Rush Limbaugh

ONE of the most successful and influential radio broadcasters of all time, Rush Limbaugh, has died, aged 70, after a fairly lengthy battle against lung cancer. Pre-internet, Australians only got soundbites of Limbaugh’s work in some tangential news or current affairs piece – usually hostile. He struck me then as a theatrical partisanship entrepreneur whose right-of-centre bombast was simply a business model. That wasn’t true. Agree with him or not, he was principled and insightful. One of his final commentaries – on how the Democrat Party now bitterly resents elections (and therefore Americans) – was bang on the money.

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19 Responses to Rush Limbaugh

  1. stackja says:

    Rush was passionate.

  2. stackja says:

    His audience felt his passion.

  3. Mother Lode says:

    The BBC News’ banner feed in my office reports “Trump leads tribute to divisive US radio host.”

    Progressives have more or less turned divisive into a ‘colour’ word. The sight of the word communicates not information (which can be tested and appraised) but the expected reaction. He is a bad man.

    Before Rush there was the establishment on one side, and a host of people that they preyed upon on the other. The division was real. And the establishment was growing more malevolent and vindictive by the day.

    What Rush did is rally opposition to this barbarous treatment. He called the establishment out and exposed them.

    He did not create the divide. He evened the playing field a bit.

    Why would that be bad.

  4. JohnL says:

    R.I.P Rush. A true American legend.

  5. cuckoo says:

    No doubt ABC/SBS will run some abusive piece tonight, on a man that only a fraction of even their tiny audience will ever have heard of, let alone heard.

    So many are speaking about their experience of hearing Rush for the first time and realizing that there were others who thought that way, that they were not alone. That was my experience when I first came across the blogs of Tim Blair and Professor Bunyip.

  6. Entropy says:

    I miss professor bunyip.

  7. Major Elvis Newton says:

    The regressive Left’s hatred for Limbaugh is borne out of pure hate. A trait they own and use prodigiously.

    Hatred of his talent, hatred of his reach, hatred of his influence.

    But most of all hatred because they know they had no-one among them who came even close to being as good as he was.

    Rush always laughed at the haters.

  8. mh says:

    Vale to the Medal of Freedom recipient.

  9. Lee says:

    The BBC News’ banner feed in my office reports “Trump leads tribute to divisive US radio host.”

    Progressives have more or less turned divisive into a ‘colour’ word. The sight of the word communicates not information (which can be tested and appraised) but the expected reaction. He is a bad man.

    I have noticed that the MSM never refer to left wing figures as “divisive” (no matter how divisive they actually are), only conservatives and those on the right.

  10. Exit Stage Right says:

    #3760273, posted on February 18, 2021 at 10:54 am
    They say don’t say anything about the dead if you can’t say something good.

    Rush Limbaugh is dead. Good.

    The Cat’s resident Blimp is not to fussed about Rush being brown bread.

  11. Tom says:

    I spent many years working in Australian radio news and current affairs – mainly commercial, but also for the ABC. However, only in commercial radio did we have broadcasters whose success was measured by the size of their audience.

    Decades before the rise of Alan Jones, Ormsby Wilkins was literally the father of Australian talk radio, broadcasting the first legal radio phone call on Sydney’s 2UE when the law changed to allow radio talkback in 1967.

    Wilkins went on to become the talkback star for the Macquarie broadcasting network across Australia and its Melbourne station, 3AW, where I worked with him as a cub reporter.

    That was the early 1970s before the internet, so little of his work has been preserved, but Wilkins, apart from his hilarious sense of humour, was a no-bullshit analyst and commentator who distrusted politicians, no matter the party, and was famous for lampooning them and holding their feet to the fire.

    Now multiply his audience by 20 and add the fierce constituional libertarianism of the USA and you have what Rush Limbaugh did for America.

    Like Limbaugh, Wilkins died young from lung cancer in 1976. But it’s Limbaugh who reminds me what a minor part Australia and great men like Ormsby Wilkins played in defending our human freedom.

