Open Forum: December 5, 2020

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2,682 Responses to Open Forum: December 5, 2020

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  1. Ben

    Is the ‘rona a ruse to get Trump out, so One World Government can begin a takeover, under cover of climate emergency lockdowns?

    Is the UN with, or against, China?

    Remember in April 2020 the US released UFO videos, and we had a near-miss asteroid not long after?

  2. egg_

    Is the ‘rona a ruse to get Trump out, so One World Government can begin a takeover, under cover of climate emergency lockdowns?

    SBS late News were making a lot of noise about da ‘rona.

    “Trump reduced WHO funding” of course!

  3. Bob the Boozer

    Bob the Boozer is in the first 100!
    Hooray for me!

  4. Zyconoclast

    The Albanian immigrant should have been permanently locked up a long time ago.
    But we don’t do that anymore because not nice.

    Deported.

  5. Megan

    12th. I’ll carry the drinks.

  6. Megan

    Dan. Missed selection again.

  7. Megan

    DAMN! Samsung auto correct is possessed by a vile, grammatically incontinent, demon.

  8. Mark A

    Thanks Tom.

    On their way to a justice of the peace to get married, a couple has a fatal car accident.
    The couple is sitting outside heavens gate waiting on St. Peter to do the paperwork so they can enter.

    While waiting, they wonder if they could possibly get married in Heaven. St. Peter finally shows up and they ask him. St. Peter says, “I don’t know, this is the first time anyone has ever asked. Let me go find out,” and he leaves.

    The couple sit for a couple of months and begin to wonder if they really should get married in Heaven, what with the eternal aspect of it all. “What if it doesn’t work out?” they wonder, “Are we stuck together forever?”
    St. Peter returns after yet another month, looking somewhat bedraggled. “Yes,” he informs the couple, “you can get married in Heaven.” “Great,” says the couple, “but what if things don’t work out? Could we also get a divorce in Heaven?”

    St. Peter, red-faced, slams his clipboard onto the ground. “What’s wrong?” exclaims the frightened couple.

    “Geez!” St. Peter exclaims, “It took me three months to find a priest up here! Do you have any idea how long it’s going to take for me to find a lawyer?”

  9. Rowe does a very good Xi Jinping.
    The man’s a true artist.

  10. Bruce of Newcastle

    Haha, Al Goodwyn thinks no-deal Brexit is a bad thing.

    It’s always been far and away the best option, to get rid of the ECJ and the rest of the Brussels totalitarian nannies. Which is why the EU is so persistent trying and trying to keep British law subservient to EU law.

  11. Herodotus

    Sharyl Atkisson on the media: they’re not doing news any more, they’re telling people what to think. More at the link, the decline and fall of the media.
    For years there has been a cohort saying the media doesn’t matter. The sensible voters will win in the end.
    Against that I submit that even in our better-than-USA voting system we still get Labor state governments, and sometimes rubbish federal ones as well. We get greens!
    But in the USA we saw the MSM recite the daily phrase log such as “Biden’s adminstration will be the most diverse evah” like trained monkeys.
    American Thinker

  12. Herodotus

    Hi Bruce – BBC were making out that la Nina is a fizzer and has been kyboshed by their old mate Global Warming.

  13. Cassie of Sydney

    ” they’re not doing news any more, they’re telling people what to think. More at the link, the decline and fall of the media.
    For years there has been a cohort saying the media doesn’t matter. The sensible voters will win in the end.”

    A classic example of this is Victoria. We see their ABC and all the rest of the progressive MSM scum run cover for Andrews and his incompetents. So watch Labor get reelected in Victoria in two years time. There’s nothing sensible about most Victorian voters.

  14. Bruce of Newcastle

    Woolly thinking.

    Prince Charles blasts cheap fast fashion as he promotes £150 luxury scarf (4 Dec)

    PRINCE CHARLES has spoken about the necessity of “making changes” in the way the public consumes clothing to tackle the climate change emergency.

    Prince Charles celebrated the 10th anniversary of the Campaign For Wool by launching a limited edition scarf while also continuing to raise awareness on the benefit of sustainable and commercially viable wool. … The Prince of Wales, patron of the Campaign For Wool, said: “It is abundantly clear to me that we need to make changes to the way we think about the production, use and the disposal of clothing and textiles if we are going to get anywhere near to meeting the United Nations climate change goals set for the industry.

    “A major part of that change has to be moving from a linear system to a circular one, where textiles and clothing are produced sustainably, enjoy long use, and are made using materials which will biodegrade naturally and quickly at the end of their useful life.”

    He certainly seems to be biodegrading naturally and quickly, at least in the top paddock. Maybe he’ll turn into a raindrop too.

  15. miltonf

    meeting the United Nations climate change goals set for the industry

    Gives himself away there. I imagine he thinks the Saxe-Blauplunkt-Mercedes will be sitting in a box seat when the NWO comes. Maybe not.

  16. Firstborn’s column – Sydney’s Daily Telegraph

    Minister missing

    Vikki Campion

    The world is denigrating our soldiers in trial by media over war crimes when the Afghan caliphate has killed more innocent civilians than the SAS ever did — while the minister paid about $365,000 a year to represent their welfare in cabinet wasn’t overwhelming in his defence of their honour.

    Our soldiers are away fighting a war where they don’t know who the enemy is, fighting an army with no uniform, no minimum age and no morals. Back in Australia, every week a veteran takes their own life.

    Not only adult males bear weapons in Afghanistan, but women and children are strapped with bombs. Piles of rubbish are filled with explosives and captured soldiers beheaded on tape.

    Releasing an internal Brereton inquiry, while redacted, to the public was a statement of transparency by the ADF chief, but until the accused soldiers are tried these are allegations and the accused must be considered innocent until proven guilty.

    Sources who have served in Afghanistan and who have read the unredacted Brereton Report urged me to be careful in my defence of soldiers because the internal inquiry would not have been released publicly without hard evidence to hand to the Australian Federal Police to investigate.

    Being told to point a weapon at a human and extinguish their life in cold blood, goes against everything our soldiers are trained to do and if our senior SAS asked their juniors to do this, it is gutting for every defence family. Our soldiers are making decisions under mortal threat in extreme climates and in that sort of conflict, there is collateral damage.

    In Afghanistan, often the person shooting you is not a soldier with the same standards as you, but a pre-pubescent, from 11-years-old, not a fanatic extremist who hates Australians — a kid who doesn’t understand.

    Those who serve have a beef with those who send them to a war from air-conditioned safety, who have failed to explain to the public why they are there or provide adequate mental health support when they return. Now on top of coping with PTSD, defence families are being hounded, their loved ones dubbed “child-killers”.

    The key cabinet minister, responsible for the welfare of defence force personnel and the veteran community, Darren Chester, fronted a press conference on the day the report was released but was his defence of serving men and women enough? Only when pressure erupted in party rooms from colleagues expressing the overwhelming feeling by the community that they need to remain rock-solid behind our armed forces, did Chester fire up.

    It was not Chester who stood by Julie-ann Finney, mother of Dave Stafford Finney who took his own life, when she powerfully called for a royal commission into veteran suicides, but his Labor shadow.

    Each week a veteran takes their own life. If this does not warrant an independent investigation at arm’s length from government, then how do we justify the royal commission into pink batts where six people died?

    My family tree, like many working-class regional families, is heavy with men who served, who went to war, who were blown up, who were paralysed for life, who were in the waves turning back the boats, who pulled dead refugees from the ocean, who found their mates in the midst of suicide, who had to cut the rope and try to breathe the life back in. We must ask why so many returned servicemen are so haunted that they come home and take their own lives. We must ask why it was only two returned servicemen Members of Parliament, Phil Thompson and Luke Gosling, who spoke up for soldiers on each side while the Minister was silent.

    LNP Herbert MP Phil Thompson was blown up by an IUD in Afghanistan in 2009 — and has since buried 10 of his mates from suicide.

    Labor Solomon MP Luke Gosling was a former commando who worked in Southern Afghanistan securing an election.

    While Thompson and Gosling went to bat from the backbench, cabinet minister Chester could only put out a press release with four phone numbers for defence personnel and their families to call if they were struggling.

    Accountability should start at the top – and cabinet minister Chester is being paid about $365,000 a year to not say – or do – very much at all.

  17. Cassie of Sydney

    “Bruce of Newcastle
    #3680017, posted on December 5, 2020 at 7:00 am
    Woolly thinking.

    Prince Charles blasts cheap fast fashion as he promotes £150 luxury scarf (4 Dec)”

    Actually BoN….I think Charles is right about this. Anyone who buys crap from chains such as H&M is contributing to the evil that is global corporatism. I would rather buy one good £150 scarf than ten cheap scarves bought from a chain like H&M.

  18. Cassie of Sydney

    “Cardimona
    #3680021, posted on December 5, 2020 at 7:10 am
    Firstborn’s column – Sydney’s Daily Telegraph”

    She’s a very good writer.

  19. Tom

    She’s a very good writer.

    Yes, Cardimona. An excellent read today. Thanks.

  20. Dot

    Everyone should be absolutely fuming over the new national security and surveillance legislation Dutton wants.

    A proposed power to edit your online data because *national security* which apparently involves tax cases…and of course, give the government infinite power because of pefodiles.

    These are some of the most ridiculous laws ever proposed in Australia. Literally enabling *legal* evidence tampering and perjury.

    What could we expect from a bald ex QPS cock sucker like Peter Dutton?

  21. min

    The MSM train voters like Pavlov’s dogs by using the same misinformation and disinformation and negative language to mess with people’s brains . Virtually the same take on a story to do with the side they are behind is presented . Even if the were more balanced and gave equal positive and negative messages ,human brains are influenced by the negative ones .
    Over the recent years the notable personalities to get this negative bias were Abbott, Pell and Trump , others too . This manipulation has worked on climate change as well although some are finding if you look out the window you see they are telling us fabrications . Some trouble still with the bad gas because it cannot be seen however..
    Friends and I have noted that organisations to which we belong and companies we invest in have a distinct left tilt these days as result of this constant brainwashing .
    Observing what is happening in the States , why were the negative reports re Biden not even given any coverage in MSM if not to make him palatable? Just hope as Rasmussen ‘s poll s have indicated that Trump has poked them hard enough to wake people up , including Aussies.

  22. Bruce of Newcastle

    Charlie seems sane compared to this guy, if he’s a guy.

    To be fair, it’s not as though the sciences are exempt from the political madness afflicting our universities. Try out this article from the current issue of The Lancet, a formerly respected medical journal that has apparently been taken over by the Babylon Bee:

    Neoliberal economics, planetary health, and the COVID-19 pandemic: a Marxist ecofeminist analysis

    Simon Mair, PhD

    Abstract

    Planetary health sees neoliberal capitalism as a key mediator of socioecological crises, a position that is echoed in much COVID-19 commentary. In this Personal View, I set out an economic theory that emphasises some of the ways in which neoliberal capitalism’s conceptualisation of value has mediated responses to COVID-19. Using the intersection of ecological, feminist, and Marxist economics, I develop an analysis of neoliberal capitalism as a specific historical form of the economy.

    Truly Blair’s Law level craziness, and a pretty stark symptom of decadence of the West. The good news is that for the first time this century universities are having to cut some drones from their staff roster.

    The Higher Ed Meltdown Accelerates | Power Line (4 Dec)

    RTWT it’s fun to see reality hit these people with a cluebat.

  23. Cassie of Sydney

    “min
    #3680034, posted on December 5, 2020 at 7:37 am”

    Excellent comment.

  24. Terry

    Ben
    #3679920, posted on December 5, 2020 at 12:08 am
    ‘Is the UN with, or against, China?’

    A fully owned subsidiary…

  25. Ed Case

    Mark Knight is big on the VaxProp today.
    I see elsewhere on the Net it’s being referred to as the Death Shot.
    Interesting [if true!] that young women are most resistant to the prospect of The Jab, usually they’re the followers, not the leaders.
    Will we be saved by the Revolt of The Karens?
    I’m dubious, but it might be our best shot.

