Open Forum: October 31, 2020

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3,712 Responses to Open Forum: October 31, 2020

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  1. Pete of Perth

    Yay we can soon go to SA.

  2. Bruce in WA

    Our daughter, whom we haven’t seen for almost a year, can finally come “home” for a while — even if she has to self-quarantine for a fortnight. At least our house allows for that. Told her I’d push her food down the passage with a broom! 😀

  3. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Happy Birthday to me, I have wined and dined very well, and am pleasantly awash. Fine dining in the Swan Valley….

  4. Rossini

    Bruce,
    I trust you will enjoy your daughters company very much
    Our daughter went OS for several years. Came home with extra baggage.
    We welcomed them with open wallets.

  5. Steve trickler

    Rossini.

    From out of the blue, all the best.👍

    —–



  6. BrettW

    From The Daily Mail. Another win for the so called Chief Health Officer of Qld.

    “An emotional Tracy Grimshaw has revealed a cancer patient who prompted national outrage when he was forced into mandatory hotel quarantine after having aggressive brain surgery has died.

    Gary Ralph, 71, had radical surgery in Sydney and arrived back in Brisbane with his wife Wendy Child on October 6 with the hopes to isolate in the comfort of their own home.

    But the couple were forced into hotel quarantine at the last minute in Brisbane, despite there being no community transmission of COVID-19 in Sydney for 11 days when he returned”.

  7. dover_beach

    Seriously, the day after a Mooslem murdered three people in a basilica in Nice, Mooslems are protesting outside of the French embassy in London? Really? We need nothing less than the Reconquista of Europe.

  8. C.L.

    Vigano returns…

    Former Apostolic Nuncio to the US, Archbishop Vigano’s open letter to President Trump warns of a ‘Great Reset’ plot to destroy humanity.

    “It is not surprising that the enemy is angered at being discovered… undisturbed.”

    Read his letter here:

    https://www.thegatewaypundit.com/wp-content/uploads/vigano-1.jpg

  9. C.L.

    Wow. Vigano is really out there nowadays…

  10. JC

    Vigano should become a cat regular. He’d get well with most people here and unlike me, he’d readily forgive imbecility, blowharding, bignoting and general stupidity.

    In a less serious note, some of his stuff is a little out there, but the general thrust of where this bullshit is heading isn’t. He’s also pretty accurate in writing the letter to a dude who is possibly the only person standing in between light and darkness.

  11. C.L.

    Yeah, I agree with your summary, JC.

  12. Steve trickler

    I’ll bounce it again tomorrow.



  13. From The Daily Mail. Another win for the so called Chief Health Officer of Qld.
    “An emotional Tracy Grimshaw has revealed a cancer patient who prompted national outrage when he was forced into mandatory hotel quarantine after having aggressive brain surgery has died.

    There’s so much of this stuff it is difficult to know which one to be more outraged over.

  14. Anyone know of a state CHO who has shown they’re up to the job they hold?

  15. Steve trickler

    Peculiar timing. I’ll say nothing more.



  16. Steve trickler #3638238, posted on October 31, 2020 at 2:34 am
    Peculiar timing. I’ll say nothing more.

    It must have been one helluva quake.
    It’s bumped #Trumpmeltdown into 2nd place on Twitter’s trend window.

  17. BrettW

    Editorial from Friday Courier Mail. Unfortunately I dont think too many voters even read newspapers anymore.

    Queensland needs a change in direction
    THIS election should be an easy win for Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk. Having just presided over Queensland’s world-leading response to a pandemic that continues to devastate almost every other jurisdiction on the planet, Ms Palaszczuk and her Labor Party should be following in the footsteps of Jacinda Ardern in New Zealand and Michael Gunner in the Northern Territory and sail to victory tomorrow.

    And she still might. Thankful Baby Boomers could swarm to Labor en masse in a vote of gratitude that pollsters have not managed to discern, delivering Labor the few seats it needs to ensure an unexpected majority.

    But despite Labor having the momentum in the final week of this election campaign, every single insider instead expects tomorrow to be a closely fought battle unlikely to deliver a clear winner on the night.

    That alone is an indictment on Premier Palaszczuk’s almost six years in power. And that is why The Courier-Mail today advocates a vote for change – for a more disciplined approach to how taxpayer money is managed, for fresh ideas and a proper understanding of the importance of our regions. And for an end to the endless stream of ideological follies Queensland can ill-afford.

    Prior to this year’s pandemic, the biggest achievement of this Labor government over its two terms in office had been in attracting some millionaires – at great but undisclosed taxpayer expense – to make some movies here. It was all Ms Palaszczuk wanted to talk about.

    But the state’s economy was meanwhile at a standstill. Business was frustrated. And Queenslanders knew it.

    Every three months for the past decade, The Courier-Mail has asked 1000 Queenslanders if they think the state is heading in the right or wrong direction. In February, this sentiment index was at its worst since the eve of the 2012 election when Labor was thrown from office in a landslide. The baseball bats were out. The state was ready for a change.

    This is the real record of a government that tomorrow could be handed the keys to the state for four more years by voters grateful for the past seven months.

    Queensland simply cannot afford another four years of the same approach to government.

    Three key tentpoles hold up Labor’s case for re-election: Ms Palaszczuk’s leadership qualities in successfully “keeping Queensland safe” from the COVID-19 pandemic, the party’s “economic plan” to rebuild the state’s economy, and a scare campaign that claims Opposition Leader Deb Frecklington plans to cut jobs in the public sector.

    On the first, it is true that Premier Palaszczuk deserves credit for the big and tough decisions she has made to keep Queenslanders safe from the pandemic, particularly in those crazy and uncertain early days. But she has also repeatedly pointed out that she is only acting on the advice of the state’s Chief Health Officer Jeannette Young – and that, as Premier, she “will always act on the health advice”. You simply cannot have it both ways. By the Premier’s own admission, Queenslanders are safe today because of the expertise and strength of one woman: Dr Young.

    On the second, you know something is bunkum when even those charged with believing in it openly mock it. And so it is with Labor’s “economic recovery plan” to rebuild Queensland’s postpandemic economy. The plan is nothing more than a 58-page glossy document of motherhood statements and reheated announcements – a prop for ministers to hold awkwardly tucked under their arm in front of their chest at press conferences. Inside the William/George Street bubble, they joke about it. It is a PR puff piece, not a plan; and certainly nothing like a State Budget, which won’t be brought down until after the election.

    Third, Labor’s appalling scare campaign over LNP “cuts” should be called out for being just as much a mistruth as Clive Palmer’s claims that Labor itself plans to introduce a death tax. The only evidence? That the LNP Newman Government made cuts when in power eight years ago.

    That Labor has built its reelection campaign after two full terms in office around the spooky music of an LNP leader beaten fair and square almost a full six years ago says much about the Palaszczuk government’s failings.

    The LNP attempted to put that scare campaign to bed yesterday with costings that calculated its promises at just over $5bn, offset by an estimated $3.4bn in savings. However, only $20m is set aside for Ms Frecklington’s trademark New Bradfield Scheme. There are also some pretty big question marks over the $1.5bn in savings the LNP thinks it can make through “better procurement” and an efficiency dividend on all departments except for Health. And the LNP is even then only able to balance its books through using almost half of the $4 billion in new borrowings made by Labor that the Shadow Treasurer Tim Mander has been criticising as “an election slush fund”.

    Regardless, the total spend is a far cry from the “$26bn in unfunded promises” claimed by Labor – the supposed evidence for the need for forced job cuts.

    Beyond that, there is no evidence that Ms Frecklington as premier would repeat the overreach of Campbell Newman. As a junior assistant minister when the LNP squandered its historic majority, she has learned the lessons the hard way.

    As leader, Ms Frecklington has made her fair share of missteps. Her decision to dine with property developers at party fundraisers – regardless of whether they donated themselves

    – demonstrated at best political naivety. Preferencing Labor last was meanwhile a shameless attempt to improve the chances of minor parties such as the Greens – a decision that fertilises the prospect of a confidencesapping minority government.

    But Ms Frecklington has shown real leadership skills with internal issues when it mattered this term. When she stared down an attempted putsch led by forces within the party’s organisational wing earlier this year, she gave a brief glimpse of the strong leader she could prove to be.

    Nineteen years ago, then-Labor premier Peter Beattie’s election campaign jingle proudly boasted that Queensland was “heading in the right direction”. Beyond her handling of the pandemic, Premier Palaszczuk today cannot claim the same.

    As the state’s biggest newspaper, we advocate for Queensland’s interests. And what Queensland needs now is change. We need a more disciplined approach to economic management, a better grasp of the importance of regional jobs towards our shared prosperity – and an end to the ideological follies that do nothing but distract our leaders from their most important job: serving you.

  18. Mmm hmmm the Brisbane Courier Mail gives a default endorsement to the LNP by saying ALP is so bad it has to go.
    Unable to think up any strong policy direction or particular strengths of the leader of the LNP, the Courier Mail points out Deb Frecklington’s singular achievement: She’s kept everybody else out of the top job.

    They don’t mention she did this not by exhibiting leadership and ‘staring down all-comers’ but by playing the wymmynses card and wailing ‘misoginyyyyyyyyyy’ when talk turned to overthrowing her coz of lack of leadership.

