Open Forum: November 21, 2020

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2,915 Responses to Open Forum: November 21, 2020

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  1. Shy Ted

    Post things of interest you say! Thought long and hard about this one because it happened in a RSL on the weekend. Entertainment was a tribute to Queen, Bowie and Elton John, pretty good actually. Much pretense of abiding by Covid rules but in a room full of people it’s impossible. A few arch-criminals got up to dance and were quickly encouraged by bouncers not to. Went to the bar for drinkies and on the way back I was sashaying to Saturday Night’s All Right for Fighting and rocked on a bit when back at the table. Lady bouncer came over – “can you sit down, sir?”. “No”. “Please sir, Covid rules”. “Covid’s bollocks”. “I know, sir, just doing my job”. “If you don’t sit down, sir…” Me singing “Saturday night’s all right for fighting”.
    Over comes 6’6″ bouncer, “please sit down, sir”. “I paid to be here, that pays your wages. Call the Covid police”. Stands over me – “6 feet please, Covid rules”. One sided exchange of profanity (me). Others dancing, off he goes, fails miserably trying to stop them. A little later bar staff say they will only serve me water, first time ever.
    And somewhere in Canberra a public servant had a spontaneous ejaculation. Wall to wall, floor to ceiling gummint regulations has killed this nation.
    Neil Diamond impersonator in a fortnight. People will have their hands in the air and swaying to Sweet Caroline. If that doesn’t cause a national lockdown nothing will.

  2. Knuckle Dragger

    Gez:

    ‘our fifteen year old teenage daughter downloading the social dramas of the school day is slowly killing my zest for life.’

    My 16 year old six foot son, having obtained one of the few Xbox games he owns or cares for, is currently on it as some sort of conference call with one mate here, one in Cairns and one in Townsville.

    They’re spending their time calling each other fuckwits, and varieties of same. Game playing appears to be minimal.

    White noise indeed.

  3. vlad

    He was Austrian, they thought there’d be Sacher-Torte.

    Mit schlag. Lots and lots of schlag.

  4. kaysee

    CS Lewis’s Prophecy Coming True, As We Give Over Our Freedoms to Technology

    As Europe was reeling from the aftermath of the Second World War, C.S. Lewis was taking part in a conversation in the English papers about the possibility of progress. As usual, Lewis cut through both the vague optimism of the progressives and the sour negativity of the pessimists.

    In reading his thoughts in Is Progress Possible — in the collection of his essays called God in the Dock — I came across a remarkable prophecy. Lewis was analyzing the state of mind of so many in post-war Europe. Many were homeless, their livelihoods destroyed and their lives fractured by the war.

    When Lewis was writing in the early 1950s Britain was limping along with widespread poverty, rationing of food and an ongoing social crisis. He recognized that the government would have to step in to provide for the people, but he feared the result would be the loss of freedom.

    Furthermore, Lewis observed that the ruling power in the brave new world would neither be God nor kings who were supposedly divinely appointed. Neither would it simply be power hungry politicians. Instead Lewis thought the power behind the throne would be modern science.

    I dread the government in the name of science. That is how tyrannies come in. In every age the men who want us under their thumb, if they have any sense will put forward the particular pretension which the hopes and fears of that age render most potent. They ‘cash in’. It has been magic, it has been Christianity. Now it will certainly be science.

    Lewis was not denigrating science as such. He was warning of a society in which science provided the ruling belief system behind the power. Why was science a frightening dark Lord? Because those who have science as their underlying ideology are also utilitarian in their views. That is to say, they will choose the scientific, efficient, cost-effective and surgical or chemical solution to problems.

  5. Knuckle Dragger

    ‘People will have their hands in the air and swaying to Sweet Caroline’

    …… BUH BUH BUUUHHHH..

    Freaking out will be mandatory.

  6. miltonf

    What I find so appalling about Demonrat voters is that for 47 years they sent Teddy “I left MaryJo Kopechne to die by drowning” Kennedy to Washington as a Senator and they’ve done the same for Creepy Sleepy Beijing Biden

    Agree totally. I have thought the same thing. Dumb as dog shit. It’s worth watching the epilogue to Chappaquiddick where Ma demonrat voters talk. Rather frightening.

  7. Entropy

    lotocoti
    #3668905, posted on November 23, 2020 at 8:35 pm
    It’s very appropriate that Germans have never forgiven themselves for falling for this fellow.

    He was Austrian, they thought there’d be Sacher-Torte.

    Whe I was a young lad visiting Austria I mispronounced it as Schizer Torte at a coffee house in St Wolfgang. The Lass serving me spent the next half hour pissing herself laughing whenever she came to our table. She was a looker so I forgave her.

  8. Roger

    He was Austrian, they thought there’d be Sacher-Torte.

    More fool them.

    He wasn’t even Viennese.

  9. Arky

    Righto.
    Just back from the garden, where I have been installing a cunning anti- possum device on the cherry tree.
    A metre of 150mm storm water pipe painted with a considerable amount of hot chilli sauce.

  10. rickw

    Top pathologist Dr. Roger Hodkinson told government officials in Alberta during a zoom conference call that the current coronavirus crisis is “the greatest hoax ever perpetrated on an unsuspecting public.”

    The public “suspects it”, but what are you going to do against such a blatant lie?

  11. Arky

    Cop that you furry bastard. I look forward later tonight to hearing you running about in circles with an arse full of chilli sauce.

  12. rickw

    Business picking up at the airport today.

    My prediction:

    One of the fuckwit premiers will trash the progress at the first opportunity.

    It’s not a matter of if, but when and which one of the Idiocracy will stuff it.

  13. Leigh Lowe

    From Tinta’s link to the Kennedy article above:-

    Politics disintegrated into the disaster we have today — a situation in which modern Democrats are closer, ideologically, to Lee Harvey Oswald, his Communist assassin, than they are to the tax-cutting cold warrior JFK.

    Quite so.

  14. Frank

    Were sandals with socks optional or de rigueur?

    Still quite popular in academia.

  15. What I find so appalling about Demonrat voters

    Don’t forget that there are about 6 million more of them than Republican voters.
    How do you feel about that?

  16. Shy Ted

    Mater #3668886, posted on November 23, 2020 at 8:20 pm
    Have to promote you to DeciMater for that one. In a minute RamBob will declare promotion to DeciMater is not an official rank. Sorry in advance.

  17. Pedro the Loafer

    You are an evil, evil man, Arky.

    Possums Lives Matter.

  18. Dot

    Don’t forget that there are about 6 million more of them than Republican voters.
    How do you feel about that?

    2.5 million in PA alone were fraudulent.

  19. Arky

    1735099
    #3668952, posted on November 23, 2020 at 9:03 pm

    ..
    Fknhell.
    Can’t you leave the evenings for the non- cretinous?

  20. Gab

    Don’t forget that there are about 6 million more of them than Republican voters.

    Most of those are dead.

  21. Knuckle Dragger

    ‘Cop that you furry bastard.’

    Liberty quote.

  22. Snoopy

    Queensland police have charged a 70-year-old Sunshine Coast man with stalking and threatening to murder Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk.

    Is it possible to volunteer for jury duty?

  23. Cassie of Sydney

    Time the racist went to bed.

  24. Gab

    Possums Lives Matter.

    No. They. Don’t!
    !!!!!!

  25. Bruce in WA

    It’s no longer 1950, and the adolescent knife carrying culture was imported from the USA.

    In the 1950s and 1960s, it was the “Dago” teenagers who carried knives, at least here in WA. The first American kid I ever met was in 1966 — and he never carried a knife.

  26. Pedro the Loafer

    “Knife culture imported from the USA” sez Numbers.

    More likely the Southern Europeans. I went to school with an Italian lad who regularly produced a pearl handled flick knife to cut up his pungeant salami, olives and cheese lunch while we honkies dined on soggy ham an tomato sangers.

    I was insanely jealous.

  27. Mater

    A flash back:

    1735099
    #1336582, posted on June 6, 2014 at 8:36 pm

    Interesting how Mk50 routinely becomes unintelligible under pressure.
    Thank Christ he wasn’t in my rifle section in SVN.
    He would have been a lay down misere for an UD*.
    *Unauthorised discharge

  28. Never heard the L1A1 referred to as an FAL, not in two branches of the military.

    You really need to get out more.

  29. Arky

    You are an evil, evil man, Arky.

    ..
    Just a regular member of the possum inconveniencing patriarchy.
    If only the women were in charge, then all the possums would be safe and cuddly wuddly and snuggly safe and there’d be not fkn trees left in my back yard.

  30. Dot

    “Knife culture imported from the USA”

    South East Asia.

    They’re tools for farm labour and you can protect your family. Most Pinoy men outside of the city have a machete.

  31. Knuckle Dragger

    Bastard possums are running through my roof at night, sounding like herds of stampeding rhinos.

    Every last one of them deserves an authorised discharge.

  32. Leigh Lowe

    Queensland police have charged a 70-year-old Sunshine Coast man with stalking and threatening to murder Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk.

    Finally.
    Some standing (and/or falling if necessary).
    Seems too young to be anyone I know.

  33. Snoopy

    Searching Wikipedia is getting out more?

  34. Pedro the Loafer

    Snap, Bruce.

    The “dings” were renowned for carrying knives back then.

    Having said that, I doubt I have ever gone a week without a pocket knife somewhere on my person, but I have never stabbed anyone (yet).

  35. Bruce of Newcastle

    Cop that you furry bastard. I look forward later tonight to hearing you running about in circles with an arse full of chilli sauce.

    I should do the kooka tree with Tabasco. The brushtails turn up rarely lately, but did so a couple days ago…mum, kid and amorous male. They got dinner, even Mr Horny, who knew me despite visiting only every half year or so. But I really didn’t want any of them trying the kooka nest box for a snooze during daytime. One of them has done so in the past since I got out ladder once to check and clean the box out, only to have a sleepy nose poke out through the entrance.

    Fortunately they didn’t stay around and the kookas appear to’ve been doing normal shifts in it all during the day today.

  36. Entropy

    I think numbers has been watching WestSide Story.

  37. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    You really need to get out more.

    From Number’s own link.

    The Australian Army, as a late member of the Allied Rifle Committee along with the United Kingdom and Canada adopted the committee’s improved version of the FAL rifle, designated the L1A1 rifle by Australia and Great Britain

  38. Knuckle Dragger

    Dings?

    Are they the same as the Garys?

  39. Leigh Lowe

    I get it.
    Native fauna.
    Protected species.
    Fair enough, to a point.
    But as soon as they run on or in our rooves, it should be open season.

  40. Leigh Lowe

    Possums.
    Fruit bats.
    Vermin.

  41. Arky

    Bruce of Newcastle
    #3668982, posted on November 23, 2020 at 9:15 pm
    Tabasco.

    ..
    The web says hot mustard.
    But if I use that all up deterring possums, what to put on a corned beef sandwich?