  26. Cassie of Sydney

    ” to get this negative bias were Abbott, Pell and Trump”

    I would add that Trump fights back against this bias. Abbott and Pell haven’t and whilst I can understand Pell not getting down and dirty, Tony Abbott should have…when he was PM and especially last year. Being dignified and being nice doesn’t win wars. The first three months of Abbott’s tenure as PM was a clear sign that he wasn’t going to be a warrior.

  27. Bruce of Newcastle

    Here’s one for JC, who likes granma Yellen.

    Biden Treasury Pick Janet Yellen Promises to Use Department to Address Race, Gender and the ‘Climate Crisis’

    I thought the idea of Treasury was to address money. But then I suppose every department in the US government now is the Department for Race, Gender and the Climate Crisis. It’s the B Ark writ large.

  28. Ed Case

    From today’s DT article: My family tree, like many working-class regional families, is heavy with men who served, who went to war, who were blown up, who were paralysed for life,
    That country is the United States, not Australia.
    I’m 62, from a large extended family, and would have to go back 78 years to find one person [not an ancestor] who was in the Armed Forces. And that’s the rule, not the exception.

    How many Repat Hospitals have any soldiers as patients?
    Very few.
    It’s nothing like Walter Reed, where there are thousands of patients at any one time.

  29. egg_

    Cheapest contractor?
    IIRC stuff failed way below their safety limit.

  30. Terry

    Cassie of Sydney
    #3680043, posted on December 5, 2020 at 7:50 am
    ‘Tony Abbott should have…when he was PM and especially last year. Being dignified and being nice doesn’t win wars.’

    I have to agree there Cassie. I think much of the criticism aimed at Abbott is completely unfair, particularly given the “colleagues” he was lumped with (“Potentially Great” Mal, Julie “Catwalk” Bishop, The Mincing Poodle, Brandis, and a myriad of other LINO-Leftards). A failing of the Westminster system.

    BUT he did have a choice. The Trump (fight) -or- Bolt (appease) approach. He could go on the attack against the tyranny of the swamp or he could choose to appease, to be liked by evil people that were never going to offer quarter.

    He chose the latter, and despite being a thoroughly good man, it was this that led to his demise and with it, our country has been diminished. (Seriously, “Mal” & “Slomo” have come since with “BullShitten” and “Albo” the alternatives).

    If I want to enjoy a few beers and good company, I will invite Tony Abbott. If I want a Leader, a warrior against the Deep State, I will take Trump every time. Not sure who the equivalent is in Australia, or even if our system of government allows one (maybe Mark Latham, maybe Craig Kelly). We need warriors, not “dignified” surrender.

  31. egg_

    Neoliberal economics, planetary health, and the COVID-19 pandemic: a Marxist ecofeminist analysis

    If you plug that crap into AI what do you come up with?

    Google’s algorithms must be good at sorting bulldust into piles.

    Marxist ecofeminists rule the world?

    Our Social Meeja Barons are Marxist Ecofeminists, of course.

  32. Mater

    I’m 62, from a large extended family, and would have to go back 78 years to find one person [not an ancestor] who was in the Armed Forces. And that’s the rule, not the exception.

    Well, I guess we now know why you hate soldiers and veterans.

    How many Repat Hospitals have any soldiers as patients?

    The history of the DVA explains this:

    “At the same time, as the department divested itself of the repatriation general hospitals, it shifted from being a major direct provider of health and hospital services to becoming Australia’s largest purchaser of health services. In the mid-1990s, repatriation health entitlement cards (DVA Gold and White cards) were introduced.”

    (p83)

  33. Megan

    Ed Case – your single example is topped by mine who like Vicki Campion’s has several service men and women in each generation over the last 100 years.

    What exactly makes your singular experience …the rule not the exception?

    No wonder your weak character comes across clearly in your contributions. It’s obviously inherited from all those descendents who hid behind the braver ancestors like mine, Vicki’ s and the hundreds and thousands of others who believed in fighting for freedom.

    Pathetic.

  34. Mater

    I’m 62, from a large extended family, and would have to go back 78 years to find one person [not an ancestor] who was in the Armed Forces. And that’s the rule, not the exception.

    BTW Ed,
    In less than a months time, there’ll be five ‘veterans’ at my Christmas table, and it’s not that big of a table.

    You coming from a family of shirkers and skivers, does not a “rule” make.

  35. Terry

    Ed Case
    #3680050, posted on December 5, 2020 at 8:09 am

    I’ll stand with the Diggers, thanks.

    I want these guys in my trench, not the jelly-backs that call themselves “leaders”, and certainly not the NPC useful-idiots that hate the country and society that these guys so thanklessly defend.

    #justfuckoff

  36. Professor Fred Lenin

    Looks like a no deal Brexit , talks arecstalemated ,as they have been for months. The arrogant bureaucrats in Brussells refused to really try to negotiate compromise ,the UK was to be a colony like Ireland they have encouraged member state citizens to believe they have ower when all piwer ultimately rests with the unelected Eurocrats .
    WTO is the way to go ,the UK will thrive without the retarding regulations and the debt rdden dysfunctional state s like Italy ,Spain Portugal Greece etc etc dr8agging taxpayers mney out of their economy .
    While on the subject of unelected rulers ,how is Paedo joes ankle ? Pity it wasnt his lying decietfull corrupt criminal neck ,one thing .ge will go down as the USA s most useless president that will take the record from obama .

  37. cohenite

    Zippy from the last thread:

    Things are either particles or waves, being both is illogical so there must be a transition point from what the micro experiments reveal and what the macro world reveals.

    Then Zippy got a bit sad about missing wave functions. I don’t want to clog up the thread with heavy stuff but Murray Gell-Mann has a very neat and satisfying approach to the difference between QM and the real world. Gell-Mann talks about coarse graining (QM) and fine graining (real world) and the protean nature of QM. In the QM you have 2 (contradictory) choices but infinite choices in the real world; QM may underpin the real world with its binary coarseness and uncertainty and be perplexing but it gives us the reality with all its potential we live in.

  38. johanna

    Bruce of Newcastle
    #3680007, posted on December 5, 2020 at 6:32 am

    Haha, Al Goodwyn thinks no-deal Brexit is a bad thing.

    It’s always been far and away the best option, to get rid of the ECJ and the rest of the Brussels totalitarian nannies. Which is why the EU is so persistent trying and trying to keep British law subservient to EU law.

    Bruce, the ECJ is not part of the Brexit deal – it is a stand alone arrangement which would require separate action by the UK if they want to get out from under.

    Needless to say, woke Boris and his predecessors have not shown the slightest interest in doing this.

  39. Old School Conservative

    Steve trickler
    #3680045, posted on December 5, 2020 at 7:58 am
    Fleccas:

    Who needs government jackboot militias when an airline flunky can say, with full airline backing, “If we have to ask you more than once to cover your nose, mouth, put your mask on: we are not going to be rude, nasty, we will just take your seat number and your name. When we get to where we are going you will either be arrested, fined, and placed on a no-fly regulation which means you will never be able to fly with any airline for the rest of your life.

  40. cohenite

    Rowe does a very good Xi Jinping.
    The man’s a true artist.

    And you’re a true bastard you old commie bastard.

  41. Ed Case

    ***BTW Ed,
    In less than a months time, there’ll be five ‘veterans’ at my Christmas table, and it’s not that big of a table.

    You coming from a family of shirkers and skivers, does not a “rule” make.***

    Ad Homs aren’t an argument.
    My point, which you haven’t addressed, is that Vikki Campion’s Narrative, that Australia is a Nation of Service families, is not true now, and never has been.
    The first AIF were volunteers, and Conscription was employed in the Second War.
    Sure, plenty of Cats have got Military families, that’s not common in the wider community now.

  42. Johno

    How many Repat Hospitals have any soldiers as patients?

    There are no more Repat hospitals.Was done away with long time ago. All Vets now have private hospital cover for recognised ailments.

  43. Ed Case

    Thanks for that.

    The U.S, does have a Martial tradition [for better or worse].
    They won’t be doing away with their VA Hospitals anytime soon.

  44. Bruce of Newcastle

    Bruce, the ECJ is not part of the Brexit deal

    Johanna – I may’ve been thinking of the EU CHR based on this recent story:

    Boris Johnson ‘has caved in on human rights’: Michel Barnier claims Prime Minister has agreed to keep Britain tied to European human rights rules after Brexit (1 Dec)

    The ECHR is enshrined in British law by the Human Rights Act but has become increasingly unpopular with many Conservatives.

    But the EU went into the Brexit trade talks warning that it would end all ‘law enforcement co-operation and judicial co-operation in criminal matters’ if the UK were to ‘denounce the ECHR’.

    Mr Barnier said at a press conference earlier this year: ‘When it comes to security and legal co-operation, judicial co-operation, you are talking for example about the exchange of personal data, sometimes very personal data, like DNA. In that area this is a must-have for us.’

    The Tories promised in their manifestos at the 2010 and 2015 elections that they would scrap the Human Rights Act and replace it with a British Bill of Rights.

    Before the 2019 election, Mr Johnson promised to ‘update the Human Rights Act and administrative law to ensure that there is a proper balance between the rights of individuals, our vital national security and effective government’.

    If the UK crashes out of the EU and the EU tries something silly with the ECJ or the ECHR then it wouldn’t be farfetched to see the Tory back bench force Boris to carry out his promise.

  45. Mater

    Sure, plenty of Cats have got Military families, that’s not common in the wider community now.

    When you import hundreds of thousands of immigrants a year, over an extended period, that outcome is not surprising.
    All going according to plan.

    Now, do you want to address your Rehab Hospital face plant?
    You mouth off a lot about stuff you know little about.

  46. Dot

    I know it is from the Guardian, but please read and even contact your MP or a firebrand Senator.

    https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2020/dec/03/dark-web-how-australias-powerful-new-warrants-would-work

    What are the new powers?
    The bill creates three new types of warrants:

    Data disruption warrants enable the AFP and the ACIC to disrupt data by modifying, adding, copying or deleting in order to frustrate the commission of serious offences online

    Network activity warrants allow agencies to collect intelligence on serious criminal activity being conducted by criminal networks; and

    Account takeover warrants let the AFP and the ACIC take control of a person’s online account and can be combined with other warrants to gather evidence to further a criminal investigation

    The opportunity for corrupt law enforcement behaviour is virtually uncapped and it tacitly approves of evidence tampering and perjury.

  47. Nick

    My point, which you haven’t addressed, is that Vikki Campion’s Narrative, that Australia is a Nation of Service families, is not true now, and never has been.
    The first AIF were volunteers, and Conscription was employed in the Second War.
    Sure, plenty of Cats have got Military families, that’s not common in the wider community now.

    They still served, dingbat. Most if not all, suffered for it.

  48. cohenite

    Ad Homs aren’t an argument.

    Against the left they always are.

  49. min

    Never mind Joe’s foot what about the poor dog’s tail.

  50. thefrollickingmole

    I can count 3 in my family/close friends group, with one joined in the last 6 months.

    Because hes an evil penis bearer it took over a year for him to be considered.
    Young, keen, very fit, his dad is ex services tankie (peacetime only) definitely not as desirable a recruit as a Lambie and very unlikely to want his tackle lopped off and tits screwed on at the taxpayers expense.

  51. Professor Fred Lenin

    Min just as well dogs have the same sense of self awareness as socialists ,otbPaedo joes dog would be ashamed of its owner.
    .

  52. Ed Case

    ***When you import hundreds of thousands of immigrants a year, over an extended period, that outcome is not surprising.***
    That’s not the issue being discussed, and it’s not true anyway.

    ***Now, do you want to address your Rehab Hospital face plant?
    You mouth off a lot about stuff you know little about.
    ***
    You’re nitpicking and pettifogging now, while making my argument for me anyway.
    In Brisbane, are Greenslopes, Roseville, and Kenmore still operating as Hospitals?
    How many ex Service men are in-patients there now, compared to, say, 1980?
    Game, set and Match to me, i’d say.

