Open Forum: November 28, 2020

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2,640 Responses to Open Forum: November 28, 2020

  1. 1735099 says:

    When it comes to financial chicanery, the apple doesn’t fall far from the tree.

    The Washington, DC Attorney-General’s office has filed a lawsuit alleging the Trump inaugural committee made more than $1 million in improper payments to the president’s Washington, DC hotel during the week of the inauguration in 2017.

    Mr Trump’s inaugural committee spent more than $US1 million ($1.34 million) to book a ballroom at the Trump International Hotel as part of a scheme to “grossly overpay” for party space and enrich the president’s own family in the process, the District of Columbia’s Attorney-General Karl Racine said.

  2. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV) says:

    number you hairbrained buffoon, do tell about your kills in ‘nam again, how many VC did you slaughter with nothing but a toothpick?

  3. Knuckle Dragger says:

    ‘how many VC did you slaughter with nothing but a toothpick?’

    Mummy and daddy tents have been scaring their offspring into compliance for 50 years thanks to this bloke Zippy.

    ‘Look you little bastards – if you don’t fold yourselves up back into the bag properly, they same way you came out then we’ll ring Liability Bob and he’ll come round with his SLR.’

    ‘Noooooo! We’ll be good! I don’t want to have a hole!’

  4. Dot says:

    Black pilled has the short version of Yuri Bezemov explaining subversion.

    Subversion is winning without firing a shot. Per Sun T-zu.

    Black Pilled short version on subversion as a four step process to defeat the West without any bloodshed

    STEP ONE: DEMORALISATION…

  5. Spurgeon Monkfish III says:

    Varvel has the summed up the irredeemable idiocy of the braindead lamestream meeja perfectly. The Ozzie version of the bimbo in the ‘toon would be Annaliese Neilsen.

  6. Spurgeon Monkfish III says:

    Just out of curiosity, does anyone know if the Oz is allowing comments on the following piece detailing yet another example of the staggering stupidity, misdirection, ignorance and blatant dishonesty that passes for public policy debate in this shithole of a country?

    EXCLUSIVE
    Remote overcrowding: ‘Indigenous gap won’t close’
    Housing in Indigenous communities is at a crisis point, with local leaders pessimistic about reaching Closing the Gap targets in the face of worsening overcrowding.

  7. Rockdoctor #3679008, posted on December 4, 2020 at 6:39 am

    Sorta off topic but not… Had a truck on my hammer last night around 8:30pm westbound through Singleton on New England Hwy. Like really close, enough to have to use the engine brakes 3 or 4 times, had no-one in front & was doing about 55 through a 50 zone. As soon as I got over the Hunter River bridge I moved left when it went to 2 lanes & he went past. Lo & behold, sub continental type at a wheel and a large Linfox logo on the back.

    Do they still have that “Don’t like my driving?” sticker on the back?

  8. Leigh Lowe says:

    Lo & behold, sub continental type at a wheel and a large Linfox logo on the back.

    Turban-charged?

  9. 1735099 says:

    For a virus, the USA is the land of the free.

    The United States faces the most difficult public health crisis in its history in the coming months as the coronavirus surges uncontrolled across the nation, America’s top health expert has warned.

    In a stunning and sobering prediction, Robert Redfield, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, said total deaths in the US could jump from 273,000 to 450,000 by February.

    “The reality is, December and January and February are going to be rough times,” Dr Redfield said. “I actually believe they’re going to be the most difficult time in the public health history of this nation.”

    “We’re in that range potentially now, starting to see 1,500 to 2,000 to 2,500 deaths a day from this virus,” he said. “The mortality concerns are real, and I do think, unfortunately, before we see February, we could be close to 450,000 Americans” dead from the virus.

    And Dettol Donny continues to tantrum.
    That’s a fair measure of his character – firmly stuck in pre-adolescent rage whilst his country suffers.

  10. Tel says:

    Black pilled has the short version of Yuri Bezemov explaining subversion.

    Subversion is winning without firing a shot. Per Sun T-zu.

    Might be worth remembering that President Reagan defeated Yuri Bezemov’s system, without needing to fire a shot. Just to keep in perspective how those strategies worked out.

  11. Spurgeon Monkfish III says:

    Do they still have that “Don’t like my driving?” sticker on the back?

    Removed due to cultural insensitivity concerns, Nelson.

    Hopefully injun’ man wasn’t forcing an abducted filipina care worker to fellate him while this allegedly dangerous driving was taking place*.

    *Those who’ve heard the story of my time on a jury in a rather ugly criminal matter will understand the reference.

  12. Dr Faustus says:

    Their ABC has Stan Grant tell us how:

    Scott Morrison handled coronavirus by going against his political instincts. He could do the same with China

    How do we possibly restore calm when both countries are making demands of each other that neither can meet?

    Why, easy. Apparently:

    It does not mean Australia should kowtow or not defend its honour, but it needs to be smart, pragmatic and prepared to put aside ideology, just like our successful approach to coronavirus.

    So, smartly and pragmatically abandon Australia’s relationship with the US and make like Richard Nixon.
    Genius.
    Kowtow-free.

  13. Spurgeon Monkfish III says:

    The United States faces the most difficult public health crisis in its history

    Absolute horseshit.

  14. Cassie of Sydney says:

    “Spurgeon Monkfish III
    #3679074, posted on December 4, 2020 at 8:53 am
    The United States faces the most difficult public health crisis in its history

    Absolute horseshit.

    He’s good at spruiking horseshit.

  15. H B Bear says:

    sTan is not the ALPBC’s deepest thinker. More of an Annabel Crabb approach.

  16. Spurgeon Monkfish III says:

    our successful approach to coronavirus

    I’m not aware of this “successful approach” to the bat flu. Presumably Stan the man with the fake tan didn’t interview anyone standing outside in a lengthy centrelink queue at seven in the morning.

    Reminiscent of the many, many braindead lamestream meeja fluffers hailing that grotesque deformed jug eared imbecile’s “successful approach” to overcoming the second wave in Mosquebourne (which was entirely due to his staggering incompetence).

  17. Spurgeon Monkfish III #3679067, posted on December 4, 2020 at 8:47 am

    Removed due to cultural insensitivity concerns, Nelson.

    Ah! Hoped-for result: “Let’s put these signs on the back of our trucks and weed out our poor drivers!”

    Actual result: the correlation between demographics and complaints approaches 100%…

  18. Spurgeon Monkfish III says:

    sTan is not the ALPBC’s deepest thinker. More of an Annabel Crabb approach.

    He’s the new Alberscreechee, gifted a wide ranging brief to be wrong about everything he turns his beady little eyes on.

  19. Boambee John says:

    The United States faces the most difficult public health crisis in its history

    Take that, wimpy Spanish Flu! The bin chicken has uncovered your weakness.