  42. notafan

    Perhaps he thinks Crocodile Dundee was a documentary.

  43. Entropy

    But as soon as they run on or in our rooves, it should be open season.

    I feel the same way about sharks, Toowoomba retired school teachers and Mormons.

  44. Cassie of Sydney

    “Entropy
    #3668985, posted on November 23, 2020 at 9:16 pm
    I think numbers has been watching WestSide Story.”

    LOL…that’s exactly what I was thinking!

  45. Leigh Lowe

    Having said that, I doubt I have ever gone a week without a pocket knife somewhere on my person, but I have never stabbed anyone (yet).

    I nearly got in a knife fight once, but tore a nail trying to open my Swiss Army knife.

  46. Leigh Lowe

    The web says hot mustard.

    How do you load that into a shotty shell.

  47. Knuckle Dragger

    There was a knife fight in Michael Jackson’s ‘Beat It’ video clip.

    I assume that all of them, much like the one in the video, result in a dance-off between opposing groups.

  48. Anne

    Anybody know anything about German Airforce landing in Canberra yesterday to take high profile criminals to The Hague?

    So hope they swing by Melbourne and pick up Andrews, Sutton and Cornelius.

  49. Arky

    What time do possums get up to their shenanagins?
    I might try some night photography and try to capture the moment in slides down the pipe and collects the chilli sauce up the back door.

  50. rickw

    Scientific Consensus, Lathes, Pendulums:

  51. calli

    So hope they swing by Melbourne and pick up Andrews, Sutton and Cornelius.

    They’ll need an Antonov 225 Planet Lifter.

  52. Bruce of Newcastle

    The web says hot mustard.

    Sounds good. Somewhere I’ve a couple jars of Hot English, which sadly no longer does anything for me. Just tastes like salty egg creme. Habituation sucks.

    Anyone who wants fruit bats, the two fig trees in my neighbours’ yards are chockers with ripe figs. Flying foxes squeak all night like badly oiled scooters.

  53. Pedro the Loafer

    “Dings” is a peculiarly Western Australian term for swarthy gentlemen of Southern European appearance. Most likely originating in the WA Goldfields, where many immigrants from Italy flocked during the early 1900’s and Italian names still feature prominently in the Kalgoorlie/Boulder phone book.

    Most “dings” of my acquaintance wear the title with pride.

  54. Knuckle Dragger

    ‘to take high profile criminals to The Hague?’

    Is Gitmo full?

    Anyway, I didn’t know they had tunnels in Belgium.

  55. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Disgraced Labor MP Barry Urban claims alleged lies told to committee protected by parliamentary privilege
    Emily Moulton
    The West Australian
    Mon, 23 November 2020 4:44PM
    Emily Moulton

    Disgraced Labor MP Barry Urban — who sensationally quit politics amid a fake medal scandal — is arguing the alleged lies he told a committee should be thrown out of court due to parliamentary privilege.

    Mr Urban, the member for Darling Range from March 2017 until May 2018, is facing a raft of charges including giving false evidence before a parliamentary committee, uttering a forged document, attempted fraud and forging a record after he allegedly lied to the committee about his overseas police service and education history. He denies all the charges.

    During a directions hearing today, his lawyers Mark Trowell and Edward Greaves revealed they were seeking to have some of the charges dropped — arguing the Director of Public Prosecutions could not use the evidence from the committee because it would be a breach of the Parliamentary Privileges Act.

    At the start of 2018, the powerful procedure and privileges committee launched an investigation into Mr Urban following a series of reports in The West Australian.

    Those stories revealed a medal he wore regularly and claimed was for war crimes investigations in Bosnia was in fact a fake.

    The reports also uncovered that he had embellished parts of his educational background.

    A day before the committee — which has the power to find members of Parliament in contempt and can recommend punishment such as fines, suspension or expulsion from Parliament — was due to release its findings, Mr Urban quit.

    The following day the report was tabled, recommending he be expelled.

    A few months later Mr Urban was charged by police, with the court hearing a motion was passed in Parliament allowing the assembly to hand over the committee’s findings to the Commissioner of Police, as long as parliamentary privilege was maintained.

  56. rickw

    From Number’s own link.

    Closest thing anyone can get to playing chess with a pigeon.

  57. Knuckle Dragger

    ‘“Dings” is a peculiarly Western Australian term for swarthy gentlemen of Southern European appearance.’

    Ah. Different then. Forget I said anything.

  58. Bruce in WA

    Australia chooses well … again.

    Australia’s preferred vaccine, the Oxford AstraZeneca jab, is up to 90 per cent efficacious, and as well as protecting people from the effects of COVID-19, it also appears to reduce the transmission of the coronavirus, stage-three data shows.

    The eagerly awaited results showed both good and disappointing news: the 90 per cent rate was achieved with a two-dose regime, the first of which was only half-strength.

    Australia has an agreement to buy and manufacture 33 million doses of the vaccine, and manufacture has already begun with the first batches being rolled out by the new year.

    While the adjusted first dose proved highly effective, when researchers gave volunteers the two doses at full strength, the efficacy rate plunged to 62.4 per cent. This is well below the standards set by rival vaccines Moderna and Pfizer BioNTech, both of which showed nearly 95 per cent effectiveness.

    Using the two studies together, the Oxford vaccine is considered 70.4 per cent effective, but unlike the other vaccines, it can be stored in a fridge, meaning the logistics of distributing it are easier and safer.

  59. cohenite

    How do you feel about that?

    How do you feel about dropping dead.

  60. Rex Anger

    The web says hot mustard.

    How do you load that into a shotty shell.

    Powdered.

    Add in chilli powder for extra zest, and a good dose of Clive’s for colouration. 😁

  61. Top Ender

    Disgraced Labor MP Barry Urban didn’t get the message.

    Try again.

    There is a revolver with the first chamber loaded, and a bottle of Scotch in the library.

    Do the right thing old chap.

  62. Mark from Melbourne

    Top pathologist Dr. Roger Hodkinson told government officials in Alberta during a zoom conference call that the current coronavirus crisis is “the greatest hoax ever perpetrated on an unsuspecting public.”

    … and that video lasted on YouTube well less than an hour and a half. And the creator’s account (via the YT message) has been cancelled. Not suspended, just tossed in the bin.

    Nothing to see here, look away now…

  63. Anne

    It was interesting that Scott Morrison changed his Social Media job description from ‘Prime Minister’ to ‘Politician’ last week.

    Not just him either, Trudeau, Johnson, Rutte, Macron, De Jonge and De Croo all changed their job titles to ‘Politician’.

    Trump’s was changed to ‘Political Candidate’.

    It’s as though world leaders are stepping down from their positions for some kind of restructuring of political Government systems worldwide. 🤷🏼‍♀️

    Anyway, I hope Morrison and the other Deep State monsters are on their way to either the International Court in The Hague or Military tribunals at Gitmo.

    Exciting times.

  64. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    There is a revolver with the first chamber loaded, and a bottle of Scotch in the library.

    Any recommended brand of Scotch, given the circumstances?

  65. Knuckle Dragger

    ‘Any recommended brand of Scotch, given the circumstances?’

    Vat 69.

  66. Mark from Melbourne

    Anyway, I hope Morrison and the other Deep State monsters are on their way to either the International Court in The Hague or Military tribunals at Gitmo.

    Anne, you might be a bit/lot out there, but when you suggest that the “international cabal” might be tried in The Hague by the ICC, you really do bring a smile to the dial.

  67. Infidel Tiger

    So Biden’s Secretary Of State is a war crazy lunatic who wants to “liberate” Syria.

    The Swamp will be joyful. The bombings are coming back.

  68. Knuckle Dragger

    Finally, some good news (Focks):

    ‘Mitch Marsh has effectively ruled himself out of playing any international cricket this summer declaring he won’t be able to bowl until the middle of the Big Bash. The all-rounder is still recovering from a syndesmosis injury suffered in the opening match of the Indian Premier League in September.’

    Oh no.

    ‘Marsh, who returned to the Test team during the Ashes in 2019, isn’t part of the 17-man squad to face India. He conceded he couldn’t see a path back in to the Australian team, Test or limited overs, any time soon.’

    Good. Fuck off.

  69. Mark from Melbourne

    Vat 69.

    Agreed. If you’re about to top yourself, why waste the cash on anything decent?

    I do, however, think that the savings on scotch might be well applied to a line of coke or a sprightly young lady. Or some combination thereof.

  70. Arky

    Found two of ’em up a neighbour’s tree eyeing off my garden.
    I’ll give them an hour and then run out there and hopefully catch them in the act.

  71. Dot

    Snoopy

    Had Bob been doing his PhD research by Wikipedia again?

    Bob! Sharpen up, you don’t want to get marked down to a master’s degree, do you? 🤡🤗😂

  72. Arky

    I think they are like students.
    If you can catch the ring leader in the act and make an example of him, the others will knuckle down and do the right thing.

  73. Snoopy

    Bob! Sharpen up, you don’t want to get marked down to a master’s degree, do you? 🤡🤗

    USQ is good with Wikipedia for post graduate theses as long as it’s correctly referenced.

  74. Siltstone

    Corio whisky used to be on the low shelf. Out of business now. There is a reason.

  75. Dot

    I can highly recommend Blanton’s on ice.

    Great light fruit cake flavours. Rich but not overcaramelised.

  76. vlad

    The timing of Corio’s demise – 1983 – sounds to me like it was a generational thing.

    It went out of existence just when the last of the baby boomers were hitting the work force and could afford something better.

  77. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Corio whisky used to be on the low shelf. Out of business now. There is a reason.

    Corio whisky was fit only for the treatment of blowfly strike in Merino sheep, and skin infections in human beings – it was never meant for human consumption.

  78. Siltstone

    People who drank Stones green ginger wine looked down on Corio drinkers. That is how bad is was.

  79. MatrixTransform

    People who drank Stones green ginger wine looked down on Corio drinkers

    Brandivino aficionados don’t care about snobs

  80. vlad

    I have an unopened miniature of it that I’m keeping for a special occasion.

  81. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    People who drank Stones green ginger wine looked down on Corio drinkers. That is how bad is was.

    What was the hideous concoction of Stones Green Ginger and Scotch Whisky?

  82. Milton:

    What I find so appalling about Demonrat voters is that for 47 years they sent Teddy “I left MaryJo Kopechne to die by drowning” Kennedy to Washington as a Senator and they’ve done the same for Creepy Sleepy Beijing Biden

    Was that the Kennedy the Democrats called “The Conscience of the Senate?”

  83. Knuckle Dragger

    I hope nobody’s bagging Stone’s.

    The greatest ever cockle-warmer for a morning of shooting in the cold.

    Stone’s Mac if it was your birthday.

