An Iranian scientist is dead but he wasn’t the real target

The real target was Joe Biden’s swamp cockroaches who want to resurrect Tehran’s nuclear terrorism:

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73 Responses to An Iranian scientist is dead but he wasn’t the real target

  1. The Sheriff says:

    Does that tweet by the communist John Brennan breach the Logan Act?

  2. J.H. says:

    BREAKING NEWS:….. Pennsylvanian Judge rules Pennsylvanian election was unconstitutional. Trump will win it… Wisconsin, Georgia, Michigan and Arizona will probably follow because their cases are similar.

  3. Bruce of Newcastle says:

    I think that’s rather fun since he said the same thing about the Soleimani assassination.
    He sure does seem to like Iranians.

  4. stackja says:

    Operation Damocles

  5. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare says:

    Israel getting their retaliation in first.

    Good.

  6. jupes says:

    There’s something seriously wrong in America that this prick is not in jail.

    If the deep state defeat the great Donald Trump and John H. Durham doesn’t release his report in the next few weeks, the abominable Brennan will get away with it.

    Disgraceful.

  7. H B Bear says:

    Normal service has resumed. Please do not adjust your MSM.

  8. Mick Gold Coast QLD says:

    Brennan? Pure evil.

    “Yet, we must not fail to comprehend its grave implications. Our toil, resources, and livelihood are all involved. So is the very structure of our society. In the councils of government, we must guard against the acquisition of unwarranted influence, whether sought or unsought, by the military-industrial complex.”

    President Dwight D. Eisenhower , January 1961

  9. Suburban Boy says:

    Brennan did pretty much what Michael Flynn was accused of – asking a foreign power to hold off on action until the new administration takes office. Supposedly a breach of the Logan Act, but of course that Act is now used only as a pretext for investigations of Trump supporters.

  10. led the Islamic Republic’s military nuclear program before it was disbanded

    .
    It was never disbanded. Associated Press is fake news.

  11. Gerry says:

    After 4 years of Trump the “experts” have no clothes …..Trump has rebuilt and renovated the basics of foreign policy and energy policy.

  12. W Hogg says:

    1) Brennan did not breach the Logan Act, even if he was trying to influence Iran.
    2) Neither did Gen Flynn.
    3) Tehran John Kerry did, dozens of times.
    4) TJ belongs in jail.
    5) Brennan effectively blamed USA for taking part in the assassination. Either they didn’t, and he deliberately put a target on US assets for a retaliatory attack, or they did and Brennan abused classified information to reveal the fact. Either way, this is treason.

  13. Up The Workers! says:

    Brennan’s objection seems to me to be in the nature of a Union demarcation dispute.

    “How dare you kill that innocent person. That’s MY job!”

  14. Tom says:

    John Brennan has risen from the Washington swamp to become the archetypal political gangster — a 21st century standover merchant who would have been at right at home in the Chicago mob war against the cops in the 1920s.

    The wannabe Biden trojan horse regime would once again empower the mob.

  15. cuckoo says:

    And immediately the narrative comes out, that this act is a threat to “peace” in the region.

    Got back to church today for the first time since lockdown, thank God. The priest couldn’t help throwing in a completely irrelevant observation about how benevolent the ancient Persians were to the Israelites (true) so why are we now being told (presumably by Rupert Murdoch) to think of modern day Iranians as eeeevil? Some things never change.

  16. PB says:

    Nothing like a well-timed foreign policy crisis involving the usual suspects to push election fraud out of the public consciousness.

    The more things change……

  17. Roger says:

    The priest couldn’t help throwing in a completely irrelevant observation about how benevolent the ancient Persians were to the Israelites (true) so why are we now being told (presumably by Rupert Murdoch) to think of modern day Iranians as eeeevil?

    Clearly they don’t teach logic in seminaries anymore.

  18. Stanley says:

    how benevolent the ancient Persians were to the Israelites

    That was then. In the 7th century Arab muslims conquered the largely zoroastrian empire and led to the Islamisation of Persia. Today there are many ex-pat, proud Iranians of Persian descent who hate what the Arab invaders have done. They will be let down by Bygon.

  19. Lee says:

    Brennan is, and has been for a long time, an utter disgrace, and should be in jail.

  20. Cassie of Sydney says:

    Hi Cuckoo…did the priest also state the historical fact that Cyrus the Great, after Babylon fell to the Persians, allowed exiled Jooos to return to J*dah..now Israel? Interesting because the theocracy in Iran is utterly hostile to the existence of Israel and actively seeks to destroy it…along with the millions of Jooos who reside there.

    I don’t know anyone who thinks most Iranians as evil…..but the Iranian regime certainly is.

  21. Lee says:

    A dead Iranian nuclear weapons scientist is a bad thing?