  53. Johno

    Brexit was 4 1/2 years ago. The ruling class don’t want to let go, do they?

  54. thefrollickingmole

    Miserable ghost is miserable..

    Kevin Rudd says Scott Morrison’s ‘public relations eggbeater’ is harming relationship with Beijing

    After meeting in person with the Japanese prime minister, Yoshihide Suga, the Liberal leader issued a statement lauding the “landmark defence treaty”, on which the pair had reached in-principle agreement, adding its significance “cannot be understated”.

    Rudd welcomed the agreement – aimed at better facilitating training and exercises in either other’s countries – but said Morrison’s language made it sound like a defence pact “where we have mutual security obligations to come to each other’s aid in the event of an attack”.

    “If you want a clear living case study of how the public relations eggbeater is taken to these sorts of initiatives, that’s it – way in excess of what is actually a pretty mundane operational agreement which we have with armed forces around the world,” the ex-prime minister said.

    Rudd said it was an example of “putting a premium on domestic political messaging in Australia and putting a zero premium on its foreign policy impact in terms of avoidable problems with Beijing”.

    Rudd the miserable specter is not unacquainted with the taste of China Choad.

  55. Johno

    In Brisbane, are Greenslopes, Roseville, and Kenmore still operating as Hospitals?

    Not as Rehab hospitals they aren’t.

  56. Mark A

    Mater
    #3680102, posted on December 5, 2020 at 9:24 am

    Sure, plenty of Cats have got Military families, that’s not common in the wider community now.

    When you import hundreds of thousands of immigrants a year, over an extended period, that outcome is not surprising.

    There is lot in that observation, diluting the population with newcomers with different values.

    Had a quick check. In our family there was no generation, war or peacetime, without someone or several serving in the army.
    No navy or air force I recall.

    (Just as generational unemployment wasn’t a norm before Whitlam IIRC?)

  57. Roger

    Rowe does a very good Xi Jinping. The man’s a true artist.

    The poor man’s Ralph Steadman.

  58. Mater

    In Brisbane, are Greenslopes, Roseville, and Kenmore still operating as Hospitals?

    So is the Austin, but that’s not the point. They are not DVA hospitals, nor do they solely treat veterans.
    Veterans are treated privately throughout the entire health system, so using these hospitals as a unit of measure is fallacious.

    Game, set and Match to me, i’d say.

    Nah, into the net is more the outcome.

  59. thefrollickingmole

    Dot

    Can you imagine Pells “”laptop from hell” after Vicpol got through with it??

  60. egg_

    Things are either particles or waves

    The smaller the mass, the more wavelike the behaviour (photons): frequency -> colours in visible spectrum.

  61. Nick

    The Left can’t wait to call Morrison ‘racist’ in ‘disrupting’ our relationship with China.

  62. thefrollickingmole

    This is funny in a “look at the man beating his testicles with a mallet and wondering if doing it harder will stop it hurting” kind of way.

    Google hires a race pimp.
    Race pimp is a highly “qualified” race pimp able to be “sciencey” about its feelz.
    Race Pimp attacks google for not kowtowing to its demands enough.

    Google dismissed race pimp prompting all the googlebots infected with googles “diversity” to chuck their toys out of the pram.

    I hope they all lose.
    More than 1,200 Google workers condemn firing of AI scientist Timnit Gebru
    More than 1,500 researchers also sign letter after Black expert on ethics says Google tried to suppress her research on bias

  63. Roger

    Cats with Netflix might like to check this out: Mosul, a well reviewed and reportedly realistic portrayal of a team of Iraqi counter-terrorist specialists involved in liberating Mosul from ISIS, block by block.

  64. Maj

    Just a conspiracy theory, eh?

    Delingpole: Compulsory Vaccine Totalitarianism – No Longer a Crazy Conspiracy Theory…

    Wild jubilation has greeted the announcement that the United Kingdom is to become the first country to roll out a Chinese coronavirus vaccine. Personally, I’m not celebrating.

    You really don’t need to be a conspiracy theorist to have reservations about a rush-released vaccine. Just listen to the British government’s own experts, who warned on Wednesday that due to a lack of testing, it couldn’t be guaranteed that it would be safe for women who are already pregnant or plan to be in the medium-term, so they shouldn’t be encouraged to get vaccinated until more data was available.

    Or Dr. Michael Yeadon and Dr. Wolfgang Wodarg, who have written to the European Medicines Agency, citing safety concerns for human trials and saying they should be halted immediately until these issues could be addressed.

    Yes, Yeadon was head of respiratory research at the very company — Pfizer — responsible for the first vaccine to be used on the British population. Wodarg, meanwhile, is the former head of a public health department in Germany. So their concerns about the vaccine can hardly be dismissed as the work of cranks.

    Among the potential side-effects, they warn, are the formation of ‘non-neutralising antibodies’ which can cause an exaggerated, and possibly lethal, immune reaction – especially when the test person is confronted after vaccination with the real, ‘wild’ virus. There is also a risk of ‘infertility of indefinite duration’ in vaccinated women; and the possibility of fatal allergic reactions to polyethylene glycol (PEG) which is used in the mRNA vaccines from BioNTech/Pfizer.

    Perhaps the biggest worry about this vaccine is that it may be made compulsory. Prime Minister Boris Johnson has insisted that there are no government plans to force people to take the vaccine. But Vaughan Gething, the ‘Health Minister’ of the hard-left Welsh ‘government’ has already jumped the gun on this by launching health ID cards in Wales.

    Mr Gething said: “Those receiving a COVID-19 vaccination will be given a credit card-sized NHS Wales immunisation card which will have the vaccine name, date of immunisation and batch number of each of the doses given handwritten on them.”

    “These will act as a reminder for a second dose and for the type of vaccine, and it will also give information about how to report side effects,” he added.

    This has understandably raised fears that vaccines are going to be made compulsory through the back door. The UK government’s Vaccine Minister Nadhim Zahawi has already hinted at this. Earlier this week, he said that some venues or businesses might insist on proof of vaccination before allowing customers entry.

    As the Mail reports:

    ‘You’ll probably find restaurants and bars and cinemas and other venues – sports venues – will probably also use that system as they’ve done with the app,’ Mr Zahawi told the BBC.

    In other words, even if the government does stick to its promise not to make ‘immunity passports’ a condition of being a free citizen, it may be relying on sympathetic businesses to do its dirty work for it.

    Certain airlines – including Australia’s Qantas – have already indicated they are considering compulsory vaccination as a condition of travel.

    Hence the concerned intervention in parliament during the tier/lockdown debate this week by Steve Baker MP during a speech by fellow Conservative lockdown sceptic Desmond Swayne MP.

    The Government would set the seal on its reputation as the most authoritarian since the Commonwealth of the 1650s should they use coercion to ensure vaccination. But it is as nothing as the enthusiasm of Labour for even more coercive and restrictive measures. pic.twitter.com/xMfxVFoAuH

    — Desmond Swayne (@DesmondSwayne) December 1, 2020

    Baker said:

    ‘Will he [Swayne] agree with me that it’s not enough for the government merely to refrain from coercing people? The government’s also got to pay attention to implicit coercion. That is, if the government turns a blind eye to allowing businesses like airlines and restaurants to refuse to let people in unless they’ve had the vaccination. The government’s got to decide whether it’s willing to allow people to discriminate on that basis.’

    He makes a good point.

    The United Kingdom – and every other country in the world now preparing to roll out its miracle vaccine cure – is teetering on the brink of health totalitarianism. It is in danger of creating a two-tier system in which a persecuted underclass – including anyone who, for whatever reason, chooses not to take the vaccine – is denied the freedoms of normal life, unable to book air tickets, or even to go out to pubs and restaurants on board with the health passport scheme.

    This is a terrifying prospect, like something out of a dystopian science fiction novel. The people who’ve been warning this was coming for many months now have been dismissed by the mainstream media as crazed conspiracy theorists. It’s starting to look like they may have been right all along…

  65. Rockdoctor

    Now, do you want to address your Rehab Hospital face plant

    Mater. Know Repat at Hiedelberg is still in operation, my dad used to get seen by them before he passed. Unsure about Concord in Sydney though, remember dad getting stuff done by them that he obviously didn’t want the Army to know about in the ’80’s.

  66. rickw

    Great presentation, again filled with such wonderful nuggets as Polish ship engaging Bismarck signalling continuously “l am a Pole” for the duration of the engagement (got so close ships AA guns were even able to engage!)

  67. lotocoti

    I hope they all lose.

    Highlighting the melanin content of the ethics expert creates the impression it’s an unlikely combination.
    Which is only a bit racist.

  68. lotocoti

    rickw
    #3680147, posted on December 5, 2020 at 10:17 am

    The ABDIEL “See you in Egypt” anecdote from a couple of days ago is a beaut.

  69. Mater

    Mater. Know Repat at Hiedelberg is still in operation, my dad used to get seen by them before he passed.

    True RD, there are some preferred providers for certain conditions where it is convenient.
    However, the fact remains that DVA got out of the provider business and pays for veterans to be treated through the standard health system.
    I have been treated for a number of very serious injuries both whilst serving, and as a discharged veteran. Not once have I entered any former Rehab hospital.
    Trying to use the lack of dedicated Rehab Hospitals to prove a point about veteran numbers, is distinctly dishonest (or misinformed).

  70. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Trying to use the lack of dedicated Rehab Hospitals to prove a point about veteran numbers, is distinctly dishonest (or misinformed).

    Or just typical Grogarly.

  71. Knuckle Dragger

    Sigh.

    Ed, the singular experience of your own family being vacillating fence-sitters is reflected daily in your uninformed and wrong analyses of everyday situations. You can see it. It screams it, because in every sentence there are weak qualifiers like ‘probably’, ‘most likely’ and ‘I’d say’.

    Because there’s no concept of joining something bigger than yourself, and with broader goals than the personal impact on yourself in your own extended family doesn’t mean it doesn’t exist in this country, because I’m here to tell you it does.

    Your contributions are speculation combined with hope, and also with ‘I tell a lot of lies’.

    If you’re 62, it doesn’t necessarily follow that you’ve had 62 years of experience. You’ve had one year of experience 62 times, and that’s a significant difference. When you explain your Queensland traffic paddle Nazi salute stance fully, I’ll take you seriously. Until then you’re a parody machine and I’ll treat you as such.

  72. Colonel Crispin Berka

    Is this the real monolith or a me-too copy hastily contrived as a commercial lure?

    A “monolith”-like object appeared in front of Circa Resort on Fremont Street Friday in downtown Las Vegas.

    I’d guess the latter.

  73. Knuckle Dragger

    Margolis #2 for me by the way.

    I could think of a few who could benefit from flying lessons off the Nakatomi Tower this year.

  74. thefrollickingmole

    That Biden Ïll develop some disease” is one of the most amazingly dumb things ever.

    I thought it was an exaggeration and he couldnt have said that.
    I was wrong.

    His brain really is full of worms.

    https://twitter.com/DailyCaller/status/1334686548122591235

  75. Arky

    “If Barrack and I I I I I I have some fundamental moral blah blah disagreement I’ll develop some disease and resign”.
    In the old days politicians didn’t acknowledge that they habitually lied about the reasons why people resigned. They would say “family’” or “health” and we would all know they had been forced out, but they wouldn’t say that.
    What Biden is saying here is that in the unlikely event of him and Obama getting into a situation where their interests conflict and Obama used whatever he knows about Biden or whatever control he has to force him out, the health excuse would be used.
    You’re not supposed to say that shot aloud to the public, even though everyone knows that’s how it works. You just admitted being a liar controlled by outside forces, you moron.

  76. Ed Case

    ***Trying to use the lack of dedicated Rehab Hospitals to prove a point about veteran numbers, is distinctly dishonest (or misinformed).***
    No, you’re response is dishonest.
    1. I asked how many vets were being treated at Repat Hospitals.
    You’re gotcha was to ignore that point, and scream that the Commonwealth wasn’t operating Repat Hospitals any more.
    2. Another commenter points pout that there are still Repat Hospitals- you continue pettifogging.
    I’ll leave this discussion for the moment.
    You appear to be a bit of a bully and a loudmouth, so i’m tentatively placing you in the Knuckle Dragger category, mildly funny in a non self aware way, but generally not worth responding to.

