His two biggest strengths were his two biggest flaws

CALL it the Jerk Store protocol. Let’s start with that. For most of his life, Donald Trump has always insisted on having the last say. No accusation or attack is stoically ignored; not in preference for a higher, nobler dignity, not in imitation of Christ and not for the sake of rebuilding an interpersonal status quo ante bellum. This has occasionally been hilarious to watch, as when he famously left Megyn Kelly nowhere to go after she attempted to embarrass the then presidential contender in 2015 for his alleged meanness to women. My personal favourite came during an explanation to Wolf Blitzer of why he regularly attacked the same Megyn Kelly. At a noticeable, distinct point, you can actually see Trump make the decision that he might as well take out Blitzer while he’s at it. When CNN’s Chris “Fredo” Cuomo politely questioned the emerging Republican frontrunner on the wisdom of always hitting back, you guessed it – Trump hit back. Even though Cuomo made a reasonable point, Trump knew these courtesy cops were insincere shills, knew they were harassing him as they never did Democrats and didn’t care how severely incinerated his bridge to their world was becoming.

There was a self-defeating downside to never backing off, however. When Trump casually declared John McCain was never a war hero because he was captured – “I like people who weren’t captured” – he crossed a line no aspiring President should ever cross. (The banal truth about John McCain, of course, was that a war hero was all he was). Yes, the inveterate RINO sycophant to progressives had slandered Trump’s supporters as “crazies” and, yes, he later boasted that he’d secretly received the Steele Dossier and shopped it around (becoming the first American “war hero” to work for the Kremlin). But at the time, Trump was just lashing out because another interviewer was pressuring him to concede a trifling point.

This policy of never conceding or accommodating was supposedly inculcated in the young Donald by the Trumps’ storied lawyer, Roy Cohn, who handled the mogul family’s legal brawls in New York as ruthlessly as any of the city’s mafia consiglieri. Cohn’s “ten times harder” maxim on countering became a signature principle in Donald Trump’s public life. You could say it worked a treat in 2015 because the American public – long mistrustful of the media – liked seeing a Republican who fought back, who didn’t grovel like McCain or Mitt Romney. (The two men who took on Barack Obama for the White House were rewarded for pious civility with accusations in The New York Times and the Washington Post of adultery and socipathic cruelty to animals respectively).

The McCain overkill nevertheless showcased a certain recklessness beneath the dignity of high office – sought or attained – and it alienated some conservatives. POWs are not second-rate losers or quitters. Trump knew that but couldn’t help himself. Not being able to help yourself is not a strength commonly attributed to effective leaders, even if uncompromising self-belief is. When it happens more than once, it isn’t a ‘bad day’ or a ‘flash of anger’ but an emotional weakness political opponents will exploit. A strong President must sometimes move judo-like with the weight of even wrongheaded orthodoxies so that he can be at the centre of things and control them. And sometimes a President has to go it alone regardless of orthodoxy as a matter of immovable principle. Contrary to mythology, on coronavirus Trump got the balance right – or, at least, no more wrong than anyone else in the world. He did not call the virus a “hoax,” he ignored Democrat know-nothings to shut down flights from China and he personally oversaw a “warp speed” vaccine program that delivered. All while Joe Biden was talking to himself in a basement.

Trump’s relationship to the movement he single-handedly built and the biblical crowds that were its doof doof drumbeat for four years are part of this story. He performed for them – outstandingly – but occasionally forgot himself for their entertainment. You tell hardened Joint Chiefs to “bomb the shit” out of the enemy in private, not at a rally. A criticism of the President I made several times during his tenure was his reluctance to address the nation from the Oval Office. This has always been the means by which presidents reach far beyond their diehard base to communicate with everyone else. There was certainly enough crisis over the past 12 months to warrant it. Trump preferred Twitter and MAGA rallies. That was foolish. Big crowds signify little. John Hewson drew hordes in 1993. In the end, when the courts closed the docket book on November’s election, these two proclivities – hair-trigger fractiousness and an overestimation of a crowd’s political worth – combined to gift his corrupt foes one last opportunity for deranged hoax-mongering.

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184 Responses to His two biggest strengths were his two biggest flaws

  1. nb says:

    His biggest flaw was the criminality of the opposition. That will also be the biggest flaw of the USA. Just as the CCP is the biggest flaw of the Chinese.

  2. Roger W says:

    And yet – I think it has been a significant error for the courts, at all levels, to not even look at the many accusations of voter fraud. It is all very well for people to say there is no evidence (when they mean no legally verified material in a court of law) but as long as some 70m American voters think there was fraud (as well as many other millions world wide) American democracy is threatened.

  3. WDYSIA says:

    If you look at the last 12 hours of @amuse Twitter feed you will find that he at least was right about CNN and antifa.

  4. FelixKruell says:

    Some good points.

    But this one:

    and he personally oversaw a “warp speed” vaccine program that delivered. All while Joe Biden was talking to himself in a basement.

    ..ignores all the other vaccines developed at similar warp speeds in other countries. It’s not clear Trump added anything to the process?

  5. Bruce of Newcastle says:

    McCain is a traitor to the USA. He leaked the fake dossier to the MSM.
    If he wasn’t dead he should be hung from the neck until so.
    I’d favour digging him up, hanging his corpse, then burying it at sea next to Osama bin Laden.

    As for Trump, he fights. If he ever decides to give up Diet Coke I’d send him a barrel of whisky.

  6. Boxcar says:

    Trump went to Twitter to circumvent the fake media’s control over the narrative.

  7. Ceres says:

    A measured piece. Trump certainly shot from the hip and at times it would have served his cause better to shutup at times. However it’s what got him in the White House and then probably helped get him out.
    Nonetheless a great legacy, 80 million Americans won’t forget him nor will many citizens of the Western world.

  8. Candy says:

    Trump is not responsible for deranged hoax-mongering or the lies, fraud and abuse by the left.

    He has definitely said some things in the past he should not have and has flaws in his character like everyone. He marches to the beat of his own drum. That is not an impeachable and jailable offence, to be a different kind of President.

  9. Peter Smith says:

    Very thoughtful contribution currencylad. I am an unabashed Trump supporter but his comment on McCain was a mistake which he should not have made. He allowed impatience with the questioning to get the better of him. He has slipped up this way a few times. But, really, against his achievments in office they are trivialities. But for Covid he would have won – among other things, the opportunity for electoral fraud would have been much less. But for Covid we would have the continuation of a great presidency. Arguably, his defeat is the most damaging effect of Covid.

  10. Struth says:

    In the end, when the courts closed the docket book on November’s election, these two proclivities – hair-trigger fractiousness and an overestimation of a crowd’s political worth – combined to gift his corrupt foes one last opportunity for deranged hoax-mongering.

    What an idiotic piece from the typical, “I don’t like his hair do so I won’t vote for him” crowd, that always goes harder on their own than the opposition.

    This last part is blatantly false and it shoots your other arguments straight through the foot.
    Hence you had to tell us the lie that somehow Trump lost the election for his behaviour.
    He lost it through corruption and criminality of his opposition, from the courts to the counters.

    He won the election in a Land slide Victory whether you fair weather conservatives like to admit it or not.

  11. stackja says:

    Trump had to fight against RINOs then MSM then Democrats then Big Tech.

  12. 1735099 says:

    There’s simpler explanation.
    He’s a mug lair.
    Unfortunately, the term is unknown to Yanks and millenials.
    Australian Boomers know it.

  13. Bruce of Newcastle says:

    If the MSM treated Trump and Biden equally you would never hear the misstatements from Trump, as the airwaves would be taken up by the antics and emanations of Creepy Joe.

    Thus you are critiquing Caesar’s wife.

    Maybe, CL, you should now write an article about Gropey Joe, for balance. Take your time, there’s plenty of authentic material out there that has never seen light of day on the MSM.

  14. 1735099 says:

    Trump is not responsible for deranged hoax-mongering

    He is responsible for the Big Lie.
    The mob believed him, and the rest is history.
    And he’s digging the hole deeper.

  15. Bruce of Newcastle says:

    He’s a mug lair.

    Haha, projection, always projection.
    Give it away Numbers, we know what you are.
    We”ve had long experience.

  16. Candy says:

    Trump certainly won with enough comfort, not a landslide.

    But it was stolen from the voters and fraud accepted by SCOTUS who refused to even glance at the evidence. This may be their undoing. Time will tell.

  17. JC says:

    Nice thread.

    In retrospect Trump was right about McCain. No war hero sells out to the Russians to fuck over a presidential contender of his own party. He even fed the dossier to Harry Read.
    He was a worthless piece of shit and his daughter is no better.

  18. Professor Fred Lenin says:

    There had to be electoral fraud ,who the hell is gping to vote for a corrupt bribe taking incessant cheat and liar like ratface paedo biden ?

  19. JC says:

    ..ignores all the other vaccines developed at similar warp speeds in other countries. It’s not clear Trump added anything to the process?

    Which ones eggsactly, Dickhead? The Russian or Chinese ones? I’d be happy to see you’re administered either of these two.

    Trump was told by the FDA it would take 6 months to review the data. Trump told them that was total bullshit and he expected them not to take 6 months but a couple of days on the outside. So yes, Trump added value.

    The kid sniffer would never have questioned the 6 month rule. That’s the candidate you support.

  20. WDYSIA says:

    Trump had to clear a lot of decks and provide plenty if cash and guarantees to get that vaccine developed and gear up manufacturing to deliver doses for 330 million people. I think that was his most significant achievement. It also spurred a bit a competition with other countries.
    https://www.hhs.gov/coronavirus/explaining-operation-warp-speed/index.html

    I’m hearing that Trump has declassified everything around Russiagate but I haven’t heard it from a reputable source yet.