  22. Gyro Cadiz says:

    I hope idiots like Brennan realise that by helping Iran to pose an existential threat to certain nations in and around the Persian Gulf, they are making themselves perfectly fair game for assassination?

    Do they think for one instant that the Saudi’s, for one, will not put a price on their head with everyone from various islamist groups to the Russian mafia (“wanted dead, not alive”) if it delays the Iranians getting nuclear weapons?

    Talk about bubble dwellers with no clue as to the real world. Someone just reached inside a totalitarian state to kill one of their most valuable and most highly protected people. How much easier might it be to do so to some clueless imbecile like Brennan or the others?

  23. Fat Tony says:

    Fabio
    #3674627, posted on November 29, 2020 at 12:02 pm
    The red smoke gave it away

    Graeme – what’s the relevance of “red smoke”?

  24. Cassie of Sydney says:

    I’ve triggered Graeme!

  25. C.L. says:

    Corrigan’s nickname was ironic, Fabio. He didn’t fly the wrong way. He went exactly where he intended to go in defiance of the state.

  26. Cassie of Sydney says:

    ” Iran is perfectly civilised towards its internal rabbinical community.”

    How would you know. Did you read it in your revised edition of the Elders?

  27. calli says:

    Like a moth to a flame.

  28. OldOzzie says:

    J.H.
    #3674435, posted on November 29, 2020 at 4:43 am

    BREAKING NEWS:….. Pennsylvanian Judge rules Pennsylvanian election was unconstitutional. Trump will win it… Wisconsin, Georgia, Michigan and Arizona will probably follow because their cases are similar.

    TRUMP ORDERS USEUCOM TO SEIZE SCYTL Servers In Germany!

    President Trump’s Forces used a military unit attached to USEUCOM (United States European Command) to get a CIA computer facility to hand over evidence in Frankfurt Germany. By using this method, with U.S. law enforcement present to take custody of the evidence, that evidence is now under the control of the Department of Justice through US Attorneys. Because of the way it was obtained, it can all be used in court or other judicial proceedings.

    Both the head of the CIA, Gina Haspel, and the head of the FBI, Christopher Wray were not informed of the operation taking place in advance. Both of them had been aggressively working to undermine and sabotage the Trump Administration. Time will tell what happens to them. Meanwhile, the raid was led by the U.S. law enforcement agency (e.g., US Marshals, DEA, Secret Service, etc) and they successfully collected the evidence.

    The servers belong to the CIA, not Dominion or Sctyl, therefore the U.S. military had full authority to do this because any CIA activity in the European theater is being conducted using military cover. In other words, CIA officers would be identified to the German government (and anyone else asking) as military employees or consultants. Read a full report here: https://drrichswier.com/2020/11/17/united-states-european-command-conducted-the-operation-to-take-control-of-computer-servers-in-germany/

  29. dasher says:

    The Obama Iran deal was possibly the worse imaginable..supported by those pathetic Europeans. This would have set the Israelis plotting from the word go as they know despite all of Obama and Brennans fine words they are the target a nuclear armed Iran seeks. When the clever people helped Iraq build a nuclear reactor in the 80’s the Israelis sorted it out on or about the moment it was commissioned with a brilliant airstrike………are these Obama /Euro types stupid? Israel cannot allow Iran to get nuclear weapons and I suspect there will be more skulduggery before th threat is eliminated. I am on the side of the Israelis and it baffles me that too many in the west are not.

  30. Perfidious Albino says:

    So where did all the radiation go then – hiding in the ocean with the global warming?

  31. OldOzzie says:

    ’Mossad’ assassins blew hole in Iran’s nuclear program

    ByLOUISE CALLAGHAN andANSHEL PFEFFER

    At about 2pm on Friday, a convoy of three cars drove down a tree-lined road outside the Iranian town of Absard, a popular weekend getaway near the mountains 50 miles east of Tehran. In one of them, a black SUV, was Mohsen Fakhrizadeh, a bearish figure with grey hair and wire-rimmed glasses.

    It was his last journey. In a spectacular and cacophonous roadside ambush, Iran’s nuclear mastermind was assassinated by a team of killers who struck out of nowhere and then vanished.

    Iran blamed Mossad, Israel’s intelligence agency. And for once nobody doubted it.

    For decades, Mossad has emerged suddenly from the shadows to eradicate Israel’s enemies. Fakhrizadeh’s demise had all its hallmarks: the ruthless and meticulously planned killing – in broad daylight on his home turf – of a man whose brutal death has a significance beyond Iran’s, or Israel’s, borders.

    But why would Mossad – with its reputation for daring assassinations of Israel’s enemies – carry out what John Brennan, Barack Obama’s former CIA chief, has condemned as a “criminal” and “highly reckless” act that risks inflaming conflict in the region?