  77. Knuckle Dragger

    Crystalline salt makes you live to 180, I’d say. Probably.

  78. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Push to ban Australian police from having a float at the Sydney Mardi Gras parade will be discussed today at annual board meeting – but there is one reason it’s likely to be rejected

    Calls for police and associated organisations to be banned from having a float
    Debate on Saturday to make final decision if police can go to Mardi Gras event
    Pride in Protest group says their presence makes Indigenous people feel unsafe
    Mardi Gras Parade will take place at Sydney Cricket Ground on March 6, 2021

    Daily Mail

  79. Boambee John

    Ed Case

    The first AIF were volunteers, and Conscription was employed in the Second War.

    The Second AIF were also volunteers, as were the RAAF (some 200,000 volunteers) and the RAN in both wars (around 40,000 in the Second World War). Many thousands of troops initially conscripted into the Army also transferred to the Second AIF during the war. All women members were volunteers.

  80. Dr Faustus

    The Street tries very hard to massage dotard into narrative:

    A strict interpretation of that interview is more than a bit bizarre should such a disagreement happen. But It does sound like he is kidding.

    And the point of the interview was that he and Harris would not have major moral dispute.

    Regardless, this will play into allegations that Harris will call the shots and that Biden will not last four years.

    Funny thing to kid about.
    The world needs to know more about whose hand is stuck up the back of Harris.

  81. Crazyoldranga

    My Pommy Grandfather was Royal Horse Artillery in WWI with bonus points for also being a founding member of the RAF. This wonderful human being then enlisted into the Royal Leicestershire Regiment at the start of WWII even though he was “mature” age. He was sent home from the front after the higher up mucky mucks found out he was in his 40’s, whereupon he joined the Home Guard.

    My Father was in the Royal Navy for sending part of WWII, along with his elder brother. The oldest was in the RAF and little Sister was a nurse. Nice photo of Dad and Uncle Bob from 1947 in the HeraldI think when HMS Theseus visited Melbourne.

    My own contribution was to join the Royal Marines Commandos out of school with a guest appearance in the Australian Army in 1989.

    For those wondering, I was born in Melbourne where my Father settled after marrying Mum and emigrating as 10Pounds tourists. I ended up finishing school in blighty before returning home after service.

    And that’s the longest post I will ever submit you all to.

  82. Knuckle Dragger

    Apropos of post-Brexit, and earlier discussion:

    None of this UK vs EU law has been adequately tested. Therefore, as King of England I would:

    1. Introduce selective conscription (wait for it. God), alongside massive modernisation and capability building of the Royal Navy and the RAF;
    2. Create the British Afrika Corps and the UK ME Foreign Legion. Free food and diversity training;
    3. Training. Jumping out of things. One week;
    4. Launch Overlord II. Drop hundreds of thousands of conscripted reffos in Normandy and Brittany, all with inoperable ammo. No naval bombardment, no long range arty prep;
    5. Minefields laid on the Flemish side of the Dogger Bank. Fishing grounds become English, and only English;
    6. Go home. Use the Channel, and RN and the RAF as shields to blow apart anything turning up in the air or on water that’s not wanted; and
    7. Give a giant middle finger to Europe and everyone in it.

    Both foolproof and seamless.

  83. Boambee John

    You’ve had one year of experience 62 times, and that’s a significant difference.

    And, unfortunately, it is the first year that has been repeated 62 times!

  84. Crazyoldranga

    That should have read “second part of WWII”. My apologies.

  85. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    And that’s the longest post I will ever submit you all to.

    Interesting post, thank you.

  86. Ed Case

    Thanks for that information.
    Not sure if the Land Army were volunteers or there was some compulsion.
    My point is that, contrary to Vikki Campiuon’s Narrative, and even though a million [?] Australians were in the Armed Services in WW2, we’re not a Country where service in the Armed Forces is particularly common, apart from the period 1942-45.
    Most of those people have now left the scene.
    Some blokes just enjoy aspects of the Armed Services, most don’t.
    Of the million Aussies in WW2, how many reenlisted for Korea?
    There might have been a few, not many.

  87. stackja

    Warner Bros. Says All 2021 Films Will Be Streamed Right Away
    Seventeen movies will each arrive in theaters and on HBO Max simultaneously, the biggest challenge yet to Hollywood’s traditional way of doing business.

    “You ain’t heard nothing yet”

  88. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    You’re not supposed to say that shot aloud to the public, even though everyone knows that’s how it works. You just admitted being a liar controlled by outside forces, you moron.

    like the trolls here, biden is quite dumb. seems birds of a feather….

  89. Knuckle Dragger

    ‘There might have been a few, not many.’

    Okay. How do you know this?

    Oh. Righto.

  90. Knuckle Dragger

    I’d say it’s likely all the election corflutes in SEQ were made of cheese.

    Man. This is easier than I thought.

  91. Anne

    Don’t forget to get your coronavirus vaccine. It’s free! 👍🏻

    https://twitter.com/xrptwin/status/1331651064391720960?s=21

  92. Ed Case

    A million Australian men enlisted in WW2, how many Australians were sent to Korea?
    30,000?
    So, yeah, there mighta been a few from WW2 that reenlisted for Korea, not many.

  93. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    Then Zippy got a bit sad about missing wave functions. I don’t want to clog up the thread with heavy stuff but Murray Gell-Mann has a very neat and satisfying approach to the difference between QM and the real world. Gell-Mann talks about coarse graining (QM) and fine graining (real world) and the protean nature of QM. In the QM you have 2 (contradictory) choices but infinite choices in the real world; QM may underpin the real world with its binary coarseness and uncertainty and be perplexing but it gives us the reality with all its potential we live in.

    Had a good think about this over a G&T late last night. I’ll post more about it later today, I gathered some of my thoughts, might be a multi part post. I don’t buy either the penrose or gell-mann explanation. Not sure how original my thoughts are, I suspect not very.

  94. egg_

    AI 3D rendering from photos

  95. Top Ender

    Crazyoldranga – well done for the service of you and your family.

  96. vlad

    A million Australian men enlisted in WW2, how many Australians were sent to Korea?
    30,000?
    So, yeah, there mighta been a few from WW2 that reenlisted for Korea, not many.

    If those stats are correct, factor in that our population was 6 million – which included women and babies. So there’s a one in three chance – at least – of any man having ww2 service. If 30,000 random men went to Korea, there’s 10,000+ who served in both.

    A few? Depends on your definition, but I’d call 10,000 more than a few.

  97. rickw

    Pride in Protest group says their presence makes Indigenous people feel unsafe

    So funny!

  98. Knuckle Dragger

    The Black Plague didn’t kill that many people, I’d say. Probably.

    Getting the hang of this.

  99. rickw

    “ Many of those who fought in the Australian forces in Korea were veterans of World War II or of BCOF in Japan.”

    https://www.dva.gov.au/file/5314/download?token=1odbBJnf

  100. DrBeauGan

    The mysteries at the bottom of physics video was good fun. And accurate. Thanks Egg.

    Among other things it tells us how amazing boredom is. 😄

  101. Ed Case

    ***A few? Depends on your definition, but I’d call 10,000 more than a few.***
    10,000 Australian WW2 vets reenlisted to go to Korea?
    Pull the other one, it plays Jingle Bells.

  102. Gilas

    egg_
    #3679946, posted on December 5, 2020 at 12:42 am

    Thank you egg.
    This is what makes The Cat supreme!

  103. Mater

    No, you’re response is dishonest.
    1. I asked how many vets were being treated at Repat Hospitals.
    You’re gotcha was to ignore that point, and scream that the Commonwealth wasn’t operating Repat Hospitals any more.
    2. Another commenter points pout that there are still Repat Hospitals- you continue pettifogging.

    Listen here you obnoxious piece of shit. Do your research.

    The institution that RD was referring to is the Heidelberg Repatriation Hospital. As in:

    The newly-renamed Heidelberg Repatriation Hospital was transferred into the Victorian health system on 1 January 1995 and merged with Austin Hospital on 1 April 1995.

    ie. A Repat Hospital in name only. It does contain the Veteran’s Psychiatry Unit which specialises in PTSD. A unit to which many veterans are referred to for specialist treatment for this condition. (ie. A preferred supplier for a specific condition – as I stated).

    They have contracts with hospitals all over the country to provide services on an as required basis. As in:

    Our contracted private hospitals:
    Contracted Private Hospitals (DOCX 50 KB) — updated 10 September 2020
    Contracted Mental Health Private Hospitals (DOCX 30 KB) — updated 10 September 2020

    Learn your subject matter before mouthing off.

  104. Pedro the Loafer

    A bit of history of K Force, the recruiting of WW2 veterans for Korea in 1950:
    RSL South Australia
    16 August 2019 ·
    In August 1950, the “K Force” recruiting campaign was launched for volunteers to serve in the Korean War. K Force was the last volunteer force raised by Australia to serve in a particular conflict, following in the footsteps of the First and Second Australian Imperial Forces.

    The Army wanted to make use of men with World War II combat experience, so K Force aimed at recruiting 1,000 men into the Army for three years, including one year in Korea, minimising the training effort required.

    Out of 17,000 Australians who served in Korea between 1950 and 1953, 339 were killed and more than 1,150 were wounded.

    Lest we forget.

    Ian Smith
    Chair
    ANZAC Day Committee
    .

  105. Pedro the Loafer

    I had a soldier uncle who served both in WW2 and Korea (now deceased).

    I heard about K Force from him ages ago.

  106. vlad

    10,000 Australian WW2 vets reenlisted to go to Korea?
    Pull the other one, it plays Jingle Bells.

    That was based on the stats you put up and reasoning I presented. Your own figure of 30,000 was too high; AWM says 17,000.

    So it was probably more like 5000 than 10,000.

    Define “a few”.

  107. vlad

    “An estimated 848,000 Korean War veterans also served in other war periods: 171,000 in both WWII and Vietnam, 404,000 only in WWII, and 273,000 only in Vietnam.” – from the US.

    Almost half of Americans in Korea had served in WW2; extrapolating that to Australia would put the figure for both around 8000.

  108. Boambee John

    “ Many of those who fought in the Australian forces in Korea were veterans of World War II or of BCOF in Japan.”

    The first units deployed, 3 RAR and No 77 Squadron, were from BCOF. A special force, K Force was raiised to reinforce and supplement 3 RAR. Many WW II veterans enlisted in K Force.

  109. A special force, K Force was raiised to reinforce and supplement 3 RAR. Many WW II veterans enlisted in K Force.

    Stupefying the more you think about that.
    A couple of years after WWII the Australian Army wasn’t able to put a battalion into the field.

    Had to blow the bugle & hope enough pre-skilled soldiers would answer the call so the country could meet the pledge that’d been made to the UN force.

  110. Colonel Crispin Berka

    Tailgunner #3680228, posted on December 5, 2020 at 11:50 am

    https://twitter.com/JuliansRum/status/1335015473528909827?s=19
    Check this out, Colonel.
    stop all engines

    Okay, so the thing about co-incidences, even very unlikely co-incidences, is that they happen every day. You imbue them with meaning because of what you are seeking. This is always true, even when the co-incidence really is due to a causal relationship. It’s just the result of all living beings having limited senses and cognitive capacity and so needing to focus only on what is most important.
    So you have to consider co-incidences against that background.

    In this case, you have to judge significance of the phrase “stop all engines” by how often Gen Flynn says that in previous communications. It could be a personal cliche for him, which would make it unsurprising to use it in this context too. I think if you found lots of other odd phrases having predictive power in previous messages, that would also boost the chances of this being an intentional double-meaning.

  111. vlad

    One of John Gorton’s boasts at the 1969 election was that there were more men and women in uniform in the armed services than ever before in peacetime. (Although technically we were at war at the time; I’d have to check the wording.)

