Education cover up

One way to cover up the on-going collapse in schooling standards to to stop reporting the data. Reports sent to parents (in Victoria, at least) are incomprehensible. So you cannot work out how well your child is doing at school. Now you won’t be able to work out how well your school is going.

The Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority (ACARA) has now banned schools and the media from publishing comparisons of school performance in national literacy and numeracy tests.

Why?

The ban on ranking schools – demanded by state and territory education ministers under pressure from teacher unions – will make it harder for parents and principals to spot which schools are the best and worst performers in basic literacy and numeracy, to drive improvements.

Seriously?

What do we know about the Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority?

We are an independent statutory authority.

For. The. Love. Of. God.

Another bunch of unelected, unaccountable*, numpties running around being helpful.

Establishing the NAPLAN was one of the finest achievements of then education minister Julia Gillard. To be her credit, she stared down the nay-sayers. The current minister, Alan Trudge, should pick up the phone, practice seagull management**, and get that data back up.

To be fair – the tests were cancelled last year due to lockdown, but there is no excuse this year.

*No doubt in the days to come I’ll get an email crapping on about how ACARA is accountable to the Parliament, National Audit Office, and the like. For my future crimes against humanity I often read the Hansard, watch Question Time, and keep track of these sorts of things. I am underwhelmed by these sorts of ‘accountability’.

**shit on people from a great height.

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84 Responses to Education cover up

  1. Nick says:

    We lack a competitive system with an emphasis on building upon the basics. Agencies such as ACARA think they are solving a problem, though in the longer run, the parents will use other means to find the information they need to make informed choices. For example Asian and Indian parents.

  2. DM OF WA says:

    It is all very well to blame the quangos but the root of the problem is our politicians. What has the Coalition ever done to stop the rot? Nothing. Why? Not because they are weak or sr stupid but because they are fully complicit. They know exactly what is happening and they approve of it. They just won’t say tell their voters that.

    This is a case of “if only Stalin knew!”

  3. areff says:

    If the ratings are re-instated just watch how it’s done.

    The Australia Council used to publish its luvvie stipends in an easily searched online database. Then they “improved” the system, in effect hiding their grants in irregularly issued .pdfs that can only be read one at a time and make searching by electorate very difficult.

    The minister was informed of this and, being a member of the SFL Party, yawned and went back to sleep.

  4. John A says:

    Establishing the NAPLAN was one of the finest achievements of then education minister Julia Gillard. To be her credit, she stared down the nay-sayers.

    LOL!!

    One of the more risible statements of the day!

    NAPLAN is just as much a crock as the ACARA.

  5. TBH says:

    I’m very glad my kids finish school this year and just as glad that we went private. Escaping the worst of the government education sector has been a godsend.

    Hiding the comparative results from different schools is nonsense. Parents aren’t stupid and neither are the kids. IMHO we have a right to know how the schools are performing, especially when performing badly.

  6. Yarpos says:

    Reminiscent of how the US stopped reporting race in crime statistics. You can talk disproportionate impact all you like , just not in crime stats apparantly.

    Never mind just invent a new fantasy world and ignore reality.

  7. Herodotus says:

    How long ago was the education system free of leftist crap?

  8. Bruce says:

    Seagull management?

    Where I used to work, it was defined a bit more expansively:

    Fly in, make a lot of noise, shit on everything, steal the chips, shit on everything again, make a lot more noise and fly out.”

    It’s the “public serpent” / “deep corporate” way.

  9. Arky says:

    It’s much worse than any of you know.

  10. Entropy says:

    Fly in, make a lot of noise, shit on everything, steal the chips, shit on everything again, make a lot more noise and fly out.

    Quite so.

  11. Entropy says:

    I just tell Miss Entropy to work out what the teachers want to hear, and tell them exactly that. But make sure you make up your own mind regardless.

    It is working out very well.

  12. 1735099 says:

    Establishing the NAPLAN was one of the finest achievements of then education minister Julia Gillard.