    If Israel is behind the assassination, one of Mossad’s Kidon teams was almost certainly responsible.

    Kidon is directed by the Caesarea operations branch, which is kept separate from the usual business of intelligence-gathering. Most of its members, who are called lochamim – warriors – in Mossad parlance, have been seconded from commando units in the Israeli army and are already trained in operating deep behind enemy lines. Their assassinations have to be signed off by Israel’s prime minister.

    Kidon’s existence dates from Israel’s battles against Palestinian terrorism. When 11 members of the Israeli Olympic team were murdered at the Munich Olympic Games in 1972 by Black September, a cell in the Palestine Liberation Organisation, the prime minister, Golda Meir, ordered Mossad to hunt down those responsible. Mike Harari, an operations chief, was tasked with forming a new unit, which was named Kidon after the Hebrew for bayonet.

    At first, there were some major failures, most spectacularly the killing in 1973 of a Moroccan waiter in the Norwegian town of Lillehammer, who had been mistaken for the Black September operations chief. But Mossad found and eliminated most of the Black September leaders in their bases in the Middle East and in Europe.

    As the level of professionalism rose, more murders of prominent figures in radical Palestinian organisations and in the upper echelons of countries such as Syria and Iran occurred without leaving a trace of the perpetrators’ identity.

    A range of tactics have been used in recent years: drive-by shootings (as in the cases of Palestinian Islamic Jihad chief Fathi Shikaki in 1992 in Malta and of four Iranian scientists murdered in Tehran between 2010-2012); relatively small quantities of explosives hidden in critical locations (used by Shin Bet, Israel’s domestic security agency, in 1996 to blow up the mobile phone of Hamas master bomb-maker Yihya Ayash when he answered it); sniper shots from great distance in the middle of the night (the chief of Syria’s nuclear program who was killed in 2008 while at his coastal villa); and poisons injected in a crowd.

    A botched attempt to poison Hamas chief Khaled Mashal in Amman in 1997 – leading to a swap of the captured operatives for a poison antidote and the release from prison of Hamas founder Sheikh Ahmad Yassin – was another rare operational failure. But for decades there have been hundreds of flawlessly executed assassinations.

    Friday’s operation was against another extraordinarily high-value target – a national hero credited with masterminding Iran’s nuclear program.

    According to the Iranian government, Fakhrizadeh was a physics professor at Imam Hossein University in Tehran and a high-ranking scientific official at the Iranian defence ministry. Israeli and western intelligence agencies, however, say this was no more than a flimsy cover story. Fakhrizadeh, they said, was Iran’s most senior nuclear scientist. Yet, he was not just a leading nuclear scientist, but a brigadier-general in the Revolutionary Guards who had overseen the development of the country’s nuclear arsenal for two decades.

    Israel, which has never publicly acknowledged its own nuclear arsenal, sees Iran’s potential nuclear rivalry as an existential threat. Although Tehran insists its nuclear program is peaceful, the radicals of the Islamic regime are committed to Israel’s destruction.

    For more than a decade, since at least five of his academic colleagues were shot on the streets of Tehran, Fakhrizadeh was one of the most heavily protected people in Iran.

    He was the man holding together all the different strands of Iran’s nuclear program – the above-board research projects, along with the people in charge of the crucial components of a nuclear weapon, the missiles and guidance systems, and the miniaturisation necessary to squeeze a nuclear device in a warhead.

    That was why, for years, the International Atomic Energy Agency had been asking the Iranian government for permission to interview him, to no avail. And why in May 2018, when the Israeli prime minister, Binyamin Netanyahu, presented in Tel Aviv the contents of an Iranian nuclear archive that Mossad had purloined from a warehouse in Tehran, he fingered Fakhrizadeh as Iran’s secret nuclear boss. “Mohsen Fakhrizadeh,” said Netanyahu. “Remember the name.”

    Yet Fakhrizadeh had evaded the assassins for years until Friday when a Nissan pick-up truck loaded with an explosive device blew up in front of his convoy. It blocked the route and took down an overhead power line, cutting the electricity supply to the town. Waiting gunmen then roared up to the convoy, firing through the windscreen of Fakhrizadeh’s car.

    According to the semi-official Fars news agency, one of the scientist’s security guards was killed while trying to shield him with his body. It was not enough. Fakhrizadeh was critically injured, and – despite being picked up by helicopter within half an hour of the attack – he died in hospital.

    Pictures on social media showed his battered car, smeared in dust and with a broken bumper, on the side of the road. Next to the car, smashed glass and blood were splashed across the tarmac.

    The Iranian security establishment faces questions as to how it allowed the man regarded as the father of their nuclear program to be exposed and how the assassins had such detailed knowledge of his travel plans.

