the cities seem to be the case load problem for the most part. Plus winter indoors etc.

    Dems in the US of course are beating this up so I am hoping that more people can see that lock downs are not the answer, and that Trump offers a way through this virus panic to something more rational.

  67. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha #3638202, posted on October 31, 2020 at 12:11 am

    “You are wasting your time. Appeals are almost never successful. How does the department know that you aren’t running a hobby farm as a tax loss?
    “Hobby farmers don’t farm #### thousand hectares in a marginal area. They don’t crop two thousand hectares of wheat a year and they don’t run two thousand sheep.”
    “I’m sorry, I have no idea of what you are trying to say.”

    In 2018 one of my sponsored worker visa applications was refused on the grounds my ‘history’ revealed I’d made similar applications in 2015, 2016, 2017 and in each application had declared a different amount for the year’s gross business income.

    This ‘raised red flags’ and the application was automatically refused on grounds of ‘something doesn’t stack up here’
    The notes explaining the decision were a combination of fightin’ words mixed with unbelievably stupid reasoning.

    (Immi, as incredible as this may sound, have actually made stupider decisions than this – they’re not exactly Rhodes scholars – the Dept is chockers with immigrants drawn from the bottom couple of deciles of intellect.)

    That’s two years ago, the appeal will be heard sometime in the next couple of years or perhaps longer.

  68. JC

    Driller
    Stop trying to change the subject. Ronery’s first comment was this:

    Zulu Kilo Two Alpha
    #3638166, posted on October 30, 2020 at 11:07 pm

    How stupid could these people possibly be?

    Monumentally fvcking stupid, that’s how stupid. Phone call, from the A.T.O. a few years ago.

    “Your farm ran at a loss last year.”

    “We are in the middle of the worst run of drought and dry years, since 1914. Show me a farm in the Eastern Wheatbelt that ran at a profit.”

    “Oh. When does your business plan show your farm returning to profit?”

    “When the drought breaks. When it rains.”

    “Oh. What’s rain got to do with whether or not you make a profit?”

    Weapons grade stupidity.

    The ATO would not call the filer directly asking these sorts of questions and making these sorts of wild statements unless the filer was the preparer. Now stop the attempt at deflecting and fuck off back to drinking. No integrity and even less intelligence.

  69. Aaaand on cue JC Biden chimes in again.
    Fresh from having his arse handed to him for his stupidity in not knowing a farquing thing about the ATO upthread, now claiming to be an expert.

    It’s not just the stupidity burning (& you’ve got that in spades) it’s the senility.
    It’s cruelty to doddering elders for you to be out at this time of night.

    Go to bed your dribbling old goat, before you get your arse handed to you again.
    Senile old coot.

  70. JC

    Driller’s stupidity and attempt at deflection caused the Ronery blog to be updated.

    Weapons grade bullshit

  71. Serious question:
    Has JC Biden ever not exhibited signs of mental decline?

  72. Lol, he’s known as the Cat’s own Tim Dunlop with very good reason. 🤣🤣🤣

  73. JC

    Aaaand on cue JC Biden chimes in again.

    Of course people call out bullshit when they see it, dickhead. It’s one of the winning elements about this blog.

    Fresh from having his arse handed to him for his stupidity in not knowing a farquing thing about the ATO upthread, now claiming to be an expert.

    I’m sure I wouldn’t know as much as you Driller does, if his hits with Fairwork are any guide.

    It’s not just the stupidity burning (& you’ve got that in spades) it’s the senility.
    It’s cruelty to doddering elders for you to be out at this time of night.

    LOl, you ought to get a hour or so pushing bullshit at CNN, Driller. They hire dishonest imbeciles like you.

    Go to bed your dribbling old goat, before you get your arse handed to you again.
    Senile old coot.

    LOl, that’s rich coming from a drunken loser.

    By the way, you told us about a year ago how you were retiring and selling up. How’s that working out? 🙂 You blowhard.

  74. JC Biden writes another long dribble (you can see the saliva on the page)
    As usual, it is all incoherent bullshit.

    The stupid old goat doesn’t get any better.
    I’d say it is sad to watch a decline into dementia – in this case it’s quite instructive – a sad old goat becoming more infantile & confused with each passing day.

  75. JC

    Driller, you’re drunk and always dishonest. Ronery did not have that conversation with the ATO.
    Stop white knighting for the imbecile because all it does is encourage bad behaviour. Now go sleep it off, you sad loser.

  76. JC Biden, here is a challenge to you:
    It’s something you haven’t achieved for a while, you may find it difficult.

    Write a posted comment that contains a minimum of one correct statement.

    GO…………!