  84. MatrixTransform

    I hope nobody’s bagging Stone

    the Old Man still drops a Stones into a beer from time to time.
    had me a taste ‘tween lockdowns

  85. MatrixTransform

    the hideous concoction of Stones Green Ginger and Scotch Whisky

    Sunday after an RDO

  86. vlad

    Equal parts Johnnie Walker and Red Bull = a John Bull.

    Mmm.

  87. Mark from Melbourne

    Corio whisky was fit only for the treatment of blowfly strike in Merino sheep

    ZKTA, you really must decide wether (misspelling intended) that appellation applies to Corio or JW Red.

    I mean both are not exactly the good stuff, but lumping them both together seems a bit rough. If memory serves you also threw JW Black into that category once… harsh, if you’re in a bar, and have ice (and a young lady in tow).

  88. Anne

    Anne, you might be a bit/lot out there, but…

    I’m not out there, Mark, I’m just the only one on this blog, with the possible exception of Gunner, who has a clue, because I’ve followed Q.

    Also I turned off the Television four years ago. 👍🏻

  89. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    ZKTA, you really must decide wether (misspelling intended) that appellation applies to Corio or JW Red.

    I’ve applied that description to three or four undrinkable whiskies . My bad.

  90. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    From the Oz – I’ve posted the whole article.

    Andrew Hastie: My great shame … but our boys were left in degrading war
    Federal Liberal MP Andrew Hastie, a former officer in the Special Air Services who served in Afghanistan.
    Picture: Marie Nirme
    Exclusive
    Simon Benson
    National Affairs Editor
    50 minutes ago November 23, 2020

    Former Special Air Services troop commander and federal Liberal MP Andrew Hastie has for the first time voiced his personal shame over the war crimes alleged to have been carried out by soldiers he served with in Afghanistan, but said people needed to understand the brutality of our longest-­running war.

    In a deeply personal account of his own time on the front line with the elite unit, the West Australian MP said the over-reliance on the elite unit in trying to fight a war without a visible victory had ­hardened the hearts of those sent to fight it.

    “People lost their way,” Mr Hastie said.

    “Many people want to know: how did this happen?

    “First, we have forgotten basic truths about human nature that previous generations of Australians better understood.

    “We live in a bent world and we all carry man’s smudge: people do bad things.

    “Christians call it sin in a fallen world. Whatever we call this ­inclination, we should always guard against the reality of people doing bad things when they are left unaccountable.”

    The federal member for the West Australian seat of Canning, who also chairs the Parliamentary Joint Committee on Intelligence and Security, has now called for urgent reform to civilian ­oversight of the Australian military in the wake of the Brereton ­report.

    Mr Hastie seeks the creation of a joint parliamentary defence committee with powers to compel chiefs to provide classified ­briefings on operations. The call for greater accountability and transparency of the ­nation’s ­military commitments and how they are waged has the private backing of several government and Labor MPs with ­concerns over the historical lack of parliamentary scrutiny of the defence department and the Australian Defence Force.

    But Mr Hastie also blasted the ADF’s “stage-managed” public ­relations handling of the war in ­Afghanistan, claiming that it had sought to “sanitise” Australia’s role in the conflict and prevented scrutiny when it was needed.

    In a veiled reference to the top brass, Mr Hastie said that those at “the very top”, as well as those at the bottom who stand accused of the crimes, also needed to also be held accountable for what ­happened.

    In his first public response to the release of the damning report that found credible proof that 19 members of Australian special forces should be referred for ­prosecution over 39 unlawful killings, Mr Hastie said that, although he was “grieved” by the findings, he resolutely defended the regiment and questioned the report’s criticisms of the elite combat unit’s “warrior culture”.

    Mr Hastie was a former SAS troop commander who served with the Special Operations Task Group in Afghanistan before being elected to parliament at a byelection in 2015.

    Writing for The Australian, Mr Hastie, who is understood not to be under investigation, said: “As a former officer of the SASR and someone who believes in regimental honour, I feel great shame in what has occurred.

    “We were sent to Afghanistan in a double trust — to defend ­Australia’s values and interests by force, but also to uphold those values in our battlefield conduct. Many good soldiers honoured that trust; a small number of soldiers did not.

    “We ignored the true nature of war and sanitised it.

    “We pretended it was no different to any other form of unilateral government policy.

    “But the reality is that war is inherently violent, escalatory and degrading.

    “It is a modern conceit to ­pretend that war can be managed with a set of safe technocratic hands.

    “The brutal reality is that no plan ever survives the first shot. People lose their way and become hard of heart, especially after multiple deployments.”

    “War has its own dark energy that can consume people in ways that modern society cannot comprehend, largely because we have packaged it up nicely for the evening news.”

    Mr Hastie writes that the ADF sanitised the war to avoid scrutiny. Had it been managed ­differently, he says much of what occurred might have been ­avoided.

    “The Australian Defence Force was very effective at sanitising our longest war with its legions of Public Affairs Officers,” he writes. “Whereas the United Kingdom and the USA took a far more liberal approach with ­allowing reporters to see their ­soldiers at war, we stage-­managed Australia’s contribution to Afghanistan through a carefully crafted information operation.

    “This approach stifled public interest reporting. Perhaps with greater access for the Australian media, we might have avoided some of the worst allegations made in the Brereton Report.

    “Parliamentary scrutiny these days is surface level,” Mr Hastie said.

    “It amounts to senior Defence leadership presenting a few PowerPoint slides and giving parliamentarians a pat on the head. This is an area of urgent reform.

    “If we are serious about increased accountability and transparency, then we need proper parliamentary scrutiny of the Department of Defence and the Australian Defence Force.”

  91. twostix

    So Biden’s Secretary Of State is a war crazy lunatic who wants to “liberate” Syria.

    The Swamp will be joyful. The bombings are coming back.

    Neocons took over the democrats in 2016 after Trump and the maga brigades booted them out of the Republican ranks….and m0nty was here thinking it was actually a huge loss for the right.

    They’re pure poison, what idiots!

  92. vlad

    So Biden’s Secretary Of State is a war crazy lunatic who wants to “liberate” Syria.

    It’s going to be a government of Winken, Blinken and Nod.

  93. Mark from Melbourne

    I’m not out there, Mark

    No, you are. I’ve not had the privilege of meeting you, but, yes, you are. I’ve seen some of your art and it is quite delightful. But Q is definitely the fringe.

    xx

  94. Colonel Crispin Berka

    “But the reality is that war is inherently violent, escalatory and degrading.

    War is so degrading it can even make people forget the Oxford comma.
    Savages.

  95. Mark from Melbourne

    I’ve applied that description to three or four undrinkable whiskies…

    My point exactly.

    Corio / JW Red / JW Black and (unreliable memory) Chivas should not be bracketed. You could add that vile JW Blue concoction if we were going down that path!

    Granted none are exactly primo, but only two of those are only useful for fly strike.

    Finished me Laphroaigh. Off to bed.

  96. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Finished me Laphroaigh. Off to bed.

    Pouring a double Abelour. Life is too short to associate with losers, wear badly fitting underwear, or drink poor quality Scotch.

    Sliante!

  97. vlad

    Don’t forget Jamesons Irish Whiskey which also made Zulu’s blacklist – although from memory I think all Irish whiskey did.

    I’ve never drunk JW Blue. I think that was Richard Nixon’s favourite.

    I have drunk JW Green – ! – and didn’t care for it.

  98. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Don’t forget Jamesons Irish Whiskey which also made Zulu’s blacklist – although from memory I think all Irish whiskey did.

    Irish whiskey is distilled from potatoes and pig manure – it is proof that only the Scots can distill whisky.

  99. Old School Conservative

    Jamesons Irish Whiskey

    A great choice back in the day for a young Mr and Mrs OSC hosting our first dinner parties on a tight budget; finish the meal with Irish Coffee using JIW and heaps of cream on top.
    Followed by port.
    Did I mention it was pre-RBT?

  100. Dr Faustus

    Any recommended brand of Scotch, given the circumstances?

    The Famous Grouse.
    The only un-fried thing vomited onto the Gorbals footpaths.

  101. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    The Famous Grouse.
    The only un-fried thing vomited onto the Gorbals footpaths.

    A Scots pub, one night – a howlingly lovely Australian girl behind the bar. It was her second night, she hadn’t done much bar work… so your obedient servant found himself in Scotland, teaching an Aussie lass, how to serve whisky to the Scots…

  102. Bruce in WA

    Mate of mine … multi-millionaire … chooses to drink … nay, insists on drinking … Dewar’s white label.

    I’ve found it very useful for starting outboards when they’re cold.

  103. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Mate of mine … multi-millionaire … chooses to drink … nay, insists on drinking … Dewar’s white label.

    Dewar’s White Label? Never heard of that one.

  104. Bruce in WA

    Coronavirus: Qantas CEO Alan Joyce says passengers will be forced to have COVID-19 vaccine before flying

    Paywalled.

    Didn’t we all say this would happen?

  105. Bruce in WA

    Dewar’s White Label? Never heard of that one.

    American. He chose it because JW Red Label was “too expensive” …

  106. Bruce in WA

    Sorry, not sure the whiskey is American, but it’s a US “favourite” … pronounced “Doo-ers”.

  107. dover_beach

    Live Monitor
    @amlivemon
    ·
    53m
    I warned everyone that a Biden victory would be a death certificate for any US manufacturing recovery hopes… now you see capital flowing out at a rapid pace… $50 trillion+ will leave
    Quote Tweet
    Lawrence McDonald
    @Convertbond
    · 55m
    Bloomberg Dollar Index, capital is flowing out of the USA at the fastest pace since April 2018. Best two weeks of inflows into global equities on record.

  108. Dr Faustus

    Jamesons Irish Whiskey

    Export-grade optic whiskey. OK for mixed drinks – perfectly fine in coffee.
    Powers is a much better version of Irish whiskey and the one you drink in lost evenings in little pubs in County Cork.

    The hundreds of pricey ‘limited mash’ whiskies, matured in Madera casks, with fanciful Gaelic names, are what you drink in trendy bars in Dublin – before your new best friend takes you back to your hotel, semiconscious, and buggers you.

  109. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    American. He chose it because JW Red Label was “too expensive” …

    The most trenchant criticism of some whiskies that I’ve ever heard is that “They are so bad that not even the blackfellas will drink them..”

  110. Steve trickler

    So far, a good summary. All the crap trolls are spewing around here gets dealt with.



  111. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    The hundreds of pricey ‘limited mash’ whiskies, matured in Madera casks, with fanciful Gaelic names, are what you drink in trendy bars in Dublin – before your new best friend takes you back to your hotel, semiconscious, and buggers you.

    Umm, I’ve been to Dublin a few times, but, no, not so far..

  112. Dr Faustus

    Dewar’s white label

    Bulk blended optic scotch.
    Teachers is another similar – what you get in the glass in Britain when you order a scotch and dry.

