Told you so and telling you again.

More Chump effect from our national leaders.

Hot on the heals of the news that:

(Matthias) Cormann, a Liberal Party power broker and Australia’s longest-serving finance minister, left the Senate in October to run for the job and is travelling around Europe on a Royal Australian Air Force Falcon jet to rally support. Europe is central to Cormann’s push as it is home to 26 of the OECD’s 38 member countries. Full membership for the latest entry, Costa Rica, is still in train but they will also have a view on the next secretary-general.

Comes the news of the cost of this diamond class junket:

An RAAF jet, which reports say costs $4000 for every hour it is used, remains on standby for the former finance minister. He has already racked up 20,000 kilometres in the RAAF Dassault 7X.

Oh and by the way:

If his bid were successful, Mr Cormann would earn a tax-free salary of $383,000.

This would almost certainly be on top of his parliamentary superannuation.

Good thing the RBA is printing money hand over fist.  Imagine a fiscally constrained government.

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58 Responses to Told you so and telling you again.

  1. Mak Siccar

    This is nothing more than an expensive thank you – courtesy of us taxpayers – for staying on as finance minister longer than what he originally wanted. The political ‘class’ are classless scum. A pox on 90% of them.

  2. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    Why do politicians get tax free salaries?!?!?!?!?!?!? outrageous!!!

  3. Roger

    From the government that gave us Robodebt.

  4. Bruce of Newcastle

    He most certainly will be a chump because anyone with a brain knows that no Aussie will run the OECD.

    One look at the membership tells you this.

    The EU lot will agitate for an EU kiddie. Turkey will want a Turk, and will accuse everyone of Is lamophobia if they don’t get it. The South Americans will say it’s their turn, even though the current guy is a Mexican. All the progs will say it must be a wymminses, preferably black. In that cacophany of wokeness Cormann has no chance. Therefore the whole jetting about in the RAAF thing is a total waste of money, effort and diplomatic brownie points.

    And on top of everything picking Cormann would piss off China. That’s something the OECD won’t ever do. ScoMo would be better off picking out the most harmless candidate from some tiny country and back them.

  5. thefrollickingmole

    A taxpayer funded “look at Moi” trip to burnish his credentials before he takes up a dozen boardships on government subsidized companies.

    Anyway if you are jealous theres nothing to stop you from chartering your own jet and doing the same… peasant.

  6. John Dee

    $4000/hr?
    Dry cost – no crew.
    Maybe.
    Fuel it up and add the cost of crew and the odd (or 5) bottle/s of fine wine plus canapés and meals.
    Add an on-call provision – i.e. crew on continual standby.
    Add crew 4 star accommodation + meals cost.
    $8000 possibly $10,000/hr

  7. There’s no doubt Cormann would be good in the job. He’s very professional and a small government, low tax supporter.
    The question for Australian taxpayers is whether having an Australian as head of OECD is in our national interests. If it is, it’s worth spending some money on helping him get the job. Other candidates will certainly do that.
    If it’s not worth it, I’d like to hear why. OECD is certainly highly influential in economic circles.
    But his tax free salary would be funded by OECD, not Australia.

  8. Daily llama

    Sometimes you can only laugh. Apparently it’s money well spent so he doesn’t get covid! Must be something about the shape of his Belgian jaw that prohibits the wearing of a mask for protection like us mere commoners. (This enthralling news comes via that paragon of journalistic rectitude, The Guardian. I’m abashed to admit I bought The Guardian Weekly once. I was unwell at the time…)

  9. Texas Jack

    OECD is apparently crucial according to ScoBrains? What chance Cormann is being quietly repaid for services rendered?

  10. Ed Case

    The problem with Australia supporting Cormann getting the OECD job is this:
    Let’s say Cormann champions something that isn’t in Australia’s best interests.
    What can we say?
    We lobbied for him to get the job, he got the job, tough titties.
    He wouldn’t do that, I hear you say.
    Why not, he’s only been an Australian for 10 years, he still can’t speak English, and I’m assuming he’s left Australia for good.
    What’s the latest on his cheroot puffing buddy Hockey?
    Has he returned to live in Australia?

  11. Ed Case

    Services rendered like fucking over Dutton’s run for PM?

