Further progress in Australia’s suicidal energy policies!

The announced closure seven years from now of EnergyAustralia’s Victoria’s Yallourn power station is an inevitable outcome of the subsidies that governments provide to wind and solar. Yallourn supplies one fifth of Victoria’s electricity and about 8 per cent of that in the National Electricity Market.  I have a piece in The Spectator covering the event.

The rapid expansion of wind and solar has seen their market share lift from virtually nothing 20 years ago, to over 20 per cent. Renewables, in addition to getting the market price for supply, are subsidised with payments that are in excess of the market price.  Consumers and taxpayers presently pay $7 billion annually in these subsidies and more are in the pipeline with subsidised transmission, Snowy2 and the market manager’s interventions to shore-up the inevitable unreliability of wind and solar.

Wind and solar’s on-off operations cause further costs to the coal generators, which have also been subject to increased taxes, euphemistically called “royalties”.

Due to government policies, energy demand is stagnating in Australia – the risible claims about green steel and green aluminium defy credibility when renewable generators cost twice as much as those powered by hydrocarbons or nuclear.

EnergyAustralia has foreshadowed that it will be investing in batteries. This is a market opportunity from increased supply irregularity but batteries do not diminish customers’ costs.

Energy Minister Lily D’Ambrosio said there would be a further 5,000 megawatts of new power generation in the next seven years.  Even without back-up supplies, skeptic Mike O’Ceirin estimates that 5,47o megawatts of wind is needed to replace Yallourn. And that this will require an additional $11billion of transmission simply provide unstable power.

One has to delve deep into history to find examples of nations engaging in conscious self-harm comparable to those that government energy policies are bringing about.

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27 Responses to Further progress in Australia’s suicidal energy policies!

  1. Spurgeon Monkfish III says:

    5,47o megawatts of wind is needed to replace Yallourn

    “Wind” can never replace baseload capacity. I’m sick to death of all these grubby parasitic idiots talking out of their fundaments.

  2. Entropy says:

    Queensland really needs to exit from the NEM before we are dragged down with the rest of the dickheads..

  3. Tom says:

    Only people who’ve never had real jobs, like Daniel Andrews and Lily D’Ambrosio (Victoria’s communist energy minister), could support primitive “technology” that’s taking us backwards to the 19th century while hiking the cost of electricity to industrial users, then subsidising the backward tech to make the only viable solution to our industrial electricity needs (coal and gas) uneconomic.

    History will remember the Andrews regime’s energy policies as we remember all the world’s other ideology-inspired social and economic disasters of the past century.

  4. Bruce of Newcastle says:

    One has to delve deep into history to find examples of nations engaging in conscious self-harm comparable to those that government energy policies are bringing about.

    China is aiding and encouraging it all too.

  5. Struth says:

    Historically, nations don’t do themselves harm, just a few traitors at the top.

  6. H B Bear says:

    Any business that isn’t working on relocation planning isn’t reading the tea leaves.

  7. shady says:

    Daniel Andrews can only have his surgery supplied by renewable energy at 10 o’clock at night. Let us see him to agree to this if he thinks this is the future for electricity. Have some skin in the game Premiere.

  8. min says:

    Firstly see my post on other thread re energyLet’s have adverts of poor African children working in the cobalt mines who tell us they are working as hard as they can so we can have the stuff to make the batteries . And don’ t start me on Snowy 2 spent many holidays there with family who worked on it including the associate commissioner who by the way built solar water heating for the house in Cooma back in the 50s Have they started tunneling yet? That will be interesting as it will be very difficult to tunnel there I was told years ago .

  9. Fang says:

    We talk about it but we need to think of ways to stop it! To make a difference!

  10. Figures says:

    One has to delve deep into history to find examples of nations engaging in conscious self-harm comparable to those that government energy policies are bringing about.

    ??? Whilst these policies are indeed suicidal we only have to go back to the last 13 months where governments shut down every second small business because of a germ.

  11. Entropy says:

    From the carpet baggers perspective it is anything but self harm. Their bank accounts show the benefits of government intervention and central planning of energy markets, for them. Bugger the unwashed.

  12. Roger says:

    Queensland really needs to exit from the NEM before we are dragged down with the rest of the dickheads..