  21. Boambee John says:

    1735099
    #3725281, posted on January 15, 2021 at 3:57 pm
    Trump is not responsible for deranged hoax-mongering

    He is responsible for the Big Lie.
    The mob believed him, and the rest is history.
    And he’s digging the hole deeper.

    The ostrich has been pushing his own “Big Lie” almost incessantly since mid-November, about electoral fraud not existing.

    Now, despite actual evidence of an Antifa/BLM presence at the Capitol, he continues to push another “Big Lie”, denying reality.

    Eat your heart out Goebbels, your legacy has been stolen.

  22. 1735099 says:

    Trump certainly won with enough comfort, not a landslide.

    But..but..he still claims it was a “landslide”.
    Perhaps he’s a little careless with the truth.

  23. Some History says:

    1735099
    #3725299, posted on January 15, 2021 at 4:16 pm

    You forgot the “I just made up some bullsh*t” line at the start of your posts.

  24. Mater says:

    Perhaps he’s a little careless with the truth.

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  25. Sean says:

    Trump was told by the FDA it would take 6 months to review the data. Trump told them that was total bullshit and he expected them not to take 6 months but a couple of days on the outside. So yes, Trump added value.

    He also waivered liability for drug companies in trials saying the risk was worth taking in this case. Really protected the companies against a big downside loss and sped up development.

  26. Watch Your Back says:

    Well, no one will use the Australian vaccine!

    So far as I know, Pfizer and Moderna are both US companies. AstraZeneca is British/Swedish.

  27. Sean says:

    He was fond of Norman Vincent Peale as a child, who I think was his pastor

    Many of the themes about the power of unflinching positivity/optimism and never accepting defeat can be read into the works of NVP.

  28. WDYSIA says:

    He is responsible for the Big Lie.

    It wasn’t a big lie, pea brain. Trump was repeating the same words that Nancy Pelosi used about him when he won 2016. “Stealing the election” were her words about Trump’s win. Look it up it the Washington Post. They were happy to report her words back then. No big lie at that time. If after all these years you haven’t realised how Trump uses his opponents words against them, like he did with Clinton and so many others then you really are not a student of history and you’re certainly no analyst.

  29. Matt says:

    He did not call the virus a “hoax,” he ignored Democrat know-nothings and shut down flights from China and he personally oversaw a “warp speed” vaccine program that delivered.

    Wait, so one of Trump’s greatest achievements is overseeing a vaccine program for a virus that half the Cats believe doesn’t exist?

  30. WDYSIA says:

    Correct Sean. He also provided guarantees for manufacturers so that they could invest with confidence instead of holding back because of the risk of failure. Op Warp Speed needed a super focused ass kicker at the top and he was the perfect man for that job. His memoirs are going to be a cracker and Troy Bramston will poop his pants.

  31. Epicurious says:

    “The banal truth about John McCain, of course, was that a war hero was all he was.”

    You need to do some more research on this claim. One good reference amongst many is https://www.adamtownsend.me/john-mccain-mythology/ which provides great detail on how McCain and OMG Senator Kerry (another alleged veteran) obfuscated over an enquiry into US veterans left behind in Vietnam. McCain was shot down while bombing a lightbulb factory, a civilian target, which violates the Geneva Convention but when has that ever stopped “heroes”.

  32. Mater says:

    Wait, so one of Trump’s greatest achievements is overseeing a vaccine program for a virus that half the Cats believe doesn’t exist warrant the complete destruction of the market economies of the Western world, or the removal of all the rights associated with being a member of a liberal society?

    Fixed it for you.

  33. cuckoo says:

    Trump could have been Emily Post, but they still would have attacked him with everything they had. He threatened the established order, and so he had to go.

  34. Damon says:

    There is a compilation video on YouTube (possibly still available) of Joe groping little girls. I’ve got a fairly strong stomach, but I was sickened. The guy should be nowhere near the White House, he should be in a mental institution.

  35. Boxcar says:

    Even in the Comments here you can see the softening of Trump support, as the wheels of strangulation slowly turn.
    They don’t always put fires out with hoses, starving them of oxygen works just as well.

  36. Matt says:

    That’s true for some Mater, but not all of them.

  37. Karabar says:

    Are you sure his disdain for McCain was due to his record in ‘Nam? Or perhaps it was the role he played in the Uranium One affair and the Iran deal?

  38. notafan says:

    Felix i think you’ll find the US warp speed program covered six different vaccines.

    The only ones to date being rolled out in the west AFAIK.

  39. notafan says:

    Thanks again CL for a balanced view.

    I was sick of Trump being touted as the second coming in 2016.

  40. Mater says:

    That’s true for some Mater, but not all of them.

    Half the Cat? Nah.

    Many said that it was being blown out of all proportion when compared to a very bad flu season.
    They were right. It is not the Black Death, and it didn’t justify the actions taken.
    A more considered approach could have saved more lives, with half the cost, whilst preserving social cohesion.

    Our leaders are either hysterical clowns, or evil bastards. Either way, they should hang their heads in shame.

  41. Boambee John says:

    Lifted from another thread.

    Some History
    #3725337, posted on January 15, 2021 at 4:54 pm
    HUGE! CNN-NPR Photo-Journalist Jade Sacker was Embedded with Antifa Leader John Sullivan During Siege of US Capitol – Cheered “We Did It!” After Inciting Riot (VIDEO)

    https://www.thegatewaypundit.com/2021/01/huge-cnn-npr-reporter-jade-sacker-embedded-antifa-leader-john-sullivan-siege-us-capitol-cheered-inciting-riot-video/

    Hasn’t the ostrich been using CNN as an “impartial” source? Or was it another of the trolls?

  42. Figures says:

    He was a good man but he had one fatal flaw. He didn’t believe all public health “experts” should be thrown in prison.

    Had he arrested Fauci for his constant lies and defunded the CDC and FDA we wouldn’t be in this catastrophic situation with the entirety of Western civilization about to collapse.

    Civilization and the belief we should be petrified of each other’s germs are simply not compatible.

  43. Watch Your Back says:

    It’s a diverting read CL, and I’m sure Mr Trump has one or two character ‘flaws’. But then who hasn’t? I’m not aware, for example, if he ever authorised state surveillance of his opponents, lied about Benghazi, took ‘donations’ from Russia, China or Ukraine. He didn’t invade Iraq either I’d say “watch my lips, no new taxes”. Very often, when I felt perhaps he had over-stated his case it turned out he was right. Another 4 years would have seen peace in the Middle East, the EU paying for its own defence, the wall largely completed, a strong economy, energy independence.

    Biden intends to set the clock back to 2015, and the some. Industries will be deliberately destroyed, jobs will leave the USA again, another war in the Middle East, China throwing its weight around, Israel attached, Islamic terrorist attacks…. Social Media dictating how we’re allowed to think. But what am I saying? Biden will be retired by Christmas.

  44. stackja says:

    Downfall of socials potential outcome
    JONATHAN AMES

    DONALD Trump may have been the first truly social media-savvy US president, but ironically he could have also triggered the downfall of those platforms’ business model.

    Decisions by Twitter and Facebook to ban the 45th president — amid continuing outrage over allegations that Trump incited supporters to rampage through the Capitol building in Washington DC — are likely to result in a review by regulators and legislators on both sides of the Atlantic Ocean.

    In the US social media networks are protected from liability for their content by section 230 of the Communications Decency Act 1996, which states that internet platforms “shall not be treated as the publisher”.

    However, that legislation was drafted before Mark Zuckerberg had hit his teens and many see it as being outdated in a world where executives at Facebook, Twitter and other social media sites appear to be routinely taking editorial decisions.

    Chris Scott, the senior partner at the London law firm Slateford, points out that there is building pressure in the US for the notorious section 230 to be reformed at least to force social media sites to “take responsibility for illegal content in particular”.

    While liability for traditional counterparts remains, in the US section 230 protects social media sites from legal action for defamatory publications, even if content is moderated by them.

    Scott said that last year sites began to introduce content warnings and that “there are signs that social networks are accepting they cannot remain immune from responsibility for ever — it’s just a shame it has taken a violent assault on the US Capitol for them to realise it”.

    THE TIMES

  45. Grip says:

    In an interview with Foreign Policy, Mr Tillerson said he sometimes struggled to catch Mr Trump’s attention, and that he changed tactics to engage the commander in chief in foreign affairs.

    “I used to go into meetings with a list of four to five things I needed to talk to him about, and I quickly learned that if I got to three, it was a home run,” said Mr Tillerson, who admitted that reaching two topics with Mr Trump “was probably the best objective.”

    Mr Tillerson said he started to take pictures and charts that allowed him to build-on certain topics with the president, and that “those seemed to hold his attention better.”

    Those briefings included a combination of two bullet points, pictures and charts, that would attract the president’s interest. Otherwise, admitted Mr Tillerson, his conversations were “really hard”.

    “If I could put a photo or a picture in front of him or a map or a piece of paper that had two big bullet points on it, he would focus on that, and I could build on that,” Mr Tillerson added.

    “His understanding of global events, his understanding of global history, his understanding of US history was really limited,” Mr Tillerson told Foreign Policy. “It’s really hard to have a conversation with someone who doesn’t even understand the concept for why we’re talking about this

    That such a President with all the concentration abilities of a 5 year old had “personally oversaw” the fast development of a vaccine is laughable.

  46. Kim says:

    Gradually we are reading more and more post hoc apologia for Trump. My suggestion: have a close look at his last four public communications. Then tell me Trump has not made a run for the bunker. The cheater knows when the game is up. Now he is tossing his allies on the trail as he flees. It won’t end well and the GOP has big problems from here.

  47. incoherent rambler says:

    Either way, they should hang their heads in shame.

    Either way, they should hang FULL STOP

  48. Grip says:

    Also:

    But Mr. Trump was notably absent. One reason for the partisan divide over vaccination, experts said, is the president himself. His repeated denigration of scientists and insistence that the pandemic is not a threat, they said, have contributed to a sense among his followers that the vaccine is either not safe or not worth taking.