    Initially, it was a good idea.
    Then, fairly swiftly, the following began to happen.
    1) The non-tested curriculum areas (Music, the Arts, PE, etc) were neglected.
    2) Teachers of these subject areas began to find themselves operating as “minders” whilst time and resources were poured into the tested portions of the curriculum.
    3) A league table developed in the media that purported to rank schools in order of merit according to NAPLAN performance. What it really showed was the relative effectiveness of schools in teaching to the test. It also sold lots of newspapers.
    4) Small schools discouraged students with intellectual impairments from participating in the tests because one poorly performing student would be seen to be “dragging down” the whole school performance. This became a major issue in small bush schools with enrolments below 20 students.
    5) Many parents began to withdraw their children from the testing programme, because of the anxiety caused by the over-hyping of the process.
    6) Instead of the test results being used as a diagnostic tool to identify under-performance and remedy it, they became the talisman that ambitious school administrators began to use to claw their way to promotion.

    NAPLAN has outlived its usefulness.
    No wonder many teachers of my acquaintance call it NAPALM.
    It burns everything it touches, but especially the poor bloody kids it is supposed to help.

  13. Nob says:

    Teaching unions hate accountability.

  14. Rex Anger says:

    It burns everything it touches, but especially the poor bloody kids it is supposed to help.

    Wow- It must be Broken Clock time. Well done, Confessing Bob!

    The entire reason the Comrades did away with the results in the first place, is that it made some members of their profession look bad. Or more accurately, look as bad as they were.

    As Nob said, Teaching unions hate accountability…

  15. rickw says:

    Most of my kids and nephews and nieces have had a paid tutor at some stage because the education system is SHIT.

  16. Bruce in WA says:

    Establishing the NAPLAN was one of the finest achievements of then education minister Julia Gillard.

    Nope … it was a steaming pile of shit, which has led to far too many teachers (and whole schools) “teaching to the test”, at the expense of other areas. A pox on the whole system.

  17. Squirrel says:

    “The ban on ranking schools – demanded by state and territory education ministers under pressure from teacher unions…..”

    And there’s the nub of it, illustrating very neatly the practical wisdom of subsidiarity and the futility of federal attempts to direct and/or co-ordinate services which are much better run closer to where they are delivered.

    That’s not to deny the problems with state education systems, but federal involvement often looks like an attempt to herd cats and push water up hill (just like pumped hydro….) – no one could credibly argue that education outcomes have improved in the decades since Whitlam seriously beefed up federal involvement.

    A better federal role would be to withdraw completely from the detail and just focus on the gap between what the state education systems are producing and what the labour market needs. There would be no need for statutory authorities and a federal education department to do that.

    The response to the virus, including problems emerging with the vaccine roll-out, are highlighting similar problems with the federal role in public health.

    Lots of bureaucratic savings waiting to be made by a government which actually believes in federalism.

  18. Roger says:

    For. The. Love. Of. God.

    Those are not sentences.

    A sentence must include a subject, an object and a verb.

    Back to school for you, Professor Davidson!

    😉

  19. 1735099 says:

    futility of federal attempts to attempt and/or coordinate

    All politicians want to be seen to be “doing something about education”.
    That was the motivation for NAPLAN.
    Perhaps the “somethings” could include –
    1. Decentralisation (subsidiary does work). Schools are, or should be, communities.
    2. Changing the teacher education model so that there is a better balance between University and practicum.
    3. Using affirmative action to arrive at a better gender balance within the profession.
    4. Paying teachers what they’re worth, which is a bloody sight more than what they’re paid now. The Finnish model, where teachers are treated like royalty, applies.
    5. Fewer tests and longer recesses. Again, the Finns show us how.
    6. Removing all taxpayer funding from schools that refuse to enrol students with disabilities.
    7. Making regular parental attendance at P &C meetings a condition of enrolment.
    8. Allowing schools to set up their learning and teaching programmes without political interference of any kind. Parents would shape and guide programmes.
    9. Making physical accessibility a condition of taxpayer funding for all schools, whether private (more accurately called “subsidised schools”) or government (state) schools.
    10. Setting up a small cohort of trials of vouchers as a research project to ascertain whether it actually improves outcomes. This could operate as a ballot system, used last for the National Service scheme.
    Then stand back and light the blue touch paper…..

  20. old bloke says:

    “The ban on ranking schools – demanded by state and territory education ministers under pressure from teacher unions…..”

    It all started with the “participation trophy.”