  20. Spurgeon Monkfish III says:

    Actual result: the correlation between demographics and complaints approaches 100%…

    Similar to the sterling work of the racist red light/speed cameras in New York.

  21. Cassie of Sydney says:

    “The United States faces the most difficult public health crisis in its history”

    The resident racist is just projecting his fantasy.

  22. Spurgeon Monkfish III says:

    The Oz really is a joke – here we go again:

    THE SKETCH
    “Question for the ages: who’ll get a jab?
    Some of our election (sic) representatives could be among the first to roll up their sleeves when the COVID vaccine gets the TGA tick of approval, ­according to Greg Hunt.
    By ALICE WOKETHING

    These jabs should be broadcast live. Unfortunately, there’d be no way of ascertaining if they were actually being administered the alleged vaccine.

  23. jo says:

    EXCLUSIVE
    Remote overcrowding: ‘Indigenous gap won’t close’
    Housing in Indigenous communities is at a crisis point, with local leaders pessimistic about reaching Closing the Gap targets in the face of worsening overcrowding.

    Overcrowding may be alleviated if the indig’s stopped wrecking the place.

  24. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha says:

    Just out of curiosity, does anyone know if the Oz is allowing comments on the following piece detailing yet another example of the staggering stupidity, misdirection, ignorance and blatant dishonesty that passes for public policy debate in this shithole of a country?

    They are, actually – nearly 300 comments, most along the lines of “try looking after your houses, and not chopping up the doors for firewood.”

  25. dover_beach says:

    The steal in Georgia caught on video.

  26. JC says:

    Ronery’s bragging and dishonest bignoting has fallen off recently. Has someone else cracked him over the head too?

  27. lotocoti says:

    Unfortunately, there’d be no way of ascertaining if they were actually being administered the alleged vaccine.

    Provided it’s delivered to them encapsulated and at 3000fps, I don’t care if it’s real or not.

  28. Carpe Jugulum says:

    notafan
    #3678833, posted on December 3, 2020 at 8:19 pm

    Mornington peninsula is much more upmarket than Penrith.

    More like your Port Stephens

    Lots of wineries and up market eateries, very pretty country especially Red Hill.

    If you are ever down that way go visit Pt Leo Estate.

  29. Rex Anger says:

    And Dettol Donny continues to tantrum.
    That’s a fair measure of his character – firmly stuck in *BANG!*

    The only person stuck in a personal fantasyland with an imagimary grievance while the rest of this scrofulous blog suffers is you Jack Hunt.

    Go fuck up your weapon-handling drills and shoot holes in someone else’s tent elsewhere.

    You’ve got a whole internet to pick from, and the tongzhis on WeChat would.love to hear from you about how great China is, and how shit and awful Bob Menzies’ Vietnamese roger-sausage was on your poor little reluctant, non-consenting conscripted botty-bott…

    Hell, they’d probably declare you a hero of the revolution, and give you a slightly bigger cage (with a cushion, even!) when the gulags come.to Toowoomba…

  30. Maj says:

    I think this younger generation wanting out of HK would make pretty darn good Aussies. If they get to enjoy the freedoms of Westminster parliamentary democracy, they wouldn’t take it for granted. If we’re going to accept immigrants from anywhere, let’s take them.

    This is the stupidest thing I’ve read on this blog for a while.

    We’re about to end up in a war with the Chinese over the next ten years and ‘conservatives’ want to bring in a few million more of them because they’re having an internal tiff over some tiny fucking island.

    You couldn’t make this shit up.

    Like it or not, soon as the COVID scam is over ScoMo and Dutton are going to restart their 160k per yr immigration program (which is actually 200k+)

    33ooo “permanent” immigrants annually come from India, a country with an extreme nationalist-religious supremacist ethos that is the second worst murderer of Christians after the religion that can’t be named

    24ooo “permanent” immigrants annually come from mainland China and they end up protesting in our streets against our government

    If zero net migration isn’t an option, I would take freedom & democracy-loving anti-Beijing students from Hong Kong over any of the above, and larger numbers of ethnic Chinese from HK will help re-balance the “Chinese-Australian community” and, as Fisky said, disrupt the United Front’s interference operations

  31. Leigh Lowe says:

    Does anyone know how Facebook “sponsored posts” work?
    I thought I would only see:-
    – posts from “friends”;
    – posts from others shared by “friends”;
    – sponsored posts which are marked as such.
    This morning up pops a rant by a Gruarniard journalist about ScoMo’s spat with China.
    This bint is a FB “friend of a friend” but the post wasn’t marked as either “shared” or “sponsored”.

  32. Geriatric Mayfly says:

    Used to take it with a grain of salt, but mentioned here quite often. On reading the reminiscences of a top NY autopsy pathologist, cats do dine on the more tender cuts from their deceased owners’ faces. Dogs, she said, prefer to sit by the cadaver and starve. Another reason, if any was needed, to hate cats; but her chapter on maggots raised the level of biliousness to eleventy.

  33. Arky says:

    Ha ha ha. “There is no manly way to say this, I bought a Miata”:
    ..
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZL3acaqWxBA

  34. Old School Conservative says:

    Spurgeon Monkfish III
    #3679055, posted on December 4, 2020 at 8:38 am
    Just out of curiosity, does anyone know if the Oz is allowing comments

    As ZK2A said, yes. I noticed a lot of sarcastic comments about $33 billion a year achieving nothing. It seems the censors are in a jolly mood today.

    Although they still found reason to reject my criticism of cultural Marxism in another story.

  35. Figures says:

    Does numbers know that different countries/states/pathology labs use different cycle numbers to determine if a covid test is “positive” or “negative”?

    Every intelligent person by now understands that every single test result is meaningless but the left remain obtuse because they’re loving the destruction of civilisation that comes with all the lockdowns.

  36. woolfe says:

    Sturg,
    Yes the Oz is allowing comments on that Closing the Gap article. Most are telling them to build there own houses and how they are sure a voice will fix the problem.

  37. Roger says:

    How do we possibly restore calm when both countries are making demands of each other that neither can meet?

    Find alternative markets and have as little to do with them as possible, I’d suggest.

    Communist China is destined to implode at some point in the not too distant future, leaving the likes of Grant, Keating et. al. as footnotes in history, like the bien pensant western apologists for the Soviet Union in a previous era.

  38. Spurgeon Monkfish III says:

    Thanks all – usually those types of “controversial subjects” aren’t open for discussion by the peasants.