    The attack follows a series of disastrous intelligence failures for a country that prides itself on its counter-espionage abilities. Locals and foreigners in Iran with only the vaguest links to perceived enemies are under constant suspicion. Yet somehow, within this ultra-paranoid environment, assassins seem to be able to kill at will before melting away.

  32. Rex Anger says:

    Its not okay to murder civilian scientists. And its particularly not okay for the terrorist community to kill NUCLEAR scientists in what will be a decades long energy deprivation crisis. If they didn’t want him in Iran we could have accepted him with open arms

    Why does Graeme assume the Iranian nuclear scientist was civilian? Or was working in solely ‘civilian’ pursuits? Who wants to go find the Radio Tehran transmitter in his bedroom? Or maybe the Mossads under his bed and the Sayeret Matkals in his sugar bowl have already found and sabotaged it so it only plays Hasidic Clarinet jazz…

    And, given Iran has been in the nuclear game for some 40 years, why has it not yet produced a series of power-generating reactors, Graeme? Why are they only smuggling in fissile materials in exchange for rocket components, etc., and trying to refine it in cyclotrons. Some ‘energy crisis,’ Graeme..

    More importantly, the only nuclear reactor their neighbours in Iraq ever produced, never generated a single kilowatt in its life. And nor was it intended to. That was why the hated J’s broke it…

    Why is it that every other nuclear power in the world aside from North Korea and Iran generally not trumpet their arsenals and threaten their neighbours with their use? India and Pakistan could have wiped each other out many times over with their arsenals, yet despite their fanatical hatred of each other, both sides are most restrained.

    Heck, even the Kim Family Estate above the 38th parallel does not routinely threaten its neighbours with atomic annihilation- Unless.the bank balance is getting low and the food has run out again. More people have died of laughing at the DPRK’s ambitions than have died to their nukes.

    If Graeme believes so hard in the poor, misbegotten fanatics who threaten everyone around them, Arab and non-Arab alike, he is more than welcome to offer his services to the nearest IRGC outpost. Their level of whoopy and his are so closely matched they’ll get on like a Lebanese fertiliser warehouse on fire…

    #BeirutWasNotaNukeBirdy

  33. OldOzzie says:

    ’Mossad’ assassins blew hole in Iran’s nuclear program

    ByLOUISE CALLAGHAN andANSHEL PFEFFER

    At about 2pm on Friday, a convoy of three cars drove down a tree-lined road outside the Iranian town of Absard, a popular weekend getaway near the mountains 50 miles east of Tehran. In one of them, a black SUV, was Mohsen Fakhrizadeh, a bearish figure with grey hair and wire-rimmed glasses.

    It was his last journey. In a spectacular and cacophonous roadside ambush, Iran’s nuclear mastermind was assassinated by a team of killers who struck out of nowhere and then vanished.

    Iran blamed Mossad, Israel’s intelligence agency. And for once nobody doubted it.

    For decades, Mossad has emerged suddenly from the shadows to eradicate Israel’s enemies. Fakhrizadeh’s demise had all its hallmarks: the ruthless and meticulously planned killing – in broad daylight on his home turf – of a man whose brutal death has a significance beyond Iran’s, or Israel’s, borders.

    But why would Mossad – with its reputation for daring assassinations of Israel’s enemies – carry out what John Brennan, Barack Obama’s former CIA chief, has condemned as a “criminal” and “highly reckless” act that risks inflaming conflict in the region?

    If Israel is behind the assassination, one of Mossad’s Kidon teams was almost certainly responsible.

    Kidon is directed by the Caesarea operations branch, which is kept separate from the usual business of intelligence-gathering. Most of its members, who are called lochamim – warriors – in Mossad parlance, have been seconded from commando units in the Israeli army and are already trained in operating deep behind enemy lines. Their assassinations have to be signed off by Israel’s prime minister.

    Kidon’s existence dates from Israel’s battles against Palestinian terrorism. When 11 members of the Israeli Olympic team were murdered at the Munich Olympic Games in 1972 by Black September, a cell in the Palestine Liberation Organisation, the prime minister, Golda Meir, ordered Mossad to hunt down those responsible. Mike Harari, an operations chief, was tasked with forming a new unit, which was named Kidon after the Hebrew for bayonet.

    At first, there were some major failures, most spectacularly the killing in 1973 of a Moroccan waiter in the Norwegian town of Lillehammer, who had been mistaken for the Black September operations chief. But Mossad found and eliminated most of the Black September leaders in their bases in the Middle East and in Europe.

    As the level of professionalism rose, more murders of prominent figures in radical Palestinian organisations and in the upper echelons of countries such as Syria and Iran occurred without leaving a trace of the perpetrators’ identity.