  113. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Turn it up loud, tell your neighbors to get knotted…

  114. Bruce in WA

    The hundreds of pricey ‘limited mash’ whiskies, matured in Madera casks, with fanciful Gaelic names, are what you drink in trendy bars in Dublin – before your new best friend takes you back to your hotel, semiconscious, and buggers you.

    Umm, I’ve been to Dublin a few times, but, no, not so far..

    Jammy bastard … (H/T Monty Python)

  115. BrettW

    Just watched a clip of Peta Credlin interviewing Matt Canavan.

    Positioned on shelf behind him was : Adani baseball cap, a book on Coal and a model of a construction truck used in mining.

    Well done Matt.

  116. Top Ender

    Or else what?

    Ken Wyatt’s warning: close the Indigenous gap or else

    AMOS AIKMAN

    Ken Wyatt has signalled his readiness to circumvent state and territory governments that fail to meet their Close the Gap obligations, calling the Northern Territory’s “too slow” delivery of remote ­Indigenous housing “a disgrace” that should not be allowed to happen.

    In a strongly worded speech due to be delivered in Darwin on Tuesday, the Indigenous Australians Minister will warn that “where critical and key service delivery is failing, we must look to new partnerships to ensure that no one is left behind”.

    “It is unacceptable that so many Indigenous Australians in the NT live in overcrowded and inadequate housing,” he will say, according to a copy of his speech.

    “People in remote communities should expect their housing services to be provided — just as they would in any other location in Australia. The fact that this is not happening is a disgrace — and in the year 2020 — and looking ahead to 2021 — something that neither I nor the NT government should allow to happen.”

    Mr Wyatt is expected to lash out at Darwin’s “disappointing” attempts to pressure Canberra into renewing a multi-million-dollar deal to co-fund remote ­policing, saying that the ­“solution to our challenges isn’t merely turning to Canberra”. “From the outset of this agreement, it was not anticipated that the Australian government would provide further funding beyond its expiration. The delivery of policing in the NT remains an NT government responsibility,” he will say.

    “Our remote communities should be able to have confidence in their government’s commitment to keeping them safe — it is the first duty of government — and recent comments reflected in the media are disappointing.”

    Mr Wyatt is touring the NT this week, where critics have ­accused successive administrations of misdirecting tens or even hundreds of millions of dollars sent from Canberra, notionally to tackle disadvantage. He is ­expected to announce the unlocking from a mining royalties fund of $100m for use by Indigenous businesses and communities to help their post-pandemic recovery and to develop Aboriginal land.

    Mr Wyatt will stress the benefits of partnerships sprung from communities that permit “joint decision making and … a genuine commitment to co-designing ­solutions”. He will also seek to strengthen his engagement with Aboriginal land councils.

    “I am serious when I say — where we have failings — we must explore new ways of working,” he will say. “The land councils are continuing to develop a proposal which would see a ­direct partnership established with the commonwealth for the provision of housing services in the NT … we don’t need to accept the current situation as the only option.”

    NT Chief Minister Michael Gunner, whose Labor team campaigned hard in 2016 and 2020 on plans to spend $1.1bn over 10 years on remote housing, is understood to view the land council proposal sceptically, fearing it could politicise service delivery.

    The NT government relies on federal funding — an estimated $280m since 2009 — to support at least a dozen remote police stations. But remote community leaders and some activist groups have complained about police resources being diverted to towns.

    NT Labor has also claimed achievements through its local decision-making policies and embryonic treaty negotiations and is unlikely to welcome Mr Wyatt’s criticism. The Territory government is facing severe ­financial pressure, exacerbated by the pandemic.

    “It is time for people to hold the relevant elected governments responsible for their ­actions, and unfortunately in some cases, inaction,” Mr Wyatt will say.

    “We don’t need to settle for the status quo. We can dream bigger. And we can realise our ­aspirations.”

    Oz

  117. Bruce in WA

    The hundreds of pricey ‘limited mash’ whiskies, matured in Madera casks, with fanciful Gaelic names, are what you drink in trendy bars in Dublin – before your new best friend takes you back to your hotel, semiconscious, and buggers you.

    As my mate KBW says, “I’m not gay! Though I did once root a bloke who said he was!”

    The funny thing is, KBW had a brother who actually was gay, and who died of AIDS. And KBW loved him with all his heart.

  118. Top Ender

    My comment under the article in the Oz:

    ““People in remote communities should expect their housing services to be provided — just as they would in any other location in Australia.”

    Well, no.

    I don’t expect the government to provide me with a free house.

    Will be interesting to see if it get up.

  119. Bruce in WA

    Will be interesting to see if it get up.

    Rotsa ruck with that one, Cookie Boy!

  120. Bruce in WA

    OK, peoples … black dog nothing like it was last night … thanks to my ever-supportive, understanding, darling wife. Why she puts up with me, I’ll never know. Anyway, I worked hard today, did a total detail, inside and out, on the car. Took my mind off things I’m better not thinking about (like a failed marriage 50 years ago and how much I must have hurt my ex-wife, who didn’t deserve any of it).

    Might have to take my wife out tomorrow and find a way to say “Thank you” — again!

    But now, time to finish the latest Jack Reacher. ‘Night all.

  121. Top Ender

    Interesting perspective from a talented writer and analyst:

    James Morrow: America not cracking up under weight of COVID

    The left’s comic book view of America as a nation torn apart by Trump and crushed by COVID-19 doesn’t stand up to scrutiny, writes James Morrow.

    The Daily Telegraph

    To say that the left-leaning media has a love-hate relationship with America is like saying a toddler has a love-hate relationship with food.

    One minute they can’t get enough of it, the next they’re screaming and chucking it on the floor.

    And never has this been more the case than during this strange interregnum between Donald Trump and Joe Biden.

    The still-president’s options to remain in power are diminishing, even as Biden broadcasts from the entirely fictional and made-up “Office of the President Elect”.

    Mirroring this contradiction, the Australian left can’t quite figure out what to make of it all: Is the US the heroic nation that rejected Trump, or is it falling apart under the weight of a second wave of coronavirus?

    Take the ABC, whose news division last week promoted a report by the recently-returned correspondent Michael Rowland with a tweet reading, “I just flew back from the US – and what I saw helps explain the COVID surge”.

    Rowland wrote that he loves America but that “in my nearly three weeks on the ground in the US covering the election, I got the impression way too many Americans were far too relaxed about COVID-19 and the massive public health tsunami about to wash across the country”.

    It’s a pretty typical viewpoint, though one which ignores rising coronavirus case numbers around the world — and the fact that pretty much everywhere, the second wave appears to be far less deadly than the first.

    Funnily enough, I also had the chance to spend a few weeks in the US — my home country — around the time of the election, and what I saw was just the opposite.

    What I saw was not so much an America that didn’t take coronavirus seriously as one which would rather be left alone to take its own precautions rather than have lives and livelihoods smashed up by heavy-handed lockdowns.

    In the heart of Trump country in central Pennsylvania, where everyone was (and presumably remains) terrified that Biden will bring in a Green New Deal that will destroy the local fracking economy, everyone I interviewed wore a mask.

    Yes, mask wearing was sparse at an open-air Trump rally I attended in Scranton, but then again, in all the civil disorder, chaos, riots, lootings, and eventual open-air street parties celebrating Biden’s win, there wasn’t much in the way of social distancing either.

    Which cuts to the heart of claims that it is only right-leaning Americans who are doing the wrong thing, or playing politics with the virus.

    If anyone has politicised COVID restrictions, it has been America’s Democrats — and their pals in the media — who’ve gleefully cheered every infected Trump contact while whistling and looking the other way at the double standards enjoyed by their own side.

    After all, how were conservative Americans supposed to react when Democrats cheered on a “Black Trans Lives Matter” rally in Brooklyn, New York, in June, which attracted as many as 10,000 people — even as they were told that they weren’t ­allowed to go to church on Sunday?

    And while every death is a tragedy, the fact remains that the US has still performed better in terms of mortality than nations like Spain, the UK, Italy, and Belgium.

    That’s even after losing thousands early on not to Trump, but to edicts by Democrat governors such as New York’s Andrew Cuomo who stacked nursing homes full of positive cases.

    Nor was there much in the way of evidence of a country torn apart by politics. The debate was robust, but no one was going at it hammer and tongs.

    In a suburb of Pittsburgh, the owner of one diner said that she had imposed a “no politics” rule, and everyone loved it.

    The one place where I saw politics acted out on the street was in New York City.

    Upon pulling into town a few days before the election, I saw stores along Fifth Avenue and Madison Avenue in mid-town and trendy boutiques in Soho boarding up their windows before Election Day, as if a hurricane or tornado was predicted to whip through the canyons of Manhattan in case of election-related violence.

    Which brings us to another bit of lazy narrative — that the Trump ­administration had brought the US to the edge of breaking up with itself, ­violently.

    Of course, after months of riots and looting by Black Lives Matter and Antifa-connected leftists, no one really believes that those stores were locked down in preparation for angry Republicans, to come smashing things up in protest of a Biden win.

    Just the opposite: As one store manager told me, “If Trump wins again there’s gonna be trouble.”

    While most on the left like to stick to the narrative that this year’s protests were, as one CNN graphic put it as a correspondent stood in front of a burning suburb, “mostly peaceful”, occasionally the mask slips.

    Writing in the Sydney Morning Herald that Joe Biden’s election had brought her to tears, columnist Amelia Lester added this past weekend, “this was a nation that felt on the brink of a civil war a few weeks ago, and now … it’s not.”

    The implication, of course, being that had things gone the other way, all bets would be off — and all those shopkeepers wouldn’t have wasted their money boarding up.

    The fact is, America is a large and complex country made up of 50 states that fiercely guard their independence and whose governors need to give permission to bring in the ­National Guard in case of disasters.

    Its President may be using every challenge he can think of to stay in power, but it’s not much different to Al Gore challenging the 2000 election results. It’s certainly less severe than Congressional Democrats using debunked evidence (the infamous Steele Dossier) to attempt to unseat Trump through impeachment.

    And it cannot hermetically seal itself off from the world like Australia, nor can it afford to shut down its economy for months on end to wait for a vaccine (indeed, neither can we).

    The fact is Americans want to do and think for themselves, and are quick to call out an expert class whose heavy-handed and often contradictory restrictions prevent them from earning a living.

    There are, it must be said, worse things that you can say about a ­people.

    Link

  122. Steve trickler

    In A World Before The Scam

    I hope the pricks behind it get smashed to pieces.



  123. Zyconoclast

    Trump’s election support from evangelicals shows we’re the biggest obstacle to racial justice

    By Robert P. Jones, author of “White Too Long: The Legacy of White Supremacy in American Christianity”

    As we look to the future in the wake of the presidential election, the prospects for healing the soul of the nation hinge on understanding the cultural forces that will survive President Donald Trump’s exodus from the White House. One of the most daunting problems we face as a nation is the legacy of systemic racism, a problem exacerbated by a president who has denied its existence and fanned the flames of racial animus.