    “I just don’t feel there’s been enough research on it. I think it was sped up too fast,” said Mark Davis, 42, a disabled worker in Michigan. “You don’t even really know the side effects, what’s in it.”…

    Mr. Trump has been quick to claim credit for the manufacturing and distribution of the vaccine. “Distribution to start immediately,” he said Friday on Twitter, a day after an F.D.A. expert advisory panel recommended approval of Moderna’s vaccine.

    Although the president has recovered from Covid-19, he remains vulnerable to reinfection. Dr. Anthony S. Fauci, the government’s top infectious disease scientist, has recommended that Mr. Trump be vaccinated. But he has given no indication that he will actually do so, and he has said little, if anything, to encourage Americans to get vaccinated.

    Mr. Trump’s own flirtations with vaccine skepticism are well known. He repeated the debunked theory that vaccines cause autism as far back as 2007, when he said he had slowed his son Barron’s vaccination schedule, and as recently as 2015 while first running for president.

    “Trump helped re-energize the anti-vaccine movement,” said Dr. Peter Hotez, an expert on vaccines, “and now he wants to pivot and make this his greatest accomplishment.”

    For the most part, public opinion has been swinging in favor of vaccination. Seventy-one percent of Americans are willing to be vaccinated, up from 63 percent in September, according to a survey released this week by the Kaiser Family Foundation.

    Still, the survey found that Republicans were the most likely to be hesitant, with 42 percent saying they would probably not or definitely not be vaccinated, as compared with 12 percent of Democrats.

    From the New York Times.

  49. Viva says:

    I would add that Trump’s habitual imprecision in his language and in his off the cuff remarks gave his enemies scope to misrepresent his views on numerous occasions. This has allowed the dems to define him to the extent that many find it credible that he instigated an attempted coup!

  50. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare says:

    his comment on McCain was a mistake which he should not have made.

    Perhaps. It was a actually a Shakespearian ‘aside’, a technique of making an amusing reference that is not meant to be taken seriously, often advisedly kept for an in-group. Trump often makes these, they are part of his character, and yes, they have got him into trouble with the MSM in the mode that Viva states just above: the mode of full-on misrepresentation.

    Like the ‘dettol’ nonsense. He was using a general metaphor for some scientific approaches that he had been told about. Not seriously referring to ‘disinfectant’. But the MSM, as with everything he ever said or did, went to town. The man must be made of real steel to be still standing after this onslaught.

    It will take some time for this man’s political value to be accurately assessed. I think the viciousness with which he has been attacked will form part of that assessment, and not to his detriment. I’m unusually disappointed in your piece, CL. There is much left out, and certainly no contrasts made to lesser performers such as Biden.

  51. JC says:

    Grip

    You’ve possibly never had a real job, so you wouldn’t understand nor even know.

    In an interview with Foreign Policy, Mr Tillerson said he sometimes struggled to catch Mr Trump’s attention, and that he changed tactics to engage the commander in chief in foreign affairs.

    “I used to go into meetings with a list of four to five things I needed to talk to him about, and I quickly learned that if I got to three, it was a home run,” said Mr Tillerson, who admitted that reaching two topics with Mr Trump “was probably the best objective.”

    When one loses confidence in a subordinate’s abilities, the boss no longer listens.

    Trump stopped listening to Tillerson because he was pretty dumb.

  52. WDYSIA says:

    Stackja, big tech loves 230 and will not relinquish it easily. The small startups love 230 because it protects them from being taken down by serial litigants. One solution could be to provide 230 protection for smaller players only until they reach a certain threshold. I don’t see anything happening under a Biden administration. Au contraire. Given the Democrats are in league with big tech, I think big tech could pressure them to implement measures to stop new startups which threaten their business model.

  53. Lee says:

    There is much left out, and certainly no contrasts made to lesser performers such as Biden.

    I firmly believe that within the next few years that there will be a great many people who are not already Trump supporters, both in the U.S. and elsewhere, who will be ruing the day he lost the presidency, and was replaced by Biden/Harris.

  54. bespoke says:

    notafan
    #3725329, posted on January 15, 2021 at 4:47 pm
    Thanks again CL for a balanced view.

    Indeed, only a fool would dismiss Trumps mistakes. The next challenger will hopefully learn from them.

  55. Rex Anger says:

    @ JC-

    +Eleventy. It happens in Public and Private Sector alike, thought the Public lot may survive somewhat longer…

    Similarly the turnover in the White House. The MSM and Derp State may have wailed about Trump being an arsehole amd not doing this or wanting that, etc. But here is the kicker- What if, aside from not delivering what policy and outcomes President Trump wanted to deliver, many of his retirees were just not up to the task of doing things that the boss wanted, and worse, his way?

    I remember seeing snippets of a 60 Minutes doco (for my sins), and the retirees they had suckered into interviews seemed to have very little outright bad to say about the man. Though the editorial bias was pretty obvious…

  56. C.L. says:

    Lizzie, I must have written a hundred thousand words on the behaviour of Democrats and the media.
    That wasn’t my subject today.

    —————-

    “His understanding of global events, his understanding of global history, his understanding of US history was really limited,” Mr Tillerson told Foreign Policy. “It’s really hard to have a conversation with someone who doesn’t even understand the concept for why we’re talking about this.

    1. Tillerson is a mechanic whose tenure at State was characterised by the virtual destruction of the US Foreign Service. Given how briefly he served, that was quite an achievement.

    2. Trump kept America out of war, made the world far safer vis-a-vis North Korea and Iran and oversaw the most promising ever suite of diplomatic initiatives in the Middle East.

    In US foreign policy over the past 50 years, two men really matter: Reagan and Trump.

    That such a President with all the concentration abilities of a 5 year old had “personally oversaw” the fast development of a vaccine is laughable.

    Even left-wing network anchors conceded it was Trump’s personally driven project. Biden and Harris both said the end-of-year timetable was impossible. I should say that Biden’s carers scripted him to say that because, as we all know, Biden has the neural firepower of a comatose jellyfish.

  57. Grip says:

    The stories of Trump having a child like attention span are many.

    Fauci:

    Dr. Anthony Fauci, the nation’s top infectious-disease expert, is astonished by President Donald Trump’s tendency to hop from one topic to another during meetings and believes Trump has a very short attention span, according to the veteran reporter Bob Woodward’s new book, “Rage.”..

    “His attention span is like a minus number,” Fauci said privately of Trump, according to Woodward’s book. Fauci also told others Trump operated on a “separate channel” and that the president has generally changed the subject when Fauci challenges him, according to the book.

    Various people who have tried to brief him:

    Mr. Trump, who has mounted a yearslong attack on the intelligence agencies, is particularly difficult to brief on critical national security matters, according to interviews with 10 current and former intelligence officials familiar with his intelligence briefings.

    The president veers off on tangents and getting him back on topic is difficult, they said. He has a short attention span and rarely, if ever, reads intelligence reports, relying instead on conservative media and his friends for information. He is unashamed to interrupt intelligence officers and riff based on tips or gossip he hears from the former casino magnate Steve Wynn, the retired golfer Gary Player or Christopher Ruddy, the conservative media executive.

    Mr. Trump rarely absorbs information that he disagrees with or that runs counter to his worldview, the officials said. Briefing him has been so great a challenge compared with his predecessors that the intelligence agencies have hired outside consultants to study how better to present information to him.

    From Trump himself:

    “My attention span is short,” he flatly declared in 1990 in his book Surviving at the Top.

    And in 2004, in Think Like a Billionaire, he wrote that “most successful people have very short attention spans.”

    Parsing the decades-long public record of Trump’s own thoughts on his mental habits is a challenge. As with many of his positions, if he has said something, chances are high that he has said the opposite, too.

    “One of the keys to thinking big is total focus,” he wrote (through Schwartz) in The Art of the Deal. “I think of it almost as a controlled neurosis … ”

    In 2008, in Never Give Up, he augmented his thoughts on this “controlled neurosis” by preaching the value of laser focus on just one thing. “In this age of multitasking, this is a valuable technique to acquire,” he said.

    The following year, though, in Think Like a Champion, he offered up somewhat different advice, saying it “helps to be thinking of two things at once.” He added, “I always try to keep two wavelengths going at once, which prevents brain cramps and reminds me that I’m destined for success.”

  58. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare says:

    Different attitudes at different times about different things.

    Who hasn’t had those?

    Also, imagine being President; everyone wants a piece of you long-time, and you haven’t got it to give. So the stories get around, especially if you are disliked by the media and any Democrat you come near.

  59. Lee says:

    The stories of Trump having a child like attention span are many.

    What is Biden’s attention span like these days?
    LOL

  60. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare says:

    Lizzie, I must have written a hundred thousand words on the behaviour of Democrats and the media.
    That wasn’t my subject today.

    OK. Mea culpa. But I can see so many reasons why it is easy to rip a President, any President, to shreds on character and thought processes if you take up a big enough cudgel. Trump’s resisted so many. I think it behoves us to know that adding to it from the non-left perspective at this stage is just retreating from what we might be saying if he had won. It’s too soon.

  61. calli says:

    I keep thinking of Teddy Roosevelt and the big, bumptious personality, driven by grand visions, plain speaking, absolute and non-negotiable love for his country. Boundless energy and enthusiasm, intolerance of slackers and fools.

    Gathering enemies along the way like a magnet and iron filings.

    There probably won’t be another president like him. Smooth, slimy, connected operators are much safer for the kingmakers.

  62. Candy says:

    I thought Trump rallies were great. Old fashioned politics of reaching out directly to people. And some of his tweets were hilarious. New tech that younger people like. It is part of his appeal. Entertaining, honest, quirky.
    And has genuine warmth for the MAGA folk and they for him.
    Staying out of Middle East, improving the lot of minorities. Many great things.
    All cut short by Democrat fraud. Something almost evil in that outfit.