  77. JC

    Driller is a drunk, blowhard and a loser.

    That’s three 🙂

  78. JC Biden/Dunlop, your orders are to write a posted comment containing at least one fact.

    You can’t even get that right, you demented old incontinent.
    No surprise. At least you’re consistent in your wrongology & Lambertism.

  79. Ed Case

    Who said Labor will pick up a couple of Seats on the Goldie and the Sunny Coast?
    Labor hasn’t held a Seat in either locale since the 1950s, they’re certainly not making history there this time.

  80. About 5 weeks ago, she received a very polite letter from the ATO wondering why they hadn’t heard from her for the past several years.

    Something similar happened to me two years after I returned from Vietnam.
    A letter arrived from the ATO demanding to know why I hadn’t lodged a return for 1970, the year I was there.
    I wrote back explaining the situation, enclosing a copy of my discharge certificate.
    There was no acknowledgement, but I didn’t hear from them again.
    My superannuation was also messed up. On RTA, I had correspondence from what was then the state superannuation board, demanding a lump sum to cover the payments they’d made on my behalf during the two years I was in the army. No payments had been forthcoming from my army pay, and to this day I’m not sure whether I actually had the ability to set it up. Back then, I was naive about superannuation.
    I was in deep do-do financially, as the Education department had lost my details, and I wasn’t getting paid.
    I’d also bought a car, lots of civvy clothes, and paid a bond on a flat. I was too proud to ask my parents for help. Fortunately I had a supportive principal, who abused pay section up and down comprehensively daily on the phone, until a clerk turned up at school in a taxi with a handwritten cheque for a month’s pay.

  81. On the topic of Caribous and Hercs.
    I note Kev’s reference upthread to a Caribou getting dragged across the treetops at the strip at Gospers.
    I was on that aircraft.
    I can still remember the RAAF jockeys hauling at the controls during the takeoff as the wind caught the tail.
    You could see them clearly from where we sat as they were somewhat elevated on the flight deck.
    This was the July 1969 exercise during which we prepared for jungle warfare through sleet, and when we heard about the moon landing.
    The best part about this was that the brass decided that the wind was too dangerous to risk further flights, and we arrived back at Holsworthy without our platoon sergeant and two of the section corporals who were slotted on the next stick out.
    The remaining NCO decided it was all too hard and left us to our own devices until the remainder of the platoon arrived 24 hours later when the weather had settled down.
    We had a wonderful full day of buggerall in the lines at Holsworthy.
    I remember the cold.
    At the end of the exercise when we went non-tac we put hootchies up, and because the wind was roaring through the open ends, I attached one green blanket tied to a tree across the open end facing the wind. Next morning when we were packing up and pulled the tent down, the blanket stayed eerily in place.
    It was soaked during the night and had frozen stiff.
    We did quite a few trips on C-130s (both A models and E models).
    Once we did a simulated tactical deplaning from the aircraft (at Nowra from memory). We were sat with our backs to the fuselage and packs on our laps and harnessed up by the grey coloured safety belts attached to the fold-up seats on the Herc.
    On landing, the loadmaster opened the ramp and shouted “Go!”
    We went.
    As I was running down the ramp, I noticed something grey dangling from the webbing of the digger in front of me. It was the Herc’s seat belt.
    He was a very large and strong individual, and had forgotten about the belt, wrenching it from its mount on exit.
    I never had any confidence in the Herc’s safety equipment after that.
    We did long flights (Richmond-Rockhampton and back for Shoalwater) on the Hercs.
    I flew again in a C-130E from Townsville to Brisbane to attend a principal’s conference during the 1989 pilot’s strike when Hawke called in the RAAF. I swear the aircraft used was one I had flown on twenty years previously.

  82. Cassie of Sydney

    Good piece in the Oz today by Janet…..

    “In the case of Peter Ridd, we’ll soon learn whether academic freedom matters
    JANET ALBRECHTSEN

    This week there were whoops of delight from Republicans over the appointment of conservative lawyer Amy Coney Barrett to the US Supreme Court. It will, they say, buttress democracy for decades to come. The Democrats were inconsolable, marking the rushed appointment as the end of democracy. The divide is fundamental: is it the role of America’s highest court to interpret law in humble deference to what the law says, or to change the law to suit social ­engineers who have grown ­impatient with the democratic process?

    Everyone agrees on one thing: judges on the US Supreme Court can alter the country in profound ways.

    By the way, two new judges were appointed to Australia’s High Court this week, although few will know their names. For the record, Simon Steward from Melbourne and Jacqueline Gleeson from Sydney, both former Federal Court judges and both in their early 50s, will serve long stints on our most influential court until they reach the mandatory retirement age of 70. Steward will join the court in December, and Gleeson, the daughter of former chief justice Murray Gleeson, will take up her seat in March next year.