  12. Exit Stage Right says:

    too

  13. Slayer of Memes says:

    Compare and contrast the reactions of prominent Leftists over the death of Rush Limbaugh (or Margaret Thatcher years ago), with that of Donald Trump and prominent conservatives over the death of RBG…

    But Leftists will claim they have a monopoly of ‘compassion’ and ‘tolerance’ and that conservatives are all ‘hateful bigots’…

    #UpsideDownWorld

  14. Lee says:

    Compare and contrast the reactions of prominent Leftists over the death of Rush Limbaugh (or Margaret Thatcher years ago), with that of Donald Trump and prominent conservatives over the death of RBG…

    I remember seeing on the news footage from overseas of leftists literally dancing in the street and carrying placards saying “the witch is dead” and probably much worse.
    I thought the Melbourne Channel Nine news report on Thatcher on the night after she died was disgraceful, disrespectful, and partisan to the left.
    Fidel Castro got much better treatment.
    But you are right, Slayer, the left are the “compassionate ones,” or so they keep telling us.

  15. Rorschach says:

    The following is a short excerpt from Andrew Breitbart’s 2011 memoir, Righteous Indignation: Excuse Me While I Save the World!, discussing how Rush Limbaugh inspired his embrace of conservative principles and American patriotism.

    https://www.breitbart.com/the-media/2021/02/17/andrew-breitbart-how-rush-limbaugh-inspired-me/

    One day I asked [my future father-in-law Orson Bean] why he had Rush Limbaugh’s book The Way Things Ought to Be on his shelf. I asked him, “Why would you have a book by this guy?”

    And Orson said, “Have you ever listened to him?”

    I said yes, of course, even though I never had. I was convinced to the core of my being that Rush Limbaugh was a Nazi, anti-black, anti-Jewish, and anti-all things decent. Without berating me for disagreeing with him, Orson simply suggested that I listen to him again.

    This is where my rendezvous with destiny begins.

    I turned on KFI 640 AM to listen to evil personified from 9 a.m. to noon. Indeed, my goal was to derive pleasure from the degree of evil I found in Rush Limbaugh. I was looking forward to a jovial discussion with Orson to confirm how right I was. One hour turned into three. One listening session into a week’s worth. And next thing I knew, I was starting to doubt my preprogrammed self. I was still a Democrat. I was still a liberal.

    But after listening for months while putting thousands of miles on my car, I couldn’t believe that I once thought this man was a Nazi or anything else. While I couldn’t yet accept the premise that he was speaking my language, I marveled at how he could take a breaking news story and offer an entertaining and clear analysis that was like nothing I had ever seen on television, especially the Sunday morning shows, which had been my previous one-stop shop for political opinions.

    Most important, though, Limbaugh, like the professor I always wanted but never had the privilege to study under, created a vivid mental picture of the architecture of a world that I resided in but couldn’t see completely: the Democrat-Media Complex. Embedded in Limbaugh’s analysis of politics was always a tandem discussion on the media. Each segment relentlessly pointed to collusion between the media and the Democratic Party. If the Clarence Thomas hearings showed me that something was wrong, the ensuing years of listening to Limbaugh and Dennis Prager — who at the time was also undergoing a political transformation from the Democratic to the Republican Party — explained to me with eerie precision what exactly was wrong. I swallowed hard and conceded to Orson that he was right.

  16. Nob says:

    My social media feeds (few as they are) are leading with “white supremacist Rush Limbaugh …” and nobody dares to take issue.

  17. NoFixedAddress says:

    Tom
    #3760472, posted on February 18, 2021 at 1:59 pm

    good comments Tom.

  18. mh says:

    Another brain dead Hollywood J ew

    Ron Perlman
    @perlmutations
    Me being Hellboy n shit, and having spent so much time in hades, I would like to extend my deepest sympathies to the poor devil who will no doubt have to spend the rest of eternity with Rush Limbaugh.
    7:01 AM · Feb 18, 2021

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