  63. bespoke says:

    Give yourself an uppercut.

    That would be the only way id get one. 😁

  64. grazza says:

    Apparently Trump and his businesses in the decades leading up to the 2016 election faced over 60 law suits for not paying debts. These debts were pretty ordinary, e.g. not paying a plumber, 48 waiters (presumably the tips or catering), Real Estate agencies and even law firms, some of whom had defended him previously! So much for the grandstanding conman who claimed that he was on the side of the worker – and they voted for him in 2016 and 2020 – even though 160,000 women lost their jobs in December. So much for the saviour of the working class, the Messiah! Reminds people of Alan Bond who didn’t pay debts until the final lawyer’s letter and then he would pay half…. bit like electing him to parliamentary leadership.

    Read all about it on QAnon which of course lacks a capital I in front of it! There is a distinct possibility that deluded Trump defenders may never emerge from the web of delusion spun by the worst president ever of the USA.

  65. C.L. says:

    The Sunday morning quarterback

    The phrase is Monday morning quarterback.

  66. bespoke says:

    Chill Albatross.

  67. 1735099 says:

    I thought Trump rallies were great. Old fashioned politics of reaching out directly to people.

    Very old-fashioned.
    Reminiscent of the rallies in Italy and Germany in the thirties.
    It’s all there.
    The total adulation, the slogans, the flags, the cheering crowds, the ranting individual waving his arms about, abusing groups and individuals…..
    Chilling…

  68. Bruce of Newcastle says:

    Tillerson was a traitor who with Kelly tried to overthrow Trump via the 25th Amendment.

    Unfortunately being head of Exxon these days does not guarantee the guy is a righty. Exxon is as green as BP and Shell, despite the climatistas’ ritual condemnation of them. So I think Tillerson thought Trump was nuts because of his anti-Paris stance. Which is the correct policy: it was Tillerson who was the nutter, and attempting a coup is not a great reason for retaining someone in employment.

  69. WX says:

    The biggest failure of the Trump Presidency was his followers. They mistook a berserker (of Norse mythology) for a warrior king. The former holds the attacking hordes at bay for a brief period while the remaining warriors regroup. The berserker does not save anyone or anything, let alone himself. His role is temporary and secondary to the warrior band’s leader/s.

    People wanted President Trump to be that warrior leader though. They chose to ignore his true purpose as the berserker. They made that choice because it absolved them of any responsibility. Rather than regroup, assess the damage thus far incurred, and plan for the moment when berserker Trumpwald the Preener was finally slaughtered, and the bridge to their defensive bastion unblocked, they convinced themselves that their impotent faith was enough.

    Virtually everything that has happened to the Trump Presidency was telegraphed by the salivating hordes, if not in detail, certainly in broad intention. Yet the followers who chose to be followers because they would be spared any consequences, have not only permitted their berserker to be slain for nought, but have outed themselves to the barbarian hordes as pretenders and easy prey.
    Separate the weak from the herd and let the cull begin.
    #conservatives.borntobeprey

  70. Rex Anger says:

    I have figured out why Bobby boy hates Donald Trump so much.

    With his massive popular regard and policy successes, coupled with his sheer strength of self-belief and reserves of courage, Bob thinks The Donald is a latter-day, spray-tanned reincarnation of Bob Menzies.

    Bobby boy hates and fears Bob Menzies, in the way Greenists hate soap, Arsenal hates Tottenham and cockroaches cannot abide filthy humans.

    Bobby boy has been terrified for the longest time that he will be bent over, conscripted again and sent back to Vietnam.

    So, as far as Bobby boy is concerned, Orange Ming Bad…

  71. Fess says:

    Thanks for a much more perceptive comment on Trump than the sneering troll style of LQC. My take is that Trump doesn’t talk like a politician because he isn’t one. He talks like a head-kicking property developer who has had over 50 years of frustration with corrupt politicians and lazy bureaucrats. I prefer that to the avalanche of snide, sneering, elitist commentary from people who have never actually built anything. They’d hate him just as much, or more, if he healed the lame, stopped world hunger and walked on water.
    As far as the election steal is concerned, I still haven’t seen a reason for why the fully automated leg of the data flows from some districts could decrement Trump’s tally by tens of thousands over the course of the counting. Below link is just one of many that are now quite well hidden by search engines and YouTube. Another county logged a batch of about 186,000 votes for Biden and 7 for Trump. Assuming Biden was getting 99.9% of the vote the probability of that batch occurring is approx 1.5 by 10 to the power -81. That’s fraud. Big, fat fraud.
    https://youtu.be/j5QesBp2gfA

  72. grazza says:

    CL argues that

    “Trump kept America out of war, made the world far safer vis-a-vis North Korea and Iran and oversaw the most promising ever suite of diplomatic initiatives in the Middle East.

    In US foreign policy over the past 50 years, two men really matter: Reagan and Trump.”

    There would have to be a serious Q mark over the North Korean pantomine with “little Rocket Man” who apparently has been laughing behind the Buffoon’s back as he has continue to build his armory – no resolute solution there and look at the weakened US position that is Trump’s legacy.

    The “suite of diplomatic initiatives” are a lot of bullshit window dressing to brown nose up to the Israelis promising zilch as these countries were not at war with Israel and certainly not threatening it. If Trump had gotten a real peace and settlement for the Palestinians whose land is being stolen by the Israeli ultranationalists with road blocks everywhere and illegitimate settlements – that would have been a real achievement.

    Reagan started the arms race with the Soviets and bankrupted them while having his afternoon naps and jar of jelly beans handy.

  73. Rex Anger says:

    Thanks Canvas Commando. Needed a laugh.

    Benito M0ntylini has competition.

    I look forward to the inevitable clash of arms, ideologies and followers.

    (Sadly, I have to place money on M0ntylini, as I think his anklebiting would be Bobby Boy’s literal downfall…)

  74. calli says:

    Interesting, WX.

    You might style him a trough disruptor. And the troughers didn’t like it. No Sir!

  75. Rex Anger says:

    There would have to be a serious Q mark over the North Korean pantomine with “little Rocket Man” who apparently has been laughing behind the Buffoon’s back as he has continue to build his armory – no resolute solution there and look at the weakened US position that is Trump’s legacy

    And how many rockets have splashed down in the Sea of Japan of late, fucko?

    The “suite of diplomatic initiatives” are a lot of bullshit window dressing to brown nose up to the Israelis promising zilch as these countries were not at war with Israel and certainly not threatening it. If Trump had gotten a real peace and settlement for the Palestinians whose land is being stolen by the Israeli ultranationalists with road blocks everywhere and illegitimate settlements – that would have been a real achievement.

    How many Arabs have exploded in packed Israeli streets lately? How many rockets have been shot down over the south of Israel? And how many terrorists have been doorknocked with AGM-114 Hellfires this last 4 years?

    C’mon, great champion of the downtrodden and geopolitical expert par excellence. Cough up…

  76. C.L. says:

    But, really, against his achievments in office they are trivialities. But for Covid he would have won – among other things, the opportunity for electoral fraud would have been much less. But for Covid we would have the continuation of a great presidency. Arguably, his defeat is the most damaging effect of Covid.

    Absolutely, Peter. No question.

    I think he could have taken a few classical political steps to safeguard himself against being the scapegoat (which was inevitable). I mentioned national addresses. Another: a bipartisan council of elders to advise the President on the virus response – in all relevant aspects; economic, social, legal etc. He could have asked Biden to join – as well as Californian and New York Democrats, Bushies etc.

  77. Lee says:

    Trump defenders may never emerge from the web of delusion spun by the worst president ever of the USA.

    Obama still well and truly holds that distinction.
    No contest!

  78. candy says:

    It’s all there.

    I didn’t seen any gas ovens or camps, or disease and starvation.
    and genocide of 6 million people.

    Perhaps I missed it.

  79. Old School Conservative says:

    The total adulation, the slogans, the flags, the cheering crowds, the ranting individual waving his arms about, abusing groups and individuals…..

    But enough about JFK, Bill and Hillary Clinton and Barrack Hussein Obama (born Kenya 1961).

  80. Sean says:

    The “suite of diplomatic initiatives” are a lot of bullshit window dressing to brown nose up to the Israelis promising zilch as these countries were not at war with Israel and certainly not threatening it. If Trump had gotten a real peace and settlement for the Palestinians whose land is being stolen by the Israeli ultranationalists with road blocks everywhere and illegitimate settlements – that would have been a real achievement.

    I think there was a discussion where he asked why Palestine should be holding up peace in the ME when there was 90 million refugees after WW2 and they had all moved on? Basically posing the question as to why an entire region needs to be destabilised by an unsolvable problem that constantly brings the US into war, and got on with a plan of building a coalition of nations looking to buffer against Iranian aggression.

  81. C.L. says:

    Albatross, make an argument or you’ll be banned from my threads permanently.

  82. Sean says:

    His big downfall was in thinking he understood science. Maybe he’s a great reader of people through intuition, but he kept making a fool of himself when saying things like ‘it will disappear very quickly’ It has become his Katrina, instead he could be basking in glory if the roll out of Vaccines was going great, rightfully boasting about the ‘Greatest Health response in human history’

  83. Fess says:

    CL …national addresses…bipartisan council of elders

    Fair enough on the national address. Bipartisan council has to assume even the slightest bit of goodwill. They would have done everything in their power to sabotage the council, including happily increasing the death toll.

  84. Old School Conservative says:

    CL, some good theories there but I still don’t see how they led to a record number of Americans voting for a senile old geezer.
    The “anyone but Trump” meme doesn’t wash and the flaws you outlined were minor in the grand scheme of voter intentions.

  85. Terry Andrews says:

    A shallow and stupid summation of the most heroic and successful President in history

  86. 1735099 says:

    After thousands of threats online during the last few days, the Republicans who voted for impeachment have been advised to buy body armour (for which they will be reimbursed) and move their partners and children to a secure location.
    Similar threats were made in Germany in the 30s by a regime which used intimidation as a successful political strategy.