  19. Tom

    Hahaha. Trump is taunting the fake news media at the first of his three Friday rallies (Detroit suburbs, followed by Green Bay and Rochester WI). It’s bitterly cold (3C), but the crowd are laughing along with his jokes and barbs. He’s indefatigable and his rallies are the best entertainment in town.

  20. jupes

    He’s indefatigable and his rallies are the best entertainment in town.

    Without doubt, the greatest leader of my lifetime. Also the funniest.

    Despite living in the age of stupid, we are privileged to live in the time of Trump.

  21. Tom

    Unfortunately I dont think too many voters even read newspapers anymore.

    Correct. Australian voters couldn’t give a stuff what newspaper journalists tell them to think about politics.

    If Labor is returned today, it’s because the TV networks have become de facto state media, scaring the crap out of people about Kung Flu, which 90% of the population are virtually immune from, and supporting the crippling of the economy and extensive border closures and lockdowns.

    In Queensland, Palacechook has at least temporarily annihilated the tourism industry by mobilising local sentiment against “southerners”. That’s Hitlerian.

    But the TV networks have effectively backed her all the way because they loathe the LNP. The Courier Mail is a voice in the wilderness that virtually no-one is listening to. Most people get their news from the TV, Spacechook and the other Silicon Valley monopolies, which campaign globally for big government and the end of democracy to help China.

  22. calli

    I note a fake passive/aggressive Westinghouse girl called the police onto Kaitlin Bennett. (Steve Trickler 12:39).

    Do not be misled by these progressive impostors. There is only one genuine article.

    And she votes conservative. 😃

  23. calli

    In Queensland, Palacechook has at least temporarily annihilated the tourism industry by mobilising local sentiment against “southerners”. That’s Hitlerian.

    She has also mobilised another sentiment, among southerners.

    Why would anyone from Sydney want to go to Queensland to bail out their economy with their hard-earned? This them and us b/s won’t be forgotten quickly. There are plenty of seaside towns in NSW that can do with tourist dollars, and that’s where they’ll be spent.

    This region was full to bursting last school holidays – every single holiday let was taken. And guess what? Not a single detectable case of Covid.

  24. calli

    On Rowe’s toon. The Biden bus won’t make the turn. Wheel base too narrow, centre of gravity way too high.

    Bye-Dems!

  25. Herodotus

    The Australian distinguishes itself today with an article by Greg Sheridan claiming that Trump does not deserve to win, and another by two characters who assert that Aussies by a large margin prefer Biden.
    Sheridan has been more sensible in the recent past, but the strain was obviously too much for him and his inner Cameron Stewart has re-asserted itself. There has been little point reading Stewart’s articles for some time, perhaps forever, as he is the worst commentator on US politics they could have found short of transplanting someone from the ABC.
    Then there’s the usual swill from PVO and Troy Boy, plus a puzzling one from Angela Shanahan saying Dan’s done a great job and those Melbournians are a brave lot.

  26. jupes

    In Queensland, Palacechook has at least temporarily annihilated the tourism industry by mobilising local sentiment against “southerners”. That’s Hitlerian.

    She has also mobilised another sentiment, among southerners.

    Why would anyone from Sydney want to go to Queensland to bail out their economy with their hard-earned? This them and us b/s won’t be forgotten quickly. There are plenty of seaside towns in NSW that can do with tourist dollars, and that’s where they’ll be spent.

    This region was full to bursting last school holidays – every single holiday let was taken. And guess what? Not a single detectable case of Covid.

    How’s that National Cabinet working out ScoMo you dill?

    Way to destroy the federation.

  27. Herodotus

    Yes, Calli, the beaches are better in NSW.

  28. 132andBush

    Rowe has it arse about.
    So when he’s not drawing literal arses he’s managed to get a metaphorical one in anyway.
    He’s a highly satirical and very underrated artist.

  29. jupes

    The Australian distinguishes itself today with an article by Greg Sheridan claiming that Trump does not deserve to win,

    Once you realise that all Sheridan’s US contacts are deep state hacks, then it all makes sense. Despite the occasional burst of common sense, Sheridan has to remain loyal to his compromised contacts. He is too stupid to establish contacts with anyone in the Trump administration, so will remain a clueless twit.

  30. Herodotus

    Check out Black Guy Barry’s pro Trump rant! Epic!
    Link

  31. calli

    Greg Sheridan claiming that Trump does not deserve to win

    Oh. A “muh feelz” article.

    Does he put up a case then as to why Biden and Harris “deserve” to win?

    Any thought given about why shop owners are boarding up in anticipation of some peaceful rioting and looting by “ideas” should Trump get over the line? Those “ideas” are energised by the Biden/Harris ticket. But perhaps that truth is a little too inconvenient.

  32. Ed Case

    Labor has no record of achievement in Qld, after 2 Terms.
    They’ve wrecked Tourism, not been able to take a position on the future of Mining, and promised Pie In The Sky projects like the Dutton Park High School, supposed to be opening in January, nowhere near completion of the structure yet.

    If the Courier Mail is hesitantly backing the LNP with a Pox On Both Houses Editorial line, then the true Labor polling position must be dire.

  33. Ed Case

    Joe Biden has said the rioting will continue with a Trump reelection and cease if he wins.
    Some may discern sinister implications from that statement, but Americans are a simple people.
    They don’t want Looters and Arsonists in their Suburbs and Trump is doing nothing to stop that.
    Massive rallies are meaningless, everyone wants to be on TV, and Trump can tell lies out of both sides of his mouth at once, without breaking into laughter.
    Perhaps his only achievement?

  34. mh

    She has also mobilised another sentiment, among southerners.

    Why would anyone from Sydney want to go to Queensland to bail out their economy with their hard-earned? This them and us b/s won’t be forgotten quickly. There are plenty of seaside towns in NSW that can do with tourist dollars, and that’s where they’ll be spent.

    The big Theme Parks on the Gold Coast won’t survive a Palace Chook re-election.
    I’m expecting Dream World to close first.

  35. Shy Ted

    Sunday roast I’m glad I’m not weird looking.

  36. Shy Ted

    Gotta go shave Will someone please tell the sciencytists there’s germs everywhere.

  37. miltonf

    He is too stupid to establish contacts with anyone in the Trump administration, so will remain a clueless twit. A very highly paid clueless twit.

    two characters who assert that Aussies by a large margin prefer Biden. So what.

    This paper’s a bad as the sydney morning vomit. Pay money to be lectured and insulted.

  38. calli

    Northconnex opens today. Finally. A huge project and much needed.

    They’ve set the toll way too high though. At $7.99 for cars and $23.99 for trucks (note the Colesworths pricing) it’s going to encourage massive rat running down old Pacific Highway and the Comenarra. The acceptable price point is $5 per car and $10 for trucks. They’d get goodwill and avoid snarls in the by-ways.

    Greed and stupidity triumph as usual.

  39. mh

    Brain freeze Biden

    Trump War Room – Text TRUMP to 88022
    @TrumpWarRoom
    Joe Biden: “I’ll lead an effective strategy to mobilize [unintelligible]!”

    https://twitter.com/TrumpWarRoom/status/1322216287670591488?s=20

  40. Bruce of Newcastle

    Henry VIII was racist.

    Black Actor Turner-Smith To Play English Queen Anne Boleyn In New Drama

    LONDON (Reuters) – Black British actor Jodie Turner-Smith is to play Anne Boleyn, wife of English King Henry VIII whom he had beheaded, in a three-part psychological thriller commissioned by TV station Channel 5.

    And misogynist. He cut off the head of a black lady!

  41. calli

    Just remembered. The load limit means the traffic will funnel onto Mona Vale/Ryde Road for metro traffic. There will be a lot of transport companies trying to work out how to avoid that massive whack just to get from Wahroonga to Beecroft and the M2.

  42. miltonf

    Latho going hard against beryl gladishocklian.

  43. miltonf

    Sir Robert Askin she is not.

  44. Herodotus

    The output of Head Case and Numbers are remarkably similar.
    There goes the neighbourhood, so I have other things to do.

  45. jupes

    Latho going hard against beryl gladishocklian.

    Good. Someone has to.

  46. Crossie

    Why would anyone from Sydney want to go to Queensland to bail out their economy with their hard-earned? This them and us b/s won’t be forgotten quickly. There are plenty of seaside towns in NSW that can do with tourist dollars, and that’s where they’ll be spent.

    This region was full to bursting last school holidays – every single holiday let was taken. And guess what? Not a single detectable case of Covid.

    Calli, the sad fact is that tourism operators mostly vote for coalition so Palacechook knows she can destroy their livelihoods without electoral consequences. She doesn’t look cartoonishly evil but she might as well cackle and rub her hands together for the destruction she has wrought.

  47. Crossie

    plus a puzzling one from Angela Shanahan saying Dan’s done a great job and those Melbournians are a brave lot.

    Stockholm syndrome strikes again. Even my own rellies in Melbourne who always vote Liberal have not volunteered a word of censure against Dan and talk about the restrictions as if they grew out of thin air, a force of nature. Rather disappointing.

  48. Mater

    plus a puzzling one from Angela Shanahan saying Dan’s done a great job and those Melbournians are a brave lot.