    No one has gone to the polls on such a claim since; but he won that election.

  112. Kev

    Salvatore
    A couple of years after WWII the Australian Army wasn’t able to put a battalion into the field.
    No. We had three
    The Royal Australian Regiment (RAR) had its beginnings in 1945 when the Australian Government agreed to provide soldiers for the British Commonwealth Occupation Force (BCOF) in Japan. The Australian Army component was the 34th Infantry Brigade based on three new infantry battalions raised at Morotai during October 1945, with volunteers coming from the Australian infantry divisions serving in the South West Pacific Area at the end of World War Two. The three battalions were the 65th, 66th and 67th Australian Infantry Battalions; they were the first full-time service infantry battalions raised for peacetime service in the Australian Army. They arrived in Japan during February 1946.

    These battalions became 1,2 and 3 RAR – a bit of a letdown after fielding 67 Battalions during the war but everyone wanted to get back to their wives/girlfriends etc and get on with life

  113. DrBeauGan

    egg_
    #3680249, posted on December 5, 2020 at 12:13 pm

    I think the problem is that we are used to regarding two entangled particles or photons as two things when they are separated in space or time. QM says they are different aspects of the same thing. It’s our notion of thinginess that has to go.

  114. Arky

    It’s our notion of thinginess that has to go.

    ..
    It’s the time aspect that sucks the big one.
    The delayed choice implies you could build an apparatus to send future information back to the present.

  115. DrBeauGan

    Suppose you had two entangled coins. If you toss one and get heads, then tossing the other one always gives tails; conversely if the first one gives tails, the second one is always heads. This always happens even if the coins are separated by the diameter of the galaxy or a thousand years in time. The explanation is that it’s not really two coins, just opposite faces of the same coin.

    This is what is happening. I’m not saying this comes easy. Because you can’t entangle coins, so our experience of entangled things is rather limited.

  116. Dot

    Please prove dark matter exists first. Everything else is complete crap without it.

  117. Top Ender

    No limits to the stupidity of cancel culture!

    Roll over Beethoven, cancel culture is coming for you

    MATTHEW WESTWOOD

    On the sestercentennial of his birth, the great composer is targeted for white-male privilege

    After pulling down statues and banishing fantasy authors, cancel culture has caught up with classical music and is making a bogeyman of Beethoven, the world’s most popular composer.

    This year was meant to be one of celebration for Beethoven, who was baptised (his exact date of birth is unknown) in Bonn on December 17, 1770. The pandemic has cancelled concerts of Beethoven’s music but that hasn’t stopped attempts by academic theorists and podcasters to bring him down a notch or two. Not so much a year of exciting performances of sonatas, string quartets and symphonies, it has been the year of cancel Beethoven.

    His crime? For starters, he was white and a man. He is an exemplar of the European music tradition: the “common practice” that has colonised concert halls across the world. Seen through the lens of race and gender theory, his music dominates the concert repertoire because white-male privilege and assumptions about white-male genius keep him there.

    Beethoven is inescapable because his titanic imagination remade almost every genre of concert music that matters. He unleashed the expressive power of the newfangled pianoforte. The concerto and symphony in his hands became driving musical narratives of heroic struggle. In the late string quartets he opens a profound window on to the soul.

    Beethoven is described in these terms because of his superlative musical achievements — and that is why the anti-Beethoven brigade wants to bring him down. In one of the loopier utterances on the subject, Slate online rebukes Beethoven for his mononym: the fact he is known by a single name, like Michelangelo or Shakespeare. It gives the pedestal of nomenclature to “straight white men at the expense of everyone else”.

    Melbourne composer and Yorta Yorta woman Deborah Cheetham says the idea of cancelling Beethoven is inflammatory and ridiculous. Earlier this year, Cheetham wrote a companion piece to Beethoven’s ninth symphony and translated the Ode to Joy into Yorta Yorta for performance with the Melbourne Symphony Orchestra.

    She recognises Beethoven as one of the musical giants on whose shoulders successive generations of composers stand. “Beethoven is part of the legacy of the canon,” she says. “We do not need to cancel Beethoven to include more female composers, they are not mutually exclusive.”

    Yet the attacks on Beethoven have had wide circulation. Musicologist Nate Sloan and songwriter Charlie Harding argue that Beethoven, or rather the veneration of his music, is responsible for the class-ridden, exclusionary practices of the concert hall: sit still, shut up, don’t clap until the end. In their podcast The Fifth, they discuss the opening bars of Beethoven’s fifth symphony, and the da-da-da-DUM motif that is one of the most famous sounds in all music. A conventional reading of this theme is that it represents the sound of fate knocking on the door, or that it’s Beethoven’s riposte to his encroaching deafness.

    But Sloan and Harding contrive to turn this musical motto into the sound of the gate slamming shut on minorities, such as “women, LGBTQ+ people, people of colour”.

    In the frontline of the academic debate about Beethoven is US music theorist Philip Ewell, who recently published an article called Beethoven was an Above-Average Composer — Let’s Leave it at That. He takes issue with the epithets routinely applied to dead white composers and their output such as “genius” and “masterwork”, which evoke slavery (master-slave) and sexism (mastermistress). To be fair, Ewell is not taking issue so much with Beethoven as with classical music’s “white racial frame” that reinforces the hierarchy of white male composers. “He (along with countless other white males) has been propped up by the whitemale frame, both consciously and subconsciously, with descriptors such as genius, master and masterwork,” Ewell says.

    That Beethoven is under siege from culture warriors on the left obscures the fact he was, for his era, a fairly progressive guy.

    Beethoven believed passionately in liberty, equality and fraternity, and for a time thought of Napoleon as the guiding light of those ideals; he intended to dedicate his third symphony to him.

    When Napoleon had himself crowned emperor, Beethoven struck out the dedication and renamed the symphony with a more generic title, Eroica (“heroic”). The ninth symphony and its Ode to Joy is stirring, triumphant music of a great humanity — not for the elite but for the “millions”.

    As for Beethoven as an emblem of sexism and racism in music, two episodes of his life may dislodge the notion that he personally is to blame. Although he was disappointed in his romantic relationships and fought a bitter battle with his sister-in-law, he had enduring friendships with women. One of his best friends was Nannette Streicher, a pioneering piano-maker and businesswoman.

    Another friend was virtuoso violinist George Bridgetower, who had mixed-race heritage: his father was from the West Indies. Bridgetower was the original dedicatee of a brilliant piece for violin and piano. Beethoven called it the “mulatto sonata” after his friend — a racist term but he evidently meant it affectionately.

    The pair gave the first performance of the sonata but fell out soon afterwards, and Beethoven renamed the piece for another violinist, Rudolphe Kreutzer.

    Richard Tognetti has long been fascinated by the story of Beethoven, Bridgetower and the work known as the Kreutzer Sonata. The artistic director of the Australian Chamber Orchestra, Tognetti will perform the sonata in concert next year, in his own arrangement for string orchestra, and he would very much like to rename it.

    “I want to remember Bridgetower and the extraordinary story — in part because of his heritage as a biracial person, but I want to remember him as a violinist as much as I do his heritage,” Tognetti says.

    Beethoven’s critics are not wrong that he dominates the repertoire. Sydney composer Ian Whitney has made an annual study of the music performed by Australian orchestras and the low rate of Australian content. Beethoven often is the most-performed composer in the repertoire and his anniversary year was no exception. Before the widespread cancellation of concerts — because of coronavirus, not culture wars — 15 to 20 per cent of the repertoire programmed by some orchestras was music by Beethoven.

    There certainly is plenty of excellent and interesting concert music to listen to: by Australian composers, by women, by people whose racial heritage is not the same as Beethoven’s. But to cancel Beethoven because of his race or his sex is nonsense. His only crime is that he is popular.

  118. Natwally

    Today I was refused service at a Coffee Club because I refuse to download and use the SafeWA tracking app and yesterday I was refused the option to pay with cash at another venue.

    We are F’ed.

  119. DrBeauGan

    If I toss my entangled coin but don’t look at it, and the next day you toss the other entangled coin and get tails, then you tell me and I check mine and see that I got heads, it doesn’t mean that information has travelled back in time, it just means they’re opposite faces of the same coin. This is what is going on with the alleged future influencing the past video.

  120. Eyrie

    I wasn’t aware the radio telescope at Aricebo had collapsed.

    Yep, the onset of a new dark age. Also we may not pick up inbound asteroids/comets etc.
    When the Galactic Survey gets here eventually, our epitaph may be “they were too lazy to survive”.

  121. Eyrie

    For a small portion of the money being squandered on “climate change” the Aricebo telescope could have been maintained.

  122. thefrollickingmole

    Hahahahahahahahahahahah
    gasp
    Haaaaahaaaaaahaaaaa

    This is awesome

    “Tell me again how coal is a relic of the past”….
    How coal baron Trevor St Baker turned a $1m power plant into a money-making machine
    In 2015, the ageing Vales Point station seemed destined for the scrapheap – now, it’s making more than $100m a year

    In September 2015, the then NSW treasurer, Gladys Berejiklian, sold the Vales Point coal power plant to St Baker’s Sunset Power International for just $1m.

    At the time, the state government believed the 40-year-old generator on the shore of Lake Macquarie, which was famously the backdrop for Midnight Oil’s 1982 US Forces video, was on the way out and unlikely to last to its scheduled 2029 closure date.

    St Baker disagreed. He told the Australian Financial Review that, while Vales Point had been a loss-making business for years, he and Sunset Power International’s co-owner, coal baron Brian Flannery, were experienced hands who would trade “in a smarter and more effective way” and run the plant for at least seven years “if coal-fired power generation continues to be required in NSW”.

    Five years on, coal power remains comfortably the biggest contributor to the power grid – for at least the next few years – and Vales Point has become a money-printing machine for its owners.

    Documents released this week showed the scale of their success: a profit after tax last financial year of $134.7m and a dividend of $62m. The year before it was a $96.8m profit and $30m dividend.

    Not a bad result for an outlay equivalent, as the AFR put it, to the price of a nice suburban home.

    Of course, the sales price was never a true reflection of the value of the plant. Just two years after the sale, in September 2017, the company revalued Vales Point at $731m, up from $70m a year earlier.

    In a demonstration of how volatile these paper valuations can be, Sunset Power International says that has now fallen to $221.7m due to a drop in demand for the plant’s electricity, which it blames on the Covid-19 shutdown and a surge in the availability of cheap solar and wind power.

    Every cent of that profit above historical margins is due to government meddling in the energy sector.
    Every cent of that profit is an indirect tax on people paying for that energy via government brain farts.

  123. miltonf

    Every cent of that profit above historical margins is due to government meddling in the energy sector.
    Every cent of that profit is an indirect tax on people paying for that energy via government brain farts.

    Absolutely spot on Mole.

  124. Kev #3680286, posted on December 5, 2020 at 1:14 pm
    Salvatore
    A couple of years after WWII the Australian Army wasn’t able to put a battalion into the field.
    No. We had three

    Thank you.

  125. Old Lefty

    If it was wrong for Google, a private company, to sack this AI researcher for publishing a paper criticising some Google technology – and I agree it was wrong:

    https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-12-05/google-staff-rally-in-support-of-ousted-ai-ethicist-timnit-gebru/12953844

    … then how much worse was it for James Cook University to sack Peter Todd?

  126. thefrollickingmole

    Old Lefty

    Google are claiming she resigned.
    And we know they wouldnt lie.

    Race pimp vs China ensconced tapeworm, Im having trouble picking a side.

  127. Ed Case

    Out of the 17,000 Australians who went to Korea, we know around 1,000 of them were WW2 vets who reenlisted to go to Korea.
    Let’s say 100 RAAFies from WW2 also reenlisted for Korea- that makes 1,100.
    More than a few, but compared to the figures from the U.S., not the reenlistment numbers of a Country where everyone has family members who were blown up, TPIed, etc., which is the spin Political spinner Vikki Campion is trying to bowl up.
    Here are my issues with this:
    Someone claiming that Australians are something they’re not devalues the sacrifice of those that did serve in Wars, and with what is clearly going to be compulsory vaxxing for Covid-19 looming, dissenters are likely to be portrayed as anti Australia and not willing to join in the National sacrifice.