  87. Struth:

    This last part is blatantly false and it shoots your other arguments straight through the foot.
    Hence you had to tell us the lie that somehow Trump lost the election for his behaviour.
    He lost it through corruption and criminality of his opposition, from the courts to the counters.
    He won the election in a Land slide Victory whether you fair weather conservatives like to admit it or not.

    Correct + lots.

  88. 1735099 says:

    965000 unemployment claims filed in the US last week – an all-time record.
    Donald Trump is still President.

  89. Roger says:

    Trump’s relationship to the movement he single-handedly built and the biblical crowds that were its doof doof drumbeat for four years are part of this story.

    Trump didn’t build the movement that put him to office; it was already there, waiting for a figurehead to lead it.

    That’s what 20+ years of job losses & declining living standards does to a people.

    That’s a problem for the Democrats, because it’s likely to be more diffiuclt to steal the next election, and an even bigger one for the GOP, because those 74mn voters aren’t going to disappear. After 4 years of Hiden they’re likely to feel they have even less to lose.

  90. Cassie of Sydney says:

    Go to bed racist.

  91. Cassie of Sydney says:

    “Trump didn’t build the movement that put him to office; it was already there, waiting for a figurehead to lead it.

    That’s what 20+ years of job losses & declining living standards does to a people.”

    A very accurate assessment Roger.

  92. Cassie of Sydney says:

    “Another: a bipartisan council of elders to advise the President on the virus response – in all relevant aspects; economic, social, legal etc. He could have asked Biden to join – as well as Californian and New York Democrats, Bushies etc.”

    Nice ideas C.L….but I doubt the Demrats, given their toxic hatred for Trump…from the minute he was elected, were ever going to join in any bipartisan councils.

  93. Rex Anger says:

    Similar threats were made in Germany in the 30s by a regime which used intimidation as a successful political strategy.

    Yes Jack Hunt. They were called Communists…

  94. C.L. says:

    This last part is blatantly false and it shoots your other arguments straight through the foot.
    Hence you had to tell us the lie that somehow Trump lost the election for his behaviour.
    He lost it through corruption and criminality of his opposition, from the courts to the counters.

    I didn’t say anything remotely akin to ‘Trump lost the election for his behaviour.’ That you could even suggest that is my view after everything I’ve written here for four years is risible.

    The post had nothing to do with the election.

    I pointed out that Trump had two intertwined faults that did him no favours. (In amongst several other observations that were all complimentary to him).

    On this point, I am correct.

    After the court process came to an end, he continued to encourage people to believe that Something Would Happen because big crowds. No, nothing was going to happen because big crowds.

    Some commenters here have become so emotionally overwrought that they won’t even concede that Trump is an actual human being with flaws.

  95. RobK says:

    Similar threats were made in Germany in the 30s by a regime which used intimidation as a successful political strategy.
    That is the dumbest meaningless equivalence I’ve come across.
    Plenty of people around the world are warned of precautions against threats, every day, especially in circles of power.
    Give it a rest numbers.

  96. JC says:

    Terry Andrews
    #3725628, posted on January 15, 2021 at 8:23 pm

    A shallow and stupid summation of the most heroic and successful President in history

    Let’s not get ahead of ourselves, Terrance. Heroic and successful, yes! The most though? Ummm, no.

  97. bespoke says:

    It would be a win for Trump either way, Cassie.

  98. 1735099 says:

    They were called Communists…

    Suggest you read a little modern history.
    Here’s a good place to start.

  99. C.L. says:

    They would have done everything in their power to sabotage the council, including happily increasing the death toll.

    —————-

    Nice ideas C.L….but I doubt the Demrats, given their toxic hatred for Trump…from the minute he was elected, were ever going to join in any bipartisan councils.

    Right. That’s why Trump should have asked them. Their hostility IS the tactical point.

  100. Cassie of Sydney says:

    I think that the Demrats spent the last four years up to November 2020 planning Trump’s demise….sure they were aided by Covid but what really helped them was the six months of violence. The Demrats were caught out in November 2016….and they sure as hell were going to make sure the result of November 2016 wasn’t repeated.

    Anyway, Donald Trump was the last Republican president. Plus I doubt very much whether the GOP will ever again regain the senate. The USA is now a one party state.

  101. candy says:

    CNN’s famous face Don Lemon has just called all Trump supporters N..zis and KKK supporters.

    The Big Lie, spread by Left media and Democrats.

    As if Trump could get bipartisanship with that lot against him and MAGA and from Day 1.
    You’re dreaming, C.L.

  102. Roger says:

    Trump didn’t build the movement that put him to office; it was already there, waiting for a figurehead to lead it.

    Sorry…more than a figurehead, but the main point stands.

    That being said, it will be intersting to watch Tucker Carlson ove rthe next few years.

    Does he entertain ambitions beyond media?

  103. mh says:

    Without wading through the 100 plus comments, this analysis is pointless if you believe Trump won comfortably. Which I do.

  104. JC says:

    Anyway, Donald Trump was the last Republican president. Plus I doubt very much whether the GOP will ever again regain the senate. The USA is now a one party state.

    Pushing DC as a state is not going to be a done deal, Cassie. There are constitutional questions that need to be dealt with because of the way DC is described in the Constitution.

    Puerto Rico is unlikely to be made a state in the next two years and even if it is, it’s not a given both senate seats will go Demonrat.

  105. Rex Anger says:

    Jack Hunt,

    I have read Shirer, and am an avid student of military and political history, both movements and personalities, in Europe between the wars.

    You are an incompetent with a political agenda.

    You either acknowledge the zero-sum bastardry and hyperviolence of all sides in the fight for the soul of Weimar Germany. Or you shut up and leave it to the adult.

    There is nothing more to be said.

  106. Struth says:

    I firmly believe that within the next few years that there will be a great many people who are not already Trump supporters, both in the U.S. and elsewhere, who will be ruing the day he lost the presidency, and was replaced by Biden/Harris.

    It won’t take years, once Trump is gone, way before 6 months has passed, people here so incredibly filled with hate for Trump (as the MSM propaganda did it’s job on the feeble minded), they will realise what the alternative actually is. They haven’t even looked at that,……. which shows how thick they are, and how brainwashed they have been.

  107. Cassie of Sydney says:

    “Pushing DC as a state is not going to be a done deal, Cassie. There are constitutional questions that need to be dealt with because of the way DC is described in the Constitution.

    Puerto Rico is unlitkely to be made a state in the next two years and even if it is, it’s not a given both senate seats will go Demonrat”

    Agree JC about DC and Puerto Rico however I think, given the fraud, it will be unlikely for a GOP president to win again. Maybe I’m just a little gloomy and despondent about the events of the last week.

    I was saying to friends back in late November and early December that Trump should have conceded. He should have stood before the media and said…okay I concede, Biden will be president and our resistance starts now. He should have done what Hilarous did after 2016.

    Anyway, I just watched this by one of my favourite conservative commentators…he uploaded it a few hours ago. He articulates very well what I’ve been thinking…..from early November.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FoUmz9DQOyw

  108. Archivist says:

    There was a self-defeating downside to never backing off, however. When Trump casually declared John McCain was never a war hero because he was captured – “I like people who weren’t captured” – he crossed a line no aspiring President should ever cross.

    That McCain quip was a verbatim repetition of a joke by stand-up comedian Chris Rock.
    This goes to show that professional comedians can make jokes that politicians can’t.
    From Chris Rock, it was funny. The exact same joke, repeated word for word by Trump, was a scandal.

  109. Cassie of Sydney says:

    “There is nothing more to be said.”

    RA…nothing shuts the fool up.

    I’ll say it again…why are we tolerating the intolerant?

  110. Boambee John says:

    grazza

    If Trump had gotten a real peace and settlement for the Palestinians whose land is being stolen by the Israeli ultranationalists with road blocks everywhere and illegitimate settlements – that would have been a real achievement.

    Hello Graeme.

  111. mh says:

    Anyway, Donald Trump was the last Republican president.

    I would say Trump was the last US president.

    Biden is clearly not leading anything, but just the stooge that knew the fix was in. No one could seriously argue, for example, that the stimulus measures announced that put whites at the back of the queue originate from Joe Biden.

  112. NoFixedAddress says:

    CL

    A good brief summary and I always enjoy your longer posts and I would enjoy your critique of his full term.

    For a President who fought with one hand tied behind his back it is remarkable what was achieved.

    And those harping on the attention span ‘bizo’ are missing the point that it is the speed in which facts are assimilated and decisions made which are important.

    If you have ever had the privilege of working with top line people you would understand that they don’t do public service ‘committees’.

  113. candy says:

    You would be hard pressed to see a Republicsn president for a very long time. Particularly if they manage to scrap the electoral college system and rely on the popular vote as Dems are better at handouts and so on. With fraud they would have the game sewn up and stacking the Supreme Court too.

    That seems their overall goal

  114. Bruce of Newcastle says:

    I suspect many many Cats have read a lot more history than Numbers has.
    That is one of the reasons why Righties are rightie.
    We learn from it whereas the Left never seems to.

  115. Boambee John says:

    1735099
    #3725644, posted on January 15, 2021 at 8:34 pm
    After thousands of threats online during the last few days, the Republicans who voted for impeachment have been advised to buy body armour (for which they will be reimbursed) and move their partners and children to a secure location.

    Strangely, the ostrich did not express similar concerns when Republicans were being doxed and their families threatened by Demonrats and Bernie Bros (one of whom almost killed a Republican congressman). The undercurrent of violence was set in train by the #Resistnce, now they begin to realise that they have opened Pandora’s Box.

  116. Cassie of Sydney says:

    “mh
    #3725738, posted on January 15, 2021 at 9:32 pm
    Anyway, Donald Trump was the last Republican president.