    It’s not much publicised given our limited & incurious media, but the QLD Labour government is planning to close coal fired power stations ahead of schedule in order to meet its 50% renewables target by 2030.

    The eastern grid will become unsustainable by that point.

    Idiocy on ideological steroids.

  13. wal1957 says:

    Queensland really needs to exit from the NEM before we are dragged down with the rest of the dickheads..

    Too late. Qld is already on the same path albeit a mite slower.
    I’m hopeful I won’t be around in 20 years to see the ‘fruits’ of this unreliables indoctrination.

  14. max says:

    Death by Government by Rudolph Rummel

    Rummel estimated the total number of people killed by all governments during the 20th century at 212 million, of which 148 million were killed by Communist regimes from 1917 to 1987.

    The Black Book of Communism

    this people do not care about us we are expendable

  15. stackja says:

    The elite live in mansions. Always have. Elections are supposedly people voting for a better life. Voters keep electing leftists to positions of power expecting a different result.

  16. Robber Baron says:

    Any business that isn’t working on relocation planning isn’t reading the tea leaves

    One of my mates is moving to Qld because he uses lots of electricity in his business. He will spend hundreds of thousands in relocation costs because its cheaper than staying.

  17. mareeS says:

    And now NSW Environment Minister Matt (Keen On Green) Kean wants to do something about wood-fuelled home fireplaces.

    Well, Matt, how about you do something about bushfires first?

    May I horrify Mr Kean by disclosing that our 102yo home in the Hunter coal mining region has three COAL-burning fireplaces and an outdoor wood-burning fire pit? We occasionally use the living room fireplace for a wood fire when the mood strikes us in winter, as coal can no longer be obtained in small quantities in Newcastle, just by millions of tonnes shipped through the port. Otherwise we use gas for heating and cooking, coal-generated electricity for lighting and appliances, and ocean breezes for cooling.

    What is he planning? Send in the green police to strip out heritage features from our home, install cameras to ensure we are clean and green?

    This bloke’s brain is up his fundament, and Gladys needs to ditch him sooner than yesterday.

  18. Mike Ryan says:

    What happens to the batteries after their energy is expended?
    How much of these toxic heavy metals are we left with?
    What then?

    We need to enforce a pre-paid bond to cover the removal and recycling of these pollutants. No financially viable recycling in uses currently. Tesla batteries are incinerated to recover the base elements.

  19. Struth says:

    This bloke’s brain is up his fundament, and Gladys needs to ditch him sooner than yesterday.

    It’s called a political party.
    Photy-arse has the say on that, he put glad bags in the Premier spot.

    Political parties are our problem.
    They do not work in our constitution, and were never meant to be there, and are not mentioned in it.
    It doesn’t ban them, but they are not necessary, and now, are at war with this nation.

  20. Kneel says:

    “What happens to the batteries after their energy is expended?
    How much of these toxic heavy metals are we left with?
    What then?”

    You can ask the same question about the turbine blades of the windmills – these are typically some hi-tech composite that can’t be recycled and is sent to landfill after 10-15 years. Even cutting them up into manageable sizes for transport to landfill is fraught with problems – toxic/harmful dust and so on.

    I suspect we will have the same attitude to battery recycling as turbine blade recycling – let the next generation worry about it! Hey, we saved the world for them, the least they can do is clean up the mess we left.
    At least with the batteries, there is already a better tech/chemistry than Li-ion in carbon/carbon – you can make these from carbon-black ink, standard office paper, aluminium foil and a bit of salt water. If you use the standard “non-rechargable” battery electrolyte (magnesium disulfide?) instead of salt water, and also use graphene instead of straight carbon, the energy density is double Li-ion by volume. This type of cell is extremely tolerant to electrical abuse – you can charge a 1.2V cell quickly by using 12V to charge it, and it doesn’t get damaged or catch fire in the process. Since you can use printing industry techniques to apply the carbon to the paper, you can ramp up production easily and get a very low cost at industrial scales. But none of the “big boys” seem interested…

  21. Bruce says:

    @ Struth:

    ““A nation can survive its fools, and even the ambitious. But it cannot survive treason from within. An enemy at the gates is less formidable, for he is known and carries his banner openly. But the traitor moves amongst those within the gate freely, his sly whispers rustling through all the alleys, heard in the very halls of government itself. For the traitor appears not a traitor; he speaks in accents familiar to his victims, and he wears their face and their arguments, he appeals to the baseness that lies deep in the hearts of all men. He rots the soul of a nation, he works secretly and unknown in the night to undermine the pillars of the city, he infects the body politic so that it can no longer resist. A murderer is less to fear”

    Marcus Tullius Cicero

  22. Dr Faustus says:

    Due to government policies, energy demand is stagnating in Australia – the risible claims about green steel and green aluminium defy credibility when renewable generators cost twice as much as those powered by hydrocarbons or nuclear.