  12. Bruce of Newcastle

    The question for Australian taxpayers is whether having an Australian as head of OECD is in our national interests.

    Great to see your comment David, but it’s still true that Cormann has zero chance in the fruity nationalist gumbo that is the OECD. It’s a waste of diplomatic energy to attempt it. And even a negative with China being so nasty lately. We should keep our heads down and our powder dry.

    As I said it would be better if ScoMo picked an ally with a competent candidate and backed them. Then give Cormann an ambassadorship to somewhere nice.

  13. Angus Black

    If his bid were successful, Mr Cormann would earn a tax-free salary of $383,000

    I don’t know about “earn”, but no doubt he’d “receive” the salary.

  14. Art Vandelay

    This demonstrates that the raison d’être of today’s Liberal Party is to gain and hold on to power so that they can provide taxpayer funded sinecures and perks for party hacks who lack the talent and ability to find a real job in the private sector. The Liberals are not interested in reform or improving the lives of Australians (apart from themselves).

    Interestingly, we were told that while a position at the OECD was considered to be prestigious for Australian bureaucrats and there was fierce competition for spots (in particular because you get to live in France on a tax-free salary), most European governments used the OECD as a dumping ground for incompetent staff that they could not fire.

  15. W Hogg

    If he flew Emirates or Etihad first class he would have a private room on the plane. Hard to catch COVID that way. That might cost $20k.

    SloMo said there is a strong national interest in having an Aussie in the job. And I am sympathetic to that view. (If it’s not Kevni or St Malcolm.) I’m open to hear the case. But so far I haven’t heard it.

  16. Roger

    The question for Australian taxpayers is whether having an Australian as head of OECD is in our national interests. If it is, it’s worth spending some money on helping him get the job.

    Under which budget line will I find this expenditure listed?

  17. Texas Jack

    Art V, the Liberals are f—cking the joint knowingly. Morrison is doing a reverse-Clinton with a triple pike, with triangulation that would make Dick Morris blush. At this point I’d rather be triangulated by Albo than the turds in charge now.

  18. Bear Necessities

    There’s no doubt Cormann would be good in the job. He’s very professional and a small government, low tax supporter.
    The question for Australian taxpayers is whether having an Australian as head of OECD is in our national interests. If it is, it’s worth spending some money on helping him get the job. Other candidates will certainly do that.
    If it’s not worth it, I’d like to hear why. OECD is certainly highly influential in economic circles.
    But his tax free salary would be funded by OECD, not Australia.

    Sorry David, he may be a supporter of low tax and small government that but as Finance Minister he didn’t practise it.

  19. Art Vandelay

    Sorry David, he may be a supporter of low tax and small government that but as Finance Minister he didn’t practise it.

    Spot on. It’s much like Frydenberg’s apparent admiration for Thatcher and Reagan.

    Frydenberg and the rest of the Liberals are pygmies in comparison to those two.

  20. miltonf

    He’s very professional and a small government, low tax supporter.

    Give me a break. It’s bad enough that he was elected by the people of WA to represent them and he is reneging.

  21. egg_

    From the government that gave us Robodebt.

    Teh Cormannator flies RoboJet at our expense?

    Their Political class, comrade.

  22. miltonf

    This demonstrates that the raison d’être of today’s Liberal Party is to gain and hold on to power so that they can provide taxpayer funded sinecures and perks for party hacks who lack the talent and ability to find a real job in the private sector. The Liberals are not interested in reform or improving the lives of Australians (apart from themselves).

    Precisely- what a chump I was for paying membership fees and donating. Does Trumble pay his annual subscription or is he a life member?

  23. Albatross

    Old and busted: military as an effective fighting force. New hotness: military as praetorian guard and occasional taxi service for our elites.

  24. Albatross

    miltonf
    #3670848, posted on November 25, 2020 at 6:58 pm
    This demonstrates that the raison d’être of today’s Liberal Party is to gain and hold on to power so that they can provide taxpayer funded sinecures and perks

    There.is.only.one.party.

  25. Albatross

    Piss off Ed Case you fathead. We’re talking about something serious here. Go back to shitting up the open and election threads.