  39. Dr Faustus says:

    In Ayatollah Antici…Pation news:

    Iran likely to hold off on retaliation over scientist’s killing, U.S. envoy says

    Elliott Abrams, Washington’s special representative on Iran and Venezuela, said in an interview that Tehran was “desperately” in need of sanctions relief from the United States and that would be a key calculation in their decision-making as President-elect Biden takes over from President Donald Trump on Jan. 20.

    The next pallet of US bills will be along shortly…

  40. Top Ender says:

    Spurgeon:

    does anyone know if the Oz is allowing comments on the following piece…. ‘Indigenous gap won’t close’

    Yes, I got one in last night, saying it was a circular problem we’ll have forever unless someone makes drastic change.

    See what I did there? It’s the only way to get past the woke moderators.

  41. Dr Faustus says:

    The Clown Show begins in earnest:

    Obama lashed by left-wing Democrats after criticising ‘defund the police’ slogan

    Former US President Barack Obama has been lashed by New York Congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and Democratic Representative Ilhan Omar after criticising the “snappy” slogan “defund the police”.

    Too much Uncle Tom, not enough Uncle Karl.

  42. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha says:

    does anyone know if the Oz is allowing comments on the following piece…. ‘Indigenous gap won’t close’

    They are up to 370 comments, most along the lines of “try not trashing the houses you are given.”

  43. Dr Faustus says:

    ‘Hush’ money: NSW police pay out more than $100m in relation to legal settlements

    In the past four financial years police in the state have settled more than 1,000 civil cases. The settlements cover a sweeping range of misconduct claims, including unlawful searches, illegal arrests, false imprisonment, assault and harassment. The figure includes legal costs as well as damages paid to plaintiffs.

    The cost of the payments to taxpayers has never dropped below $20m a year, peaking at $32.6m in 2016-17. In the past four years NSW police have handed out $113.5m to settle claims.

    Either VicPol has a rival for the Crown of Constabulary Awfulness, or complaint culture has worked out that it costs more than that to tie police up in legal proceedings.

  44. Bruce of Newcastle says:

    Former US President Barack Obama has been lashed by New York Congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and Democratic Representative Ilhan Omar after criticising the “snappy” slogan “defund the police”.

    Um, ladies, you can’t have a Maoist police state without police.

  45. Maj says:

    Pressure is building:

    Donald J. Trump
    @realDonaldTrump

    The “Republican” Governor of Georgia, @BrianKempGA, and the Secretary of State, MUST immediately allow a signature verification match on the Presidential Election. If that happens, we quickly and easily win the State and importantly, pave the way for a big David and Kelly WIN!

    2:31 AM · Dec 4, 2020

  46. Top Ender says:

    Calls for boycott, PM ‘unnerved’ by Port Arthur film

    RICHARD FERGUSON DENNIS SHANAHAN

    Port Arthur gunman Martin Bryant

    A new film about Port Arthur killer Martin Bryant has left Scott Morrison “unnerved”, with John Howard and Tasmanian MPs fearing that revisiting the tragedy and focusing on the gunman will bring back the trauma of the state’s darkest day.

    Nine-owned streaming service Stan revealed this week it had commissioned Nitram, directed by Snowtown director Justin Kurzel, which will explore Bryant’s life before he murdered 35 people in 1996. The film is already in production in Geelong despite a significant public backlash.

    Mr Morrison said on Thursday he would not seek to stop the production but he urged the filmmakers to consider the victims and their families.

    “I am unnerved about the revisiting of the Martin Bryant case,” he said. “It has scarred us as a nation deeply. I hope when this is done, and for those who choose to see it, we will remember the victims and their families and the torment that they have endured.”

    The massacre occurred only weeks after Mr Howard was elected prime minister and prompted him to introduce laws outlawing automatic weapons. When asked for a comment, Mr Howard told The Australian: “My response is that I will not dignify the project with a comment.”

    The Australian approached Stan for comment.

    Several Tasmanian MPs said the film should either halt production or face a boycott.

    Labor MP Brian Mitchell’s seat of Lyons includes Port Arthur. He said the film would open wounds. “My simple plea is to just stop production,” he said.

    “I know the producers are wellintentioned but they cannot escape that their focus will be on the gunman and his actions, and the victims will fall into the background. Port Arthur has been a good example on how to handle a mass shooting. In Tasmania, we have focused our thoughts on the victims, our media never mentions the gunman’s name.”

    Tasmanian Liberal senator Eric Abetz said people should avoid the film. “I lost a good friend in the massacre. The perpetrator wants publicity and notoriety and the film will feed that sick desire,” he said. “I would encourage people to exercise their freedom in boycotting the film.”

    Greens senator for Tasmania Peter Whish-Wilson said he wanted to talk to the filmmakers and did not understand why they would focus on the killer.

    “Why wouldn’t you make a film about the community that came together in a time of immense grief and how politics was put aside to deal with gun control?” he said.

    Children’s safety charity the Alannah and Madeline Foundation was founded by Walter Mikac after his daughters, 6 and 3, were killed at Port Arthur. Its chief executive, Lesley Podesta, said: “We do not want to see any film or dramatisation which provides a platform or creates celebrity for the perpetrator. We do not want to see further distress and hurt exacted on those he left behind.”

    Oz print edition

  47. zyconoclast says:

    Might be worth remembering that President Reagan defeated Yuri Bezemov’s system, without needing to fire a shot. Just to keep in perspective how those strategies worked out.

    He defeated the dying carcass of the USSR.

    He did absolutely nothing about what was happening in USA.
    In fact with his no fault divorce laws and illegal alien amnesty, he greatly contributed to the decline and fall of the the USA.

  48. thefrollickingmole says:

    Tel
    #3679062, posted on December 4, 2020 at 8:44 am
    Black pilled has the short version of Yuri Bezemov explaining subversion.

    Subversion is winning without firing a shot. Per Sun T-zu.

    Might be worth remembering that President Reagan defeated Yuri Bezemov’s system, without needing to fire a shot. Just to keep in perspective how those strategies worked out.

    Id disagree Tel.
    The Soviet long term tactic worked incredibly well.
    Unfortunately for them their own system was so shit it didnt last long enough to reap the rewards. (and probably retarded their “progress” because they were a living example of how shit Communism was).

    Freed from the necessity to defend Soviet Communism a couple of generations have been miseducated about how ‘unfair” capitalism is.
    When we have some fairly extreme cases of government distorting what should be free markets, generally to assist crony capitalists.

  49. Eyrie says:

    The soviet commies who are still around must be absolutely astounded at the success of their subversion of the West. Succeeded beyond their wildest dreams but much too late to save their evil empire.

  50. Eyrie says:

    Calls for boycott, PM ‘unnerved’ by Port Arthur film

    Wouldn’t take much to unnerve that wimpy marshmallow.