    A range of tactics have been used in recent years: drive-by shootings (as in the cases of Palestinian [email protected] Jihad chief Fathi Shikaki in 1992 in Malta and of four Iranian scientists murdered in Tehran between 2010-2012); relatively small quantities of explosives hidden in critical locations (used by Shin Bet, Israel’s domestic security agency, in 1996 to blow up the mobile phone of Hamas master bomb-maker Yihya Ayash when he answered it); sniper shots from great distance in the middle of the night (the chief of Syria’s nuclear program who was killed in 2008 while at his coastal villa); and poisons injected in a crowd.

    A botched attempt to poison Hamas chief Khaled Mashal in Amman in 1997 – leading to a swap of the captured operatives for a poison antidote and the release from prison of Hamas founder Sheikh Ahmad Yassin – was another rare operational failure. But for decades there have been hundreds of flawlessly executed assassinations.

    Friday’s operation was against another extraordinarily high-value target – a national hero credited with masterminding Iran’s nuclear program.

    According to the Iranian government, Fakhrizadeh was a physics professor at Imam Hossein University in Tehran and a high-ranking scientific official at the Iranian defence ministry. Israeli and western intelligence agencies, however, say this was no more than a flimsy cover story. Fakhrizadeh, they said, was Iran’s most senior nuclear scientist. Yet, he was not just a leading nuclear scientist, but a brigadier-general in the Revolutionary Guards who had overseen the development of the country’s nuclear arsenal for two decades.

    Israel, which has never publicly acknowledged its own nuclear arsenal, sees Iran’s potential nuclear rivalry as an existential threat. Although Tehran insists its nuclear program is peaceful, the radicals of the Islamic regime are committed to Israel’s destruction.

    For more than a decade, since at least five of his academic colleagues were shot on the streets of Tehran, Fakhrizadeh was one of the most heavily protected people in Iran.

    He was the man holding together all the different strands of Iran’s nuclear program – the above-board research projects, along with the people in charge of the crucial components of a nuclear weapon, the missiles and guidance systems, and the miniaturisation necessary to squeeze a nuclear device in a warhead.

    That was why, for years, the International Atomic Energy Agency had been asking the Iranian government for permission to interview him, to no avail. And why in May 2018, when the Israeli prime minister, Binyamin Netanyahu, presented in Tel Aviv the contents of an Iranian nuclear archive that Mossad had purloined from a warehouse in Tehran, he fingered Fakhrizadeh as Iran’s secret nuclear boss. “Mohsen Fakhrizadeh,” said Netanyahu. “Remember the name.”

    Yet Fakhrizadeh had evaded the assassins for years until Friday when a Nissan pick-up truck loaded with an explosive device blew up in front of his convoy. It blocked the route and took down an overhead power line, cutting the electricity supply to the town. Waiting gunmen then roared up to the convoy, firing through the windscreen of Fakhrizadeh’s car.

    According to the semi-official Fars news agency, one of the scientist’s security guards was killed while trying to shield him with his body. It was not enough. Fakhrizadeh was critically injured, and – despite being picked up by helicopter within half an hour of the attack – he died in hospital.

    Pictures on social media showed his battered car, smeared in dust and with a broken bumper, on the side of the road. Next to the car, smashed glass and blood were splashed across the tarmac.

    The Iranian security establishment faces questions as to how it allowed the man regarded as the father of their nuclear program to be exposed and how the assassins had such detailed knowledge of his travel plans.

    The attack follows a series of disastrous intelligence failures for a country that prides itself on its counter-espionage abilities. Locals and foreigners in Iran with only the vaguest links to perceived enemies are under constant suspicion. Yet somehow, within this ultra-paranoid environment, assassins seem to be able to kill at will before melting away.

  34. dasher says:

    Confidence building clauses and fine rhetoric are utterly without merit when the regime concerned behaves in the way Iran behaves. Just like the Palestinians were out manoeuvred by Trump …they had missed every opportunity for decades to come to the table, so it is with Iran, a rogue state that should not be entertained until its deeds start to match its words. How many time must we learn that appeasement on emboldens those with malicious intent. I have no idea how it will happ[en but if Biden falls back on the Obama approach it will guarantee an outcome that they will no be happy with.

  35. Stimpson J. Cat says:

    Imagine a future where all War is illegal and the only acts of violence allowed are the state sanctioned assassination of scientists.

    How is this a problem for anyone except nerds?

    Don’t send your kids to university, Gentlepeople!

    It’s not rocket science!

    😂

  36. Stimpson J. Cat says:

    No but seriously,
    I can’t believe anyone would actually get upset about the illegal killing of scientists.

    Just think of it as:

    “Free Competition in the Free Market of Ideas”.

  37. Rex Anger says:

    You are talking utter nonsense. The Iranians have not launched a war of aggression since about 1777.

    You might wanna tell that to the Shia population of Iraq, the Mad Mullahs’ cannon fodder ofnchoice since 2005 against the hated Baathist competition, minority Sunnis, Assyrians, Yazidi and so on.