  128. Bruce of Newcastle

    I wasn’t aware the radio telescope at Aricebo had collapsed.

    Yep, the onset of a new dark age.

    Not quite. There’s still the 500 metre radio telescope built by China…
    Wiki.

  129. Knuckle Dragger

    Ed ‘I tell a lot of lies’ Case at 11.36:

    ‘Of the million Aussies in WW2, how many reenlisted for Korea? There might have been a few’

    ‘I’d say’ Ed Case, just now:

    ‘More than a few’

    Butbutbutbutbutbut. Ah, there you are sir. You seem to have spilled your pudding. Here, let me help you back to your room.

  130. cohenite

    egg_
    #3680240, posted on December 5, 2020 at 12:03 pm
    Four direct measurements of the fine-structure constant 13 billion years ago

    So, in the galaxy up the road ‘C’ could be less or more than it is here. AE van Vogt dealt with the issues in The Voyage of the Space Beagle, a really weird book.

  131. thefrollickingmole

    Ah, there you are sir. You seem to have spilled your pudding. Here, let me help you back to your room.

    It may be brown, shapeless and have the consistency of pudding, but I dont advise a taste test…

  132. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Special forces soldier deployed to Afghanistan seven times says ADF top brass created killing culture
    Ellen WhinnettThe West Australian
    Sat, 5 December 2020 2:00AM
    Comments

    A decorated special forces soldier who was deployed to Afghanistan seven times says the Australian Defence Force “created the beast” by sending operators out to kill “every other day or night”.

    Wes H. Hennessey CSM, 48, from Toowoomba in Queensland, said he felt compelled to defend the special forces community after the Brereton report, which referred 19 current and former soldiers to police for investigation over war crimes including murder.

    The soldier, who uses his former protected identity initial H, said he was not investigated by the Brereton inquiry.

    He said he did not condone the actions alleged in the report, including “bloodings’’, where rookie solders were ordered by their superiors to execute prisoners for their first kill.

    He said those found to have committed war crimes “should be held accountable, 100 per cent”.

    But he said the entire special forces community had been smeared by the alleged actions of a few, and that senior leadership within the ADF — who trained the special forces soldiers and encouraged the “can-do” attitudes of its top operators — were not being held accountable.

    “To me, they created the beast,” he said.

    “They needed the capacity, they needed us to be the strategic tool for them. They referred to us as the scalpel and sometimes the sledgehammer.”

    H, a former 2nd Commando Regiment warrant officer who joined the military at 17 and spent 18 years in the special forces, was deployed in Afghanistan seven times, including two back-to-back deployments totalling 13 months in 2013-2014.

    He said he was mentally fatigued by the end and there had been numerous operations in which “we were out killing people every other day or night”.

    H, who left the Army in 2014, decided to step out of the shadows and join the national debate when he became infuriated by the decision of Chief of the Defence Force Gen. Angus Campbell to accept the recommendation of Assistant Inspector-General of the Australian Defence Force, Justice Paul Brereton, to recommend the revocation of the Meritorious Unit Citation.

  133. One of John Gorton’s boasts at the 1969 election was that there were more men and women in uniform in the armed services than ever before in peacetime. (Although technically we were at war at the time; I’d have to check the wording.)

    Were we?
    I reckon I might have noted it at the time, but that declaration seems to have never been reported anywhere.
    Let me know when you find the “wording”.

  134. Mater

    Were we?
    I reckon I might have noted it at the time, but that declaration seems to have never been reported anywhere.

    Wasn’t too hard. Try here.

    Let me know when you find the “wording”.

    The relevant part:

    “There are more Australians under arms today than ever before in our history except in time of major war. They are better equipped and they have greater mobility.”

  135. herodotus

    Cheetham wrote a companion piece to Beethoven’s ninth symphony and translated the Ode to Joy into Yorta Yorta for performance with the Melbourne Symphony Orchestra.
    Do cats think she yorta have done that?

  136. herodotus

    Fuck off numbers. You aren’t an authority on anything.

  137. Knuckle Dragger

    Ha.

    Liability Bob, the Scourge of Tents puts a toe in the water.

    Has toe chewed off. Ow ow ow ow ow.

  138. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    This is what is happening. I’m not saying this comes easy. Because you can’t entangle coins, so our experience of entangled things is rather limited.

    Oh I dunno. Unscrambling eggs has always been the go-to metaphor for me. 🙂

    And above, great article in the Tele by Vicki Campion. Well written and concise. Important stuff too.

  139. calli

    This is what is happening. I’m not saying this comes easy. Because you can’t entangle coins, so our experience of entangled things is rather limited.

    Try my knitting basket.

  140. The original post –

    One of John Gorton’s boasts at the 1969 election was that there were more men and women in uniform in the armed services than ever before in peacetime. (Although technically we were at war at the time; I’d have to check the wording.)

    The relevant part (and what I was looking for) was that (technical?) declaration of war.
    I can’t find it anywhere in that speech.

  141. JC

    Bruce

    I’ve always maintained grandma ran pretty decent monetary policy. I wouldn’t put her in charge of anything else.

  142. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Today’s Oz arrived with a big colour glossy on how useful Flinders University was. I had a leaf through. Did a little tabulation, e&oe please, after lunch. 7 of the 23 articles were by men. Nearly all of the 23 writers were at Professorial level, with the occasional mere PhD (mostly from the three aboriginal writers putting forth aboriginal material of a very general nature). Only nine of my tick-of-approval articles were of the sort of quality that might signify that they come off anything like a significant scientific or international research base and were adding to it. Two were in serious archaeology done within Australia and for STEM two were on environmental chemicals for recycling and two medical ones came in respectively on medical devices – mainly facemask improvements; and microbes in the gut.

    Quite a few of the others, my no-ticks, were articles of general interest in broad social work, nursing, health and community development and aboriginal issues, reporting on quite a lot of make-work studies, imho, all with full Professorial Chairs (and teams too) to back them of course. Two of the ticked ones were on mass terrorism and the cyber battlefront respectively; pretty general even there though.

    We are not winning in the battle for serious STEM was my opinion from reading the offerings. Too much attention going to second-level studies of problems in our social system, fireside chats really, and climate change of course, where ditto applies regarding any real atmospheric science.

    Anyone else read this? Am I being too tough? Or not tough enough? Or maybe just right?
    Hard to tell these days.

  143. Mater

    One of John Gorton’s boasts at the 1969 election was that there were more men and women in uniform in the armed services than ever before in peacetime. (Although technically we were at war at the time; I’d have to check the wording.)

    The relevant part (and what I was looking for) was that (technical?) declaration of war.
    I can’t find it anywhere in that speech.

    And no one claimed it was in there.

  144. zyconoclast

    A centuries-old village church has been ravaged by a huge fire.

    Pictures of the blaze at All Saints’ Church in Mackworth, Derbyshire, show significant damage to the roof of the Grade I listed building.

    Church warden Prof Bryan Jones said he felt “absolutely numb… watching 1,000 years of history go up in flames”.

    Derbyshire Fire and Rescue Service said the cause of the blaze was unclear but the possibility of an arson attack was being investigated.

    Earlier this afternoon, it was announced that police have arrested a teenage boy over the incident.
    Officers say the boy, from the Derby area, is being held on suspicion of arson

  145. Kev

    Numbers
    The relevant part (and what I was looking for) was that (technical?) declaration of war.
    I can’t find it anywhere in that speech.

    Why are you looking for a “Declaration of War’ Under our constitution it isn’t necessary. I’m pretty sure we didn’t declare war for the Boxer Rebellion, the Boer War, the Russian Revolution, Korea, Indonesian Konfontasi, Somalia, Iraq, Afghanistan or East Timor.
    What’s your point?

  146. egg_

    It’s our notion of thinginess that has to go.

    I share the concept of the Physics video – everything arises from Geometry – fields, the whole box and dice.

    Some have difficulty understanding that the Sun’s gravity has an instantaneous effect on the Earth* (it’s a field, not a wave propagated in Simple Harmonic Motion) – gravitational waves are not gravity.

    The thought experiment “what if the Sun instantaneously disappeared?” – it would have an instantaneous effect on the Earth! Duh!!

    *Just like charged particles react to each other instantaneously over a distance (they’re in a field).

  147. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    When Vicki in that article above wrote about her family history, it was pretty clear to me that she was referring to a strong family tradition going back to the First World War, and not to having shot-up soldiers currently at the Christmas dinner table. Australian working class families bore the brunt of those two major wars, and then the wars and skirmishes that came after that. Families tend not to forget their own heroes.

    And especially those who are still being made, still serving.

  148. egg_

    in the galaxy up the road ‘C’ could be less or more than it is here

    Yup, Universal constants are one hell of an assumption – hence, junk Science like dark matter/energy fudges.

  149. Rex Anger

    The relevant part (and what I was looking for) was that (technical?) declaration of war.
    I can’t find it anywhere in that…
    *BANG!*

    What will that change, Jack Hunt.

    You went.

    You came back.

    For someone who loudly asserts himself to be a survivor and not a victim, you sure do spend a lot of time trying to comport and defend yourself as the latter. Particularly when your bullshit gets called out…

  150. 1735099

    What’s your point?

    That Vietnam was the only war in our history when conscripts were deployed overseas to a civil war on foreign soil in peacetime.

    That fact, amongst the other historical exceptions, explains why Vietnam is such a poor fit with ANZAC mythology.

  151. johanna

    Isn’t there a law of physics that covers the inevitable tangle when more than two cables or wires are close together?

  152. woolfe

    Chris Kenny is usually sensible, now in Paywallian he has a pro undemocratic Aboriginal Voice article

    Wonder how may beatings and rpes this will stop?

    Soon there will be another longrunning issue vying for attention against the pandemic, our China conflagration, and the endless climate catastrophism in our national debate. It is the proposal to formulate and legislate an Indigenous voice to parliament and government.

    From the time Cape York leader Noel Pearson convinced me of the usefulness of this proposal five years ago, I have been confident that people would embrace it. This is because apart from recognising a sensible, practical, and worthwhile idea, Australians also have a well-honed and generous sense of what amounts to a “fair go”.

    Despite a maelstrom of activism, distraction, partisanship and furphies, the fair go can still win out. Next year presents a chance for some good history.

    Back in 1967, Australians voted overwhelmingly in favour of giving the federal government the power to make laws specifically relating to Indigenous Australians. Looking back, it seems an oversight not to have included a mechanism for Indigenous people to have some say over how that “race power” might be exercised.

    Former prime minister Tony Abbott — a leading opponent of the voice, to be sure — neatly argues that recognition of Indigenous Australians would not alter the constitution so much as complete it. This is true because the constitution brought together six groups — the peoples of six colonies — and the people it overlooked as partners or participants were the original inhabitants.

    There is a symbolic sense to this, but it rings true in the practical as well. Given the widely endorsed reform of 1967, surely the provision for a “voice” under the constitution would complete the document in a far more meaningful and useful way. Still, constitutional enshrinement of a voice is off the table for now; Scott Morrison says it will not be considered.

    The compromise (if a nonnegotiable edict can be described in that way) has been for Morrison and Indigenous Affairs Minister Ken Wyatt to seek to design and legislate a voice, without any constitutional reference.

    This imposes a divorce between the issues of Indigenous constitutional recognition and the voice — a divide between the symbolic and the practical. The recognition debate, even though it provided the impetus for the voice, has been pushed to one side and the focus, for now, is the shape and workings of a legislated voice.

    Appointed late last year as one of a few non-Indigenous members of the government’s senior advisory group, I have been part of this process. Without breaking the confidences of this group, I can tell you it has been exhaustive work, led by co-chairs Marcia Langton and Tom Calma, made more difficult because the pandemic plunged it into the virtual world, where frank exchanges across divergent views have worked towards common ground.