    The election results — in which 76 percent of white evangelicals supported Trump — along with pre-election research showing how white evangelicals’ political behavior is animated by racial resentment, indicate that the white evangelical community will be

    the most powerful force in hindering this work for racial justice and reconciliation and the efforts to achieve the promise of a multiracial democracy at this time of reckoning in our nation.

    I was born into the world of white evangelical Protestantism, where we were taught that our community was the salt of the earth, a beacon of light and an exemplar of what is best about America. In earlier times, our community quietly asserted that the moral foundations of the nation were moored to white Christian culture, and when a changing country made that claim untenable, prominent leaders aligned with the Republican Party declared it to be the “moral majority,” a force to save the country from its apostasy and ruin. But these last four years, culminating with white evangelicals’ continued enthusiastic fealty to Trump in the presidential election, have revealed the opposite.

  124. Bruce of Newcastle

    Mr Jones doesn’t know his Bible.

    27 for all of you who were baptized into Christ have clothed yourselves with Christ. 28 There is neither J ew nor Gentile, neither slave nor free, nor is there male and female, for you are all one in Christ Jesus.

    No one cares what colour, shape, or gender the people in church are. It’s what’s inside that counts, as MLK said.

  125. PeterM

    Mr Jones needs to provide evidence for the existence of systemic racism and President Trump’s divisive statements.

  126. Shy Ted

    Masks will save us. And that’s how to jump like a girl.

  127. Herodotus

    Go weave a basket numnuts.

  128. Herodotus

    Delivery of remote indigenous housing is too slow – can’t keep up with the rate that they’re trashed.

  129. Bruce of Newcastle

    Numbers, why don’t you look at the data?

    https://covid.cdc.gov/covid-data-tracker/#trends_dailytrendscases

    https://covid.cdc.gov/covid-data-tracker/#trends_dailytrendsdeaths

    The death rate has barely risen but the case rate has skyrocketed. That wasn’t what happened at the start of the outbreak where deaths rose in lockstep with cases.

    All his is consistent with the arrival of the winter season. Which is no fun, but it happens with coronaviruses every year. I suspect a lot of the case numbers are other coronaviruses being picked up by the various test kits. And due to Trump’s sterling efforts to get vaccines out, despite ridiculous opposition from the Dems, the vaccines will start going to the elderly in nursing homes and medical staff very soon.

  130. Daily dose of Covid – 19

    USA –
    Total deaths – 263,135
    New deaths – 434
    Deaths per million – 795

    Texas –
    Total deaths – 21,165
    New deaths – Not recorded
    Deaths per million – 730

    California –
    Total deaths – 18,727
    New deaths – Not recorded
    Deaths per million – 474

    Florida –
    Total deaths – 18,085
    New deaths – 80
    Deaths per million – 842

    Illinois –
    Total deaths – 12,112
    New deaths – 61
    Deaths per million – 956

    New York –
    Total deaths – 34,261
    New deaths – 28
    Deaths per million – 1761

    Georgia –
    Total deaths – 9,198
    New deaths – Not recorded
    Deaths per million – 866

  131. rickw

    Numbers, why don’t you look at the data?

    Very funny Bruce!

  132. Cassie of Sydney

    Good morning waaacist.

  133. Cassie of Sydney

    Racist Covid Alert!

    Here’s the Daily Toowoomba tally…courtesy of Shy Ted.

    Daily dose of Covid – 19.
    Toowoomba –
    Total dead – 0 (damn)
    Brain dead – 1
    Morally dead – 1

    We live in hope. One day….one day.

  134. Cassie of Sydney

    When the racist isn’t getting excited about dead Joooos, he’s getting excited about dead Americans…..he’s one sicko.

  135. The death rate has barely risen but the case rate has skyrocketed.

    Depends on your definition of “hardly”.
    As of November 19th it was at 2064. The previous highest total was on April 21st at 2744. The trend is upward, as are the case numbers which increasing exponentially with this wave (702, 930 on April 21st; 4,786,401 on November 19th). I guess you can be grateful for small mercies, but the death rate will inevitably rise with accelerating case numbers such as these, even though the outcomes are better because of improvements in treatment.

    All his is consistent with the arrival of the winter season. Which is no fun, but it happens with coronaviruses every year. I suspect a lot of the case numbers are other coronaviruses being picked up by the various test kits.

    How many? What proportion?

    And due to Trump’s sterling efforts to get vaccines out, despite ridiculous opposition from the Dems, the vaccines will start going to the elderly in nursing homes and medical staff very soon.

    Trump threw money at it. That’s good. What was the “ridiculous opposition?”
    Questioning his assertion that a vaccine would be available before the election wasn’t ridiculous. They were correct.

  136. Bruce of Newcastle

    Numbers – The death rate per day at the first peak was 20% higher than it is now. Yet the case rate now is six times the case rate back then.

    Which puts Covid-19 as less dangerous than normal seasonal flu. It was about 1.5 times worse than flu, but now on these numbers it is only about a third as bad.

    You could put the flu case rates and death rates up also if you want. I’m sure the data is easy to find for such a good researcher as yourself.

  137. calli

    I wonder how Mr. Jones explains the millions of dollars going out every week from those evil white supremacist churches to charitable missions to the poor and underprivileged?

    It’s a confection of what he thinks they think, not supported by what they actually do.

    As Bruce has quoted the scriptures, so will I.

    But wisdom is proved right by her deeds. Matt 11:19

    The context – false accusations by the legalists.

  138. incoherent rambler

    Looking for some news, but this seems to be the digit thread.

  139. incoherent rambler

    Liberty Quote
    Political elites are desperately seeking legitimacy as their grip on power is forcibly relaxed by free world citizens who prefer grassroots government to supranational authority. In reaction to the resurgence of the democratic spirit, liberal elites are tossing Newspeak at the plebs. Thus far, they have turned patriots into xenophobes, democrats into populists, conservatives into ­autocrats, free speech into hate speech and diversity into demagoguery.
    — Jennifer Oriel

    Thanks for that sinclair.

  140. Shy Ted

    There’s a lot more truth in Anne’ world than on the MSM. My fave conspiracy sites have been going gangbusters in recent days, breaking news way ahead of the rest and they’re only reporting what others have uncovered. Lotsa links to the breakers but there’s so much nerdiness in the links I can’t get my head around it. We’re all at least several days behind what’s happening and that’s before any spin is added. Sidney Powell stuff in recent days has, as she said it would be, biblical. My uninformed opinion is that a lot of stuff is just hacked or leaked from deep within. Our side is winning. Can’t say more, you never know who’s watching.

  141. Gilas

    And just like that..

    Bobbsy Numbnutz has them salivating.

  142. duncanm

    1735099
    #3669173, posted on November 24, 2020 at 6:40 am

    News from Texas, a Republican state.

    mobile morgues are clearly for storing covid deaths as a infection control strategy, not because facilities are overrun.

    .. but it makes good news.

    El Paso County:
    Total Covid Deaths to date (from your link) – 853
    Population: 840k
    Deaths due to influenza in 199925 per. 100k (age adjusted)
    Deaths due to influenza in 1999 – approximately 21,000

    (Covid mortality rate to date. 1 in 100k.)

  143. calli

    First cicada of the season spotted on the water-stained buggy track. It was so perfectly disguised I almost stepped on it. Large, dark grey with a flash of orange under the wing.

    Put it in a nearby tree, but it had the death wish and flew back to the track. Oh well.

  144. calli

    Gilas, the Daily Dump is as regular as clockwork. 😀

  145. duncanm

    USA –
    Total deaths – 263,135
    New deaths – 434
    Deaths per million – 795

    Deaths per million in the 1999 flue season – 2,370

  146. duncanm

    sorry – that’s wrong.

    237 per million.

  147. Cassie of Sydney

    “the Daily Dump is as regular as clockwork”

    An appropriate description Calli.

  148. duncanm

    Deaths due to influenza in 1999 – 25 per. 100k (age adjusted)
    Deaths due to influenza in 1999 – approximately 21,000

    too early. need morning coffee.

    1999 influenza deaths would be ~ 2100

  149. Top Ender

    Ol’ ken “Possum Skin Man” isn’t getting much support about his call today for more $$$ for Outback housing…

    My comment got up and here’s a selection below of others. There are 53 comments so far and every one of them disagrees with ol’ Ken:

    Woger of Wome

    The only ones who can close the gap are aboriginals themselves.

    Beniah

    I need a new patio, because I need to sit outside rather than being cooped up when eating. I need a new office built on the back of my house because the broom cupboard I use is undignified for a professional. When is the Government going to look after me? They need to give me these improvements because my house is substandard and I deserve it. I pay taxes, I’m entitled to Government support. Hey, Mr Whyatt, put me on the list too. This Government needs to start looking after us all.

    David
    What about holding the aboriginal organisations to account as well. The Mt land councils are statutory authorities. It’s about tome we made the land rights act work and brought it and the land councils into the twenty first century. The CLC and NLC are the biggest barriers to genuine aboriginal development and up till now Labor has been their strongest supporters. Rearranging the deck chairs won’t stop the titanic from sinking.

    Peter

    This movie is 30 years old.

    Robert

    Obviously money is not getting to all those in need all the time.
    That is classic government and department servants history over the ages.
    However the operative word surely is his reference to “remote”.
    By definition how do you make the services in remote areas equal to suburban.
    people who live remotely should not expect the services of the urban areas of towns and cities.

    Gregory
    and with each demand … the chances of a yes vote re constitutional change recede even further

    David
    Shouldn’t each tribe self-determine their “Gap” targets

    Imposing one-size-fits-all targets across the Nation is very Centralist

    Even if they are imposed by an all-indigenous body

    We’d get a lot more buy-in from tribes, if they set their own targets

    OR were allowed to opt-out

    David

    Housing?

    The census showed that 10% of ATSI housing was vacant

    Some tribes had over 20% vacant

    For example, Aurukun (a big tribe) have 368 houses for 273 families (1287 people)

    But 85 of those houses are empty (23%)

    The typical house is a 3-bedroom with 4 people/house at a rent of $100/week including utilities like water and electricity

    Soylent Majority

    Any time I read about a politician “dreaming bigger” I hear the sound of vast amounts of money being flushed down the toilet.

    Kim

    Come on SM we are only talking about $33,000,000,000+ every year.

  150. Robber Baron

    Is Australia still run as a soviet politburo?

    When will parliamentary democracy return?

  151. calli

    In other news, he doesn’t even drop his cigar. 🤣

    Florida Man Rules!

  152. sfw

    Machetes were the choice of Port Moresby locals and nearly everyone else in PNG back in the 70’s just after so called ‘independence. I got home late one evening pretty drunk, when I opened the door and turned on the light I saw 4 locals making reparations for them selves with my personal items, all had machetes. Being pissed and not too bright, I just stood there, luckily for me they ran out the back door and left with what they could carry. One left his machete behind, I still had it till a few years ago but lost it somewhere in recent moves.