    I would say Trump was the last US president.

    Biden is clearly not leading anything, but just the stooge that knew the fix was in. No one could seriously argue, for example, that the stimulus measures announced that put whites at the back of the queue originate from Joe Biden.”

    Agree.

  117. Boambee John says:

    1735099
    #3725700, posted on January 15, 2021 at 9:07 pm
    They were called Communists…

    Suggest you read a little modern history.

    Perhaps you could start with The Gulag Archipelago. It is not a work of fiction.

  118. Cassie of Sydney says:

    “Strangely, the ostrich did not express similar concerns when Republicans were being doxed and their families threatened by Demonrats and Bernie Bros (one of whom almost killed a Republican congressman). The undercurrent of violence was set in train by the #Resistnce, now they begin to realise that they have opened Pandora’s Box.”

    The racist does excel at one thing…. hypocrisy.

    As I wrote yesterday, with him it’s only ever about the political side.

  119. dover_beach says:

    We haven’t seen the last of him.

  120. Cassie of Sydney says:

    “dover_beach
    #3725774, posted on January 15, 2021 at 9:57 pm
    We haven’t seen the last of him.”

    I hope not!

  121. NoFixedAddress says:

    C.L.
    #3725703, posted on January 15, 2021 at 9:08 pm

    Right. That’s why Trump should have asked them. Their hostility IS the tactical point.

    C.L.

    I think you will find, unreported, that Mike Pence led that effort to the point where nearly every State Governor grudgingly thanked the Trump Administration.

    A retrospective of Trump’s VP would be an interesting post.

  122. Tel says:

    The McCain thing has a bunch of layers to it.

    In terms of background, the Vietnam War was the war that many conservative Americans believe they should have won, but actually they lost. If you have money to buy beers you can hear 100 theories about that … but there’s this deep seated suspicion that someone, somewhere let the side down. Call it irrational if you like, call it emotional … but Trump was able to associate John McCain with that negative emotion and long standing grudge.

    Then there was the broad feeling that the insiders in Washington had been there too long, and it would be great to have an outsider. John McCain was the long in the tooth insider who had sat and sat as long as anyone remembered, while Trump was seen as the people’s champion to stick it to Washington D.C. good-n-hard.

    Now there’s more happening here, because candidate John McCain was also the guy in 2008 who lost to Obama. That also left a bad taste for many conservative Americans, and even a few knuckle dragging working class Democrats found they didn’t appreciate Obama’s policies. In rural areas and coal mining country Obama is associated with the drawn out, slow economic disaster from 2009 to 2012, the rise of militant Green … and the associated opiate crisis, loss of jobs, loss of dad to suicide … sure they blamed Obama, but deep down they blamed McCain for losing. Don’t support this guy, he will only lose it again!

    Want a free set of steak knives with that? McCain many times enthusiastically supported the various military adventures in the Middle East, and frankly he should have known better. Sure those military families remember McCain’s service, even as a POW … but when their boy comes home dead and none of them even know what the heck the point of that was, they kind of remember the incident closer to home with a bit of additional clarity. Know what I mean??

    Then to top it off, economically speaking John McCain was a reasonably consistent free trade globalist in his outlook … and Trump has always been an unabashed nationalist. For families who can’t see any way that globalism helped them, makes sense they turn to nationalism. What would anyone expect?

  123. John of Mel says:

    but I doubt the Demrats, given their toxic hatred for Trump…from the minute he was elected,

    Oh no, Cassie, it started much earlier than that. Obama’s adviser in June 2016.
    “It is not enough to simply beat Trump. He must be destroyed thoroughly. His kind must not rise again.”

  124. Tel says:

    That’s what 20+ years of job losses & declining living standards does to a people.

    A lot of people in the USA did very well out of free trade and cheap imports.

    Many people, but not all … point is that the worst hit areas happened to be the old, traditional Democrat base where manufacturing and mining jobs were being eliminated and sent offshore. Those were the people willing to swing across and try a Republican who talked about nationalism.

  125. Fess says:

    C.L.

    Right. That’s why Trump should have asked them. Their hostility IS the tactical point.

    My first thought was – yes you’re right. But… Dems would have been in the media spouting pious platitudes while privately sabotaging all efforts, and the media would have spun it as evil/unstable Trump. It’s all academic, of course, but I can’t see an angle where Trump would come out on top of that scenario.

  126. David says:

    Yep agree. These things didn’t endear him to the suburban class and older people. Rallies didn’t ‘keep them safe’. In their minds it’s also uncouth to directly hit back at somebody. If you’re a leftie you can do this via a surrogate and consequently remain presidential. He had no voice though beyond his own. It’s also not his style.

    His biggest downfall though remains that he wasn’t part of the elite political establishment. The maniacal ferocity of the movement to bring him down was truly astonishing. The ruling tribe could never accept an outsider.

  127. politichix says:

    NoFixedAddress
    #3725741, posted on January 15, 2021 at 9:33 pm

    And those harping on the attention span ‘bizo’ are missing the point that it is the speed in which facts are assimilated and decisions made which are important.

    If you have ever had the privilege of working with top line people you would understand that they don’t do public service ‘committees’.

    Absolutely. Tho smug patronisers never seem to consider that….

  128. WX says:

    An interesting point from Archivist at 9.28pm that I had not previously read of.

  129. Baa Humbug says:

    These ‘flaws’ may well be accurate but did they affect the man’s vote?
    Americans voted him in despite the 2016 McCain trashing.
    Americans voted for him in unprecedented numbers in 2020 despite his overly ‘combative’ nature.
    Then how did he lose?
    Did enough Americans hate him so much they went out in droves to vote against him? If so, how does one explain his 95% approval among Republicans and his high 40’s approval among all likely voters? Who else is left that hated him so much? Certainly not enough to add up to 80m voters.

    This essay would have been fine if Trumps vote had dropped from his 2016 tally or at least hardly budged.
    No post election analysis about Trump and his behaviour can approach the truth without addressing election fraud.

  130. mh says:

    Donald Trump – The Last American President 🇺🇸

  131. Armadillo says:

    His biggest downfall though remains that he wasn’t part of the elite political establishment.

    It’s his biggest strength, David.

    These people he is fighting against aren’t exactly “public servants”.

    Declass, declass, declass.

    Follow the money.

  132. Armadillo says:

    Trust in humanity.

  133. Boris says:

    Did enough Americans hate him so much they went out in droves to vote against him? If so, how does one explain his 95% approval among Republicans and his high 40’s approval among all likely voters? Who else is left that hated him so much? Certainly not enough to add up to 80m voters.

    Yes more people hated him then loved him. These 95% of republicans are the only people who voted for him. All The rest voted against. Unlike conservatives who stayed home and allowed Obama to win twice: in 2008 and 2012, and then blamed corrupt elites.

    Lesson: always vote for the lesser evil.

  134. Boris says:

    The main lesson here is that pondering to your base only and ignoring the independents is a losing strategy. It worked in 2016 because trump was a novelty and independents gave him a benefit of the doubt. But in 2020 this backfired.

    While I am no supporter of the Democrats, this lesson serves a useful purpose. Had Trump won, next time Democrats would have chosen a radicals firing up the socialist base. Now they know it does not work so they will try to chose a moderate. Sure it is not good enough for conservatives but it is way better than the alternative.

  135. Michael K says:

    That’s a problem for the Democrats, because it’s likely to be more diffiuclt to steal the next election, and an even bigger one for the GOP, because those 74mn voters aren’t going to disappear. After 4 years of Hiden they’re likely to feel they have even less to lose.

    The 2020 results show that stealing hundreds of local elections is going to be very difficult. In 2022 the entire House plus 20 Democrat Senators are up for election. The hysteria created by the Capitol riot operation, which it was, has not harmed Trump’s support. In fact, it has increased in several polls. We will see what happens . I expect over reach by the tech oligarchy that runs the Democrat Party.

  136. The Continental Op says:

    “His two biggest strengths were his two biggest flaws”

    Even Groucho would wince at that.

    So no one here actually bothers to read what they write?

  137. jupes says:

    because it’s likely to be more diffiuclt to steal the next election,

    No. The Georgia Senate run-off just showed that the template works its arse off.

    Despite all the evidence proof of election fraud in the Presidential election, the Dems knew that no one cared, even in a Rebublican state, so they just used the exact same procedure as before and “won” that election too. In full view.

    Don’t believe me? Well Ruby Freeman has still not been arrested even though tens of millions of Americans have watched her put ballots through the machine three times.

  138. Tom says:

    Thanks, CL, for a splendid analysis.

    It’s a pity that some took it as a pile-on that lets Trump’s enemies off the hook for far worse behaviour. CL is simply looking at Trump’s character flaws in isolation.

    Regardless of what happens next, my opinion is that no-one else would have attempted what Trump achieved between 2016 and 2020.

    That’s because Trump is a highly intelligent alphamale with not only an unshakeable faith in his own ability to get things done as president, but the same sense of disgust the American common man feels about the corruption of the Washington swamp and its capture by lobbyists for special interests.

    That is why the news media’s relentless campaign to destroy the Trump presidency is so reprehensible.

    Ninety-nine percent of the global news media is utterly disinterested in the greatest story in American history: an outsider goes into politics – much like the Jimmy Stewart character in the Hollywood classic, Mr Smith Goes to Washington – to clean up rampant corruption, culminating in the fraudulent “election” as US president of a corrupt stooge for America’s communist geopolitical rival, China.

    Instead of reporting the greatest story in history, the news media has sided with the corrupt establishment to get rid of the outsider who set out to clean up the corruption!

    That the media would not be interested in such a great story is utterly astonishing.

    The media has ceased to be the public’s eyes and ears and has become a player in the fight for political control of the world. It has taken the side of the Western elite and the Chinese Communist Party in its quest to abolish liberty and enslave the world using the social control technology mastered by the fascist oligarcs of Silicon Valley.