  21. Rex Anger says:

    3. Using affirmative action to arrive at a better gender balance within the profession.

    Why do you think there are so few men left, stooge? It ain’t because of ‘swinging dicks,’ as you were honking and farting about earlier today…

    8. Allowing schools to set up their learning and teaching programmes without political interference of any kind. Parents would shape and guide programmes.

    Including from leftwit unions, bureaucrat hacks and dogooders with wheelbarrows to push, like yourself?

  22. Gorilla Dance Party says:

    ACARA isn’t even the only unelected, unaccountable body in education we’re paying for. I’m surprised at the nay-sayers in this thread; if NAPLAN wasn’t effective, the education unions wouldn’t be so hostile to it. If they have their way it will be completely meaningless in a few years. Students will still have to do it (so the bureaucrats working for NAPLAN get paid), but it won’t be useful.

  23. 1735099 says:

    Why do you think there are so few men left,

    Because of the attitudes and ignorance of the likes of you towards men who see teaching as a career. Pseudo-macho doesn’t cut it in the classroom.
    The decline is real.
    The reasons are open to debate.

  24. Albatross says:

    1735099 says:
    March 17, 2021 at 8:07 pm
    Why do you think there are so few men left,

    Because of the attitudes and ignorance of the likes of you towards men who see teaching as a career. Pseudo-macho doesn’t cut it in the classroom.

    What an estrogenic post.

  25. Cassie of Sydney says:

    “1735099 says:
    March 17, 2021 at 8:07 pm”

    Go to bed racist….you’re a fetid disgrace.

  26. Rex Anger says:

    Because of the attitudes and ignorance of the likes of you towards men who see teaching as a career. Pseudo-macho doesn’t cut it in the classroom.

    Lolwut?

    So, non-Communists, free thinkers, men of character who could conceivably be perceived as positive role models (by boys and girls alike! 😱) and anyone smarter than the Union Secretary need not apply, eh, Emasculated Bob?

  27. Rex Anger says:

    Because of the attitudes and ignorance of the likes of you towards men who see teaching as a career

    Ideologues and stooges like you ruined the teaching profession, Emasculated Bob. Not the imaginary male chauvinistas and Strawmen you conjure out of your Little Red Book of Approved Imaginations to do virtuous non-battle against…

  28. H B Bear says:

    NamBob’s other special subject.

  29. Jannie says:

    Reminds me of Outcomes Based Education in the mid 1990s. The gobbledygook in the school reports made it impossible to work out if our kids were doing well or poorly. Talking to the teachers didn’t help either, they could not explain it.

  30. Tel says:

    They don’t have anything like the power to prevent the media from publishing … although perhaps they can make the data difficult to get hold of.

    One of their listed statutory purposes is:

    publishing information relating to school education, including comparative school performance

    If ScoMo wants a quick win he could easily challenge them and then simply bring down a requirement that they do their job or get the sack. If he played his cards right, every Australian would be cheering.

  31. Sinclair Davidson says:

    … or he could tell everyone that people who defy the government get shot. In the region …but not in Australia.

  32. Tel says:

    They know exactly what is happening and they approve of it. They just won’t say tell their voters that.

    Annoyingly, you are right about that one … we have yet another test of character that ScoMo is guaranteed to fail. Let’s see if Mark Latham can wrestle an explanation out of the NSW government at least.

    Switching over to a government led by Sir Tubnrug might be a long term blessing in some ways. Better to have the lack of competence.

  33. Rebel with cause says:

    Is there any evidence that NAPLAN has improved educational outcomes? If you believe the government can’t operate schools effectively there’s very little reason to believe they are any good at designing and administering a test of educational quality.

    I’d also point out that many of the most important and valuable lessons I learnt at school, from my favourite and best teachers, would not be amenable to a test. An anecdote I know, but I believe you know a good school when you see it, not because some some government approved test tells you.

  34. Rex Anger says:

    Is there any evidence that NAPLAN has improved educational outcomes?

    It may not have, but the sheer consternation it caused the Teaching Unions and Edumashon Bureaucracies, as people voted (or tried to vote- How dare they?!) with their feet was very much worth it.

    As Nob said above, Teaching unions hate accountability.