  153. duncanm

    yet another reason not to fly Qantas.

    Qantas chief executive officer Alan Joyce said international travellers hoping to come to Australia would need to be vaccinated against COVID-19.

  154. Cassie of Sydney

    “duncanm
    #3669222, posted on November 24, 2020 at 7:43 am
    yet another reason not to fly Qantas.

    Qantas chief executive officer Alan Joyce said international travellers hoping to come to Australia would need to be vaccinated against COVID-19.”

    Yep…although I suspect other airlines will follow suit.

  155. calli

    Vaccination was always going to be a line item on our passports.

  156. calli

    And they’ll come up with a catchy, hip name for it.

    How does “Vac-visa” sound?

  157. Knuckle Dragger

    Top Ender’s link at 12.59 – Possum Skin Kenny on the spruik:

    ‘“It is unacceptable that so many Indigenous Australians in the NT live in overcrowded and inadequate housing,” he will say, according to a copy of his speech. “People in remote communities should expect their housing services to be provided — just as they would in any other location in Australia.’

    As TE said in his later comment – no. People in remote communities should not expect their housing to ‘be provided’ – and in particular because said houses, made of slab, Besser blocks and iron cost over $1,000,000 each to be built in said communities.

    Of course this is because all the contractors charge like wounded bulls for the privilege. Anyone would. Nobody is going to give away all those additional overheads associated with remote construction for free. Wyatt again:

    ‘“The land councils are continuing to develop a proposal which would see a ­direct partnership established with the commonwealth for the provision of housing services in the NT’

    Which means the land councils want a direct tap into the endless Federal cash, circumventing the NT Gummint (failed local businessmen and bored housewives).

    ‘Mr Wyatt is expected to lash out at Darwin’s “disappointing” attempts to pressure Canberra into renewing a multi-million-dollar deal to co-fund remote ­policing, saying that the ­“solution to our challenges isn’t merely turning to Canberra”.’

    Don’t know why it’s disappointing. Every other State and Territory government does it, but having said that the NT is much more blatant than most:

    ‘The NT government relies on federal funding — an estimated $280m since 2009 — to support at least a dozen remote police stations. But remote community leaders and some activist groups have complained about police resources being diverted to towns.’

    It goes like this. The NT gummint gets a bucket of money from the Feds for X, and to be given to the NT jacks for X. The NTG goes ‘well, let’s siphon off some of that bucket for this, some for my other pet project, some for the other thing (like a $12,000,000 pokies room with a window masquerading as an unneeded grandstand at the racetrack), and the jacks can have what’s left.’

    The NT jacks’ top floor, headed by a bloke who still owes favours to said gummint for giving him the top job after he left as an Assistant Commissioner to head the Department of REMOTE HOUSING before coming back as the Chief, then go ‘well let’s put some of that towards something in Alice Springs and some in Tennant Creek and lots of it in Darwin, because that’s where most of the public attention goes.’

    So out of that bucket for remote cop stuff, there’s a teensy bit of backwash that actually gets it – in traditional fashion, most has been grifted off before it gets there. Hence the wailing about robust processes, which is both expected and unsurprising by fake Ministers wearing fur, because that’s part of the Great Game.

  158. notafan

    My limited observation driving through on a Sunday morning in mid sized town in North Carolina was that blacks went to black run churches and white people went to white people churches.

    The local Catholic church which was new behind original church due to increasing congregation was mixed white Hispanic with a few blacks including some about to be baptised, big RCIA programme was evident as numbers seeking baptism attested.

    If my friends, blue collar non church goers were any indication there was a degree of discomfort with blacks, always super polite to them face to face but cautious about dealing and avoided black neighbourhoods. The cautious was born of experience.

  159. Shy Ted

    Aaagh, my ears. I urge you not to press the little arrow.

  160. notafan

    Will Nannaanna open the border today?

  161. Gilas

    “Gender means nothing unless we are talking things women are better at”

    Liberty quote from Ryan Long

  162. Top Ender

    Comments from the bench are interesting:

    Woman deserved lighter sentence because of her race: lawyer
    JASON WALLS

    A NEW mum who was jailed for six months for her role in a violent home invasion in 2018 should have been given a lighter sentence because she is Aboriginal, a court has heard.

    Bronwyn Bianamu was handed an 18-month prison sentence, suspended after six months, after pleading guilty to unlawful entry and causing harm in October last year.

    In an appeal hearing in the Supreme Court yesterday, her lawyer Mark Thomas argued the penalty was manifestly excessive given she had made it almost all the way through her 20s without a criminal record which was “exceptional” for an Aboriginal woman.

    But an incredulous Justice Judith Kelly said the relatively higher rates of incarceration for Indigenous people in the NT was “a far call” from making the woman’s lack of a criminal record “exceptional”.

    “Have you just made the submission that it’s exceptional for a 29-year-old Aboriginal woman in the Northern Territory not to have a criminal record, is that what you just said?” she said. “That’s the most extraordinary submission I’ve ever heard.”

    Mr Thomas clarified his submission was that “it’s exceptional for her, as an Indigenous person, to go through her life without any difficulties with the criminal law”.

    But Justice Stephen Southwood appeared equally sceptical, noting about one third of the population of the NT was made up of Indigenous people.

    “Now there are not 70,000 people in prison Mr Thomas, nor are there 35,000 women of Aboriginal descent in the NT who have a criminal history,” he said.

    Mr Thomas also submitted the court should take into account the high rates of incarceration for Aboriginal people in general in determining whether Bianamu’s sentence was excessive.

    But Justice Kelly pointed out that position was at odds with an earlier ruling of the High Court and ignoring that precedent would be “a ludicrous proposition”.

    The Court of Appeal will hand down its decision at a date to be fixed.

    NT News print edition

  163. LBLoveday

    Contrast the condemnation by politicians of, and calls for prosecution of the soldiers who killed while waging war at the direction of their government, with politicians legislating for taxpayers paying doctors to kill viable children of 9-months gestation when there are many thousands of people willing to adopt them, even pay handsomely to do so as they do to adopt children from overseas.

  164. Knuckle Dragger

    And a postscript on Possum Ken:

    ‘“Our remote communities should be able to have confidence in their government’s commitment to keeping them safe — it is the first duty of government’

    No it is not the first duty of government to keep people safe who decide, of their own will to live in areas hundreds of kilometres away from specialist medical assistance while in 45 degree heat and surrounded by things that will kill you. And who burn their free accommodation to the ground every time there’s a disagreement or they get the shits on with something.

    The cattle stations – in the NT at least – don’t bitch about not having free medical clinics next door. Every single remote community does. Some, along with some of the mining concerns are so remote they have their own road and fire rescue teams, because they accept that it is part of the price of being so far away from everything.

    The stations and mines, by the way, also have a weird ability to self-regulate the behaviour of punters who play up out there. Apparently, it’s called being sat on your arse.

  165. Mother Lode

    Robert Jones sees religion as a political phenomenon – nothing more.

    It is not a new idea, nor a clever one. But it is all he’s got.

    People like him will labour for hours, tapping out opinions and sneering contempt at everyone who disagrees, but for all his energy he is trapped in a 2-dimensional world view trying to explain a 3-dimensional object that intersects it.

    In a 2-dimensional world a sphere appears just a circle, a cube is a square. A human body would be incomprehensible.

    He sees the whole being of religion purely as politics.

  166. Mother Lode

    Woman deserved lighter sentence because of her race: lawyer

    Fine.

    In her culture what would have been the punishment meted out for taking something not hers?

  167. Bushkid

    Robber Baron
    #3669216, posted on November 24, 2020 at 7:40 am
    Is Australia still run as a soviet politburo?

    When will parliamentary democracy return?

    I’ve been wondering the same thing, RB.

    It’s almost too easy to forget we used to have a Parliament, isn’t it.

  168. Quibbler

    Curious. I can access every other thread but the US election one. A message comes up saying ozblogistan is broken.

  169. Tom

    Quibbler, the Cat is very slow today so Ozblogistan is indeed teetering on the edge of being broken.

    At least it’s not subject of constant denial-of-service attacks that areff tells me have been directed at Quadrant in the past three months, which Quaddie has been forced to fix using outside contractors.

  170. Tom

    Many thanks to rickw for his splendid morning vids. Salty Cracker on Sidney Powell today was especially useful.

    Long live alternative media and the citizen journalists driving it. They’re thriving because mainstream journalists have abandoned the truth-telling business.

  171. Bruce of Newcastle

    CO2 is dangerous stuff.

    Trump Supporter Charged with Assault for Breathing on Protesters (23 Nov)

    A man accused of breathing on anti-Trump protesters outside the president’s golf club in Sterling, Virginia, was charged with misdemeanor assault.

    Kathy Beynette told News4 that she and another woman were protesting President Trump outside the Trump National Golf Club on Saturday. Across the street, a group of Trump supporters were counter protesting…

    “Then, quite out of nowhere, the guy came over from across the street, came charging across the street,” Beynette said…

    In the video, a woman can be heard telling him, “You’re in my face and you don’t have a mask, so you need to back off.” The man then takes a deep breath and blows.

    “He just proceeded to assault us by taking a deep breath and doing a very powerful exhalation on both of us,” Beynette said.

    Kathy Karen wants to speak to the manager!

    Good luck ringing 911 lady after the Dems defund the police.

  172. notafan

    The young woman currently seeking a reduced sentence was party to a violent home invasion, victims including women and iirc there were children in the house.

    This is a current cause de jour for the left intelligentsia, zero sympathy for her aboriginal victims of course.

  173. Roger

    This is a current cause de jour for the left intelligentsia, zero sympathy for her aboriginal victims of course.

    Similar case in regional Qld where nine people broke into the home of a woman to inflict “payback” on her. She died of her injuries. Her partner and child were also assaulted in the attack. The courts would be remiss in their duties if they failed to impose custodial sentences in such cases.

  174. Gab

    Is it my computer or is this site taking forever to refresh?

  175. Roger

    Is it my computer or is this site taking forever to refresh?

    It’s the site.

  176. Knuckle Dragger

    More hamsters!

    Better hamsters!

  177. Mark from Melbourne

    Certainly come good with a vengeance!

    Super-hamsters.

  178. notafan

    It’s very telling that progressives are demanding light or no sentences for Aboriginal criminals while ignoring the right to justice of their victims but not at all surprising.

    Like demanding that someone else provide housing in remote communities while ignoring the violence and despair that are part and parcel of why there is insufficient housing.

    If anyone needs a great reset it is aboriginal communities.
    The fauxoriginals so visible on twitter living comfortable middle class lives in the big cities are not helping.

    .

  179. calli

    And he said the company was looking into the possibility of requiring passengers to have a vaccination passport which would allow them to travel.

    Bother. I shouldn’t have given them ideas.