    Both judges will be watched closely by those who understand that the High Court can fundamentally change the direction of our country, too. Eighty per cent of its cases are mundane, having little impact on the country. The other 20 cent are the Big Bang cases. Through the intersection of law, politics and values, they can cause seismic shifts throughout the country.

    Will Steward and Gleeson become roaming judicial adventurers making decisions like philo­sopher kings rather than humble judges? There are no guarantees. After all, the court’s most recent appointment, and disappointment, is Justice James Edelman. Part of the recent 4-3 majority decision in Love v The Commonwealth, along with fellow justices Michelle Gordon, Geoffrey Nettle and Virginia Bell, Edelman dreamt up a legally bogus racial privilege to exclude two men from the normal application of our non-citizens laws.

    Chief Justice Susan Kiefel’s scathing rebuke of the majority should be inscribed somewhere along the hallowed halls of the High Court for the newcomers.

    “Implications are not devised by the judiciary,” Kiefel said, because they are “antithetical to the judicial function since they involve an appeal to the personal philosophy or preferences of judges”.

    The departure of Nettle and Bell means that, without the support from the new appointees, Edelman and Gordon might be relegated to minority dissents the next time they choose to cook up propositions to suit their preferred outcomes, and pronounce them as the law of the land.

    All eyes will be on the newest judges especially if the High Court decides to hear the case involving physics professor Peter Ridd. In August, Ridd lodged a 13-page ­application for special leave to ­appeal a 2018 Federal Court decision that upheld his sacking by James Cook University. On Thursday, the High Court agreed to hear oral arguments about special leave in February next year. This is interesting. The vast maj­ority of applications are rejected “on the papers” — in other words without an oral hearing.

    Next, the High Court will decide if the Ridd case is sufficiently important to warrant judgment from the nation’s highest court. There is, as former High Court judge Michael Kirby once said, no point pretending that it is a logical or scientific process. In other words, it’s down to whether the court finds a matter interesting. The test is subjective, their decision unappealable.

    For the punters, the raw odds are about one in 10: last year, of a total of 445 special leave applications, the court granted leave in 52 cases.

    Insiders give Ridd a 50-50 chance of making it over the next hurdle. The case, after all, is not just about the “substantial injustice” of JCU’s termination of Ridd’s career, claiming he acted in an uncollegial manner in breach of the university’s vaguely drafted code of conduct when he raised questions about the quality of climate research at JCU.

    If the High Court grants Ridd special leave to appeal, the court’s final determination is likely to ­reverberate across the country. Many universities have intellectual freedom clauses in their ­enterprise agreements with academics. And most universities have ambiguously drafted codes of conduct that could be used to restrict these same intellectual freedom clauses. Where does that leave academic freedom in this country?

    Ridd’s case is being led by Melbourne QC Stuart Wood, while JCU has Bret Walker SC in its corner. Ridd’s claim for special leave to appeal includes a powerful observation from legal scholar Ron­ald Dworkin that “any invasion of academic freedom is not only harmful in itself, but also makes future invasions more likely”.

    There is another harm to ­society. If JCU’s infringement of academic freedom is allowed to stand, it will have a chilling effect on other academics. We will never know what research escapes rigorous testing by academics who do not want to jeopardise their jobs.

    The High Court is being asked to rule on the core mission of a university: is it, first and foremost, to defend academic freedom and further research, to seek the truth by challenging orthodoxies that can become dangerously inaccurate over time?

    If, on the other hand, universities are allowed to sack academics in circumstances similar to Ridd, with obvious impacts for the quality of research and learning, then Australians are entitled to confirmation of this dystopian brave new world at Australian universities from our highest court.

    And dystopian it certainly is. Along with making 17 findings against Ridd, two speech directions and five confidentiality directions (even prohibiting him at one stage from speaking with his wife about the matter), JCU also issued a “no satire” direction against Ridd demanding he not make fun of the disciplinary proceedings.

    No satire? It’s hard not to make fun of a taxpayer-funded university that censures, then sacks, a respected professor of physics, and employee of 27 years, a man ranked in the top 5 per cent of researchers globally for raising questions about the quality of climate science research at the Great Barrier Reef.

    Only this week, this report slipped under the ABC News’s ­Armageddon radar: “Researchers have found a new reef that is as tall as a skyscraper in the waters off Cape York in north Queensland.” As Ridd told Inquirer this week, “we are constantly learning new, and incredible things about the reef”.

    The shoddy, disproportionate treatment of the physics professor by JCU has become the centrifugal force to better protect academic freedom at universities, not just via the courts, but by parliament too.