  139. jupes says:

    That’s because Trump is a highly intelligent alphamale with not only an unshakeable faith in his own ability to get things done as president, but the same sense of disgust the American common man feels about the corruption of the Washington swamp and its capture by lobbyists for special interests.

    Yep. And he remained focussed despite the relentless attacks on him and achieved more in four years than any president in living memory.

    Instead of reporting the greatest story in history, the news media has sided with the corrupt establishment to get rid of the outsider who set out to clean up the corruption!

    Remember Watergate? That was where the ‘hero’ journalists exposed (a small amount of) corruption in a political party. Now they are doing the exact opposite.

  140. Sean says:

    Kushner said that behind closed doors Trump was open to many points of views, often himself not being sold on only 1 course of action as his public persona would show, but ultimately relied on his gut instinct a lot. It would have annoyed some because it meant he was open to be persuaded by an argument having previously decided on another course of action.

  141. Mater says:

    That McCain quip was a verbatim repetition of a joke by stand-up comedian Chris Rock.
    This goes to show that professional comedians can make jokes that politicians can’t.

    But originally written by Democrat Senator Al Franken?

    The John McCain’s not a hero joke was originally written by ‘comedian’ Al Franken: “I have tremendous respect for McCain but I don’t buy the war hero thing,” Franken wrote in an essay about the 2000 elections. “Anybody can be captured. I thought the idea was to capture them. As far as I’m concerned he sat out the war.”

    In 2008, Chris Rock borrowed the joke and turned it into a popular routine to attack McCain with as he ran for President

    A joke is ‘funny’ if written by a Democrat politician, or repeatedly told by a famous comedian whilst supporting a Democratic Presidential Candidate, but a political killer if referenced by Trump?

    Just another example of the deplorable double standards.

  142. Cassie of Sydney says:

    “Just another example of the deplorable double standards.”

    The double standards are endless.

  143. Cassie of Sydney says:

    ” I expect over reach by the tech oligarchy that runs the Democrat Party.”

    I hope you’re right.

  144. NoFixedAddress says:

    Tom
    #3725945, posted on January 16, 2021 at 5:56 am

    well commented Tom

  145. Cassie of Sydney says:

    “Boris
    #3725934, posted on January 16, 2021 at 4:26 am
    And here is a perspective from a veteran conservative.

    http://www.danielpipes.org/20160/republican-mob-was-once-an-oxymoron-now-it

    LOL….Pipes is a coastal elitist as well as being an old chum of John Bolton. Daniel Pipes, like Bolton, has never seen a middle eastern war, or a war anywhere, that he doesn’t like.

    You know Bolshevik Boris, sometimes we Joooos, you, me and Daniel just don’t appreciate those who come out and bat for us. Only Donald Trump had the chutzpah to move the embassy. Don’t expect the same support for Jooos and Israel under Biden’s admin. I don’t think that Biden is an anti-Semite…but he’ll sail whichever way the wind is blowing and the wind in the Democrat party is decidedly icy towards Jooos and Israel.

    I loved the following from Pipes…

    “But decades of Leftist dominance over education, the media, the arts, and the “deep state” left a great swath of Republicans bad-tempered. Out with the old code of civility, etc. – instead, outrage, impatience, anxiety, defiance, anger, and pugnacity now rule instead. Despising the Left so vehemently, many Republicans wave away Trump’s personal faults as “fake news” and cherish his luridly vulgar, egomaniacal personality as a sign of authenticity and effectiveness.”

    My jaw dropped at Pipes bare faced smug elitism and disdain for the masses. I haven’t seen Pipes speak so disparagingly of the BLM and Antifa rioters over the last six months. I also note that he doesn’t bother asking why people are so full of “outrage, impatience, anxiety, defiance, anger”. Being a coastal elitist, having gone to the best schools and colleges and for someone so supposedly intelligent Pipes seems happy to ignore the effects of globalisation, the loss of manufacturing, the breakdown of towns and smaller communities in the rust belt, the unemployed, the ice addiction running amok through many devastated communities….because Pipes and his ilk are immune from such dysfunction. Unlike him, I don’t blame people for being outraged, impatient, anxious, defiant and angry……very angry. They have every right to be.

    So what does Pipes think people on the right should do? Turn the other cheek? Be dignified and civil in the face of outright hostility? People on the right have tried that…fat lot of good it has done. All that ensues is that it further empowers the progressive left to further insult you, to further scream and shout at you, to further shut you down, to further cancel you. We’ve seen how the left operate…even here in Oz, they are ceaseless in their vilification…..just ask Tony Abbott….he’s been smeared for years, assaulted in the streets of Hobart, endured the most vicious electoral campaign in Australian history and recently investigated by the police for “Covid violations” all because a leftist progressive and very hypocritical skank posted hearsay on Twitter. Abbott has always been dignified in the face of such vitriol…..and yet it never stops the vitriol, the smears, the bile.

    I’ve long known that Pipes is clearly a McCain/Romney/Paul Ryan Republican…which means the only Republicans Pipes supports are the ones that can’t win elections.

    Oh and further to Pipes….next time he’s invited to Australia to give a talk to the Jooooish community and the Islaaaaaaaamic Federation of Australia and the progressive left try and stop him from doing so…smearing him as someone who is an Islaaaaaaamopbobe, waaacist and far-right… as what happened a few years ago, I won’t get angry, I won’t protest and I won’t lift a finger because doing so would be so utterly and “luridly vulgar”.

    Try better next time Bolshevik Boris.

  146. Tel says:

    Yes more people hated him then loved him. These 95% of republicans are the only people who voted for him. All The rest voted against.

    That’s measurably untrue.

    Trump’s vote amongst the so called “Black” and “Hispanic” voters improved from 2016 to 2020 and those voters had no interest whatsoever in Romney.

    https://www.newsweek.com/donald-trump-increases-share-black-hispanic-vote-1544698

    Both groups traditionally vote Democrat, but Trump achieved 4 percent swings … your statement “All the rest voted against” is completely false and the opposite of what the observable data is indicating.

  147. calli says:

    Cassie of Sydney
    #3725975, posted on January 16, 2021 at 8:08 am
    “Just another example of the deplorable double standards.”

    The double standards are endless.

    Like a Hall of Mirrors.

    All there to shut you up and make you think you’re going crazy because you don’t quite know what you’re seeing any more. Stuff so bizarre and brazen it just doesn’t make sense that they think they can get away with it. But they do, over and over again.

    Exhibit A – last June Dems refused to condemn rioting. Suddenly they’re arming up to stop civil unrest. What changed?

  148. Mark A says:

    Cassie of Sydney
    #3725999, posted on January 16, 2021 at 8:45 am

    🏆👍

  149. Mater says:

    “But decades of Leftist dominance over education, the media, the arts, and the “deep state” left a great swath of Republicans bad-tempered. Out with the old code of civility, etc. – instead, outrage, impatience, anxiety, defiance, anger, and pugnacity now rule instead.

    As the Historian (and former editor of the New Statesman (Fabian) magazine) said:

    A conservative is not afraid of force, or of using it thoroughly. But always as a last resort.

  150. Mater says:

    Historian = Paul Johnson

  151. Cassie of Sydney says:

    “your statement “All the rest voted against” is completely false and the opposite of what the observable data is indicating”

    Boris has a long history being wrong about a lot of things.

  152. Baa Humbug says:

    Boris
    #3725932, posted on January 16, 2021 at 4:20 am

    The main lesson here is that pondering to your base only and ignoring the independents is a losing strategy. It worked in 2016 because trump was a novelty and independents gave him a benefit of the doubt. But in 2020 this backfired.

    So independents voted for him in 2016, getting him to 62.5m votes but abandoned him in 2020 where he got 75m votes?
    Furthermore, more blacks, hispanics and other minorities voted for him in record numbers in 2020.
    His votes in California, NY, NJ and other blue hot spots increased this time around.
    Doesn’t seem like he was abandoned by too many at all.
    The math mate, do the math.

  153. mh says:

    Breitbart

    Rasmussen Poll Shows No Slip in Support for President Trump

    On January 5, President Trump’s job approval rating with Rasmussen was 47 percent. Today, the president’s job approval is 48 percent.

    The attack on Capitol Hill took place on January 6. Since then, there has been more than a week of 24/7, highly-coordinated media hysteria attacking the president as a traitor, as guilty of sedition, of being criminally liable for leading a violent coup against the United States of America … and his job approval rating is up a point.

  154. candy says:

    Trump haters generally never do the maths or read the full quote or watch the whole video or look at what they supported the day before. The end goal is to disparage Trump.

  155. bollux says:

    The inevitable downfall of the Left is that they make stuff up and then come to believe it.

  156. Boxcar says:

    Just pulled this of American Thinker.
    “When O’Brien, the interrogator from the Thought Police in Orwell’s 1984, holds up four fingers and asks Winston Smith, an imprisoned member of the underground opposition, how many he sees, poor Winston persists in saying he sees four. But that is not what O’Brien wants to hear. “No, Winston, you are insane. There are five fingers.” The interrogations continue until Winston, wracked with pain and exhaustion and persuaded of his insanity, agrees finally through his tears that he was lying to himself, that he had always been lying to himself, and admitted that he saw five fingers. He understood that two and two make five. Emptied of his individuality and broken by the inquisition, he also knew that he had won the victory over himself. He knew he was a flaw in the social pattern. He learned, he understood, he accepted. And in the end, he knew that he loved Big Brother.”
    It looks like a few Cats are already seeing five fingers??????

  157. Chris M says:

    Trump was sometimes too nice to people. And whilst he did well he didn’t go far enough with deregulating and meaningful downsizing. In reality the various departments have intentionally created such complexity to make it very difficult to do so however. He probably should have completely eliminated a couple of alphabet agencies at least.