  26. miltonf

    Remember the scheme to give aspiring apparatchiks overseas trips on the taxpayer’s dime? ANUs ALP club members used it to pull down Trump signs in the US. The Liberals never abolished it- when asked they said it had been ‘transferred’.

  27. Noddy

    Reading his bio, obviously Mr Cormann is a very ambitious man!
    What does membership of the OECD cost the Australian tax-payer?
    Using the Falcon jet is not a problem because it is justified as a ‘navigation exercise’ with ‘intelligence gathering’ potential.

  28. Snotball

    Completely done with both major parties and the greens. As far right as I can go!

  29. Ed Case

    From Cormann’s Wiki Bio:
    On the ABC’s Stateline program on 27 April 2007, Lightfoot stated that he considered Cormann (although he stopped short of naming him) an “inappropriate person” to replace him. Lightfoot’s main complaint was that there were “more appropriate people” to succeed him “who have served the party longer” and “who have been in the country longer”.[21]
    Not appropriate, yet Scotty is sending him to Paris to represent us.

    When Senator Ian Campbell unexpectedly announced his planned resignation on 4 May 2007, Cormann was quickly preselected by the party to fill the resulting casual vacancy.[20]
    That sentence doesn’t make sense. Didn’t Campbell run into strife over the Orange Bellied Night Parrot?
    Anyway, Cormann’s bio is similar to Kevin Rudd’s.
    Both claim to have cold called a powerful politician, got a cool job, and a rails run into Parliament.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mathias_Cormann

  30. Albatross

    Noddy
    #3670883, posted on November 25, 2020 at 7:18 pm
    Reading his bio, obviously Mr Cormann is a very ambitious man!
    What does membership of the OECD cost the Australian tax-payer?

    “Anti-dumping”, anti-competitive tax policy for a start. So just our freedom to do business, and our national sovereignty. No big deal.

  31. Albatross

    Piss off Ed. Nobody reads your shitty posts.

  32. Albatross

    Snotball
    #3670885, posted on November 25, 2020 at 7:23 pm
    Completely done with both major parties and the greens. As far right as I can go!

    Not yet buddy.

  33. Albatross

    The 12m Euro we give them I’d happily pay for them to just bugger off.

  34. Nicholas (Unlicensed Joker) Gray

    Let’s not forget that he hopes to join the O.E.C.D. This organization always calls for more taxes, according to International Freedom. So he’s costing us money now to join a gang who want to raise our taxes in the future! No thanks!

  35. Mark M

    Heard Scomo on 2gb and Ben Fordham talking about this.

    Scomo said the government was paying.

    Of course the taxpayer pays, not the government.

    It’s worth a listen if your blood pressure is low.

  36. H B Bear

    Nothing says low tax, small government like a $4k an hour RAAF jet. A true Lieboral elder statesman.

    It is hard to imagine anything Cormann could do that would be worth $4k an hour. What is the going rate for speed humps? Good to see SloMo off his shiny arse to defend this. Another nail in the coffin.

  37. H B Bear

    I suppose he is on his way to London to deliver another one of those Lieboral values speeches. Or to be out of the country as gross debt ticks over one trillion dollars on the Lieboral watch.

    At least they are not the Liars.

  38. Chris M

    OK this guy is no different to a say big union boss, so for a positive spin:

    Very unlikely to be any ballot fraud and vote switching in Australia. The two parties and their politicians are so alike (uni-party) it makes no difference where the votes go so they have little intrinsic value. In fact we don’t even need to vote, they just have a power sharing roster system now.

  39. miltonf

    The two parties and their politicians are so alike (uni-party) it makes no difference where the votes go so they have little intrinsic value. In fact we don’t even need to vote, they just have a power sharing roster system now.

    The ChiComs were right many years ago when they said Aust political parties take turns in ‘running’ the country.

  40. Perfidious Albino

    Bronwyn Bishop must be spitting chips now, after get rolled for flying to Geelong in a helo…

    Just waiting for Kevin and Malcolm to put in their respective requests for use of the Falcon 7 (to further Australia’s interests, natch…)

    Kevin will also be shitty that Cormann is being backed into this OECD role on a bipartisan basis and that he didn’t get the same level of support for his pipe dreams – probably explains why he’s been so up and about lately.