    We’ll see what she’s got to say when we go back into our third lockdown, and deliver the coup de grâce to the Victorian (and possibly the Australian) economy.

  49. calli

    Jezebel spirit, Dover.

    It’s everywhere.

    And the little wink doesn’t fool me.

  50. On the topic of Caribous and Hercs from the old thread…
    I note Kev’s reference to a Caribou getting dragged across the treetops at the strip at Gospers.
    I was on that aircraft.
    I can still remember the RAAF jockeys hauling at the controls during the takeoff as the wind caught the tail.
    You could see them clearly from where we sat as they were somewhat elevated on the flight deck.
    This was the July 1969 exercise during which we prepared for jungle warfare through sleet, and when we heard about the moon landing.
    The best part about this was that the brass decided that the wind was too dangerous to risk further flights, and we arrived back at Holsworthy without our platoon sergeant and two of the section corporals who were slotted on the next stick out.
    The remaining NCO decided it was all too hard and left us to our own devices until the remainder of the platoon arrived 24 hours later when the weather had settled down.
    We had a wonderful full day of buggerall in the lines at Holsworthy.
    I remember the cold.
    At the end of the exercise when we went non-tac we put hootchies up, and because the wind was roaring through the open ends, I attached one green blanket tied to a tree across the open end facing the wind. Next morning when we were packing up and pulled the tent down, the blanket stayed eerily in place.
    It was soaked during the night and had frozen stiff.
    We did quite a few trips on C-130s (both A models and E models).
    Once we did a simulated tactical deplaning from the aircraft (at Nowra from memory). We were sat with our backs to the fuselage and packs on our laps and harnessed up by the grey coloured safety belts attached to the fold-up seats on the Herc.
    On landing, the loadmaster opened the ramp and shouted “Go!”
    We went.
    As I was running down the ramp, I noticed something grey dangling from the webbing of the digger in front of me. It was the Herc’s seat belt.
    He was a very large and strong individual, and had forgotten about the belt, wrenching it from its mount on exit.
    I never had any confidence in the Herc’s safety equipment after that.
    We did long flights (Richmond-Rockhampton and back for Shoalwater) on the Hercs.
    I flew again in a C-130E from Townsville to Brisbane to attend a principal’s conference during the 1989 pilot’s strike when Hawke called in the RAAF. I swear the aircraft used was one I had flown on twenty years previously.

  51. notafan

    DB
    This is the problem when everyone is their own pope, no matter how bad people might think the actual Pope is.

    I like that account, good for a few laughs, at mostly American idiocy (and some malevolence).

  52. notafan

    Twitterati anxiously poised for increasing case numbers though there seems to be some admissions about weak positives.

    Many still convinced its an indiscriminate grim reaper.

    Sad.

  53. notafan

    Did someone write a novella?

  54. Zatara

    Only a Dem could come up with this.

    Campaign rallies in undisclosed locations that are closed to the public

    Obama and Biden are scheduled to hold drive-in rallies in two Democratic strongholds to encourage Michigan residents to vote with just three days until the Nov. 3 election.

    The events are not open to the public…

  55. About 5 weeks ago, she received a very polite letter from the ATO wondering why they hadn’t heard from her for the past several years.

    Something similar happened to me two years after I returned from Vietnam.
    A letter arrived from the ATO demanding to know why I hadn’t lodged a return for 1970, the year I was there.
    I wrote back explaining the situation, enclosing a copy of my discharge certificate.
    There was no acknowledgement, but I didn’t hear from them again.
    My superannuation was also messed up. On RTA, I had correspondence from what was then the state superannuation board, demanding a lump sum to cover the payments they’d made on my behalf during the two years I was in the army. No payments had been forthcoming from my army pay, and to this day I’m not sure whether I actually had the ability to set it up. Back then, I was naive about superannuation.
    I was in deep do-do financially, as the Education department had lost my details, and I wasn’t getting paid.
    I’d also bought a car, lots of civvy clothes, and paid a bond on a flat. I was too proud to ask my parents for help. Fortunately I had a supportive principal, who abused pay section up and down comprehensively daily on the phone, until a clerk turned up at school in a taxi with a handwritten cheque for a month’s pay.

  56. Cassie of Sydney

    Good piece in the Oz today by Janet…..

    “In the case of Peter Ridd, we’ll soon learn whether academic freedom matters
    JANET ALBRECHTSEN

    This week there were whoops of delight from Republicans over the appointment of conservative lawyer Amy Coney Barrett to the US Supreme Court. It will, they say, buttress democracy for decades to come. The Democrats were inconsolable, marking the rushed appointment as the end of democracy. The divide is fundamental: is it the role of America’s highest court to interpret law in humble deference to what the law says, or to change the law to suit social ­engineers who have grown ­impatient with the democratic process?

    Everyone agrees on one thing: judges on the US Supreme Court can alter the country in profound ways.

    By the way, two new judges were appointed to Australia’s High Court this week, although few will know their names. For the record, Simon Steward from Melbourne and Jacqueline Gleeson from Sydney, both former Federal Court judges and both in their early 50s, will serve long stints on our most influential court until they reach the mandatory retirement age of 70. Steward will join the court in December, and Gleeson, the daughter of former chief justice Murray Gleeson, will take up her seat in March next year.

    Both judges will be watched closely by those who understand that the High Court can fundamentally change the direction of our country, too. Eighty per cent of its cases are mundane, having little impact on the country. The other 20 cent are the Big Bang cases. Through the intersection of law, politics and values, they can cause seismic shifts throughout the country.

    Will Steward and Gleeson become roaming judicial adventurers making decisions like philo­sopher kings rather than humble judges? There are no guarantees. After all, the court’s most recent appointment, and disappointment, is Justice James Edelman. Part of the recent 4-3 majority decision in Love v The Commonwealth, along with fellow justices Michelle Gordon, Geoffrey Nettle and Virginia Bell, Edelman dreamt up a legally bogus racial privilege to exclude two men from the normal application of our non-citizens laws.

    Chief Justice Susan Kiefel’s scathing rebuke of the majority should be inscribed somewhere along the hallowed halls of the High Court for the newcomers.

    “Implications are not devised by the judiciary,” Kiefel said, because they are “antithetical to the judicial function since they involve an appeal to the personal philosophy or preferences of judges”.

    The departure of Nettle and Bell means that, without the support from the new appointees, Edelman and Gordon might be relegated to minority dissents the next time they choose to cook up propositions to suit their preferred outcomes, and pronounce them as the law of the land.

    All eyes will be on the newest judges especially if the High Court decides to hear the case involving physics professor Peter Ridd. In August, Ridd lodged a 13-page ­application for special leave to ­appeal a 2018 Federal Court decision that upheld his sacking by James Cook University. On Thursday, the High Court agreed to hear oral arguments about special leave in February next year. This is interesting. The vast maj­ority of applications are rejected “on the papers” — in other words without an oral hearing.

    Next, the High Court will decide if the Ridd case is sufficiently important to warrant judgment from the nation’s highest court. There is, as former High Court judge Michael Kirby once said, no point pretending that it is a logical or scientific process. In other words, it’s down to whether the court finds a matter interesting. The test is subjective, their decision unappealable.

    For the punters, the raw odds are about one in 10: last year, of a total of 445 special leave applications, the court granted leave in 52 cases.

    Insiders give Ridd a 50-50 chance of making it over the next hurdle. The case, after all, is not just about the “substantial injustice” of JCU’s termination of Ridd’s career, claiming he acted in an uncollegial manner in breach of the university’s vaguely drafted code of conduct when he raised questions about the quality of climate research at JCU.

    If the High Court grants Ridd special leave to appeal, the court’s final determination is likely to ­reverberate across the country. Many universities have intellectual freedom clauses in their ­enterprise agreements with academics. And most universities have ambiguously drafted codes of conduct that could be used to restrict these same intellectual freedom clauses. Where does that leave academic freedom in this country?

    Ridd’s case is being led by Melbourne QC Stuart Wood, while JCU has Bret Walker SC in its corner. Ridd’s claim for special leave to appeal includes a powerful observation from legal scholar Ron­ald Dworkin that “any invasion of academic freedom is not only harmful in itself, but also makes future invasions more likely”.

    There is another harm to ­society. If JCU’s infringement of academic freedom is allowed to stand, it will have a chilling effect on other academics. We will never know what research escapes rigorous testing by academics who do not want to jeopardise their jobs.

    The High Court is being asked to rule on the core mission of a university: is it, first and foremost, to defend academic freedom and further research, to seek the truth by challenging orthodoxies that can become dangerously inaccurate over time?

    If, on the other hand, universities are allowed to sack academics in circumstances similar to Ridd, with obvious impacts for the quality of research and learning, then Australians are entitled to confirmation of this dystopian brave new world at Australian universities from our highest court.

    And dystopian it certainly is. Along with making 17 findings against Ridd, two speech directions and five confidentiality directions (even prohibiting him at one stage from speaking with his wife about the matter), JCU also issued a “no satire” direction against Ridd demanding he not make fun of the disciplinary proceedings.

    No satire? It’s hard not to make fun of a taxpayer-funded university that censures, then sacks, a respected professor of physics, and employee of 27 years, a man ranked in the top 5 per cent of researchers globally for raising questions about the quality of climate science research at the Great Barrier Reef.