    Ditto every Western serviceman blown up or shot at by Iranian-supplied explosives, small-arms and AT weapons.

    Even the Australian Army was not immune Graeme- One Bushmaster PMV was hit and burnt out by a Iranian-provided EFP charge in 2009. Sadly for you, no J-backing infidel stooges died. Their J-inspired J-engineers did their J-ob too J-well…

    And let’s not ask the Syrians and Lebanese about what they think of your poor, misunderstood Iranians either. And the innocents their stooges have murdered and driven out…

    I might tell the Mossads to change the propaganda chip in your brain while you’re sleeping tonight. Or at least turn the volume down a tad…

    #DrumsDrumsInTheDeep

  38. C.L. says:

    Bird, I didn’t actually write anything editorially about the licitness of killing this scientist. I simply said his death was a shot across Joe Biden’s bow.

    As reports say he and his bodyguards were killed in a “shootout,” we can’t be sure this was an assassination at all. Mossad doesn’t do shootouts when they want an individual dead.

    As a general rule, you’re right. States don’t have the moral authority to go around preemptively killing individuals. Second, I am not a wide-eyed Rapture hillbilly who thinks Israel should never be criticised. I have slammed the state many times for its official lies about Pius XII, for example.

    It’s also worth pointing out here that 77 percent of American Js voted for Joe Biden – despite everything Trump did for Israel.

    As for your portrayal of Iran as an innocent, wonderful country ruled by peace-lovers and puppy-fanciers, don’t be silly.

  39. Lee says:

    Pardon my ignorance, but it appears that “Graeme” and “Fabio” are the same person, and if so who is he?

  40. C.L. says:

    Imagine a future where all War is illegal and the only acts of violence allowed are the state sanctioned assassination of scientists.
    […]
    I can’t believe anyone would actually get upset about the illegal killing of scientists.

    Is the “illegal killing” of non-scientists OK?
    Why the moralising about the especial enormity of killing a Scientist?

    How many scientists do you know with Tehran-provided bodyguards?

    This bloke wasn’t conducting a study into the prevalence of chlamydia in feral camels. His job was to create nuclear fucking bombs.

  41. Cassie of Sydney says:

    “It’s also worth pointing out here that 77 percent of American Js voted for Joe Biden – despite everything Trump did for Israel.”

    Hi C.L. That’s representative of the collapse of American Jooory….most American Jooos are now secular…thanks to assimilation and intermarriage….they don’t observe anything The Orthodox and Haredim now vote Republican (if they vote)….that move will increase over the coming decade Also, Trump got the Florida Jooooish vote….he made inroads into what was a solidly conservative Demrat vote.

  42. Entropy says:

    As reports say he and his bodyguards were killed in a “shootout,” we can’t be sure this was an assassination at all. Mossad doesn’t do shootouts when they want an individual dead.

    correct. How about these as some alternative scenarios for some fun speculation:
    * Mr Scientist had pissed off his benefactor, perhaps he had deflowered someone’s daughter? Or at least told the wrong person he desired her
    * he had outlived his usefulness ( alive that is, maybe not so in death)
    * he was trying to defect.

  43. Cassie of Sydney says:

    “Lee
    #3674715, posted on November 29, 2020 at 1:18 pm
    Pardon my ignorance, but it appears that “Graeme” and “Fabio” are the same person, and if so who is he?”

    A serial pest.

  44. Bruce of Newcastle says:

    The Iranians have a tendency to develop the God-complex from time to time. That was the case when Philip and Alexander, completely pissed off with them, decided to extirpate the Persian Empire from the planet. Which they did. The Iranians keep throwing up nutty regimes every few centuries, the mullahs are just the latest bunch. Aside from that they’re fine people.

  45. Roger says:

    Who just got smote.

  46. Stimpson J. Cat says:

    Is the “illegal killing” on non-scientists OK?
    Why the moralising about the especial enormity of killing a Scientist?

    Look it’s very clear that scientists are Gods Chosen people.
    They were blessed with God given greater IQs and gifts beyond the ken of us mere mortal men.
    Their white lab coats mark them out as special beings to be respected and venerated and treated differently than those of us not amongst their ranks.
    Their ideas are not to be challenged or questioned, merely accepted with charity and grace.
    There is a price for this status however.
    It’s very sad.
    The “Nerds Curse” as I call it.

    How is this hard to understand?

  47. Cassie of Sydney says:

    “the mullahs are just the latest bunch. Aside from that they’re fine people.”

    Indeed they are BoN.

  48. C.L. says:

    * he was trying to defect.

    Bingo.
    ——————
    Good points, Cassie.