  51. Rex Anger says:

    @TE-

    It is almost as if our censorious elite actually want people to see.how a mentally ill man was somehow furnished with an arsenal of allegedly ‘innocuous’ or ‘destroyed’ automatic weapons, and pointed in the direction of a large concentration of people…

    …Or it will turn out to have nothing directly to do with said massacre, and it was a big ol’ nothingburger with a side of self-righteous screechiness.

    Either way, the Barbara Streisand effect wins.

  52. lotocoti says:

    Those Balts.
    When a Lithuanian enters the forest, they feel better than they do in the city.
    That’s because there are a lot of trees to hang oneself on.
    It’s the feeling of endless opportunities.

  53. Eyrie says:

    Looks like Australia might have to work for a living now that the murdering Chicom thugs are proving to be not our friends.

  54. zyconoclast says:

    Check it out, seriously beautiful images

    https://twitter.com/GodsWhisper__

  55. zyconoclast says:

    How South Asian American socialist candidates are helping lead the left
    3 South Asian members of the Democratic Socialists of America won historic down-ballot races this year, while others laid the groundwork for future runs.

    1. Indian American
    Median household income: $101,390

  56. woolfe says:

    WA buckles to China, what a surprise
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i7xEomu5Tls

  57. Spurgeon Monkfish III says:

    Uh oh – a pack of shouty imbeciles appear to have taken to the streets of Sydneystan.

    Anyone know what it’s about?

  58. bespoke says:

    zyconoclast
    #3679295, posted on December 4, 2020 at 12:20 pm

    Eilien Donan Castle 👍

  59. herodotus says:

    Time for tariffs on electrical goods large and small, solar panels and wind turbines – well, those from a certain country anyway.

  60. Top Ender says:

    Letter in the Oz today:

    Jumping the gun on our special forces

    As a former officer in the Special Air Service Regiment (not 2 Squadron and having never served in Afghanistan) I urgently appeal to the Prime Minister to stop the disbandment of 2 SAS Squadron scheduled for Tuesday. Thankfully, the stripping of the Meritorious Unit Citation has apparently been halted.

    Scott Morrison, we need to get our house in order. I thought it would have been necessary for Angus Campbell and Rick Burr to consult with you before taking any wide-ranging actions, such as the disbandment of a squadron, that stem from the Brereton report — or are the generals allowed to operate in isolation these days?

    We are now playing catch up. Can we finally get this whole sorry mess in proportion and stop the headlines it is causing around the world?

    This is not to excuse some of the members who may have committed atrocities, but it should have been handled quietly and much more professionally than has been done.

    What does the disbandment of 2 Squadron actually achieve?

    Andrew Leahy, South Perth, WA

  61. herodotus says:

    The red shoes on the former general you walk past may be the red shoes you have to dance in later.

  62. Maj says:

    From Americans to Be Issued Cards With COVID-19 Vaccination

    Vaccines aren’t subject to the same controls as pharmaceutical drugs, which must go through the more scientifically rigorous process of double-blind, placebo-controlled studies. Instead, vaccines are usually tested against another vaccine and aren’t compared against a non-vaccinated group.

  63. Rockdoctor says:

    Nelson didn’t notice. Probably. Was told by a Queensland cop once that the prime mover number plate is the one you want, apparently a lot of rolling stock isn’t tracked. So I don’t even bother. Besides I am so used to being pushed along by cowboys who obviously think the New England has less scrutiny than the Pacific Hwy and white 4WD’s of my brethren even though I am no slouch with my speed I just let it go. Let them seethe then get over when it opens to 2 lanes, they’re usually gone after that.

    IMO from having seen the process more than once, complaints usually in smaller organisations are ignored or paid off with the complainant being told we will investigate, very serious etc or same as option 2 with the big boys but goes nowhere when the union shoves it nose it. So why bother. Industry is adicted to sub continentals undercutting locals and if Government were serious about safety as they say they are ie ever K over is a killer cash grab. They would close down the dodgy truck driver scheme in an instant.

  64. Zyconoclast says:

    Just in case you missed it

    A not-so happy ending from Monument for porn-star pair

    Sydney’s ultimate work from home couple, American porn star Billy Santoro and his Australian husband Gage, have left the exclusive Monument apartments. And it seems they didn’t go willingly.

    A removal van was spotted outside the exclusive complex overlooking the Oxford Street rainbow mile on Thursday morning and residents report the duo packing up their apartment-cum-studio.*

    But when CBD phoned Monument for a comment, the concierge Gary put the phone down on us. How rude! We thought we would have better luck with strata committee member Christian Bohlke, but he hung up as well. Stay classy CB.

    Perhaps that’s what the strata committee meant when it emailed residents telling them that communal living has “many incredible benefits” but that it can at times leave residents feeling “a little frustrated or disgruntled”.

    Neighbours were put on edge by the pair’s habit of working from home during the pandemic and producing content for their OnlyFans subscription account. They had gained international notoriety due to racist social comments they blamed on a meth addiction.

    Monument residents made noise complaints and the police were called out several times, as was an ambulance on at least one occasion.

    Recently the strata committee unanimously ruled that the couple breached by-law 4 by “disturbing the peaceful enjoyment of surrounding lots with extreme noise” and ordered the duo comply with the complex’s by-laws or face a penalty notice.

    Finally, the owners of their seventh-floor apartment, who didn’t like the apartment’s reconfiguration into a home porn studio, served notice on the couple.

    The pair had said not a single neighbour had approached them directly to complain. So Sydney.

    *funny huh!

  65. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV) says:

    A New Theorem Maps Out the Limits of Quantum Physics
    The result highlights a fundamental tension: Either the rules of quantum mechanics don’t always apply, or at least one basic assumption about reality must be wrong.

  66. Rex Anger says:

    @ Cohenite-

    Also Hillary: I aRe ReLeVoNt TwOoooo!!!1! PaYz TeNsh0N to Me Plz!!!1?

    She’s just like Kevin Rudd, but with a better beard and on-call assassins…

  67. Herodotus says:

    Namibian group does My Uunona to the tune of My Shirona.
    Shot at dawn.

  68. Top Ender says:

    The Mocker: Kevin Rudd’s fatal flaw, a glass jaw, still on display

    THE MOCKER
    Follow @Oz_Mocker

    Imagine from Kevin Rudd’s perspective how his career would have turned out if not for News Corp. In his mind, the last day of his prime ministership would have been in December 2016. Despite his party and an adoring public begging him to remain in office, Rudd is bound for New York to assume his new role as UN secretary-general. “I could not have had a wiser, more knowledgeable, or more inspiring mentor than Kevin,” says a tearful Julia Gillard, as she is sworn in as the new prime minister.