    A final report has gone to government and soon, we expect, options will be released for public consultation. The design models and the consultation processes will appear complicated to some, but at heart they come back to the fundamental proposition of what represents a fair go, a fair say, for Indigenous Australians.

    Previous attempts in this space have failed, most noticeably the service delivery model of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Commission. But failure should not halt progress; it should inform it. To my mind, if a government has special powers to make laws about a group of people then, at the very least, that group of people ought to have an established process to provide input on those matters. Will this be a panacea? Of course not. But will it help? The chances are extremely high, if done properly.

    As a nation, we continue to wear the obvious stain of Indigenous disadvantage. The militant activism of the Black Lives Matter movement and the toxicity of identity politics worry me greatly, but we need to ignore those who would hijack an important process for extremist aims — they should not be allowed to dissuade people of goodwill.

    A well-organised voice will not be a capitulation to a radical agenda, rather it will provide a proper forum where mainstream and grassroots Indigenous views have the chance to drown out the protesters and focus on practical outcomes. We are not doing so well on Closing the Gap (we are doing terribly) that we can close ourselves off from new approaches.

    If a voice were to be legislated and we were to see it run successfully, it may well clear the way for a reference to be specifically mentioned in the constitution when we eventually vote on constitutional recognition. That is no certainty, but it is possible.

    Still, even if that never happens, the constitutional authority for the voice already exists under the “race power” and an esteemed, national advisory body, selected and empowered by Indigenous people, should help parliament focus on the right priorities for the advancement of first peoples. This objective, this project, lifts all Australians. It matters to all of us and deserves broad support.

    So when the options are publicised and the debate begins, please get involved, read about it, discuss it and consider it.

    There will be disagreements, a thousand distractions and contradictions, but that is the stuff of public debate. Even a wellconstructed voice will be messy, confused and sometimes driven by personal ambitions and vendettas; that is the way of representative politics.

    What it will not be is a “third chamber” — the damaging tag given to it by those who seek to elevate the proposal in order to shoot it down. (Barnaby Joyce was one who used this tactic but then admitted the term was nonsense and should not be used to undermine the proposal). The voice will be strictly advisory, limited in scope, and focused only on Indigenous issues.

    A voice is not about perpetuating a victim mentality; rather it is about asserting self-reliance.

    It is all too easy, especially for those of us who are not in daily contact with disadvantaged Indigenous communities, to harden our hearts, talk about all the spending and programs invested in this area, point to the opportunities available for all in this nation, and dismiss the entire issue as mere special pleading.

    It is harder to think of the differing prospects for two children born in this country today. The Indigenous child faces significantly lower prospects of surviving to adulthood, completing an education, getting a job, staying out of jail, enjoying good health and living into old age than the non-Indigenous baby. These are the gaps we must close. Parliaments and governments must find a way, and it is not too much to ask that a formal Indigenous representative body gives them some guidance.

    If you give it a moment’s thought, you can see how unreasonable it would be to deny them that voice. Especially when many Indigenous advocates have compromised to find consensus.

    The poor decisions in this national trauma do not all belong to governments and heartless bureaucrats. Some Aboriginal people do daily harm to themselves and their communities at greater rates than people in non-Indigenous communities.

    We should not blame the victims, sure, but neither do we want to absolve people of personal responsibility. Where is the opportunity to accept responsibility if Indigenous people do not even have a clear say on their issues.

    For an insight into the complexities, let me suggest the autobiography, published last year, by singer-songwriter Archie Roach. In Tell Me Why we meet a bright, privileged and loved Indigenous teenager living with a caring, non-Indigenous foster family in suburban Melbourne. Archie was given a good start in life; this is where, for instance, he first learned music. But it turned out Archie had parents all along; he had not seen them since he was taken away at two years of age, and when he learned the news it was all too late, they had died. Yet there were siblings to find.

    He tells his story with crushing and simple honesty. Although airing only gratitude and respect for those who raised him, Archie was nonetheless discombobulated by the discovery of his past.

    He wanders, he finds family, and he reconnects, but he plummets into alcohol, drugs and hopelessness. To read his story, which we know ends in redemption and success, is to gain some insight into the brutal injustices that can reverberate in Indigenous lives, knocking them off course.

    This is not about excuses, or apportioning blame; it is about accepting reality. We need to do better as a nation at healing these wounds and giving all our children a decent shot at the boundless opportunities in this continent we share. A voice is a fair go.

  153. Mater

    That fact, amongst the other historical exceptions, explains why Vietnam is such a poor fit with ANZAC mythology.

    Vietnam is not a poor fit with the ANZAC tradition, you are.
    Take some personal responsibility.

  154. cohenite

    Chris Kenny is usually sensible, now in Paywallian he has a pro undemocratic Aboriginal Voice article

    Wonder how may beatings and rpes this will stop?

    Kenny is a nut about the 3rd nations bullshit; I think he even supports pascoe.

  155. Knuckle Dragger

    ‘when conscripts were deployed overseas’

    And volunteers, old Yeller. Volunteers like you, who could have just said ‘no thanks’ and that would have been the end of it.

    12 months later you could have resumed your career as a parasite, but you opted to go for the benefits, left your mates in the lurch to go to the rear and put as many rounds through tents as you needed in order to stay there.

  156. egg_

    Isn’t there a law of physics that covers the inevitable tangle when more than two cables or wires are close together?

    Electromagnetism = electron spin (not orbit) – it is theorised that there can be magnetic monopoles – i.e. not a North/South dipole, per a bar magnet.

  157. Knuckle Dragger

    *Old Yeller*

    Shan’t be criticised for improper capital use.

  158. Kev

    …and it wasn’t a civil war, it was a communist invasion

  159. cohenite

    That fact, amongst the other historical exceptions, explains why Vietnam is such a poor fit with ANZAC mythology.

    Naturally the old commie bastard supports the commies; what a traitor it is. Vietnam was another yank good idea fucked by poor implementation, just like the ME attempt to destroy the RoP. The yanks had the dumb idea, and it will flourish again under the demented joe regime, that they could convert commies, and the RoP, to the joys of Western democracy. If they had concentrated on just destroying the vietcong commies, just like they should have destroyed the RoP in Afghanistan/ iraq and every other shithole then they may have achieved something.

  160. vlad

    Thanks, Mater, that was the passage I had in mind even though I didn’t remember it exactly.

  161. gafa

    The opportunity for corrupt law enforcement behaviour is virtually uncapped and it tacitly approves of evidence tampering and perjury.

    You know what “they” say… if you’re not doing anything wrong you should have nothing to hide!
    Are “corrupt” law enforcement going to just randomly pick your name out of the barrel just for fun?
    Even in the Lawyer X debacle the bad guys were actually bad guys.

    Worse comes to worse just stop using the internet, who needs it anyway…play golf, go fishing.

    When a Mountain Lion stalks you, never turn your back on it!

    P.S. Dutton’s just another sheet of used dunny paper, flush him!

  162. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    …and it wasn’t a civil war, it was a communist invasion

    One in 1972, and a second in 1975?

  163. vlad

    Every war starts in peacetime.

  164. Bruce of Newcastle

    Anyone else read this? Am I being too tough?

    Not tough enough Lizzie.

    I have the UniSyd mag thing here, unopened. On the plastic wrap it says

    Be a green warrior
    Switch to a digital
    SAM subscription:
    {url}

    My only digital response you can imagine. I never wanted it. They tracked me down about thirty years after I graduated and sent it unsolicited, along with begging letters. The Chemistry department newsletter is as bad or worse – just about every featured researcher is doing something on climate bloody change. STEM is increasingly stuffed in this country.

  165. kaysee

    Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)
    #3679789, posted on December 4, 2020 at 8:49 pm

    Diversity, Inclusion, Equity
    The video provides a good introduction to wokeorology and the main concepts.

    It isn’t possible to understand concepts like “diversity,” “inclusion,” and “equity” without first understanding that the Woke see everything in the world through a particular lens of power.

    When you do understand how the Woke see the world and thus how they use language to their advantage, you’ll also understand how we’re all being played.

  166. DrBeauGan

    This is what is happening. I’m not saying this comes easy. Because you can’t entangle coins, so our experience of entangled things is rather limited.

    Try my knitting basket.

    Can you knit me a sweater of quantum entangled wool, please Calli? I’d like to be able to be in two places at once. 😇

  167. egg_

    The explanation is that it’s not really two coins, just opposite faces of the same coin.

    Agrees with the Geometry/fields concept – a great analogy.

  168. calli

    No worries. Just one thing though. I do difficult patterns so will it be Fair Isle or Aran?

    When you get the box, it may or may not be inside.

  169. Ed Case

    Let’s look at the situation in Australia vis-a-vis the Vietnam War in 1969.
    Calwell hadn’t opposed it while he led Labor, Whitlam talked out of both sides of his mouth at once, Menzies left Holt in the lurch, and Holt was the only one with the guts to pull us out of the mess, but he had a penchant for trying to swim Bass Strait, and was never seen again.
    From memory, it was well supported in Australia, and continued to be until the Deep State of the day decided they’d accomplished their mission and it was time to exit.

  170. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Anyone else read this? Am I being too tough?

    Not tough enough Lizzie.

    Yes, I think I was trying to be nice and see some value there, whereas there is not much.

    It is better than the UTS one which I saw recently, but that is not saying much. They are super woke.
    And my USyd one should be along any minute if you have yours. I may not bother opening it.
    Certainly not sending them any alumnus money.

    Back to the birdies. Everyone doing well and I have trained the Lorikeet clan to leave the Currawong family alone while they breakfast by providing very separate tables, i.e. moving the dishes further apart along the balustrades. Lorikeets kept happy with wet grain and crumbled bread, while brekky is the time for the black bird family to get powered for the day on meat. Amazing, but the Lories still like a nip of meat too. They are highly amusing as they stand their ground and argue with me if I shoo them off the meat. They are outraged, absolutely outraged, they say, as they wipe their beaks on the edge of the meat dish and jump along to where they know I won’t be cross at them, further up at the bread and seed station.

    Visiting possum smashed another dish last night so now there are no overnight treats left out.
    I am running out of clean little bowls for them all and will have to buy some more.
    Hairy needs to do the dishwasher more often.

  171. gafa

    Because hes an evil penis bearer it took over a year for him to be considered.

    Seriously, why would any real young man whose not been locked incommunicado in a basement for the last 10 years want to join the military… makes no sense, unless, you have no other choices or are totally onboard with the feminising and dumbing down of the military and happy to be a party to it.

    Until men stop signing up nothing is going to change!

  172. Knuckle Dragger

    Ed, deciphered:

    ‘Calwell hadn’t opposed buteyko breathing while he led Labor, Whitlam waved traffic paddles on both sides at once, Menzies left Holt in the lurch, and Holt was the only one with the guts to put up enough corflutes to get us out of the mess, but he had a penchant for trying crystalline salt, and was never seen again.’

  173. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Meantime, Attapuss is refusing his meat. I pick up his untouched meat and take it to the Currawongs, for that is the same meat they get too. Good lean Kangaroo. Attapuss doesn’t seem otherwise sick – I’ve consulted Dr. No-cost, the vet on Google, and Attapuss has no signs of problematic lassitude, hairball blocked gut, lack of urination and drinking, and he is still tucking into his kibbled grain free biscuits. The litter tray is working as usual with the same contents.

    We think it might be jealousy. He’s put out by our cooing and concern over the babies on the terrace and now the noise Lorikeets. He’s become rather clingy to me lately, insisting I put my/his special rug on my legs and invite him up for a tummy and ear rub.

    Yesterday, after he also refused the 4-star Coles mince I got him, I got worried, and so pulled out a $16 piece of steak, very tender, cut it into bits and offered it to him. It quickly vanished. So it’s not that he’s gone off meat, he’s gone off cheap meat. This morning I offered him another colour in his Fussy Cat menu, and laced it with the rest of the steak. He ate the lot. Subterfuge. It works on kids every time.

  174. kaysee

    Mr. Biden and the Matter of Scandal

    The implications for the present moment are clear. Public figures who identify as “Catholic” give scandal to the faithful when receiving Communion by creating the impression that the moral laws of the Church are optional. And bishops give similar scandal by not speaking up publicly about the issue and danger of sacrilege.