  180. Cassie of Sydney

    “Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)
    #3669359, posted on November 24, 2020 at 12:01 pm
    Qantas passengers will need COVID-19 vaccine for international travel, Alan Joyce says”

    Joyce is such a fascist.

  181. Runnybum

    Joyce can fk off the little Irish bastard.

  182. Mark from Melbourne

    It’s the site.

    The Doomlord has just learned that the upper bound of a thread, even with the super-hamsters, is somewhat less than 2800 comments.

  183. Bruce of Newcastle

    Qantas passengers will need COVID-19 vaccine for international travel, Alan Joyce says

    Excellent reason for not flying with his airline.
    Some other airline will understand the benefits of not preaching to their prospective customers.

  184. thefrollickingmole

    I wonder If Joyce would require the same level of precaution for that other epidemic from the 80’s
    AIDs.
    And have it marked on peoples passports?

  185. duncanm

    People in remote communities should expect their housing services to be provided — just as they would in any other location in Australia.

    really. I await my free new digs with anticipation.

  186. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Ol’ ken “Possum Skin Man” isn’t getting much support about his call today for more $$$ for Outback housing…

    The lurk in some of those communities is that you have two houses – one in your “tribal ” name and the other in your “whitefella” name. You live in one, while the other is repaired, rinse and repeat.

  187. Dr Faustus

    In The Requirements of Dr Young news:

    Queensland to allow Sydney visitors from December1 as coronavirus border restrictions relaxed

    “Dr Young is now satisfied that they have reached the 28 days. So, can I say to New South Wales, we will welcome you to Queensland from December 1.

    “We know how tough this has been on families — this is a great day, it’s exciting news and it has met the requirements that Dr Young has set.”

    Not instantly clear why, NSW having reached ‘the 28 days’, we need to wait a further week to travel to Sydney. But very positive and wonderful, nonetheless.

    Ms Palaszczuk said NSW Premier Gladys Berejiklian was “very positive” on hearing the news.

    “It’s wonderful to be back in communication with the New South Wales Premier,” Ms Palaszczuk said.

    Presumably the embargo was part of Dr Young’s Patent 28-day Elixir.

  188. Mother Lode

    Joyce is such a fascist.

    Large organisations have created vast labyrinthine HR departments that have budded off more little departments. They do not have anything to do most of the time because people are grown up and know how to work with each other.

    So they must find ways off keeping themselves busy – so they can make a case as to why they are important to the business and why they should get pay rises.

    They are not especially trained in anything real. But COVID has been a boon. They have been able to sit in group meetings and let their minds run wild with ‘ideas’ about dealing with COVID. They are not able to scientifically assess the problem or the efficacy of their ideas.

    (A little like AGW where the idea that CO2 has the capacity to make temperatures rise was never tested against the amounts that would be involved, no notion of logarithmic scaling, EM frequencies and orbital energies, the vast and steady processes that remove CO2 from the atmosphere etc. Just “CO2 makes things hotter!”)

    So they declare handshakes are dangerous – let’s bump elbows instead! Breathing is dangerous – quick! Get a mask! And so on. Make busy!

    And then senior people hear about it and relish the opportunity to show how caring they are. The alternative is to call out the stupid, but then they could be labelled dismissive of other people’s health.

    Tards all.

  189. thefrollickingmole

    Not instantly clear why, NSW having reached ‘the 28 days’

  190. The ongoing Davos Reset…

    The leaked European Commission proposal on Sustainable Finance Taxonomy is worrying and infuriating for industries and businesses in Finland and across the Nordics.

    If implemented, the proposed EU legislation would treat existing carbon-free technologies such as hydro and nuclear separately from new carbon-free technologies like wind and solar. This means that hydro and nuclear – which already ensures electricity production in the Nordic countries is 90% CO2-free – risk becoming labelled as non-sustainable.

  191. From KD:

    No it is not the first duty of government to keep people safe … live in areas hundreds of kilometres away from specialist medical assistance…
    …cattle stations … don’t bitch about not having free medical clinics next door. Every single remote community does [bitch].

    Even when the govt (i.e. taxpayers) build a free medical clinic in a remote community, that community is apt to make it harder & more expensive to do so, including stonewalling the build.

    Dunno how long the clinic at a place (let’s say it was Lajamanu) was held up by negotiations over how much cash would be paid to ‘the community’ for the footprint of land required for the clinic.

    It was more than a year, possibly two, plus millions of $$ (possibly more than ten M) just to obtain the ‘permission’ to build a (free) medical clinic there.

  192. Dr Faustus

    Excellent reason for not flying with his airline.
    Some other airline will understand the benefits of not preaching to their prospective customers.

    Not a faintest chance, I fear.
    The Inner Nanny is out of the cage and running hard.

    Once the Ronavaccine hits our shores, after an interval to allow the nomenklatura to be jabbed twice, there will be a tsunami of personal regulation – leading to multi-purpose internal passports and an effective Social Credit system.

    Public transport is a dead cert. As is unimpeded access to public and private services: a long, slow spaced out queue at the counter for non-passport holders; special, premium-priced ‘lurgi-seating’ at sporting events/theatre/restaurants. From next year.

    Then mission creep:

    – Buy a packet of durries – the OziCard smart chip links to the register;
    – Sugary drinks – Big Doctor knows, and up goes the Medicare levy in anticipation;
    – More than 1.35 standard drinks – a text to your phone, and a limit to your next purchase;

    The only people who could object are wheezing, fat wreck, drunks who hate Australians enjoying the gift of CovidNormal.

  193. Cassie of Sydney

    “Mother Lode
    #3669396, posted on November 24, 2020 at 12:37 pm
    Joyce is such a fascist.

    Large organisations have created vast labyrinthine HR departments that have budded off more little departments.”

    Yep, I work for one such organisation.

  194. Mother Lode

    Yep, I work for one such organisation.

    Ditto.

    My company has only just let us back into the office and only at 25% capacity maximum. Every second seat is flagged that cannot be used so people do not infect each other. The walls are covered with ‘reminders’ about no eating at desks, no more than 4 people in the kitchen at a time (it normally handles 15 at a time at lunch), the coffee mugs have been removed, and the dishwashers taped shut.

    In the Mens rooms they have marked the ones that cannot be used because of distancing policy. How long do they think people stand there. Or that they turn their heads enough to breath on each other?

    One brain fart after another.

  195. Tom

    Daily newspapers have people whose designated job title is “leader writer”, whose job it is to write the daily editorials. Thankfully, even though it is at war with its readers by allowing the junior staff Maoists curating online feedback to ban comments that don’t support their toddler’s view of the world, the Paywallian still has good leader writers, who supplied the only worthwhile piece of writing at the otherwise useless rag today — on a subject I am currently researching:

    Time to nourish the news guzzled by the digital feed
    Two decades ago, that canny rock star David Bowie told a bemused BBC interviewer: “I don’t think we’ve even seen the tip of the iceberg. I think the potential of what the internet is going to do to society, both good and bad, is unimaginable.” He knew a thing or two about changes. It’s easy to forget the simple-minded utopianism with which the worldwide web began. The same goes for social media, which was going to connect us all for a great big hug. That’s not to say it has been all bad; far from it. But for all its bonuses, living online seems linked to some disturbing trends in teen mental health, social conflict, educational challenges and political derangement. Deeply implicated in all this is the contested role of the plutocratic tech platforms such as Google and Facebook.

    It’s worth setting the scene like this to highlight how absurd it would be if politicians and regulators kept their hands off the policy levers and just let the digital revolution roll on, hoping for the best. Almost three years ago, when he was treasurer, Scott Morrison set the Australian Competition & Consumer Commission to work on the digital platforms inquiry. Now his Treasurer, Josh Frydenberg, promises that a new mandatory code to govern relations between the tech platforms and the news media will be ready by next month. The reaction of the platforms — stonewalling the idea of a voluntary code, attacking the regulator and spamming the citizenry with misinformation — has been unworthy of their intelligence and expertise.

    Simple facts testify to the case for a regulatory reset. On mobile devices, Google enjoys 98 per cent of online searches in Australia. About 8 per cent to 14 per cent of Google search results turn up news reports, the fruit of years of investment by media organisations. Facebook has 17 million users scrolling through for at least a half-hour a day. Of every $100 spent on online advertising across the nation, $47 is pocketed by Google and $24 by Facebook; the total spend is about $9bn a year. What kind of competition regulator would ignore such unprecedented market concentration and power?

    But this is not just about dollars, it’s about minds and votes. The ACCC inquiry’s final report in June last year documents the catastrophic decline in advertising revenue for news media as the digital platforms hoovered up their business clients. That was revenue relied on to invest in the costly enterprise of journalism, turning out the news reports and commentary that the tech platforms wove, without financial compensation, into their products to keep the eyeballs coming. Diligent and accurate news bulletins and analysis are the lifeblood of an informed electorate and a functioning democracy able to debate and overcome its challenges, and to showcase its talents and opportunities to galvanise the creation of jobs, wealth and all manner of social and cultural achievements. A viable news media is a clever country in constant conversation with itself.

    This is why the government and the regulator are driving policy reform to serve public goods in the national interest. The tech platforms are dead wrong to suggest this is an exercise to cater to traditional news media as a sectional interest. In Europe and the US as well, politicians and antitrust authorities also are keenly focused on how to ensure that this new information landscape is optimised for society and does not become a dystopia. The ACCC approach is being closely watched around the world, and rightly so. It involves some clever and innovative ideas about how to remedy the bargaining power imbalance between news media and the tech behemoths, and how to counter the lack of transparency of these vast digital enterprises and their murky algorithms.

    On Monday’s Commentary page, former newspaper executive Greg Hywood made clear the links between the digital platforms enriching themselves at the expense of news media, the collapse of mastheads, the loss of reporters’ jobs and regional coverage, and a dangerous weakening in the ability of the fourth estate to hold institutions and those in power accountable by means of effective journalistic scrutiny.

    As the tech giants connect up individuals, they degrade the information needed by societies. The ACCC put it this way: “Consumers accessing news through digital platforms potentially risk exposure to unreliable news through ‘filter bubbles’ and the spread of disinformation, malinformation and misinformation (‘fake news’) online.” Social media certainly empowers the self-expression of citizens but all this online opinionising depends on the raw material of news reporting — and its quality. Precisely because current social media reinforces existing bias and taps into anger, fear and outrage, there has never been more need for coolly accurate news writing and explanation if we are to check political hysteria and encourage sound decisions.

    Perhaps when the posturing is over, the tech platforms will see that deeper collaboration with news media is in everyone’s interest. Social media madness is building a constituency that hungers for something more thoughtful and nuanced. There is no reason new online platforms cannot be designed, and buttressed with journalism, to reinvent a public sphere in which people can have good-faith debate and nudge towards compromise positions on the basis of shared facts and non-fake news. That shouldn’t be beyond our digital wits.