    Australia’s green steel and aluminium businesses are about to take a hit as GFG Alliance flushes down the tubes with the Greensill collapse.

    Not instantly clear why GFG’s super-excellent plans had to be financed by a second tier supply chain lender.

  23. IRFM says:

    And in whose backyard are you going to put the infinite number of solar cells and wind turbines to provide the semblance of a base load for power generation – a buffer stock of 4 hours. Jaysus – you can’t make this stuff up.

    And now for the best bit – the super large mines needed to supply the exotic metals and rare earth metals that go into the manufacture of solar cells and turbines will defy the imagination in terms of their respective spheres of influence.

    Now that you have dug them up and processed them what about the waste from the mining operations and what about the reclamation of the used cells and turbines.

    Is there a government plan anywhere around the world that has thought these aspects through to their logical conclusion

    If you want a small footprint use nuclear. At least the operators have an idea on what to do if the systems get knocked around by the odd earthquake or two – put them somewhere else and avoid the problem.

  24. Nighthawk the Elder says:

    Virtually no-one in the Latrobe Valley believes the 2028 date. Talk on the street is it won’t last past 2024. The owners will pull all the future capex programs and the reliability will go down hill fast. Morale will evaporate as well. Yallourn has a chequered history with its staff since the days of privatisation and the relationship between workforce and management has been challenging over many years. Would not have been too much love in the room when the announcements were made.

    Base load stations can be reliable but need constant attention to keep them that way. As soon as you move to band aid maintenance, they fall over very quickly. And that is exactly what happened at Hazelwood. Despite its age, it was quite reliable. New owners came along around 2012/2013, pulled the plug on the rolling plant replacement program and the rest is history.

    One final factor is the wholesale price remains significantly depressed and not sustainable for long term profitability. (Can someone explain why we don’t see this reflected in the retail price).

    No one believes 2028.

  25. David Brewer says:

    One has to delve deep into history to find examples of nations engaging in conscious self-harm comparable to those that government energy policies are bringing about.

    If only it was conscious! Then there might be some hope of getting ministers to at least start thinking about cost-benefit. But the awful truth is that they are living in a dream world. Just look at how they believe that wind and solar are cheaper, and that more of them will bring power prices down. The opposite is true, everywhere in the world where this has been tried. But ministers are not conscious of this. They have not the foggiest notion of what they are doing.

  26. David Brewer:

    The opposite is true, everywhere in the world where this has been tried. But ministers are not conscious of this. They have not the foggiest notion of what they are doing.

    It’s willful ignorance. Our ruling classes live in a bubble they’ve created and are comfortable with it. Only when grim dark and cold reality knock those walls down will they see any sense.
    We desperately need one of our major coal fired plants to go tits up for a couple of weeks to create a mini and recoverable version of what awaits us.

  27. Art says:

    Capacity Factors – It’s reasonable to point out the far lower capacity factors of wind and solar, but these are already factored into the Integrated System Plan.

    Variability of Wind/Solar – It’s reasonable to note wind droughts of several days, eclipses, and all other potential issues… but these are already factored into the Integrated System Plan.

    Batteries – It’s reasonable to note that batteries can not possibly solve the storage problem at a reasonable cost. Again, read the Integrated System Plan. Most storage will be off river PHES.

    Cost – It’s reasonable to question the cost of the transition, but not if you fail to include the cost of coal fuel. A coal plant like Bayswater has fuel costs of $40 Billion over 50 years. Once you add that in, there’s plenty of budget to fund the necessary infrastructure, such as additional transmission lines.

    By 2028, wind/solar/storage will be supplying well over 50% of electricity in Australia.

    Replacing Yallorn isn’t a technical challenge at all. It’s only a political challenge because an industry generating $5 Billion per day has managed to brainwash so many in the population.

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