  41. Amused

    Roger
    #3670742, posted on November 25, 2020 at 5:45 pm
    From the government that gave us Robodebt.

    Are Labor back? They gave us Robodebt.

  42. Snotball

    And they wonder why society had become so corrupt. Fine example our leaders provide.

  43. LBLoveday

    “This would almost certainly be on top of his parliamentary superannuation.”

    Howard/Latham closed the Parliamentary Pension scheme to newcomers in 2004 and Cormann was first elected in 2007, hence is entitled to access his lump sum superannuation under the same conditions as other Australians.

  44. gowest

    It will be interesting to see what Cormann can achieve for us. Anyone who can successfully negotiate with our cess-pit of a senate is a force to be reckoned with.

  45. Neil

    I think from 1996-2007 Howard/Costello ran the country.

    Since 2007 the Public Service has been running the country

  46. Aynsley Kellow

    Well said David Leyonhjelm.

    Having co-authored two books on the OECD (one specifically on Australia’s participation), it seems to me you sum up the case well. The OECD certainly has its faults, but of all the international organisations it does good work – albeit quietly.

    There is value in having a good candidate for S-G. We put forward Alan Fels when it was last vacant, but the post is normally filled by a former minister and Fels did not tick the box.

    And rather than likely to be filled by a EU pick, someone from the APEC group has a good chance of balancing the competing blocs each side of the Atlantic.

    Good luck to him.

    Cue the abuse.

  47. Nob

    Thanks Aynsley and David for your contributions.

    The OECD isn’t the usual UN dictators club spinoff, ( see members list ) although susceptible to O’Sullivan’s Law of course.

  48. Albatross

    Aynsley Kellow
    #3671062, posted on November 25, 2020 at 11:05 pm
    Well said David Leyonhjelm.

    Having co-authored two books on the OECD (one specifically on Australia’s participation), it seems to me you sum up the case well. The OECD certainly has its faults, but of all the international organisations it does good work – albeit quietly.

    Name two of its “good works”.

  49. Albatross

    http://www.oecd.org/tax/beps/

    Defend this geniuses. Do you know how this works?

  50. miltonf

    Nice trips paid for by other people who are not nomenklatura.

  51. Entropy

    Neil
    #3671048, posted on November 25, 2020 at 10:39 pm
    I think from 1996-2007 Howard/Costello ran the country.

    Since 2007 the Public Service has been running the country

    Quite so.

  52. Aynsley Kellow

    Albatross:
    The development of policy on Good Laboratory Practice and Mutual Acceptance of Data that limit use of chemical risk management policies as disguised barriers to trade.
    Development of standard that facilitate international electronic commerce.
    Periodic peer reviews of policy, including economic policy.
    Conduct of the Program of International Assessment of Student Achievement (PISA) that tell us how our education system is tracking (not very well).
    Upholding its core codes of a commitment to trade liberalisation.
    etc.
    Just because its work is quiet does not mean it is not effective. In fact, probably more so.

  53. Tel

    Defend this geniuses. Do you know how this works?

    Looks like they are organizing a cartel to prevent open competition amongst tax jurisdictions.

    Like the guy said … quiet achievers.

  54. Tel

    If his bid were successful, Mr Cormann would earn a tax-free salary of $383,000.

    There’s the first place we can tighten up our leaky tax boat … full income tax applied to all the “tax free” salaries on these international organizations, and compulsory super, compulsory medical insurance, compulsory compliance audits … apply all the stupid rules that private industry must deal with.

    We wouldn’t want any dwedful Base Erosion caused by tax free salaries, would we?

  55. Miltonf

    Grifting dressed up as scholarship

  56. Nob

    chemical risk management policies as disguised barriers to trade.

    “Safety” has jumped the shark a long time ago.
    Now it’s just another stick to beat you with.

  57. Neil

    From the government that gave us Robodebt.

    Data matching between the ATO and Centrelink was started in the early 1990’s under Richardson/ALP. In 2011 Shorten/ALP replaced humans with computers to data match. Robodebt had started. But labor had a human check any results the computer spat out

    In 2016 Coalition removed human checking of the computers results and introduced a new method to determine income. It was this that caused all the problems. Plus income averaging to determine income instead of using fortnightly statements was against the law. Hence the lawsuit

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