    But sadly, nefarious forces under the guise of commentary conspired to bring him down, hence Rudd’s petition for a royal commission to expose their wrongdoing. Fortunately, his resilience is as strong as ever. When he told CNN in May he had “lost a general election and ceased to be prime minister in part … because of the tactics of the Murdoch media empire,” he prefaced this by saying “I’ve got fairly broad shoulders”.

    Here is just a sample of the Murdochracy’s sinister attacks on Rudd. First, ABC’s Kerry O’Brien, 7.30 Report, May 12, 2010: “Do you understand why so many people have turned against you now, Kevin Rudd – not just the government [but] Kevin Rudd – and do you accept they have judged your leadership and found you wanting?”

    Fairfax’s David Marr in Quarterly Essay, June 2010: “Being an arsehole is no bar to high office … But of Rudd it has to be said that there is a large number of people who, having worked with him as a diplomat, public servant, shadow minister, leader of the Opposition or lately as prime minister, loathe the man”.

    Phillip Coorey, Sydney Morning Herald, June 14, 2010: “It was always said when Rudd unravelled, it would be spectacular. People are deserting him as quickly as they embraced him.” Tony Wright, SMH, June 18, 2010, on Rudd’s speech at the Canberra press gallery’s midwinter ball: “Rudd sounded like an angry soul desperately trying to overcompensate. Could the rat in his story be Marr and, by extension, the journalists who had invited the PM to the ball?”

    Rod Tiffen, SMH, June 19, 2010: “Last year’s champ is this year’s chump. Rudd is no longer the man who achieved record approval for so long, but simply the man who blew it.”

    Tim Soutphommasane, The Guardian, June 24, 2010: “Rudd’s leadership style was his worst enemy … Rudd ultimately failed to convey any conviction or vision as PM. Many of his critics would say that it was because he had neither.”

    Michelle Grattan, SMH, July 31, 2010: “Kevin Rudd has Labor’s campaign in turmoil, and nobody has a clue how his rogue behaviour will play over the crucial third week.” Nine’s political editor Laurie Oakes, April 9, 2011: “One of the Labor MPs who tossed Kevin Rudd out of the prime ministership summed up the brutal reality of the current situation yesterday: ‘We are as much in coalition with Kevin as we are with Rob Oakeshott, Tony Windsor or Andrew Wilkie.’ Spot on.”

    ABC’s Barrie Cassidy, November 15, 2013: “For Rudd it was different. He was treated differently because he was different: autocratic, exclusive, disrespectful and at times flat-out abusive.”

    Former NSW premier and now federal Labor Senator Kristina Keneally, The Guardian, February 16, 2016: “Kevin Rudd … governed like a toddler: obsessed with a new, bright, shiny toy one day, only to be off in another direction the next, distracted by the next policy toy…” Joe Aston, Fin Review, April 7, 2020 “Except Labor’s caucus did soon figure out Kevin, and wisely rissoled the prick.”

    Shall I go on or have I made my point?

    In pushing for a royal commission, Rudd maintains this is not about him, and that he is motivated by the need for media diversity and balanced journalism. “And it’s not just targeted at News Corporation,” he told ABC presenter Fran Kelly on October 12.

    Really? Just eight days later he told ABC Drive host Patricia Karvelas “Well my primary – in fact my sole basis for the petition in Australia is about Murdoch’s influence within Australian politics…”

    His standard response to criticism by News Corp commentators is to claim “character assassination”.

    He abhors such behaviour, apparently. As he told ABC Insiders in 2013 following his ousting of Gillard, “Julia’s record, I honour. I will not be engaged in any character assassination of her or her political and policy reform record. I believe we should be building one another up, not be in the business of tearing one another down.”

    And this: “I [will] not be engaging in any negative commentary in relation to Julia’s prime ministership. I believe that is simply wrong in principle.”

    Rudd’s problem is his mandible, not Murdoch. In closing: Carmel Egan, The Age, December 3, 2006: “His parliamentary opponents believe they have already identified Rudd’s weak spot … a glass jaw.” Kerry O’Brien, 7.30 Report, November 21, 2007: “Since you’ve became leader you’ve developed a bit of a reputation for having a glass jaw particularly in regard to your dealings with the media.” Eleanor Hall, ABC’s The World Today, June 25, 2007: “It’s his glass jaw essentially and his attempt to micro-manage.”

    The late Alan Ramsey, SMH, March 31, 2007, on Rudd’s haranguing of Sun-Herald editor Simon Dulhunty regarding a story by Kerry-Anne Walsh that disputed the then opposition leader’s claim that he and his mother were evicted from their rented dairy farm soon after the death of his father: “Kevin Rudd has a dangerously glass jaw.”

    As Oakes later put to Rudd at the National Press Club regarding his attempt to kill that story: “How do you explain or excuse this sort of thing; do you really think you can heavy the media, and what are you going to do about the glass jaw?”

    Nearly 16 years later, it remains as fragile as ever. And just quietly, I’m not sure about those broad shoulders.

    Oz

  69. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV) says:

    A not-so happy ending from Monument for porn-star pair

    numb-errs is looking forward to fatlicks’ review of their only fans channel

  70. Top Ender says:

    The Mocker Part 2:

    Speaking of glass jaws – Monday’s edition of The Australian featured what could well be the lengthiest letter ever published in this paper. The author was one Peter FitzSimons, SMH columnist and author, and he was a tad peeved about an article in the weekend edition regarding his latest book ‘Breaker Morant’.

    “The latest plea (Respect for justice and law died with Breaker Morant) penned by James Unkles, takes direct aim at my recent book on Breaker,” wrote an indignant FitzSimons. “He says I overlooked the ‘appalling injustice’ Morant and his men received ‘at the hands of their British superiors’. Seriously?” And on it went.

    And yesterday, FitzSimons appeared on ABC’s The Drum where friend and host Julia Baird allowed him a remarkable four-minute spiel to vent about Unkles’ article. Referring to Morant’s claim that British Boer War commander Lord Kitchener had given orders to execute prisoners, FitzSimons tersely declared “There were no such orders … and if Mr Unkles said, you know, ‘there’s proof of this,’ let’s see it, mate”.

    To which I can only refer FitzSimons to an article he himself wrote in 2016 concerning the advice he received as a young adult that helped him become the great man he is today: “To this day, when I come across attack-dog pieces about how the Australian Republican Movement could be so much better if I wasn’t chairman, or how terrible one of my books is, I just don’t read on. I suppose I could go through every paragraph and dwell on the unfairness for days on end, write angry letters and all the rest, but why bother? Personally, I am not in the bicker business…” He’s not? Well, he certainly fooled me.

    As for his assertion “Morant was a despicable war criminal, responsible for the deaths of innocent prisoners,” I do not dispute that, although whether he received a fair trial is another matter. But let’s examine what FitzSimons said of Ned Kelly, the Australian outlaw who murdered three police officers at Stringybark Creek in Victoria in 1878.