  158. feelthebern says:

    The inevitable downfall of the Left is that they make stuff up and then come to believe it.

    It must be so exhausting for these people, having to change their core beliefs depending on who said something, made up something on a weekly basis.

  159. Ed Case says:

    ***Apparently Trump and his businesses in the decades leading up to the 2016 election faced over 60 law suits for not paying debts. ***
    In New York commercial R.E. development for 50 years.
    60 sounds a very low number for that milieu over that time frame.

  160. Ed Case says:

    ***So independents voted for him in 2016, getting him to 62.5m votes but abandoned him in 2020 where he got 75m votes?***
    There was a Libertarian candidate and a Green Party candidate in 2016 who gained a few million votes that Trump mighta found handy in 2020.
    He did nothing for them, so they either sat out 2020 or voted Democrat.

  161. Boris says:

    I’ve long known that Pipes is clearly a McCain/Romney/Paul Ryan Republican…which means the only Republicans Pipes supports are the ones that can’t win elections.

    He also supported Raegan. He also supported Trump in 2020 elections (not in 2016), but he fails to mention this in his Newsweek article http://www.danielpipes.org/19896/why-im-voting-for-trump

  162. Boris says:

    So independents voted for him in 2016, getting him to 62.5m votes but abandoned him in 2020 where he got 75m votes?

    No. In 2016 independents stayed home. In 2020 they came out in droves to vote against him. Nearly all of them did.

  163. Cassie of Sydney says:

    “In 2020 they came out in droves to vote against him. Nearly all of them did.”

    Care to provide a source for that Bolshevik Boris? “Nearly all” is a quite a claim.

    Or is this just more hyperbole to support your “assumptions”.

  164. Ed Case says:

    There are 3 Voter Registrations in the United States: [R], [D], & [I].
    Trump didn’t do any good with [I] in either election.
    The difference was the Gary Johnson vote and the Green Party vote in 2016 disadvantaged the Democrats.
    Trump coulda won those 3 million votes in 2020, but opted to chase a miniscule improvement in the black and hispanic vote.

  165. Faye says:

    Our 20th & 21st January can’t come quick enough – he doesn’t EVER quit.

  166. Noddy says:

    Then to top it off, economically speaking John McCain was a reasonably consistent free trade globalist in his outlook … and Trump has always been an unabashed nationalist. For families who can’t see any way that globalism helped them, makes sense they turn to nationalism. What would anyone expect?

    Donald Trump frightened the shit out of the globalists!
    Too much support from the ordinary people, the forgotten voter.
    Same league as Pauline Hanson!

  167. Baa Humbug says:

    Trump coulda won those 3 million votes in 2020, but opted to chase a miniscule improvement in the black and hispanic vote.

    Oh FFS. The man INCREASED his vote by an unprecedented amount over 2016, yet people are still talking about how many votes he should have chased.
    The question is why (or even if) so many people voted for Biden. If they were Trump haters, where did they come from? Why didn’t any poll show this supposed hatred Surely if there were 10’s of millions of haters, they would have shown up somewhere leading up to the eletion. Where?

    Why are those millions of haters only in 6 contested states? You’d expect most of those haters would be from deep blue states, but Trump INCREASED his vote in those states.

  168. C.L. says:

    Albatross, I asked you yesterday to make arguments (using sentences, paragraphs and logic) and stop posting moronic ad hominems.

    You’ve resumed doing so this morning and you’re now banned.

  169. Ed Case says:

    ***Oh FFS. The man INCREASED his vote by an unprecedented amount over 2016, yet people are still talking about how many votes he should have chased.***
    You’ve missed the point.
    It didn’t matter how many hispanic and black votes he got in California, Illinois and New England, it mattered how he did in the Swing States he won in 2016.
    That’s where those Independent/Third Party votes mighta come in handy in 2020.

  170. Sean says:

    Imagine beings triggered you can’t even handle people doing an election post mortem :s

    The demographics are changing in the US. The next GOP leader has to build on Trump’s bridge to all and can follow a more class based ‘American worker vs the Elite’ model instead of trying to split people into ethnic groups.

    I think backing away from the religious stuff worked in his favour. Probably a lot of conservatives don’t like that, but I think it broadens the church if it can be done in the right manner. I think Trump wanted to judge people by their skills and ability, not just the group they came from, but yeah I agree that his instinct to always fight and demand too much loyalty was a burden in the end.

    The word Unity is such a complex one to define in the US. I don’t think Trump’s vision brought enough people together to really win the popular vote, but that’s not to say the the next candidate can’t rebadge it in a way that makes more people open to signing up.

    From his inauguration speech:

    At the bedrock of our politics will be a total allegiance to the United States of America, and through our loyalty to our country, we will rediscover our loyalty to each other. When you open your heart to patriotism, there is no room for prejudice.

    I don’t think in such a fractured country this is a working philosophy and glosses over some of the underlying problems in the US.

  171. Sean says:

    I think Scott Adams understood Trump quite well (maybe with a bit of idolising at times).

    He gave me a few good filters on how to try and understand him in a different way:

    – The Entrepreneur – a disruptor that sees opportunity where others don’t and can bring it into reality
    – The Persuader – great at using visuals to put images into peoples minds
    – The Optimist – telling the story of hope and progress, which was what the country wanted coming out of the recession and Obama years of talking down the country
    – The Negotiator – The first claim was not always a final demand but an anchoring point for the negotiation (the press had a field day in trying to say otherwise)

  172. Fess:

    My first thought was – yes you’re right. But… Dems would have been in the media spouting pious platitudes while privately sabotaging all efforts, and the media would have spun it as evil/unstable Trump. It’s all academic, of course, but I can’t see an angle where Trump would come out on top of that scenario.

    Correct – that’s the Democrat playbook. Find an organisation, gut it, skin it, and wear its fur while demanding respect.
    The first act of unfaithfullness in a marriage doesn’t occur when you pay the whore, it starts when you approach and talk to her.

  173. mh says:

    As president-elect Joe Biden calls for “unity” and “healing,” his inauguration festivities will feature an anti-Trump choral ensemble that recently smeared conservatives as “fascists.”

    The Resistance Revival Chorus, which consists of female and gender “non-binary” singers, is scheduled to perform Saturday during an official inauguration concert celebrating diversity. “America United: An Inauguration Welcome Event Celebrating America’s Changemakers” will stream live starting 7 pm ET on Biden’s official inauguration site and on various social media platforms.

  174. candy says:

    I don’t think in such a fractured country this is a working philosophy and glosses over some of the underlying problems in the US.

    Sean I do think at times people come together over national disasters etc, or tremendous sporting achievements, 9/11 for example. Perhaps really tremendous sporting achievements, stuff like that. Perhaps that is what Trump was saying? that patriotism can overcome differences.

    In any case those days are gone I think. The sheer abuse of Trump from even before the 2016 election and all through four years of MAGA people being told they are fascists, KKK supporters, rotten deplorable people, and now the fraud, has perhaps broken MAGA folk. I wonder if they will ever feel the same about the USA.

  175. Essenin says:

    Yes, so sad. But if it had been anyone else, who was any better, it wouldn’t have been anyone at all.
    And on the self-love of loving mass rallies.
    I covered Gough’s Nov-Dec 1975 in outer Sydney and Melbourne for a Trotsky rag. He thought they were there for him. He was wrong, and we were too. They were there for something that wouldn’t come this time.
    Goodonya, CL

  176. Arky says:

    There was nothing more that Trump could have done to have won.
    The idea that if he had of been “nicer” or some stupid shit like that he could have swayed enough womanish pea- brained traditional republican voters is horse shit.
    He lost as soon as covid hit the shores and the excuse to flood the country with mailed ballots was not vigorously opposed by courts and the slimy establishment Republicans.
    That’s the entire story, the end.
    One might ponder on the derangement of the media whores and the tech oligarchs, but given both those groups are as popular as a sack full of arseholes, that had zero or a positive effect.
    Same with the poll manipulation. No one believes that shit anymore.

  177. Mike Ryan says:

    American Polity is better thanks to Trump.
    The swamp and media were on full display for the world to see and they were shocked.
    He will be missed. So will his kids – nice people. And Jared.
    Trump has left a giant legacy, much like Thatcher.

  178. Baa Humbug says:

    Arky
    #3726838, posted on January 16, 2021 at 10:02 pm
    +1

  179. Rex Anger says:

    +1 To Arky and Mike Ryan both.

    Massed, criminal manipulation of ballots by unscrupulous operators to force an outcome favourable to them and them alone.

    Any discussion of niceties, aortas, political groups and voting blocs this or that etc. is sophistry.

  180. Arky says:

    Trump didn’t really reveal the swanp or the media bias.
    We’ve known it for yonks.
    When was the last time you watched a hollyweird movie and thought “ Yeah, this reflects my values”.
    Or watched a TV talking head and thought; “You aren’t a lying, filthy, stupid sack of shit selling yourself out to a bunch of bullshit you blatantly don’t believe a word of”.
    No.
    What Trump revealed was the utter mendacity of the traditional moneyed conservative political class.
    A clique of Ivy league mega rich snobbish wankers lying their arses off to keep the cheap labour coming in via illegal immigration. Too stupid to understand the dangers to themselves of the demographic shifts that creates.
    They are ashamed and taken aback and a bit frightened by the influx into their party by traditional working people left politically homeless by the globalist agenda embraced by democrats slightly more than republicans, and too stupid to capitalise on it.
    What Trump revealed is this: The political class across the board has utter contempt for the bulk of the population upon whom they stand.
    Deep, deep down they feel themselves better than the ordinary person.
    Moreover, they consider themselves to have more interests in common with their counterparts in societies overseas than with lower status citizens of their own nation.
    Through the eyes of doctor Fauci we see how they see us: as panic stricken fools. We are to be lied to and manipulated into doing what they want. If we have interests of our own, they are irrelevant.

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