    Only this week, this report slipped under the ABC News’s ­Armageddon radar: “Researchers have found a new reef that is as tall as a skyscraper in the waters off Cape York in north Queensland.” As Ridd told Inquirer this week, “we are constantly learning new, and incredible things about the reef”.

    The shoddy, disproportionate treatment of the physics professor by JCU has become the centrifugal force to better protect academic freedom at universities, not just via the courts, but by parliament too.

    Ridd’s sacking led Education Minister Dan Tehan to initiate a review into free speech and academic freedom at Australian universities in 2019 by Robert French. Nothing had been done prior to Tehan taking the portfolio. This week, Tehan tabled the Higher Education Support Amendment (Freedom of Speech) Bill 2020, which gives effect to legislative changes suggested by the former chief justice. The bill requires that universities commit to “academic freedom” — as defined by French — in return for getting registration, and taxpayer funds.

    These are indeed interesting times for academic freedom, with a review under way by Professor Sally Walker into the implementation by universities of the model code on academic freedom also recommended by French.

    The model code is intended to operate as an umbrella-like standard to fall over all university policies, codes, pronouncements, etc. If a particular enterprise agreement has a broader definition of academic freedom, that is great for academics at that university. If an EA offers less protection than French’s model code, then that model code will lift the standard of academic freedom protections. That will be a terrific boost for academic freedom across the country because, as experts who have trawled through EAs of Australian universities told Inquirer this week, none of the EAs offer more protection than French’s model code.

    When Walker’s review is completed late next month, we will discover which vice-chancellors have dragged the chain, more cowardly corporatist controllers than defenders of robust intellectual excellence.

    Their incalcitrant approach to academic freedom should firm up the minister’s resolve to stop the rot. Tehan’s next move might be to legislate that every university implement the full French model code as a requirement of university registration. Even if not legislated, the minister has a backdoor way to secure the same outcome. Under section 136 of Tertiary Education Quality and Standards Agency Act, Tehan can direct the university regulator to use the model code when enforcing the educational standards to Australian universities. With oversight from Senate Estimates, this could well transform TESQA, known as a wet-lettuce regulator, into a genuine guardian of university excellence acting in the best interest of academics, students, taxpayers and the country.

    In other words, with the model code in place, either by law or ministerial directive, what happened to Ridd can never happen again. That, of course, will not help the unassuming, but determined, professor. His final appeal for justice, and common sense, rests with the High Court next year, when at least one new judge, maybe two, will be on the bench. No wonder we will be watching closely.”

  57. This is why gunshops are boarding up.
    Frightening stuff…

    Americans follow results much as they watch the Super Bowl: they expect to know the winner before they turn off their televisions. But this time, with tens of millions of mail-in ballots still to be counted, television anchors note that it may take days, even weeks, to announce a winner. This, they insist, is not a sign that the system is malfunctioning but a consequence of an election during a pandemic.

    From the White House, however, a different message emerges. Early election returns show President Donald Trump leading in the swing states. This is unsurprising given that the overwhelming majority of Mr Trump’s supporters have chosen to vote in person, whereas a greater share of Joe Biden’s supporters, who tend to live in urban areas more vulnerable to the spread of covid-19, have voted by mail-in ballot.

    Some states, such as Colorado, have been tallying their mail-in votes from the day they arrived—but not the swing states of Michigan, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin. They do not allow counting to begin until election day.

    Come midnight, the president sends out a tweet thanking the American people for his historic re-election. Mr Trump had sketched out this strategy back in July. On the same day that he suggested delaying the November election—something he has no power to do—the president posted another, more revealing tweet:

    Must know election results on the night of the Election,
    not days, months, or even years later!

    This tweet, largely overlooked at the time, had offered a disturbing precis of the strategy Mr Trump now deploys.

    As the counts of mail-in ballots begin to eat into his election-day lead, Mr Trump declares that all his most dire predictions are coming true—the mail-in ballots have been corrupted by Democratic operatives intent on stealing the election.

    Trump’s reliable megaphones in the right-wing media amplify his claims. Both domestic and foreign actors—in particular, Russia—bombard social media with fake news. Small instances of harmless human error (such as the incident in September, when a temporary election worker in Luzerne County in Pennsylvania accidentally discarded nine mail-in ballots, prompting a Department of Justice inquiry) become grist for wild conspiracy theories. And Mr Trump works tirelessly to ensure the count of mail-in ballots is plagued by delays, questions and confusion, deploying teams of lawyers to challenge the vote in any way possible.

    The counts in the three swing states become bogged down in litigation. The New York Democratic primary in June offered a disturbing foretaste of what we now see. Election officials took six weeks to determine who won the state’s 12th and 15th congressional districts.

  58. Cassie of Sydney

    “Black Actor Turner-Smith To Play English Queen Anne Boleyn In New Drama”

    Utterly absurd…peak stupidity and completely offensive. Can’t wait to see the ratings. Does this tokenism work both ways….will we see a white person ever play Nelson Mandela?

  59. Bruce of Newcastle

    Obama and Biden are scheduled to hold drive-in rallies in two Democratic strongholds to encourage Michigan residents to vote with just three days until the Nov. 3 election.

    The events are not open to the public

    By contrast:
    Trump announces seven-state, 14-rally campaign swing over the next three days (30 Oct)
    Five rallies a day! And no parked cars and little white rings.

  60. Cassie of Sydney

    I see the racist and homophobe is looking for attention.

  61. Cassie of Sydney

    ” but Americans are a simple people.”

    Bit like you.

  62. custard

    The character in Chip Boks first cartoon this morning looks very much like Latham. 😆

  63. Bruce of Newcastle

    Haha, Numbers quoting the Economist. A far-left rag. It used to be good but I had to drop my subscription a decade ago.

    They are boarding up gun shops because of the fear of Antifa/BLM/Democrat rioters.

    Walmart Reverses: Puts Guns/Ammo Back On Store Shelves (30 Oct)

    Having signaled their virtue (and scared half the population), WalMart has decided to reverse its decision and has decided Friday to begin returning firearms and ammunition to the sales floors of its U.S. stores after removing the products earlier in the week out of an abundance of caution following civil unrest.

    “After civil unrest earlier this week resulted in damage to several of our stores, consistent with actions we took over the summer, we asked stores to move firearms and ammunition from the sales floor to a secure location in the back of the store in an abundance of caution. As the current incidents have remained geographically isolated, we have made the decision to begin returning these products to the sales floor today.”

    I love how the Left always blames Trump for their own actions.

  64. BrettW

    It was good to see the boss of Village Roadshow (Sea World, movie World and Water World) took a big swipe at Premier for not opening borders. Blamed her for not being able to employ 500 people and also refused to let her use one of the Worlds for a photo op.

    “The big Theme Parks on the Gold Coast won’t survive a Palace Chook re-election.
    I’m expecting Dream World to close first”.

  65. Cassie of Sydney

    “British newspaper finds musing hero in Nice terror attack (but not really)”

    Funny how the death cult adherents are always the victims and always the heroes.

  66. JohnJJJ

    Well, I am sure you have noticed Mars, the god of war, in the night sky. It is at its closest to Earth and at its brightest. October surprise?

  67. Old School Conservative

    Don’t you people ever sleep?

    Up early to greet the pest control man.
    Multiple Flanneries so he can’t do the outside job.
    Coffee and the Cat are my alternatives.

  68. miltonf

    Yeah I have noticed it lately. Interesting.

  69. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    Black British actor actress Jodie Turner-Smit

    it’s not a transvestite

  70. Firstborn’s column…
    —-

    Forget the kidults, give the kidlings some doh

    Vikki Campion

    In Victorian times, many women trying to work turned to laudenum, an opiate advertised as “the poor child’s nurse” to control their children.

    Now, we have iPads and Paw Patrol on demand.

    Universal access to early learning is seen by the “don’t breed them if you can’t feed them” mob as a taxpayer-fleecing scam for lazy mothers who can’t be bothered raising their own children and funding it criticised by fiscal conservatives as middle class welfare, their least-favourite kind.

    But our economy relies on every adult who can work to work.

    In a world where the taxpayer will make more out of a woman who works than you will lose subsidising early learning there has to be a wider logic in this.

    First — you accept someone not being paid to teach young children — if we said to the men who vote against this “your missus is at home with the kids – you have to pay her $240 a day”, he may change his mind.

    The government just voted to pay $18bn to fund universities this year, another $2m to send 180 students overseas on exchange, and $8.3bn in subsidies to help young children into their first foray in education away from their families.

    In the first five years, the human does the most growing and learning ever in their lives. It is critical for children to have resources as those neural pathways form — surely that is more important than sending some habitual student in a mid-life crisis off to get another degree they will never pay back?

    The parent of any school-aged kid is getting subsidised education, so what we are really arguing about is the age it kicks in.

    Toddlers who benefit from early education can’t protest in the street, or wine and dine MPs or vote. There’s no national union of students for the under-fours.

    Labor’s latest $6.2bn childcare funding package — adopted from former leader Bill Shorten’s model — is not lavish, especially considering resulting GDP growth of $4bn, and paid by parents through their taxes.