  196. Arky

    Conservative parties across the world.
    We don’t want your surrendering on social policies.
    We don’t care about your fucking small tax reductions.
    We don’t want your fucking conscience votes on killing babies from your broad church of fakes.
    We don’t want your bipartisan surrenders on the stuff that actually matters.
    We don’t want your slimy apologetic grins when the ABC frames us as “mean”.
    We don’t want to hear your labels for us, “clingers” and “delcons” and “deplorables”.
    We don’t want to hear about your views on renewables, you don’t know a fucking thing about it.
    We don’t care about your purity on tariffs.
    We don’t want your John Howards.
    We don’t want your Boris Johnsons.
    We don’t want your fucking Malcolm Turnbulls.
    We don’t want your Mitch Romneys.
    We don’t want your John McCains, Paul Ryans, Theresa Mays or Amanda Vanstones.
    We don’t want your losers. We don’t want your fake protest “conservatives” who form parties, take names and then surrender after the first poll set back.
    If you are one of “we” then you are the future of popular conservatism.
    Put these losers in the past.

  197. Arky

    Conservative parties across the world.
    We don’t want your surrendering on social policies.
    We don’t care about your fucking small tax reductions.
    We don’t want your fucking conscience votes on killing babies from your broad church of fakes.
    We don’t want your bipartisan surrenders on the stuff that actually matters.
    We don’t want your slimy apologetic grins when the ABC frames us as “mean”.
    We don’t want to hear your labels for us, “clingers” and “delcons” and “deplorables”.
    We don’t want to hear about your views on renewables, you don’t know a fucking thing about it.
    We don’t care about your purity on tariffs.
    We don’t want your John Howards.
    We don’t want your Boris Johnsons.
    We don’t want your fucking Malcolm Turnbulls.
    We don’t want your Mitch Romneys.
    We don’t want your John McCains, Paul Ryans, Theresa Mays or Amanda Vanstones.
    We don’t want your losers. We don’t want your fake protest “conservatives” who form parties, take names and then surrender after the first poll set back.
    If you are one of “we” then you are the future of popular conservatism.
    Put these losers in the past.

  198. thefrollickingmole

    More swamp thing than man…
    Antony Blinken: Biden’s secretary of state nominee is sharp break with Trump era

    Obama administration

    From 2009 to 2013, he served as Deputy Assistant to the President and National Security Advisor to the Vice President. In this position he also helped craft U.S. policy on Afghanistan, Pakistan, and the Iranian nuclear program.

    Blinken supported the 2011 military intervention in Libya[26] and the supply of weapons to Syrian rebels.

    He condemned the 2016 Turkish coup d’état attempt and expressed full support for the democratically elected Turkish government and its institutions.

    In April 2015, Blinken voiced support for the Saudi Arabian-led intervention in Yemen.[29] He said that “As part of that effort, we have expedited weapons deliveries, we have increased our intelligence sharing, and we have established a joint coordination planning cell in the Saudi operation centre.”

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tony_Blinken

  199. thefrollickingmole

    But dont worry, any link to Soros/open society is just a conspiracy theory.

    https://www.osaarchivum.org/press-room/announcements/OSA-was-renamed-Vera-and-Donald-Blinken-Open-Society-Archives
    The Central European University (CEU)’s Open Society Archives (OSA) was renamed the Vera and Donald Blinken Open Society Archives in honor of the couple, who have provided a major bequest to sustain the institution.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Open_Society_Archives
    OSA Archivum (abbreviated as OSA, short for Open Society Archives at the Central European University) is an archival repository and laboratory that aims to explore new ways of assessing, contextualizing, presenting, and making use of archival documents both in a professional and a consciously activist way. It was founded by George Soros in 1995.

  200. Arky

    Most of all, we don’t care about your extra $5.62 cents in the pocket from fiddling around the edges of taxation while the whole thing goes down the shithole because you can’t be bothered making the case for conservative, Christian, traditional ideals because you are frightened of the abuse from people who will never vote for you.
    And we are going to join that list, as it is the only thing that grabs your attention.

  201. Bruce of Newcastle

    Haha, Mr Radioactive thinks rubbishing Deloitte is unjustified. Mr Radioactive, have you been under a rock this last several decades that Chris Richardson has been ABC’s go-to economic talking head? Or that anyone who commissions and pays for a consultancy to write a report about how good they are almost certainly is in the whitewash business? We are not idiots, even if you are.

    When they open their books on the modelling, the assumptions and the methodology AND get it independently audited THEN someone might believe it. When I do such analysis that’s what happens to my modelling. But then I’ve not worked for a giant lefty self-important taxpayer-funded kolkhoz like the ABC, I do my work for companies who make actual stuff.

  202. Bruce of Newcastle

    Oops, that was supposed to go onto the ABC thread.
    As you were.

  203. C.L.

    On Monday’s Commentary page, former newspaper executive Greg Hywood made clear the links between the digital platforms enriching themselves at the expense of news media, the collapse of mastheads, the loss of reporters’ jobs and regional coverage, and a dangerous weakening in the ability of the fourth estate to hold institutions and those in power accountable by means of effective journalistic scrutiny.

    Yeah, we’ve all noticed how much the legacy media scrutinises institutions and those in power.

    As the tech giants connect up individuals, they degrade the information needed by societies.

    Que?

    The ACCC put it this way: “Consumers accessing news through digital platforms potentially risk exposure to unreliable news through ‘filter bubbles’ and the spread of disinformation, malinformation and misinformation (‘fake news’) online.” Social media certainly empowers the self-expression of citizens but all this online opinionising depends on the raw material of news reporting — and its quality. Precisely because current social media reinforces existing bias and taps into anger, fear and outrage, there has never been more need for coolly accurate news writing and explanation if we are to check political hysteria and encourage sound decisions.

    Nope. People beieve they can sif through what they see online and form their own opinions. They don’t need Louise Milligan and Barrie Cassidy to do it for them anymore. Sorry. Ba-bye.

  204. Mother Lode

    The reaction of the platforms — stonewalling the idea of a voluntary code, attacking the regulator and spamming the citizenry with misinformation — has been unworthy of their intelligence and expertise.

    But all too worthy of the motivations that their intelligence and expertise serve – dominance, power, and a political agenda.

  205. Tom

    Tucker Carlson Tonight — the opening segment is must-watch on Silicon Valley’s role in shifting millions of votes in the 2020 election.

  206. Knuckle Dragger

    ‘We don’t want your surrendering on social policies.
    We don’t care about your fucking small tax reductions.
    We don’t want your fucking conscience votes on killing babies from your broad church of fakes.
    We don’t want your bipartisan surrenders on the stuff that actually matters.
    We don’t want your slimy apologetic grins when the ABC frames us as “mean”.
    We don’t want to hear your labels for us, “clingers” and “delcons” and “deplorables”.
    We don’t want to hear about your views on renewables, you don’t know a fucking thing about it.
    We don’t care about your purity on tariffs.
    We don’t want your John Howards.
    We don’t want your Boris Johnsons.
    We don’t want your fucking Malcolm Turnbulls.
    We don’t want your Mitch Romneys.
    We don’t want your John McCains, Paul Ryans, Theresa Mays or Amanda Vanstones.
    We don’t want your losers. We don’t want your fake protest “conservatives” who form parties, take names and then surrender after the first poll set back.’

    Outstanding, and written by a man I assume is now clad in possum pelts.

  207. Runnybum

    Arky, I agree, but most of the population in Australia will vote for the same shite at every election.
    A lot on this site too, they will vote for the same corrupt thieving bastards & wonder how it all went wrong.
    Dumb fks just keep voting for the Uniparty.

  208. Mother Lode

    Blinken supported the 2011 military intervention in Libya[26] and the supply of weapons to Syrian rebels.

    Failure should always be rewarded, right?

  209. thefrollickingmole

    Mother Lode

    Also neck deep in the pallets of cash to the Iranians as well.

  210. Arky

    Right.
    This is what we do.
    We DO NOT form another phony conservative party that gets instantaneously infiltrated by spivs, saboteurs and nutters.
    We start an organisation to encourage, support and rate independent conservative candidates.
    An organisation with a strict definition of conservative, which can’t be broken, intimidated or infiltrated and isn’t hostage to any one candidate.

  211. Runnybum

    Arky, all good ideas, but we first need to educate people that voting for the same shit ain’t working, starting on this site might help.

  212. notafan

    When did we last get ‘coolly accurate’?

    Progressive journalists were outraged, wanting to lodge complaints because the woman who committed a terrorist assault in a Melbourne prison was (accurately) described as wearing a jihad.

    The only paper that ever does any ‘straight reporting’ is the herald sun.

  213. Roger

    Blinken supported the 2011 military intervention in Libya…

    Nobody involved in that unmitigated disaster should ever again hold public office.

  214. MatrixTransform

    My company has only just let us back into the office and only at 25% capacity maximum.

    I wonder why not 18.6% 0r say, 27.2% ??

    In the Mens rooms they have marked the ones that cannot be used because of distancing policy. How long do they think people stand there. Or that they turn their heads enough to breath on each other?

    off course, it’s perfectly ok for a stream of fellas to stand on the same spot and take a slash into the same trough though … right?

    One brain fart after another.

    I suspect there were not actually brains involved at all

  215. Arky

    The problem with parties is this: true believers tend to be nutters, and the politically sensible tend to be spivs.

  216. Runnybum

    Notaclue, there is no paper in Australia that does any ‘straight reporting’.
    You are as naive as that statement that the conjob vaccine is 100% safe.
    Wake up ya dumb bint, come pick bananas with me, ya might learn something.

  217. Arky

    And those who are neither spivs nor nutters are probably paid to be there to ensure it’s failure.

  218. Mother Lode

    Just read an interesting quote attributed to Saint Augustine:

    The truth is like a lion; you don’t have to defend it.
    Let it loose. It will defend itself.

    Whether it is correctly attributed or misattributed, it is a brilliant thought.

    The left are always trying to protect us from errors and to present us with a carefully prepared and approved ‘truth’.

    They like to present it as if there are statements which are signed off as true by authorities such as them which are not obviously truthful by themselves. They selflessly volunteer to do all that for us.

    No agenda. Love of humanity. You get the idea.

  219. Runnybum

    Arky, I would like to see recall laws & term limits, also no family mambers employed even if they deny family surnames….I am looking at you Krudd & many others.

  220. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Aha. Only just saw it. Qld border open.

    Making plans to see our new grandson, asap. Means pushing the diary around a bit though.

  221. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Yeah, we’ve all noticed how much the legacy media scrutinises institutions and those in power.

    Yes. Their coverage of President Trump over the past four year and during the run up to the election, and now their fairness in covering the electoral has been spot on unbiased in every way. They really socked it to Joe Biden about his business in the Ukraine and pulled him up when he clearly didn’t have a clue what he was talking about, reporting completely with an even hand on the two campaigns/ sarc off.

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