    Re Bird, he is a highly intelligent person with gifts: creativity, wit, IQ and writerly craftsmanship. Unfortunately, these have been placed at the service of searching for and finding Israelites in all of the crises and mysteries of the world.

    I care about you, Graeme, and still respect the talents you have.

  49. Entropy says:

    Mossad doesn’t do shootouts when they want an individual dead.

    Of course, a fourth alternative scenario is those wily Mossad agents might just want you to think exactly that.

  50. Stimpson J. Cat says:

    Look,
    I think it’s hilarious that people on this site can justify killing scientists,
    for any reason whatsoever.
    It’s a small step from there to justify killing anyone.
    And then a giant leap for mankind!

    Very Libertarian Indeed!

    **Can I just say that if I was ever assassinated it would be incredibly disappointing to know that I wasn’t the real target.
    Very hurtful and disrespectful. **

  51. C.L. says:

    Yeah, we get it, Stimp.
    But 1) nobody has applauded the killing of “scientists.”
    HE WAS A BOMB MAKER.

    Bomb makers have always been legitimate targets. Even the SAS can still kill them.

    Second: why are scientists your line in the sand?

  52. Bruce of Newcastle says:

    Well I’m a scientist Stimpy and I’m sure that quite a lot of lefties would be keen to assassinate me, if they could get away with it.

    Dr Fahrizade could’ve always chosen to go into zoology or pharmaceutical chemistry or something, but no he got it into his head he wanted to build a bomb. Well Israel didn’t like that idea and the guy is now pushing up radioactive daisies. Karma happens.

  53. Tintarella di Luna says:

    I am on the side of the Israelis and it baffles me that too many in the west are not.

    #MeToo – I cannot fathom it either — the Dewish people have enhanced the world so much notwithstanding the inexplicable deadly animosity over the centuries.

  54. Stimpson J. Cat says:

    Well I’m a scientist Stimpy and I’m sure that quite a lot of lefties would be keen to assassinate me, if they could get away with it.

    Yes but you are a Christian Scientist and very likeable Bruce.
    You’ve got nothing to worry about.
    You are more likely to blow yourself up with your crazy chemistry!

  55. Stimpson J. Cat says:

    “scientists.”

    So there are qualifications needed to be a scientist?

    You actually need qualifications?

    A white labcoat is not enough?

    I’ve never heard of this!

  56. Tintarella di Luna says:

    lovely gravatar Bruce of Newcastle

  57. Rex Anger says:

    So there are qualifications needed to be a scientist?

    You actually need qualifications?

    Well, yes.

    But a good maniacal laugh is also a job requirement.

    Most establishments at the very least have a devious or mischievous cackle as the minimum entry standard…

    I entered my field sounding like a cross between Chewbacca and a demented goblin. I now have a nuanced range…

  58. Baa Humbug says:

    How did Israel get tons of documents out of an Iranian warehouse a couple of years back? Local insurgents.
    Probably cultivated for years by Israel and or Sauds. Those locals hate the mullahs just as much as Israelis and Arabs do.
    Maybe those same insurgents did this bloke in.
    Maybe those same insurgents blew up a nuclear facility building a few months back.

    Tel Aviv and or Riyadh will never say if it was them or not. They want their enemies to believe they may be next.

  59. thefrollickingmole says:

    Zinc.
    Bird strike aisle 3

  60. Ubique says:

    I gently suggested in The Oz that Israel had to strike before a Biden administration began to unwind President Trump’s blockade of Iran’s nuclear weapons program. Comment rejected, naturellement.

  61. Lee says:

    Iranian leaders would be wise to wait for the return of responsible American leadership on the global stage & to resist the urge to respond against perceived culprits.

    “Responsible American leadership”?
    Presumably the fifth columnist Brennan means a Biden administration.
    Biden; a dementia-suffering hawk who has already been beating his chest aggressively on the world stage, and who you wouldn’t want anywhere near a nuclear button or switch.
    By contrast, PDT has brokered peace treaties, calmed down North Korea, and is said to be the first U.S. president in more than forty years not to start a war or conflict.

    Democrats and their supporters clearly exist in a Bizarro World.

  62. Up The Workers! says:

    If it is OK to kill a bomb-maker, then it will upset nobody if somebody does the world a favour and takes out Hugo Chavez’s election adviser and Campaign Manager, George Soros.

    Those comically inept Dominion Cheating Machines of his are the biggest bomb ever planted under the Dementiacrat’s Presidential election chances.

    Maybe Joe Biden did some of the programming, thinking that nobody would possibly notice the truck-loads of millions of bogus 4.30 a.m. ballot papers all filled out with only his name on them?

  63. Stimpson J. Cat says:

    Bomb makers have always been legitimate targets. Even the SAS can still kill them.

    If it is OK to kill a bomb-maker

    This actually is a very interesting point, Gentlepeople.