    When bishops publicly announce their willingness to give Communion to Mr. Biden, without clearly teaching the gravity of his facilitating the evil of abortion (and his approval of same-sex relationships), they do a serious disservice to their brother bishops and their people. The reason is obvious. By his actions during the course of his public life, Mr. Biden has demonstrated that he is not in full communion with the Catholic Church.

  175. Rex Anger

    That Vietnam was the only war in our history when conscripts were deployed overseas to a civil war on foreign soil in peacetime.

    Boohoohoo, Bad Bob Menzies did not declare war so why was I selected and called up
    up and given the opportunity to go there which I did and have been raging and offering excuses about it ever since?

    WAAAAAAH! 😭

    Some successful ‘Survivor’ you are, Jack Hunt…

  176. Ed Case

    The Military has always attracted more than it’s share of Weirdoes, no one disputes that.
    The figures for SexChange Ops in the U.S. Army is an eye opener, it’s about 50 times that of the general population.
    Washington warned against Standing Armies.
    Yes, you’re always going to need a Navy, and an Air Force since about 1910, but Standing Armies are only ever about mischief.
    Militias are the best shot, we could still go back to that, altho we won’t.

  177. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    The Military has always attracted more than it’s share of Weirdoes, no one disputes that.

    Speaking from experience?

  178. 1735099

    And it wasn’t a civil war, it was a Communist invasion

    Unless you were Vietnamese, and you had seen the French, the Japanese, the French (again), and the Americans invade. I believe Ho was Vietnamese.
    They call their wars after the invaders – viz, the French War, the Japanese War, the American War, and in 1979, the Chinese War.
    Perhaps – just perhaps – they had the right to determine, and fight for, their own country.
    They’d been repelling European foreigners since 1885 when the French prevailed in the Sino-French war, and Chinese warlords for centuries before that.
    The Americans were just the last in a series.
    And our government was stupid enough to join the conga line.

  179. Nick

    KD, the Daily Mail has a piece on ex-WAG, Mz Buckley. It contains this gem which says all you need to know

    The iconic dress featured a sequinned G-string intentionally attached to the base of Tania’s back.

    The couple announced their break-up on Tania’s Instagram.

  180. Bruce of Newcastle

    Lizzie – Just been out feeding baby magpie. She’s doing very well despite losing her parents somehow. Occasionally gets a biffing from one of the local adults, but has learned she can hide in the bushes and escape their attention. Early practical education!

  181. jo

    egg_
    #3680433, posted on December 5, 2020 at 4:59 pm

    Isn’t there a law of physics that covers the inevitable tangle when more than two cables or wires are close together?

    Electromagnetism = electron spin (not orbit) – it is theorised that there can be magnetic monopoles – i.e. not a North/South dipole, per a bar magnet.

    Electromagnetism is a field. One pole cannot exist by itself. Maybe you could have a field with one pole in the centre and one on the outside like a sphere. My 2 bobs worth. Mind you 1 bob is 1 too many.

  182. Calwell hadn’t opposed it while he led Labor,

    More rewriting of history on Catallaxy.
    This is how he responded to Menzies’ commitment of Australian troops –

    We do not think it is a wise decision. We do not think it is a timely decision. We do not think it is a right decision. We do not think it will help the fight against Communism. On the contrary, we believe it will harm that fight in the long term. Wc do not believe’ it will promote the welfare of the people of Vietnam. On the contrary, we believe it will prolong and deepen the suffering of that unhappy people so that Australia’s very name may become a term of reproach among them.

    That reads like “opposition” to me.
    He was the ALP leader at the time (May 4, 1965).

  183. Ed Case

    Roo meat has no fat, it’s no good for cats.
    Ditto fish, that’s even worse, the cat will get abcesses.
    Cats have a very similar digestive system to Man, in proportion to size.
    Beef and Water is best for Man, ditto cats.

  184. Knuckle Dragger

    Jesus Weeping Christ.

    ‘The iconic dress featured a sequinned G-string’

    It wasn’t iconic at all, and it wasn’t a G-string. It was a fake Bedazzler-encrusted G-banger stapled to the back of a dress that made her look like a reverse Ralph Nader, such was the Harry High-Pants look.

    Terrible. I would have sacked her on the night if she’d turned up like that.

  185. Knuckle Dragger

    ‘More rewriting of history on Catallaxy.’

    Here’s some more:

    ‘I was deferred.’
    ‘I was deferred twice.’
    ‘I was not deferred.’

  186. bespoke

    Dot
    #3679858, posted on December 4, 2020 at 10:15 pm
    Great speach by the Critical Drinker.

    Deserves a repost (well I thinks so anyway) Cheers Dot.

  187. Ed Case

    Thanks for the reproof, Numbers.
    Do you think he woulda changed direction on Vietnam had he won in 1966?
    I say it was likely.

  188. Leigh Lowe

    KD.
    Mr Buckley seems to have been remarkably relaxed this year.
    A great weight lifted?

  189. Leigh Lowe

    Lead story on Channel 7 news.
    Tumbleweeds in the ‘burbs.

  190. Knuckle Dragger

    ‘A great weight lifted?’

    On reflection – yeah, actually.

    Like the bit on The Perfect Storm where Clooney and Wahlberg see the sun peeking out from behind the bastard storm clouds, with calm seas beyond. Without the giant wave drowning them and sinking the boat just after that.

  191. cohenite

    Evita Duffy is a young conservative lady who defends her Downs sister against the new, actually its not new, it’s a defining aspect of leftists, leftie eugenics idea to kill DS in uterus. Like all conservative women Evita is a stunner and her little sister is vastly more attractive then leftist skanks.

  192. Nick

    A great weight lifted?

    While she does have a face that suggests ‘difficult’ and not very bright, it would seem that both of them had a hand in naming their progeny

    The former couple have been co-parenting their two sons Ayce, 12, and Jett, 14, in the months since the break-up.

    Ayce……

  193. Mater

    The Military has always attracted more than it’s share of Weirdoes, no one disputes that.

    Please stop making sweeping generalisations based on your exposure to Bob.
    He’s kinda special, and not really a representative sample.

  194. Do you think he woulda changed direction on Vietnam had he won in 1966?

    “Changed direction?”
    On commitment of troops he was entirely consistent.
    Maintaining his position, had he won, would have saved the lives of 500 Australians, 200 of them conscripts, avoided the wounding and traumatising of thousands more, saved the Australian taxpayer billions in repatriation costs, and made no difference to the outcome in Vietnam.
    Sometimes history is a real bugger.

  195. Knuckle Dragger

    Off, suitably attired in bag of fruit no less to the NT Sports Awards 2020.

    A big field in the Driving a Stolen VL Commodore on Three Wheels and a Rim event.

  196. Nick

    Off, suitably attired in bag of fruit no less to the NT Sports Awards 2020.

    Now that will have an interesting highlight reel. I’m guessing white carnt, gubba, ‘inter tribal dispute’, grog, sit down, bashing and ‘he’s a legend, the only member of his family to have attended school’, will be present.

  197. Ed Case

    ***On commitment of troops he was entirely consistent.***
    Okay, and thanks for that.
    But do you think there is any chance he woulda done a U-Turn on Vietnam if he’da won in ’66
    like Curtin did on Conscription when he took power in 1941?

  198. thefrollickingmole

    The figures for SexChange Ops in the U.S. Army is an eye opener, it’s about 50 times that of the general population.

    Offer shit for free.
    Wonder why you have people attracted to the free shit on offer joining out of all proportion to numbers in the community generally…

    Its a mystery, wrapped in an enigma surrounded by a planetary body sized neon sign saying “Its fucking obvious you mong”.

    “Army unsure why it has a high proportion of alcoholics after offering free booze”
    “Air perplexed about possible connection between obesity and 24/7 all you can eat buffets on base”
    ” Navy confused about sudden surge in AIDs cases after compulsory daily group buggery implemented”

    Definitely a graduate of the Numberwang academy for advanced window licking.

  199. cohenite

    The old commie bastard supporting the commies again; what a bastard.

  200. Albatross

    Ed, please take your questions to Gomer Pyle’s blog. You can find the link by clicking on his name.

  201. Albatross

    It needs visitors, and this has the advantage of not shitting up the OT:

  202. thefrollickingmole

    Wang returns like a dog to its vomit to the one true topic.

    His brutal pegging by Bob Menzies and his 12 inch rubber conscription phallus.

  203. Albatross

    That phallus gets bigger and more ridged each time the story is told.

    Seriously, he should be ignored. Abusing him is boring; he’s as shameless as he is uninteresting.

  204. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    The old commie bastard supporting the commies again; what a bastard.

    Some sixty thousand summary executions after April 1975, one hundred and eighty thousand deaths from starvation and disease in the “re – education” camps, nobody knows how many “boat people” were drowned at sea or murdered fleeing the Communist paradise, and the new Government was just as venal and corrupt as the old South Vietnamese Government ever had been.

  205. Nick

    Warner’s PR team are in overdrive. He was on ch7 news having ‘family time’ with his kids.

  206. Nick

    The Wallabies practicing the anthem in the ‘Gadigal language’. Should be frickin practicing with a ball.

  207. kaysee

    A-listers Matthew McConaughey and Russell Brand slam the left for their treatment of conservatives

    Actor Matthew McConaughey has blasted the “far left,” and said that the “illiberal left” is condescending, patronizing, and arrogant when it comes to dealing with conservative Americans.

    McConaughey recently spoke to fellow entertainer and British actor Russell Brand and discussed the attitudes of those on the “far left” when it comes to dealing with their conservative peers and working-class Americans.

    “We live in a time, I feel, in my country and yours, where there’s this sort of … condemnation and criticism of what I might describe as ordinary working people,” Brand began. “A kind of offhandedness, like, ‘Oh, they’re dumb, they’re voting for Brexit, they’re voting for Trump.”

    “I don’t like it, and I don’t like to hear it,” Brand said. “I’ve spent enough time with people that have been described in this manner to feel ill at ease with it. How do you feel about … that kind of judgment? Do you feel that there is a way of meshing together these apparently disparate groups right now?”

    McConaughey responded, “I hope so. … Let’s get aggressively centric, I dare you. It’s not a recessive, it’s an aggressive move.”

  208. Leigh Lowe

    Nick

    #3680503, posted on December 5, 2020 at 6:12 pm

    A great weight lifted?

    While she does have a face that suggests ‘difficult’ and not very bright, it would seem that both of them had a hand in naming their progeny

    Look, in this enlightened age I shouldn’t say this.
    But I will.
    Footballers have an uncanny ability to pull top birds (looks wise).
    So the fact that Nafan Buckley has a head like a dropped pie should have been no impediment to him snagging a super-model.
    Collingwood captain and more importantly a Brownlow medallist, which means a lifetime of invites to WAG mecca.
    Shit, he could have been a balding ranga with a hare-lip and a turned eye and he could still reasonably expect to have his pick of some solid 10s.
    But he didn’t.
    He got stuck with a plastic wannabe.

  209. Leigh Lowe

    Ayce.
    Jett.
    FMD.
    Move to Port Adelaide, Bucks.

  210. Leigh Lowe

    Just back from Stobie Poland.
    Their unusual custom of driving their cars on the beach is very appealing.
    But I did make a mental note.
    Do not buy a second-hand 4WD with fishing rod racks from coastal areas of Stobie Poland.
    Likely to be riddled with cancer.

  211. Ed Case

    Back in the Days of Joh, when the Labor Party in Qld never looked like getting out of the woods, there were 3 from one family who stood for Labor on Brisbane’s Northside, Jet Drabsch, Ace Drabsch, and i’ve forgotten Dad Drabsch’s first name.
    Then, a couple of years ago, Palaszczuk’s partner stood down from some sinecure over a Conflict of interest.
    Another Drabsch.
    What it all means, someone else will have to figure out.
    Anyway, Bucks isn’t a winner, Malthouse and Matthews knew that …

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