Calculated show of contempt by China

Today in The Australian

Calculated show of contempt by China

As so often happens with mass production, the quality of China’s lies has plummeted as their number has increased. However, the purpose of its latest outrage was not so much to deceive as to humiliate.
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About Henry Ergas

Henry Ergas AO is a columnist for The Australian. From 2009 to 2015 he was Senior Economic Adviser to Deloitte Australia and from 2009 to 2017 was Professor of Infrastructure Economics at the University of Wollongong’s SMART Infrastructure Facility. He joined SMART and Deloitte after working as a consultant economist at NECG, CRA International and Concept Economics. Prior to that, he was an economist at the OECD in Paris from the late 1970s until the early 1990s. At the OECD, he headed the Secretary-General’s Task Force on Structural Adjustment (1984-1987), which concentrated on improving the efficiency of government policies in a wide range of areas, and was subsequently Counsellor for Structural Policy in the Economics Department. He has taught at a range of universities, undertaken a number of government inquiries and served as a Lay Member of the New Zealand High Court. In 2016, he was made an Officer in the Order of Australia.
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25 Responses to Calculated show of contempt by China

  1. Spurgeon Monkfish III

    Goose Morristeen’s response was even more pathetic.

  2. win

    What is the accepted standard for good quality lies and to plummiting lies?

  3. maree

    Good luck to China attempting to humiliate. It is like the kindy playground, just making themselves the weak kids. Most of us grew up laughing at this stuff. Poor XI and his “wolf warriors” are still in pre-school, and should remain there.

  4. bollux

    I’m starting to think Xi Xinping may be better for Australia over this lot. I’m going out to eat Chinese tonight, see if I can stomach it.

  5. Warwick

    I agree with Maree. No Australian of sound mind will ever feel humiliated by China.

  6. Bronson

    Xi’s humiliation depends on an understanding of ‘lose of face’. Good luck explaining that concept to an Australian given that taking the piss out of each other and everything else is a national pastime.

  7. Speedbox

    maree
    #3679116, posted on December 4, 2020 at 9:36 am
    Good luck to China attempting to humiliate. It is like the kindy playground, just making themselves the weak kids. Most of us grew up laughing at this stuff.

    For most Australians (‘petals’ excluded) the Chinese pictures/cartoons and commentary are juvenile crap that don’t pierce the skin. We may have a retort (F. off), but not hurt ‘cos the Chinese man was mean to me.

  8. tombell

    surely Xi is a raaaaacist?

  9. Roger

    However, the purpose of its latest outrage was not so much to deceive as to humiliate.

    They might want to rethink this strategy.

    Australia is a nation that celebrates a military defeat at the hands of a decrepit empire as its defining moment in history.

  10. H B Bear

    I suspect Xi doesn’t spend much time thinking about Australia. Like the rest of the world.

  11. Roger

    I suspect Xi doesn’t spend much time thinking about Australia. Like the rest of the world.

    I don’t know, Bear; if the Global Times is any indicator – which of course it is – the CCP seems to be obsessed with us atm.

  12. H B Bear

    Iron ore at nearly $140 a tonne suggests the Ch!nks haven’t got a lot a degrees of freedom at the moment even if they are having to drink straight Coke without the Grange. That may/may not change and then it will become interesting.

  13. Spurgeon Monkfish III

    I suspect Xi doesn’t spend much time thinking about Australia

    Except when Pooh and the inner circle feel like having a good long laugh. Then the Morristeen, Albansleazey, Payne and Dunderhead Dan videos go on.

  14. Arky

    We have spent 40 years engineering a situation whereby they don’t need us, but we depend totally on their manufactured goods for our basic needs, and on their mega factories as a market for our raw materials, and their population as a market for our primary industries, and on their students to keep our universities full, and upon their money to keep our real estate market afloat.
    Of COURSE they treat us with contempt.

  15. yarpos

    They dont seem to understand that they are acting like petulant teenagers in western eyes. Rather saving face the ae making bigger and bigger fools of themselves. Probably good that the worls sees the true face of China.

  16. Dr Faustus

    For most Australians (‘petals’ excluded) the Chinese pictures/cartoons and commentary are juvenile crap that don’t pierce the skin. We may have a retort (F. off), but not hurt ‘cos the Chinese man was mean to me.

    Known to everyone but the idiot Morrison.
    Pro Tip: When Mr Obnoxious is laying a turd in the soup tureen, don’t reach for a spoon and give him a laff .

  17. Steve

    Like anyone cares what the CCP or Xi thinks?

    Meh……

  18. Steve

    It does seem a rather clumsy and amatuer attempt to cause outrage…

    In fact if it is, its embarrassingly clumsy…almost keystone cops clumsy & funny, actually.

    Is China trying to goad Australia into war? The gradual belligerence suggests it as a possibility.

    Almost like …hey…have a virus…now what you going to do about it?

    The chinese are actively weaponizing space, so unless the US are able to disable them, we may get a few surprises.

  19. Biota

    Seems like they have an Australian cultural studies section that thinks they know how our dialogue works. They don’t, and it comes out sounding comically stilted and phony.

  20. Spurgeon Monkfish III

    Seems like they have an Australian cultural studies section that thinks they know how our dialogue works.

    Someone should slip them some videos of Sir Les Patterson and Aunty Jack. Or Kevni Ruff getting all sweary about a certain f*cking language.

  21. pbw

    I pleased that Henry Ergas has brought the term “comprador” to general attention. For the Chinese, it carris the sort of connotations that “quisling” does for an ageing generation of Westerners. It’s the natural descriptor for those who happily bankrupted regions in their own countries in in the process of enhancing their own trans-national privileges. How is that open-borders libertarianism going in China nowadays?

  22. HD

    Seems like they have an Australian cultural studies section that thinks they know how our dialogue works. They don’t, and it comes out sounding comically stilted and phony.

    Those large scale state run/ sponsored propaganda op’s based/directed out of China really seem to be having a go at Australia of late.

    I have noticed over the year a lot of blog sites/ comments sections seem to be full of dickheads especially fond of the PRC, claiming to be Australian and lacking general proficiency in the king’s English. The grammatical structures/ mistakes, use of language/ colloquialisms that are non-existent, rare and/or unusual in either written or spoken Australian English. Chronic inability to understand even not so subtle, subtleties implied. User ID’s implying anything other than first language mandarin speaker though all the giveaways.

    For example, on the topic of SAS bad behaviour:

    http://thesaker.is/australian-lowlifes-american-empires-bitches/

  23. Chris M

    A populous country apparently run by angry toddlers using a failed German-origin government system. Sad, joyless, cantankerous leaders. How dissapointing for the hardworking people of that country to see such immaturity and instability.

    And why are they on twitter anyway, isn’t it banned? Why isn’t Weibo and Tiktoc banned here Scotty?

  24. Squirrel

    This, posted on a DFAT social media page, with the “Don’t be afraid we are coming to bring you peace” caption added, would have been an appropriate response to the CCP propaganda –

    https://images.financialexpress.com/2020/06/Tiananmen-Square-crackdown-1.jpg

  25. H B Bear

    Australia would pose a unique problem to China. Unlike most of the Third World governments that have sold their country’s sovereignty to the Chinese government Belt & Road, Australian politicians merely face a few years on the Opposition benches, a moderate pay cut and loss of a few staff. None flee into exile, rather the few that do retire do so with a comfortable pension or are warehoused till a suitable embassy or QANGO position opens up. They do not have a lot of leverage. A loss of national income does not see hungry protesters in the streets looking to overthrow the government.

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