    Do we have figures or statistics on how many Is®aeli bomb makers/scientists were assassinated by their fellow Middle Eastern countries before they successfully created/aquired nuclear weapons?

  64. C.L.

    Is the “illegal killing” of non-scientists OK?
    Why the moralising about the especial enormity of killing a Scientist?

    Just putting it out there – the ‘peaceful scientist pursuing Iran’s future power needs’ was also a Brigadier General in the Revolutionary Guards…

  65. Ubique says:

    In which subversive western university was Fakhrizadeh trained in nuclear physics? His cv online is scanty to say the least.

  66. WX says:

    when a Nissan pick-up truck loaded with an explosive device blew up in front of his convoy. It blocked the route and took down an overhead power line, cutting the electricity supply to the town. Waiting gunmen then roared up to the convoy, firing through the windscreen of Fakhrizadeh’s car.

    This doesn’t make sense. You don’t need to blow up a vehicle to block a route. This is an extra element that could go wrong and derail a plan. Why was a larger truck not used, and was the convoy also blocked from behind? Why did the pick-up not plough into the car carrying the victim before the gunmen approached? Why was the victim not simply shot in a drive-by at a traffic light or intersection without the exploding pick-up? The powerline seems like an unintended element, because presumably it could have been toppled without the pick-up, if it was intended to block the convoy. If the reports of bystanders are correct, this appears quite an awkward, not-so-professional hit.

  67. Mick Gold Coast QLD says:

    From WX at 7:01 pm:

    “…

    This doesn’t make sense. You don’t need to blow up a vehicle to block a route. …”

    Precisely WX, why didn’t they just shoot out the left front tyre? That will have stopped Abdul Abdul’s vehicle without all the noise and messiness, surely.

  68. Cold-Hands says:

    A dead Iranian nuclear weapons scientist is a bad thing?

    #TheirABC seems to think so… they’ve been calling it a “murder” from the getgo.

  69. jupes says:

    Precisely WX, why didn’t they just shoot out the left front tyre? That will have stopped Abdul Abdul’s vehicle without all the noise and messiness, surely.

    Well for a start, it wouldn’t be as much fun. Secondly they might miss.

    Far better to have a big bang, then exploit the chaos. We know the plan was good because it worked.

  70. Cold-Hands says:

    Details in the Iranian Press paint a completely different version of events- assassination via remote control!

    1 \ Amazing new details of the Fakhrizadeh assassination emerge in the Iranian press: IRGC affiliated Fars news reports the assassination was done using an automatic machine gun operated with a remote control and not with gunmen who were on the ground. FarsNews.ir

    2 \ According to the report Fakhrizadeh and his wife were on their way to spend the weekend at their house in a Tehran suburb. There were three security cars with them and at a certain point the leading car left the motorcade to do a preliminary security check of the house

    3 \ Right after the car at the front of the motorcade left shots were fired on Fakhrizadeh’s car and it stopped. Fakhrizadeh stepped out of the car thinking his car hit an object on the road or there was a problem with the engine

    4 \ At that point shots were fired again from a Nisan pickup truck which stopped 150 meters from Fakhrizadeh’s car. The shots were fired from an automatic machine gun which was mounted on the pickup truck and operated by remote control.

    5 \ Fakhrizadeh was hit by three bullets – one hit him in the spine. Seconds later the Nissan pickup truck exploded in what looks like a self destruct mechanism. According to Fars news Iranian security forces identified the owner of the pickup truck who left Iran on October 29th

    6 \ Fars reported the assassination operation lasted only three minutes and was all done by remote control with no gunmen on the ground. END

  71. jupes says:

    Second: why are scientists your line in the sand?

    They’re not. Stimpy’s line in the sand is who carried out the killing, not who was killed.

  72. Bruce says:

    @Cuckoo:

    Persians?

    As the Monkees sang: “That was then, this is now.”

    The days of Xerxes are LONG gone culture; a civilization worked over by a couple of thousand years of expansion, collapse, invasion, etc. Then there is the dubious influence of old Mo.

    Interestingly, “Zoroastrianism” still staggers along in parts of Iran (and elsewhere).

    Though they heatedly deny it, the baleful effects of the Sand Pirate and his followers blighted the place, ultimately leading to what we see today. Of course, they chose the path of Shia, rather than Sunni (sll to do with how to choose the successors of Mo) but they also cling to the philosophy of the “Twelfth Imam”; a mythical figure functionally (but not philosophically) equivalent to “The Messiah”.

    This belief is also shared by the even more “heretical” Allawites of Syria.

    Essentially, it is a “millenial” DEATH CULT.

  73. Stimpson J. Cat says:

    Jupes,
    If you spent more time drinking Is®aeli wine and less time whining about Is®aelis,
    you would be a much happier man.
    Everyone Knows This.
    😂

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