    It shortens the pay gap and will slash pension costs because mothers can retire on their own super.

    Labor women this week offered greater relevance to parliament, with the alternate dominate theme motherhood statements on a recycling bill that everyone agreed upon – and an unsuccessful motion by South Australia’s nuttiest ALP mung bean Mark Butler to stop North Queensland getting the technology that Japan already has, clean coal.

    We must stop disincentivising the women who want to work. The argument should focus on early education and, if required, savings from other heavily-subsidised lives Australian adults lead.

    Educators have certificates, diplomas and degrees specialising in teaching, yet they are reduced to “childcare workers” in both Coalition and Labor press releases — equivalent to calling a psychologist a “counsellor” or a senior minister, a “government clerk”.

    Early educators not only provide insight into development milestones — such as speech, co-ordination and learning — but can help correct impediments before they become lifelong burdens.

    When early childhood educators have their own babies, they often can’t afford to return to work because their own pay does not cover the cost.

    Mums in regional areas often either miss out on paid work, such as seasonal fruit picking, because they can’t get a spot or take their children to work with them. Mums everywhere say no to an extra day of work because the subsidy cuts off and you are working for no take-home pay.

    Stay-at-home mums are investing in all-important emotional capital, they sacrificing their own career to raise another — but it is not an option everybody has or wants.

    Given the vital nature of early childhood education, if it comes to a choice between giving useless degrees to mature-age kidults, the money should go to the young.

    The parent of any schoolaged kid is getting subsidised education, so what we are really arguing about is the age it kicks in.

  71. Ed Case

    D-Day for Queenslanders.
    Instal the Mighty LNP and boot the miserable Labor Party.
    Vote early, and Vote often, Cats.

  72. dover_beach

    The Bee responds to fact check:

    Our writer @IMAO_ is responsible for this one. We called him into the office and said, “Hey, dummy, boats don’t go in space!”

    He said, “Oh. I guess that makes sense. Probably should have looked into that on Google.” He then committed seppuku to preserve his journalistic honor.

    Hilarious. Thread here.

  73. JonSan

    I thought Australia’s international borders have been closed due to the “deadly covid-19”. How come then we have hordes of Australian journalists traipsing across the US covering the election? Are journalists exempt from the rules applied to the peasantry?

  74. miltonf

    I thought Australia’s international borders have been closed due to the “deadly covid-19”. How come then we have hordes of Australian journalists traipsing across the US covering the election? Are journalists exempt from the rules applied to the peasantry?

    They are are part of the nomenklatura.

  75. miltonf

    The internet has made them irrelevant but that doesn’t stop them.

  76. min

    Not Stockholm Syndrome Crossie, Battered wife Syndrome . Treated with contempt ,psychological aggression , blamed for needing to be controlled and too frightened to leave sums up some of the Dan “love”

  77. custard

    Good luck today Cardimona

  78. notafan

    We must give mothers more options to stay home with their children and not provide perverse incentives to force them back into the workforce.

    No-one does it better than a dedicated mum.

    End child care subsidies and bring in tax splitting for families.
    Forcing women out into paid employment is all part of Marxist desire to destroy the traditional family.

    I regret every second my children spend in care. Every single second.

  79. miltonf

    Was thinking yesterday how Howard obliterated the CES and gave juicy contacts to rent seekers but never laid a finger on the ABC. The CES was relatively harmless and did a fairly good job (no pun intended). Templine used to be good.

  80. dover_beach

    Latest:

    FL In Person Early Vote
    Rs +523,920

    VBM-IPEV= Ds +114,528

    Ds led election eve 2016 +96,000

    Rs Target: 18,528

  81. notafan

    And please don’t pretend child care is ‘education’.

    Babies and toddlers were not designed to hunt in packs but to interact in a ratio of two or three separated by age with one very loving mother.

  82. miltonf

    Forcing women out into paid employment is all part of Marxist desire to destroy the traditional family.

    True plus baby extraction and disposal on demand plus distorting a woman’s body chemistry with the pill. Something that suppresses ovulation has to be bad.

  83. Diogenes

    Why would anyone from Sydney want to go to Queensland to bail out their economy with their hard-earned? This them and us b/s won’t be forgotten quickly. There are plenty of seaside towns in NSW that can do with tourist dollars, and that’s where they’ll be spent.

    When Mrs D & I are visiting the grandchildren on the Sunshine Coast we will endeavour to spend as little in Qld as possible.

    In anticipation of the border opening we had booked Jetstar flights for 15Nov (Mrs D) , 18 Nov (me) returning on the 22nd and we had a choice of flights a day from SYD to MCY. What we had not counted on was the malevolence of Piceofshit, we can still go being Central Coasties but…
    last night get the emails Mrs Ds flight on 15th cancelled and a grand total of 0 flights available before the 16Nov – so she is now going up on the 16th, and ironically as I can’t drive her to the airport she will have to catch public transport through the ‘hotspots’ to get there (allowed as long as she doesn’t go through the ticket barrier at Central to go to the toilet- go figure).

    Our 6pm flight home was cancelled and we will now need to leave at lunch time, which totally throws the plans we had for the weekend right out of the window.

    Mrs D then said what about flights to/from BNE or OOL , as she could go up earlier & catch up with her mother, and we could catch a shuttle from kids to BNE … from 3 flights a day to literally 3 flights a week, none of which suit us.

    I hope Queenslanders are sitting on their verandahs with the baseball bats just waiting for Pieceofshit.

  84. jupes

    From nota’s bee link above:

    Amy Schumer is also lending her skills to the effort by visiting polling stations in minority neighborhoods and performing stand-up comedy outside so no one will show up.

    LOL

  85. jupes

    FL In Person Early Vote
    Rs +523,920

    VBM-IPEV= Ds +114,528

    Ds led election eve 2016 +96,000

    Rs Target: 18,528

    Dover, please explain.

  86. Anthony

    DHD will not appear today. He has saved Victoria and will now rest. With, we note, the figures in the descendancy. When the figures rise, DHD will re-enter the battle to save us once again – before he’s sent to jail.

  87. Tel

    The CES was relatively harmless and did a fairly good job (no pun intended).

    It remember my first and only visit to the CES, during the “had to have” recession and I was so young and naive that I thought I would walk out with a job.

    They were shitful. There’s more life and hope buying a round of beers for the old men in the back corner of the pub at 10AM on a weekday, than there ever was at the CES.

    On the bright side, the experience encouraged me to make an effort in my own life … never to end up at the CES again … and perhaps in a negative way they inspired others.

  88. Diogenes

    choice of flights a day from SYD to MCY. What we had not counted on was the malevolence of Piceofshit, we

    sorry three flights a day SYD to MCY)or 6 to BNE , and Pieceofshit

  89. Entropy

    First — you accept someone not being paid to teach young children — if we said to the men who vote against this “your missus is at home with the kids – you have to pay her $240 a day”, he may change his mind.

    bullshit. Most stay at home mums have complete control of the $ as it is. The bloke just works and has no idea where the money goes, just that it does.

  90. Knuckle Dragger

    Every time.

    Every time I laugh at the people who unwittingly continue on commenting on dead threads. Laugh, I say!

    Until this morning. Saturday morning. Should have known, but ohhhhh no.

    The OT is the great leveler.

  91. Entropy

    Cardi, once you have the election business out of the way, perhaps have a word with mars Joyce. That would have to be the lamest set of justifications for someone else’s to pay for her children I have ever seen.

  92. Knuckle Dragger

    Educators.

    Hahahhaaaaaaa.

  93. Knuckle Dragger

    This is what the media feed the sheeple:

    ‘At least eight people have died in Turkey and Greece after a massive earthquake hit the Aegean Sea on Friday (local time), sending buildings crashing down and setting off what authorities have called a “mini tsunami.”’

    It wasn’t an earthquake. Well, not really.

    It was Seal Team Eight destroying the undersea tunnels. After they rescued the children and planted Obama’s body there, never to be found.

    Obama’s been CGI now for six months or more. Three days of struggle.

    @TheStorm

  94. Tel

    How come then we have hordes of Australian journalists traipsing across the US covering the election? Are journalists exempt from the rules applied to the peasantry?

    Good trick isn’t it? Allow me to show you how it operates.

    The borders are closed EXCEPT you can ask for special permission … that sounds so reasonable!

    What are the rules for this “special permission”? Oh there aren’t exactly rules … it’s more of a case-by-case basis, and what that means is at the whim of some people who were never elected but suddenly have become extremely powerful because they control who can leave the country. Ahhh … the concept of “rule of law” was designed to prevent the alternative which is “rule of men”. Now you get how it works, huh.

  95. dover_beach

    Jupes, three days out and Reps are almost where they were in Fl on election eve. VBM is vote by mail. Rep should pass 2016 figure by tomorrow at this rate.

  96. Rockdoctor

    Last election I was still in Queensland. Looked at my ballot paper thought briefly about drawing genitals on it then held my nose going with KAP, PHON, whoever was the independents, last 3 LNP, ALP & Greens last. Hinchinbrook went to Damento who hasn’t achieved much even with the media ignoring him. From my contacts in the north he is likely to get in again. Rightly or wrongly there’s a lot of parochial anti-Brisbane sentiment in NQ that see the major parties as SEQ centric the Katter’s have tapped into and feed off. Not being allowed to exhaust my vote was also an unnecessary irritation.