  35. Tel says:

    Is there any evidence that NAPLAN has improved educational outcomes?

    sure our educational system has gone backwards, so have all the Western democracies … but with NAPLAN we know how quickly we are going backwards.

  36. Dot says:

    4. Paying teachers what they’re worth, which is a bloody sight more than what they’re paid now. The Finnish model, where teachers are treated like royalty, applies.

    Eddie Woo should be on $2 mn a year.

    A lot of maths teachers should be out of a job.

    The internet has made the ABC, SBS, Departments of Education etc. obsolete.

    Embrace the change. It is far more efficient and tailor made.

    The content for education for K-12 and many university level and trade disciplines is available for FREE online.

  37. roman says:

    I allege the ban on public reporting is due to the shit-show that was the forced ‘at-home learning’ during that covid-19 thing last year. To allow a comparison of grades from 2020 to years previous would probably blow peoples’ minds.

    That and English now teaches children activism. Yeronga State High School required my daughter to write (but not actually send (as far as I know)) a letter to the Prime Minister demanding action on gender equality.

  38. bespoke says:

    The Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority (ACARA) has now banned schools and the media from publishing comparisons of school performance in national literacy and numeracy tests.

    What power do they have to ban private schools and the media do so?

    Or are they just being subservient?

  39. Tintarella di Luna says:

    I’ll just put this here: words of wisdom from a person I admire greatly:

    It is hard to imagine a more stupid or more dangerous way of making decisions than by putting those decisions in the hands of people who pay no price for being wrong.

    Thomas Sowell

  40. bespoke says:

    3. Using affirmative action to arrive at a better gender balance within the profession.

    Fewer males entering the profession is due to the hostile culture and a curriculum heavy in SJW ideology.

    1. Decentralisation (subsidiary does work). Schools are, or should be, communities.

    No! Teachers should not think or be encouraged to be community leaders.

    2. Changing the teacher education model so that there is a better balance between University and practicum.

    What is that balance? Why does a high school math teacher need to do to University?

    4. Paying teachers what they’re worth, which is a bloody sight more than what they’re paid now. The Finnish model, where teachers are treated like royalty, applies.

    Are you saying they should be individually assets and payed accordingly to there performance? Mat the Finnish teachers because they serve the students and not the other way around.

    5. Fewer tests and longer recesses. Again, the Finns show us how.

    Slash all SJW curriculum.

    6. Removing all taxpayer funding from schools that refuse to enrol students with disabilities.

    Be specific. Physical disabilities can be accommodated up to a point with minimal disruptions but mental and learning disabilities are always detriment to the class.

    7. Making regular parental attendance at P &C meetings a condition of enrolment.

    Not all parents are on the same schedule as teachers. If a teacher has concerns then they are not doing there job.

    8. Allowing schools to set up their learning and teaching programmes without political interference of any kind. Parents would shape and guide programmes.

    This just mush as if you would be responsive if I asked you to just teach the basics and leave the parenting up to me.

    9. Making physical accessibility a condition of taxpayer funding for all schools, whether private (more accurately called “subsidised schools”) or government (state) schools.

    What are talking about? Ramps etc.

    10. Setting up a small cohort of trials of vouchers as a research project to ascertain whether it actually improves outcomes.

    Very good. But that would entail parents being given accurate performance ratings on schools.

  41. bespoke says:

    7. Making regular parental attendance at P &C meetings a condition of enrolment.

    T: Little Johnie was telling other kids without diesel motors his dad couldn’t produce the food you eat. So I had to discipline him.

  42. 1735099 says:

    Fewer males entering the profession is due to the hostile culture and a curriculum heavy in SJW ideology.

    The reasons for the decline in men entering the teaching profession has more to do with the attitudes demonstrated daily here than “SJW ideology”, whatever that is.

    No! Teachers should not think or be encouraged to be community leaders.

    There is a direct correlation between how teachers are regarded by their communities and great results. Refer Finland.

    What is that balance? Why does a high school math teacher need to do to University?

    For the same reasons that a primary school teacher needs to go to university. If you’re going to teach successfully, you need to have an in-depth understanding of child development. Would you go to a GP who had no knowledge of anatomy? Having said that, the time spent in practicum needs to be at least doubled, and people who are master teachers recruited by universities. These people would divide their time equally between schools and university campuses.