    The policeman who led the doomed party, Sergeant Michael Kennedy – an honest man with an impeccable service record – was initially only wounded in that ambush. He begged for mercy as he lay on the ground, unarmed and helpless. Nonetheless Kelly shot and killed his prisoner in cold blood and robbed the three dead policemen of valuables which the gang used as trophies. Kennedy would leave behind a widow and five young children.

    So what does FitzSimons make of Kelly? Put it this way, these were his closing words in that biography:

    Vale, Ned Kelly

    You were a one-off

    You were an Australian original

    Mate, we remember you.

  71. Arky says:

    Looks like Australia might have to work for a living now that the murdering Chicom thugs are proving to be not our friends.

    ..
    Sure they’re our friends.
    And they’re going to make us an offer we can’t refuse.

  72. Arky says:

    The policeman who led the doomed party, Sergeant Michael Kennedy – an honest man with an impeccable service record – was initially only wounded in that ambush. He begged for mercy as he lay on the ground, unarmed and helpless. Nonetheless Kelly shot and killed his prisoner in cold blood

    ..
    Meh.
    Shooting prisoners is de rigor, as anyone following the Cat threads lately knows.

  73. cohenite says:

    Re; the Keswick island debacle with the chunks already building a nuclear reactor and space launch platform, UNESCO is now involved in the Fraser island bushfire post mortems and have referred to Fraser Island by its 3rd nations name sillywhitebuggarfootuparse with the green 3rd nations kunt lidia thorpe calling all infrastructure built on 3rd nations land an act of war.

    I reckon the solution is there: just send lidia and UNESCO to sort out the chunks. Sweet.

  74. Top Ender says:

    “de rigeur” Arky.

    “De rigor” is what dey go into after you’ve shot them.

  75. DrBeauGan says:

    A New Theorem Maps Out the Limits of Quantum Physics
    The result highlights a fundamental tension: Either the rules of quantum mechanics don’t always apply, or at least one basic assumption about reality must be wrong.

    Zippy, that article was absorbed maddening. It never stated the new theorem or who had proved it, it gave no links to any sources, and it confused Bell’s theorem with Bell’s inequality. I wanted to murder the writer.

  76. Steve trickler says:

    Vic-Pol have some competition in the brutality stakes. Checks out these p*gs who took a knee for BLM a while back, go about their job. Same cowards who ran away from BLM rioters and yet here, they use force against people in wheelchairs! Disgusting mob of wankers in uniform.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lrG3mr0mow8

  77. Zyconoclast says:

    Vic-Pol have some competition in the brutality stakes. Checks out these p*gs who took a knee for BLM a while back, go about their job. Same cowards who ran away from BLM rioters and yet here, they use force against people in wheelchairs! Disgusting mob of wankers in uniform.

    Did somebody say porky?

  78. Rex Anger says:

    de rigeur” Arky.

    “De rigor” is what dey go into after you’ve shot them

    I thought ‘der rigger’ was der guy who put der hook on der crane.

    While ‘der ringer’ is either a very nice little OHSHIT! pistol, or that thing the missus subjects you when you stagger in at 2AM…

  79. cohenite says:

    and it confused Bell’s theorem with Bell’s inequality

    I thought they were the same thing. I’m glad I didn’t read it.

  80. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV) says:

    Zippy, that article was absorbed maddening. It never stated the new theorem or who had proved it, it gave no links to any sources, and it confused Bell’s theorem with Bell’s inequality. I wanted to murder the writer.

    paper:
    Testing the reality of Wigner’s friend’s observations

  81. Knuckle Dragger says:

    Most vomit-inducing headline of the day, courtesy of The Hun:

    ‘Rebel [Wilson] sizzles in bikini photo shoot’

  82. notafan says:

    Looks good Carpe

  83. Nick says:

    No KD, it was Ch7’s exclusive about Warner’s’ road to repair his bogan groin. How the film crew just knew he’d be there I’ll never know.

  84. Knuckle Dragger says:

    Nick,

    Mmmm. I mean ewwww.

    Actually, the end of that fuckwit’s career hasn’t been in the meeja in recent days. I may search for information.

  85. Morsie says:

    What in the hell is the Australian T20 team wearing?

  86. Rockdoctor says:

    What in the hell is the Australian T20 team wearing?

    Some aboriginal design apparently. I am declining to even watch, soon as I heard it on the radio today.

  87. Arky says:

    Top Ender
    #3679679, posted on December 4, 2020 at 6:22 pm
    “de rigeur” Arky.

    “De rigor” is what dey go into after you’ve shot them

    ..
    Sure, you would be correct, if I had been speaking french.
    Moi? Never.
    I was using spanish.

  88. Knuckle Dragger says:

    ‘What in the hell is the Australian T20 team wearing?’

    The good linen from Bruce Pascoe’s house.

  89. Steve trickler says:

    “You can’t remember her name because you drank too much”.

    That struck a chord.

    Guilty!

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K941YQJw9Dg

  90. Roger says:

    Zippy, that article was absorbed maddening. It never stated the new theorem or who had proved it, it gave no links to any sources, and it confused Bell’s theorem with Bell’s inequality. I wanted to murder the writer.

    Steady on; it did reference two researchers at Brisbane’s Griffith University.

  91. DrBeauGan says:

    paper:
    Testing the reality of Wigner’s friend’s observations

    Thanks, Zippy. I downloaded the PDF and read enough of it. I think it’s desperately muddled. It depends too much on English language statements which are inherently fluffy.

    My view is that Wigner needs to factor in that his friend has made an observation and consequently the wave function has collapsed, although he doesn’t yet know what it has collapsed to. The simplest explanation of the collapse of the wave function is that it happens in the presence of sufficient mass whether it is observed or not, hence the existence of the macroworld. Penrose has also suggested this.

    I think they keep confusing standard probability semantics, which is about our ignorance of the details, typically our ignorance of initial conditions, with quantum probability which is asserted to be a property of the universe. The latter is certainly a shocking idea on first encounter, but you can get used to it.

    The fact that you have two distinct descriptions of a photon hitting a metal plate which gives rise to an electron being emitted is the problem. The quantum description is continuous and leads to hideously complicated smooth states, the description of it as a measurement leads to, or follows from, the collapse of the wave function. You can reconcile them with the Penrose hypothesis that says that with a sufficient amount of matter involved, the spatial curvature forces the collapse of the wave function. And indeed, most of the quantum description. Any real measurement process must involve the quantum system interacting with big, massive things. It’s at this point that the wave function collapses, or that the quantum language stops describing the system. Persevering in using it is merely wilful dottiness.