    Personally I think Queensland is in a catch 22, Freckless doesn’t deserve Government and will be as wet as & absolutely as useless as Ballieu was in Victoria. However 4 more years of the present incompetent clown show?

  97. Entropy

    It’s very simple: if your job pays a lot you can afford childcare. If you job doesn’t pay much you can’t. Has it ever occurred to OPM taking advocates that from society as a whole perspective (eg not the mum’s) there is a price signal at work? Sometimes the most benefit to society IS for the parent to not work for a time.

  98. notafan

    Entropy

    Bloke would also need to deduct board, lodging and all personal expenses from mother of his children payments, phone, clothing, entertainment etc uhoh she might end up in the red.

    Its utter nonsense that looking after your own children is provided a service to their father.

    What a bizarre way of thinking about marriage.

  99. Nick

    That’s an interesting point JonSan. On the one hand, AmeriKKa is a hotbed of Trump created COVID, the worst in the world, and hey, how come Tony Abbott can go overseas? On the other hand, it’s different when journalists do it.

  100. Nick

    Amy Schumer is also lending her skills to the effort by visiting polling stations in minority neighborhoods

    Strange that the ‘white’ slur never gets a mention in such situations.

  101. miltonf

    CES templine got me holiday work. Anyway, like I say the Jobs network is/was considerably worse than what it replaced. Was Mrs Krudd involved in that?

  102. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Good morning. Another wet night for the little fledglings and now Gladys, their diligent mother, is busy finding wet worms and sodden grasshoppers for them.

    I have to go to the shops to buy a sponge cake for afternoon tea. ?Did someone say make one? Oh. No.

    Vote, Queenslanders, vote, vote and vote against that horrible woman who is stopping me and Hairy from seeing our latest little grandson and our daughter, who’s just had a major caesarian and has two other little ones under six to care for. Although her husband is home, he is on crutches because football, and his mum is currently able to do much either. I would be there in a shot if I could. Comiserations to all others who have mentioned here even more pressing familial reasons for these borders to open and stay open.

  103. dover_beach

    RCP has AZ now tied in their poll avg. Funny how the polls ‘tighten’ as we approach election day. You can’t completely destroy your reputation by constantly engaging in psyops. Trump holds AZ.

  104. dover_beach

    Local journal’s poll in NC has Trump +2.

  105. Rockdoctor

    Why would anyone from Sydney want to go to Queensland to bail out their economy with their hard-earned? This them and us b/s won’t be forgotten quickly. There are plenty of seaside towns in NSW that can do with tourist dollars, and that’s where they’ll be spent.

    Newcastle/Central Coast is booming from what I hear. Have been looking at going down to Terrigal for a weekend, finding it hard to get accommodation. Guys at work tell me similar up at Forster and Coffs Harbour. I was looking at doing a trip up to Townsville as I have some matters there to attend to, that’s on hold as well.

  106. notafan

    numbers banged on and on about the Christchurch attack, revisited recently when the perp got his life sentence.

    But when his own coreligionists are brutally murdered for the crime of attending mass, the silence is deafening.

    Why is that?

  107. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    ps. the pulled muscle in my back is still there but it has stopped doing major spasms. Dr. O’Oirish says he has seen people writhing in agony on the floor with these back pulls, so he was sympathetic. Three days in bed with a hot water bottle my best friend snuggled into my back seems to have settled it down, plus some Valium, which apparently helps with the spasms. It certainly helped with passing the time. ZZZZzzzzzzzz.

  108. 1735099

    Why is that?

    Completely unnecessary.
    Any whisper of [email protected] terrorism turns into a shout on this blog.
    FWIW, the incident in Nice is barbaric and unacceptable.
    Condemning it on an Australian website is unlikely to make any difference.

  109. Leigh Lowe

    In Queensland, Palacechook has at least temporarily annihilated the tourism industry by mobilising local sentiment against “southerners”.

    Does Palace-Chook post at the Cat?

  110. Dave in Marybrook

    Just watching Rage- selected songsa, ie not the charts.
    Song By Mia Rodriguez, Beautiful and Bittersweet.
    Film clip has a burning high street on the news, watched by two young comfy street kids- “mayor Gluttonberg” is shown.
    He’s got a prosthetic nose- ie he’s a J#wish pig.
    The hipsters spike his drink, then haul him into the boot of a car, and bash him in the face with a baseball bat.
    I then turned it off, the kids were watching by then.
    I’m f#cking wildly angry. This is wilful, conscious, anti-s#mitic call to violent acts, pitched a 15-y-o, who are the consumers of this pop.

  111. jupes

    Jupes, three days out and Reps are almost where they were in Fl on election eve. VBM is vote by mail. Rep should pass 2016 figure by tomorrow at this rate.

    Thanks. Got it.

  112. notafan

    So why condemn Christchurch?

  113. Dave in Marybrook

    correction, it’s charts.
    This clip should be dragged from all formats, and definitely broadcast TV.
    I’m off to work- can someone give me hot tip to “action” this? Or double-check I’m not overreactin g, I’ve been up since 3
    areff? Lizzie?

  114. Cassie of Sydney

    “numbers banged on and on about the Christchurch attack, revisited recently when the perp got his life sentence.

    But when his own coreligionists are brutally murdered for the crime of attending mass, the silence is deafening.

    Why is that?”

    I noticed that…but with the racist and homophobe, dead Joos and Christians don’t concern him. He’s a hypocrite.

  115. notafan

    I know trump is 74 but Biden is 77 and just doesn’t seem quite right, 81 in 2024, seriously he was the best they had?

  116. Cassie of Sydney

    “Condemning it on an Australian website is unlikely to make any difference.”

    LOL…anyone else recall his sanctimony after Christchurch?

  117. Knuckle Dragger

    Today is Rise Up Day.

    For those who have led from the couch, it is time to Rise Up and show the sheeple at the other end of the country how it’s done. All furniture vans are waiting in giant warehouses for sealed orders to be opened, and The Plan put into action.

    Can’t be that hard, surely.

  118. Cassie of Sydney

    Imagine if a Christian had gone into a mosque and murdered three Mueslis….I wonder if the racist and homophobe would be so reticent to “condemn it on an Australian website because it is unlikely to make any difference”. Unbelievable hypocrisy.

  119. notafan

    Clearly wrong, response here to latest French attacks have been muted, with some anger at anglophone reporting as though the French are to blame.
    There seems to be zero discussion as to why a Tunisian seems to have have made his way to France for the sole purpose of killing Catholics, any colour.

  120. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    I know trump is 74 but Biden is 77 and just doesn’t seem quite right, 81 in 2024, seriously he was the best they had?

    he’s the top of the corruption tree

  121. Cassie of Sydney

    “Dave in Marybrook
    #3638400, posted on October 31, 2020 at 9:24 am”

    Absolutely outrageous and disgusting.

  122. Knuckle Dragger

    “Condemning it on an Australian website is unlikely to make any difference.”

    Despite lengthy commentary on South East Asia, US politics, labour policies, firearm legislation and European virus statistics.

  123. Boambee John

    Is m0nty still bleating about “voter suppression”?

    Does he realise that to the fascist left (Demorats and Liars), “voter suppression” means not just preventing illegal immigrants, non-citizens, the dead and other ineligibles from voting multiple times, it means preventing them from voting at all. Truly appalling from his perspective.

    Ans as for preventing eligible voters from voting multiple times, surely that is a constitutional right for the left?

  124. C.L.

    Universal access to early learning is seen by the “don’t breed them if you can’t feed them” mob as a taxpayer-fleecing scam for lazy mothers who can’t be bothered raising their own children…

    Right. That’s what it is.

    But our economy relies on every adult who can work to work.

    Raising your own children is work.

  125. Cassie of Sydney

    “Despite lengthy commentary on South East Asia, US politics, labour policies, firearm legislation and European virus statistics.”

    Yep….he’s such a clown.

  126. Zatara

    Trump supporter follows Biden campaign bus all over Houston in hearse called the “Democrat Cemetery Vote Collector”

    Trump followers have been focusing in on Biden’s biggest weakness, he is horrible in front of real people.

    Gather 20 ‘safe’ supporters to sit in little circles like grade school kids and be lectured to by stumbling bumbling Biden… and 200 Trump supporters show up outside to ask him questions nobody else will. Loudly.

  127. Leigh Lowe

    Dr Spud Mahathir, PhD.

  128. Crazyoldranga

    On the topic of Queensland election today, my prediction is for the Chook to win quite decisively. Having been up and down to that State from Victoria numerous times over the past month my observation of locals and Uber drivers is that there is no real opposition party to vote for and the majority of people are sticking with what they know.

  129. Knuckle Dragger

    ‘Yep….he’s such a clown.’

    Bozo Supreme, Cassie.

    And if the elderly coward accepts that commentary on an Australian website won’t make a difference, yet comments with hilariously vomitous regularity of all those things, surely some Australian website condemnation of a 1400 year old Stone Age death cult (not a single incident, the entire ideology) would be okay as well?

    If nothing would make a difference? If the same concept was applied across the board?

    No? Oh.