    Ridd’s sacking led Education Minister Dan Tehan to initiate a review into free speech and academic freedom at Australian universities in 2019 by Robert French. Nothing had been done prior to Tehan taking the portfolio. This week, Tehan tabled the Higher Education Support Amendment (Freedom of Speech) Bill 2020, which gives effect to legislative changes suggested by the former chief justice. The bill requires that universities commit to “academic freedom” — as defined by French — in return for getting registration, and taxpayer funds.

    These are indeed interesting times for academic freedom, with a review under way by Professor Sally Walker into the implementation by universities of the model code on academic freedom also recommended by French.

    The model code is intended to operate as an umbrella-like standard to fall over all university policies, codes, pronouncements, etc. If a particular enterprise agreement has a broader definition of academic freedom, that is great for academics at that university. If an EA offers less protection than French’s model code, then that model code will lift the standard of academic freedom protections. That will be a terrific boost for academic freedom across the country because, as experts who have trawled through EAs of Australian universities told Inquirer this week, none of the EAs offer more protection than French’s model code.

    When Walker’s review is completed late next month, we will discover which vice-chancellors have dragged the chain, more cowardly corporatist controllers than defenders of robust intellectual excellence.

    Their incalcitrant approach to academic freedom should firm up the minister’s resolve to stop the rot. Tehan’s next move might be to legislate that every university implement the full French model code as a requirement of university registration. Even if not legislated, the minister has a backdoor way to secure the same outcome. Under section 136 of Tertiary Education Quality and Standards Agency Act, Tehan can direct the university regulator to use the model code when enforcing the educational standards to Australian universities. With oversight from Senate Estimates, this could well transform TESQA, known as a wet-lettuce regulator, into a genuine guardian of university excellence acting in the best interest of academics, students, taxpayers and the country.

    In other words, with the model code in place, either by law or ministerial directive, what happened to Ridd can never happen again. That, of course, will not help the unassuming, but determined, professor. His final appeal for justice, and common sense, rests with the High Court next year, when at least one new judge, maybe two, will be on the bench. No wonder we will be watching closely.”

  83. Knuckle Dragger

    This is what the media feed the sheeple:

    ‘At least eight people have died in Turkey and Greece after a massive earthquake hit the Aegean Sea on Friday (local time), sending buildings crashing down and setting off what authorities have called a “mini tsunami.”’

    It wasn’t an earthquake. Well, not really.

    It was Seal Team Eight destroying the undersea tunnels. After they rescued the children and planted Obama’s body there, never to be found.

    Obama’s been CGI now for six months or more. Three days of struggle.

    @TheStorm

  84. Rockdoctor

    There are two airstrips in Singleton omn the Army base there. I have rellies who live nearby.

    Dochra YDOC and Singleton YSGT

    True that, Dochra is on the firing range close to Mitchell Line of road (Golden Hwy) and Singleton is nestled between the rail line and some acreages near the old Whittingham rail siding visible from the New England Hwy. There is another one on the base running along centre ridge that pretty well much ends metres off Range road, that is so small only a Caribou could land on it. I reckon by Mick of the GC’s description this is the one he was talking about.

  85. If my Biden like memory serves me correctly, both of the Singleton strips were subject to violent turbulence during the spring westerlies leading to some memorable arrivals.

  86. Helen

    A squadron of ibis strafed the house this morning, I saw a pair of brolgas on my way out yesterday at the billabong and they gave me a little dance and stormy bird was definitely calling, much closer this morning, I thought I’d heard him a few days ago but faintly, far away. So it is on.

    I have an injured children’s python. I think my cat gave it a bit of a chew, there was some blood when I picked it up in the house. I popped it in a plant box and two mornings later he is still there and still alive. He seems a little stronger this morning from his movements when I touched him.

    I put a dish of water in yesterday and gave him a drink, if he is still good tomorrow I will try to find a small gecko for his breakfast. Or maybe the next day.

    Gunner, I read a comment from you as though Stimpy, the bald headed denim shorts wearing crazy man had died. Is that true? I am sorry for comrade John Constantine, another leaf to fall from the tree of cat.

    He disappeared around the fire times, didn’t he? If he has gone, I hope it wasn’t that.

  87. Dr Faustus

    In Get Your Orders In Before He Chokes On His Cocoa news:

    Elizabeth Warren reportedly plans to ask Joe Biden to join his cabinet as Treasury secretary if he wins the election

    Sara Nelson, president of the Association of Flight Attendants labour union who was not familiar with Warren’s plans, told Politico that Warren would “be the person to meet the moment.”

    Ringing endorsement.

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