  92. rickw says:

    Seriously good work, well worth watching the whole way through:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1itrbnnjgEM

  93. rickw says:

    Mr Morrison said on Thursday he would not seek to stop the production but he urged the filmmakers to consider the victims and their families.

    Don’t stop it, just withdraw taxpayer funding of the project you moron.

    I would be perfectly happy for this project to go ahead provided that:

    1). It showed how Taspol completely ignored Bryant’s increasingly erratic and illegal behaviour.

    2). It explained how the fuck Bryant’s AR-15 passed through Vikpol’s hands.

  94. rickw says:

    Ha ha ha. “There is no manly way to say this, I bought a Miata”:

    You do know there’s a Miata “hello other Miata!” signal when they see each other on the road:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m8lY1De7ZNM

  95. Roger says:

    I would be perfectly happy for this project to go ahead provided that:

    Sounds reasonable to me.

    What are the chances?

  96. Boambee John says:

    Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)
    #3679800, posted on December 4, 2020 at 9:04 pm
    China announces expansion to weather modification program, artificial rain to cover area bigger than size of India

    From the world wide environmental movement, we hear nothing but Simon and Garfunkel (The Sounds of Silence, for the younger Cats).

  97. Leigh Lowe says:

    I would be perfectly happy for this project to go ahead provided that:

    Except it won’t.
    He will be a normal wholesome kid who was corrupted by ‘merican TV violence and right wing politicians.

  98. zyconoclast says:

    Call for probe into ‘missing’ £50bn of UK cash

    The Bank of England should be trying to track down £50bn of “missing” UK currency, a committee of MPs has said.

    The figure amounts to about three-quarters of all UK banknotes in existence.

    The cash is not used in transactions or held as savings, but may be overseas, tucked away in homes unreported or being used in the “shadow economy”.

  99. zyconoclast says:

    Most vomit-inducing headline of the day, courtesy of The Hun:

    ‘Rebel [Wilson] sizzles in bikini photo shoot’

    I see your Rebel [Wilson] and raise you a

    Nadia Sawalha, 55, poses in her underwear while struggling to pull up her tights as she bemoans the ‘torture of a saggy crotch’

  100. Nick says:

    I love how the idea of a 55 year old of any gender is triggered by not being able to wear active wear lol.

  101. Knuckle Dragger says:

    Ewwwwwww zyco.

    Stunning and brave.

    Ewwwwwwww.

  102. zyconoclast says:

    A Victorian MP [Liberal Democrats] put forward a bold proposal for Australia to have a new “super state” comprising regional parts of Victoria and NSW.

    The state’s Parliamentary Budget Office published the radical policy proposal on Friday after state Liberal MP for Northern Victoria Tim Quilty requested “independent advice” about the “economic character” of a new state.

    Major Victorian regional centres such as Ballarat, Bendigo, Mildura, Wodonga and Shepparton would be included in the new state, alongside NSW hubs such as Wagga Wagga, Albury, Orange, Bathurst and Griffith, according to the report.

  103. zyconoclast says:

    I love how the idea of a 55 year old of any gender is triggered by not being able to wear active wear lol.

    That is because is is only used to wearing inactive wear.

  104. Old Lefty says:

    This reminds me of Yes Prime Minister: ‘you can’t start investigating civil servants!* Who knows where it might end?’

    https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-12-04/tasmanian-government-worker-stood-down-over-sex-abuse-allegation/12952808

    * Or state school teachers, ABC producers, leftist politicians etc etc.

  105. Old Lefty says:

    There may be a more innocent explanation for the missing sterling currency, zyconoclast. With today’s piddling interest rates, people have probably reverted to keeping their money in a tin under the bed.

    But the China stash theory is plausible. Witness Sydney’s own Harry Tribugoff fretting about the possibility that Chinese will stop buying his apartments do that they can sit empty as boltholes.

  106. Leigh Lowe says:

    OK.
    Here is a practical illustration of something I was talking about a couple of weeks ago.

    The flat top loop.

    Starting at bugger all altitude above ground level with no release of back-stick over the top.
    I think he has half a thought about rolling out of it at the top (hence the change of direction shown in the diagram).
    Once you get two-thirds of the way around the die is cast.
    He pulls back hard at the bottom but all that does is stall it into the deck.

  107. zyconoclast says:

    Blood taken from a young person could be the key to maintaining long-lasting health in old age, scientists claim.

    Blood factors obtained from young beings can improve late-life health in animals, the study published in Nature journal revealed.

    It could also help reduce the chances of developing age-related diseases, the scientists at University College London (UCL) said.

    Dame Linda Partridge, a geneticist at UCL, said research shows that young blood could allow humans to live a life free of diseases such as cancer and heart disease right up until their deaths.

    “I would say ageing is the emperor of all diseases,” she told The Times.

    “A lot of people regard ageing as ‘natural’ and that therefore you shouldn’t interfere with nature. But we’ve always considered it an ethical imperative to cure illness where we find it.”

    Professor Partridge’s analysis of data forms are part of a wave of studies and trials backed by PayPal co-founder Peter Thiel at a San Francisco start-up called Ambrosia.

  108. Snoopy says:

    Arky
    #3679150, posted on December 4, 2020 at 9:58 am
    Ha ha ha. “There is no manly way to say this, I bought a Miata”:

    Didn’t I see an MX5 parked in the driveway in one of Mild Spectre’s wildly popular YouTube videos?

  109. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha says:

    Baby-faced Astrophel Sang, 19, was filmed in June flicking a lighter in a bid to torch the flag – unaware it was flame-proof after he had climbed on top of the Cenotaph.

    Don’t worry, Astrophel, you’ll get your baby face rearranged one night…

  110. Dot says:

    Great speach by the Critical Drinker.

    Why do we need heroes?

  111. I saw this video from Mark Felton a month ago, and thought it worthwhile posting.
    Involves the Stalingrad holdouts after the surrender.

  112. Some History says:

    Blood taken from a young person could be the key to maintaining long-lasting health in old age, scientists claim.

    That couldn’t possibly go well. That’s a “vampire” movie in the making.

    Keep Professor Partridge in a pear tree.

  113. Arky says:

    Vicpol sickos use the image of one of their dead employees for a stupid suicide PSA video.
    Creepy as fuck.
    https://twitter.com/VictoriaPolice/status/1333998775686205441

  114. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV) says:

    The simplest explanation of the collapse of the wave function is that it happens in the presence of sufficient mass whether it is observed or not, hence the existence of the macroworld.

    I have had a strong sense for quite some time that the problem here is we expect logic to be fundamental, in that certain things only can happen or not. There’s a kind of boolean logic implied in the trying to understand the idea of quantum probability waves and solid macro reality. Things are either particles or waves, being both is illogical so there must be a transition point from what the micro experiments reveal and what the macro world reveals.