  130. notafan

    BTW, no-one works for the sake of the economy.

    And if your work needs a taxpayer subsidy I guess that makes you a rent seeker, a bit like a solar panel.

  131. Knuckle Dragger

    ‘Dr Spud Mahathir, PhD.’

    The voice of morality.

    ‘Cover up your women! I saw a prostitute once outside the Bourbon and Beefsteak!’

  132. Leigh Lowe

    Universal access to early learning …

    It’s not “early learning”.
    It is child minding.
    If their is any “learning” it is woke gender indoctrination and the like.

  133. notafan

    yes LL an introduction to the gender fairy and preferred pronouns

    And climate change.

  134. cohenite

    From the last thread, Cassie put up an article on the Ridd case; I might have to revise my opinion of Tehan, a bit:

    Ridd’s sacking led Education Minister Dan Tehan to initiate a review into free speech and academic freedom at Australian universities in 2019 by Robert French. Nothing had been done prior to Tehan taking the portfolio. This week, Tehan tabled the Higher Education Support Amendment (Freedom of Speech) Bill 2020, which gives effect to legislative changes suggested by the former chief justice. The bill requires that universities commit to “academic freedom” — as defined by French — in return for getting registration, and taxpayer funds.

  135. Boambee John

    Cassie of Sydney
    #3638408, posted on October 31, 2020 at 9:28 am
    “Condemning it on an Australian website is unlikely to make any difference.”

    LOL…anyone else recall his sanctimony after Christchurch?

    You mean when the bin chicken forgot to mention the green-left elements of the shooter’s “manifesto”?

  136. Bruce of Newcastle

    Biden is 77 and just doesn’t seem quite right, 81 in 2024, seriously he was the best they had?

    The Dems believe the world is burning up and only they can save it. But Bernie’s policies made him unelectable. So how do you save the world without turning off the voters?

    Biden and Harris. The far left wing of the Dems says that Biden is manipulable. Harris provided the necessary color, and Harris is implicated in the stuff that Hunter has been involved with.

    So there’s leverage over both of them.

  137. notafan

    Fifteen hours a week of four year old kindergarten is all the early learning children need before they start school.

    CL yes looking after babies and toddlers is work, sometimes hard work, but the most rewarding job on the planet.

  138. Zyconoclast

    Way to destroy the federation.

    Federation should be time warped back to literal 1901 or ditched all together.

  139. calli

    A snapshot of my little NSW seaside town.

    Breakfast at Birubi this morning. Sun dappled dunes stretching in an endless arc to the south towards a pool of haze and fume. A quick thunderstorm to the north, gone out to sea in a flash and a flurry.

    Surfers waiting patiently in the small swell, hoping for the tiniest of waves to bring them in.

    Suddenly all the boards turn as one, like needles on a compass, the surfers craning to see over the approaching wave. False alarm. A pod of dolphins displaying their sleek dorsal fins break the surface as they cruise up the beach in search of breakfast. The surfers resume their wait.

    I imagine the underwater conversation – “nah, nah! Tricked youse!”

  140. calli

    It’s not “early learning”.
    It is child minding.

    I beg to disagree. It must be “learning” of the finest calibre.

    Why, I have a photo of a grandson in gown and mortar board, a graduation memento.

    A prodigy at only four years of age! 😀

  141. I am increasingly of the opinion that opinion polls are going to be wildly wrong in this cycle, due to the radically different turnout dynamics introduced by the rise in early voting. I don’t know what this means, whether it benefits Biden or Trump.

    My hope is that it favours Biden because early voters tend to be younger and more liberal. Also, Trump scaring away his voters from early voting could have the unintended consequence of suppressing his own vote, because Election Day is going to be frantic.

    I mean, given the delays in in-person voting due to the virus, if Trump wanted to minimise his vote he couldn’t have done any better than shifting all his voters to the one day during a roaring pandemic.

    Yesterday’s 8th Circuit decision is a precursor to a string of attempts by Federalist Society stooges to steal the election. That is the big worry for Biden at this stage. Winning the vote is guaranteed: getting those votes counted is the challenge.

  142. notafan

    is that you being a US political pundit Monty?

  143. Cassie of Sydney

    “You mean when the bin chicken forgot to mention the green-left elements of the shooter’s “manifesto”?”

    Oh yes BJ…I remember his omissions.

    I also note that the other day Bozo of Toowoomba wasn’t very reticent about commenting on an Australian website about the creation of the state of Israel. He didn’t hold back with his “commentary of lies”.

    Speaking of Bozo…

  144. JohnJJJ

    miltonf
    They are are part of the nomenklatura.
    Wonderful to see the Soviet terminology coming back into fashion. I am certain these words are the only ones to accurately describe the ABC/SBS/Andrews world we are entering: Gulag, Revanchist, Apparatchik… Please supply some more. I am sure there is a Soviet word that means wonderful politician caring for the people but in reality thoroughly venal and depraved.

  145. stackja

    Tom
    #3638269, posted on October 31, 2020 at 5:05 am

    Trump in 2025 on his own TV show?

  146. Spurgeon Monkfish III

    Having just presided over Queensland’s world-leading response to a pandemic that continues to devastate almost every other jurisdiction on the planet

    What a preposterous load of horseshit. Anyone paying money for such garbage is an idiot and I don’t care if the editorial goes on to advocate Queenslanders chuck out Pluckachook (who is very likely to be re-elected, in a monumental exercise in self harm by voters).

    Freckleface is hopeless and appearance wise is almost indistinguishable from Pluckachook, although the latter is fatter and has that annoying way of upscreeching.

    Mediocrity personified, the pair of them.

  147. Cassie of Sydney

    This is a great conversation between Gad Saad and Noor Bin Laden from yesterday…

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fgVJr3Aub_g

    .

  148. Cassie of Sydney

    I’ll try the youtube clip…

  149. Cassie of Sydney

    “I am sure there is a Soviet word that means wonderful politician caring for the people but in reality thoroughly venal and depraved.”

    Don’t know what the Soviet word would be but the Australian words are….

    Dan Andrews

  150. Spurgeon Monkfish III

    My hope is that it favours Biden because early voters tend to be younger

    Why would any young person vote for a decrepit geriatric imbecile who doesn’t know what day it is, what office he’s running for, what city he’s in, or even what planet he’s on?

  151. Zyconoclast

    Black British actor actress Jodie Turner-Smit

    it’s not a transvestite

    Not yet.
    Give it time.

  152. Colonel Crispin Berka

    see the major parties as SEQ centric

    They’re democratic. They’re chasing votes, not cows.

    Vote, Queenslanders, vote, vote and vote

    Already did yesterday, doing my part to Stop The Spread. /virtueSignal.

    The catfight is underway.
    In the blue corner, the Bombay of Borders, FrecklesMcFrecklefaaaace.
    In the red corner, the Cornish Rex of Coronavirus, Palaaaaaacechook.
    In the maroon corner, the Tabby of Trailer Parks, HyperinflationHansonnnnn.
    In the green corner, the Cyprus of Climate, MadnesssssMacMahonnnnn.

    And it’s on!
    Palacechook has done an early charge by notionally saving 30,000 notional Queenslanders.
    HyperHanson has backed Ridd and free speech cases, giver her a leg up over Labor.
    Freckles has secretly supported coronavirus imports from the Welshies, getting the drop on Labor!
    The chook has no reply because she already handed responsibility over to Da Science, ohh, bad move.
    But wait, the chook has a recovery plan to “rebuild” a manufacturing sector that we…didn’t have before… but hey who’s counting?
    But wait… the liberals have dusted off the old Bradfield scheme and are exploiting his name on a plan that isn’t the one he proposed! Oh ladies and gentlemen, this has to be the infrastructure pork barrelling fight of the decade. What will it be, iron or irrigation? Stay tuned.

  153. miltonf

    “I am sure there is a Soviet word that means wonderful politician caring for the people but in reality thoroughly venal and depraved.”

    Don’t know what the Soviet word would be but the Australian words are….

    Dan Andrews

    Joe Stalin aka big brother

  154. Leigh Lowe

    notafan

    #3638442, posted on October 31, 2020 at 9:47 am

    Fifteen hours a week of four year old kindergarten is all the early learning children need before they start school.

    The most abhorrent phrase to come out of that industry is “structured play”.

  155. miltonf

    Why would any young person vote for a decrepit geriatric imbecile who doesn’t know what day it is, what office he’s running for, what city he’s in, or even what planet he’s on?

    Why they ran that geriatric crook- the friend of credit card companies (for a fee)- I still don’t get. Most plausible explanation is that they really believe blue collar workers think he is working class. The piece of filth has never worked in his rotten life.

  156. Leigh Lowe

    I beg to disagree. It must be “learning” of the finest calibre.

    Why, I have a photo of a grandson in gown and mortar board, a graduation memento.

    A prodigy at only four years of age! 

    Would of learnt more going around building sites and playing with the tools (hand tools).

  157. notafan

    Its been a while but my children enjoyed going to kindergarten. It might have been twelve hours, three times four days a week.

    Mostly teachers in late middle age so not much fiddle de de.

  158. Knuckle Dragger

    The defining tale of the US election should be that of Garrett Foster.

    The bloke so woke he dug up a missus not only POC but a quadriplegic as well, then brought an AK to a rally claiming the ‘other side were too pussy’.

    Who then decided to aim up at a bloke in a car at close range, and ended up well ventilated.

    Which in turn provoked nonplussed howling of ‘How could this have happened?’

  159. Knuckle Dragger

    Also, Foster was a ranga.

  160. Siltstone

    Great to see nomenklatura being used again. Baizou is a newer word that warrants greater use

  161. Spurgeon Monkfish III

    The defining tale of the US election should be that of Garrett Foster.

    Garret Foster was a bad dude.

    Until he ended up in a gutter full of holes.

    The end.

  162. P

    The Second Coming of Jordan B. Peterson

    His return to public life suggests a shift in religious belief

    Article includes his latest youtube vid ‘Return Home’.

  163. Knuckle Dragger

    Nomenklatura.
    Baizou.
    Fiddle dee dee.

    Added to The List.

  164. Colonel Crispin Berka

    Most plausible explanation is that they really believe blue collar workers think he is working class.

    Joe Biden is a Delaware shell corporation.

  165. dover_beach

    Letter from Poland:

    The atmosphere is extremely tense. The lay people are organizing spontaneously to protect their places of worship, because there are so many protesters that the police cannot manage the situation. Right in the middle of Warsaw, on the Three Crosses Square, brutal fights took place, including people being stabbed. Both sides are losing their temper and many people — both pro- and anti- protests — are resorting to violence.

  166. notafan

    Correct spelling is fiddledeedee

  167. miltonf

    Baizou

    Didn’t know that one.

  168. Knuckle Dragger

    Perhaps more importantly than the Qld election, today is Beersheba Day.

    ‘They’re under the guns.’

  169. JC

    Joe Biden is a Delaware shell corporation.

    That’s funny.

  170. Oh come on

    Pretty funny to see m0nty fretting about Trump stealing the election, given that his candidate comes from the party that has a long and ignominious history of stuffing ballot boxes illegally as required. And they’ll cheat again this time wherever they can if the counts are tight. They have precincts where they win 100% of the vote – most people call them cemeteries (joke from Robert Barnes).

  171. dover_beach

    Also, Trump scaring away his voters from early voting could have the unintended consequence of suppressing his own vote, because Election Day is going to be frantic.

    Oh, that explains why Reps are doing very well in early in person voting.

  172. dopey

    The great Jack Nicklaus endorses Trump. The pirate is very cross. Get on the blower Pete. Change his mind.

  173. notafan

    You’ve got to say it like you’re Scarlett O’Hara

  174. stackja

    Trump in Minnesota.
    “Thank you everybody.”

    “Make It Great Tonight”
    by Jon David Kahn

  175. Geriatric Mayfly

    Videos have been posted on social media appearing to show the moment one multi-storey building went down, the BBC’s Orla Guerin in Istanbul reports.

    For it is she. Like a fly to the buried bodies old misery guts turns up.

  176. The Second Coming of Jordan B. Peterson

    His return to public life suggests a shift in religious belief

    Canadian, ex-addict and born again. The holy trinity of boring.

  177. H B Bear

    Mavis returns to what he does best, fellating old Liars, in Teh Weekend Paywallian. This time fossilised old factional hack Barry Jones gets a hummer. Pass.

  178. woolfe

    Eric Trump
    @EricTrump
    · 1h

    1973 Biden Enters Office
    1974
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    2020 I’ll fix America!

  179. JC

    Yesterday’s 8th Circuit decision is a precursor to a string of attempts by Federalist Society stooges to steal the election. That is the big worry for Biden at this stage. Winning the vote is guaranteed: getting those votes counted is the challenge.

    Monster, you fat basement dwelling idiot.

    Poll booths close at 6pm. A fat twerp like you shows up at 7.00 and the booth is closed. Is that suppressing the votes ?

    You big idiot. Get back in the basement and don’t come out until you’re told.

  180. P

    Trump and Biden hit Midswest as vote count tops 80 million

    Unprecedented early voting numbers

    More than 80 million people had already voted as of Thursday, well above half of the overall 2016 vote count, which was 138.8million.

    About two-thirds of America’s early voters have mailed in or dropped off their ballots, and the rest voted in personal polling places throughout the country.

    Voting experts say voter turnout for the contest between the Republican Trump and Democratic challenger Biden could be the highest percentage of the electorate since 1908, when 65% of the country’s eligible voters cast ballots.

  181. dover_beach

    Monty thinks Texas is ‘in play’.

  182. Tintarella di Luna

    P
    #3638475, posted on October 31, 2020 at 10:19 am

    Thank you P

  183. Eyrie

    Regarding that NZ spaceplane project:

    Looks like a small reusable booster stage for a very small satellite launcher. The kid might soon learn that spaceships do not need wings. See Falcon 9 booster and recovery and soon Starship.

  184. JC

    Monty thinks Texas is ‘in play’.

    An American pal just told me the same thing. There’s going to be an awful drop back to earth for some people. For monster, it will cause an earthquake or massive tsunami depending on where he falls.

  185. Terry Pedersen

    I thought Australia’s international borders have been closed due to the “deadly covid-19”. How come then we have hordes of Australian journalists traipsing across the US covering the election? Are journalists exempt from the rules applied to the peasantry?

    They are are part of the nomenklatura.

    Anyone in Australia can apply for a permit to travel overseas for work. Miranda Devine springs to mind.

  186. rickw

    Sitting outside at a cafe sans mask! Smash the Bat Eared Mong’s Police State!

  187. JC

    I’d like to predict 360 EC votes for Trump, but I can’t as the science doesn’t allow this and ultimately I’ll always follow the science. The science says that I can only make a prediction when Barrie Cassidy calls it for Hiden.

  188. Dot

    Must be exhausting pretending to be an old health bureaucrat (Terry P), a banana beater (Runny Bum), an old bush gal, educated on dirt floors (P), a retired public defender solicitor advocate with a well, Bichon Frise and a Bedford Van (Gools proper)…robbiemac, insane ole’ Ed Case…

    We err, salute you(?).

  189. cohenite

    Biden is 77 and just doesn’t seem quite right, 81 in 2024, seriously he was the best they had?

    Why the fuck are people still tip toeing about this; biden is senile, completely; he’s almost at the adult nappy stage. The fact that he can be coherent for periods up to 5 minutes is testimony to the effectiveness of anti-dementia drugs and treatment. He is owned by the chunks and has an indisputable history of corruption. He is a front for the communists/elitists. As I said in a just world he would be shot; not that I’m advocating violence.

  190. Dot

    Watching this Alan Lichtman guy on Fox. He might be right. Trump might just have too much stacked against him.

    I hope his model is wrong.

    Biden and Harris are unworthy candidates, and like Hillary they were even unworthy of the Democrat nomination.

    A lot of Democrats agree with me.

    Tucker time.

  191. Delta A

    Dot, not fair to include P in that lineup. She is genuine, informed and posts some excellent articles.

    The others, not so much.

  192. JC

    Dot

    Lichtman is a Demonrat from way back. You can’t trust a demon.

  193. cohenite

    Speaking of shooting people (not advocating violence), david rowe would have to be on the list. The US cartoonists are great on the other hand.

  194. Dot

    No, she’s not really.

    *I remember everything in Walgett at the age of two and at the age of six I was educated on a dirt floor in Walgett and I also sold concessions in what was to become Sydney Airport.*

    Sure. 🤣

  195. miltonf

    Why the fuck are people still tip toeing about this; biden is senile

    I’m not tip toeing round it all- the guy is ga ga and before he went ga ga he was a sly, pay-to-play career political parasite. He is repulsive in both pre and post going ga ga phases.

    Anyway, I thought old white guys guys were supposed to be the worst in left world- that’s where it doesn’t make sense. Butt Plug would be more their ‘man’

  196. Makka

    More bad news for the Biden camp.

    Larry Schweikart
    @LarrySchweikart
    ·
    2h
    Wait, “for months” they’ve been “worried?” How could that be? Demented Perv Biteme was up 15?

    SIREN: Bloomberg News reports Biden advisers are worried about Black and Hispanic voter turnout https://twitchy.com/gregp-3534/2020/10/30/siren-bloomberg-news-reports-biden-advisers-are-worried-about-black-and-hispanic-voter-turnout/ via
    @twitchyteam

  197. calli

    C’mon man! As Bolt would say, it’s about the “side”.

    You’d think the boarded up shops in anticipation of peaceful “ideas” might be a clue to the media. However, they’re run by the Three Wise Monkeys.

    Right up until the Trumpian Reeeeeee! moment.

  198. Leigh Lowe

    Why the fuck are people still tip toeing about this; biden is senile

    Is it dementia?
    I mean, the limited exposure I have had to dementia sufferers is that they don’t slur and mangle words like that. The words are often totally out of context and meaningless, but the diction is reasonably clear.
    Stroke?

  199. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    Canadian, ex-addict and born again. The holy trinity of boring.

    Well that’s something you are bit of a guru about… being boring

  200. JC

    The words are often totally out of context and meaningless, but the diction is reasonably clear.
    Stroke?

    He’s had brain bleeds on both sides of his stupid head. That space would be a freaking mess under an MRI and they wouldn’t be able to tell.

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