    Ontologically speaking we observe that phenomena appear to obey rules and so we implicitly presume that we can find ultimate rules and that these ultimate rules really are the things they represent, even though it’s rarely stated that way.

    This is mistaking the map for the territory. If we drop the presupposition that reality is consistent at all scale from a boolean logic perspective and adopt a broader logic say ternary logic or maybe even quaternary logic, then the distinction between quantum and macro from a descriptive point of view may disappear. The problem of collapse of wave function likely will disappear with it. My problem with fundamental particles, particle clouds, probability waves is that they inherently require decomposition of properties to comprehend and hence are not really fundamental. There is nothing fundamental about a probability wave any more than the idea of a particle. Either require an aggregation of properties to be consistent or make any sense and the properties in turn require aggregation of properties. etc.

    I personally think that we are wired with an implicit boolean logic and a model of space and time which we perceive and presume to be real, whereas reality may just be capable of being modelled by boolean logic and space and time up to a point. That point being where boolean logic etc stops being sufficient. You get a strong sense of that as soon as terms like non-locality start to appear in the literature. What the hell is non-locality, how do you even picture that or think about it directly as opposed to how we infer it.

    We are actually trapped in a mental synthesis of space-time and have no ability to synthesize something outside of that, which a concept like non-locality requires. Same with maths, it is really a language with complex rules, but when formulas introduce division by zero for example, we are stuck in choosing an appropriate rule. Is it itself, infinity, zero or NaN? The incompleteness of the language becomes apparent and hence its utility is limited, albeit extremely useful.

    So I don’t think there is any collapse of probability waves.

  115. Arky says:

    If I ever top myself, no one has my permission to use my image in some gaye anti- suicide bullshit.
    Wankers.
    And stop raising awareness of it, it only gives people ideas anyway.

  116. Knuckle Dragger says:

    ‘We are actually trapped in a mental synthesis of space-time’

    I’ve been telling people this for eons.

  117. Steve trickler says:

    Get the fuck out of the way!

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XPPzJZaCX_E

  118. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha says:

    I saw this video from Mark Felton a month ago, and thought it worthwhile posting.
    Involves the Stalingrad holdouts after the surrender.

    Interesting link, Winston, thank you.

  119. MatrixTransform says:

    So I don’t think there is any collapse of probability waves.

    you should see the Crazy Old Mole’s photographs

  120. Winston Smith VRWC Pty Ltd
    #3679861, posted on December 4, 2020 at 10:32 pm
    I saw this video from Mark Felton a month ago, and thought it worthwhile posting.
    Involves the Stalingrad holdouts after the surrender.

    Thanks Winston.
    Have watched a lot of Felton’s stuff, but there’s soooo much of it.

    Have ordered a couple of his books. (they’ll join the other 45,000 books on my “to read” stack in the spare room.)

  121. Dot says:

    Blood taken from a young person could be the key to maintaining long-lasting health in old age, scientists claim.

    BREAKING

    Elizabeth Bathory to receive a posthumous Nobel Prize for her pioneering work in Medicine & Physiology.

  122. DrBeauGan says:

    I have had a strong sense for quite some time that the problem here is we expect logic to be fundamental, in that certain things only can happen or not. There’s a kind of boolean logic implied in the trying to understand the idea of quantum probability waves and solid macro reality. Things are either particles or waves, being both is illogical so there must be a transition point from what the micro experiments reveal and what the macro world reveals.

    It’s true that we, with other animals, have embedded assumptions about space and time as well as assumptions about how to process information. It’s also the case that our language tends to impose those assumptions on our thinking. It’s open as to how far we can overcome the assumptions that turn out to be false when we go outside the narrow world of our everyday experience. Quantum physics is the first time we’ve seriously faced this challenge in a way, although one could make a case for replacing a man centred universe by our current sense of the universe as being a precursor.

    Not everyone can handle that well.

  123. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha says:

    Have ordered a couple of his books. (they’ll join the other 45,000 books on my “to read” stack in the spare room.)

    Any Cats with an interest in Wobbly Wobbly Two, I’d recommend the two volume history of the Battle of Arnhem “Arnhem 1944” by a Swedish historian, one Christer Bergstrom. He revisited Cornelius Ryan’s research, and came to the following conclusions –

    “Market Garden” was a better plan, with a far better chance of success then usually believed.

    The British drop zones at Arnhem were the best that were available.

    There may have been two SS Panzer divisions, refitting in Arnhem, but they were the shattered remnants of said divisions, with few, if any actual tanks.

    XXX Corps did not “stop to drink tea” on the way up to Arnhem. They had planned to reach Arnhem in 48 hours – after 45 hours, the division stood at Southern Nijmegen, having covered 60 kilometers in five hours, and there were 25 kilometers to Arnhem-

    The last and most damning point

    The principle cause for the failure of the operation was the failure of the 82nd Airborne to adhere to their orders to capture the bridges at Nijmegen. They sent a small force to capture the bridge – that force withdrew, and the Yanks then decided to sit on the high ground outside Nijmegen, and wait for XXX Corps to show up. They then proceeded to hang the blame on the British.

    Bergstrom makes his case well – add it to your “To read” stack!

  124. Mark A says:

    Dot
    #3679894, posted on December 4, 2020 at 11:37 pm

    Blood taken from a young person could be the key to maintaining long-lasting health in old age, scientists claim.

    BREAKING

    Elizabeth Bathory to receive a posthumous Nobel Prize for her pioneering work in Medicine & Physiology.

    It’s a pity the proper technique to apply was lacking at her time.

  125. MatrixTransform says:

    vampires r us

  126. C.L. says:

    Of course she has:

    A paranoid schizophrenic who admitted slitting a seven-year-old girl’s throat in a park has been cleared of murder.

    The Albanian immigrant should have been permanently locked up a long time ago.
    But we don’t do that anymore because not nice.

  127. MatrixTransform says:

    Of course she has:

    all you need is a cervix and loose alibi

  128. Mark A says:

    C.L.
    #3679923, posted on December 5, 2020 at 12:12 am

    Of course she has:

    A paranoid schizophrenic who admitted slitting a seven-year-old girl’s throat in a park has been cleared of murder.

    The Albanian immigrant should have been permanently locked up a long time ago.
    But we don’t do that anymore because not nice.

    Don’t think I’m xenophobic, (well not much anyway) but a 60 foot high fence should’ve been erected around Albania some time ago with a one way gate to enter but never leave.

  129. egg_ says:

    Newus fredus!

  130. Zyconoclast says:

    The Albanian immigrant should have been permanently locked up a long time ago.
    But we don’t do that anymore because not nice.

    Deported.

Comments are closed.