    Are you saying they should be individually assets and payed accordingly to there performance? Mat the Finnish teachers because they serve the students and not the other way around.

    That’s largely gibberish, but if you’re saying what I think you’re saying, find me one study – just one – which links teacher performance to salary. Teaching is a collaborative activity. As soon as you introduce this payment by performance strategy, all collaboration goes out of the window, and results falter. It’s failed everywhere it’s been tried. Teacher selection is much more relevant.

    Slash all SJW curriculum.

    Shouldn’t be difficult. There is no such curriculum.

    Be specific. Physical disabilities can be accommodated up to a point with minimal disruptions but mental and learning disabilities are always detriment to the class.

    Something like 15% of students have “mental and learning disabilities” depending on definition. Are you suggesting that they be banned from attendance? That hasn’t been the case since the 1950s. As a strategy, it was tried in Germany in the 30s.

    Not all parents are on the same schedule as teachers. If a teacher has concerns then they are not doing there (sic) job.

    Which job? Parenting or teaching?

    This just mush as if you would be responsive if I asked you to just teach the basics and leave the parenting up to me.

    Most teachers would be happy with this. Do “the basics” include content like pet care, road safety and IT? The world is a little more complex than it was when you wnt to school.

    What are talking about? Ramps etc.

    Physical accessibility is one aspect. Financial, cultural, and organisational aspects of access are just as relevant. No school should be licensed unless it is accessible to all in each of these aspects.

    Very good. But that would entail parents being given accurate performance ratings on schools.

    One problem is that school performance is related to multiple factors, and is never static. There is no such thing as a good reputation when it comes to any school. Reputations are built and demolished daily. Concepts such as school tone and flexibility are much more relevant than reputation.

    BTW, the jury is out on the benefits of a voucher system.

  43. Albatross says:

    1735099 says:
    March 18, 2021 at 7:55 am

    What a shame it is what people like you have done to the profession. Now it’s full of self-important numpties with BAs in Communist Dogma.

    you need to have an in-depth understanding of child development

    Absolute fucking SNORT!

  44. Mater says:

    Slash all SJW curriculum.

    Shouldn’t be difficult. There is no such curriculum.

    What Bullshit.
    Suggest you sit in on a few lessons. We who have children, currently at school, got to do exactly this when they were housebound recently.

    You are dribbling absolute shit. Even if you think you’re right, you are out of date.

  45. 1735099 says:

    You are dribbling absolute shit. Even if you think you’re right, you are out of date.

    Up until two years ago, I was in classrooms daily.
    I doubt that two years has made that much difference.
    And teaching about the Empire and saluting the flag went out about thirty years ago.

  46. bespoke says:

    I got the dismissive and evasive response I expected 😁.

    US parents are learning what creepy stuff the kids are being fed because they refuse to go back to work. I almost wish it was happening hear.

  47. Mater says:

    Slash all SJW curriculum.

    Shouldn’t be difficult. There is no such curriculum.

    Then:

    Up until two years ago, I was in classrooms daily.
    I doubt that two years has made that much difference.

    Reminds me of this old classic:

    There are these two young fish swimming along, and they happen to meet an older fish swimming the other way, who nods at them and says, “Morning, boys, how’s the water?” And the two young fish swim on for a bit, and then eventually one of them looks over at the other and goes, “What the hell is water?”

  48. bespoke says:

    Being told you’r inherently bad because you have the wrong skin pigment was wrong and destructive in the past and still wrong and destructive now.

  49. bespoke says:

    they (teaches unions) refuse to go back to work.

  50. Boambee John says:

    There is a direct correlation between how teachers are regarded by their communities and great results. Refer Finland.

    There is a message in that comment for the ostrich, if only he were self-aware enough to understand it.

  51. 1735099 says:

    I almost wish it was happening hear (sic).

    Nothing dismissive or evasive about that response.

  52. Rex Anger says:

    Nothing dismissive or evasive about that response.

    Of course not, Tong Zhi.

    And nothing evasive or dismissive in your honking, farting and frantic, spiteful denunciations of everyone you felt was dissing your noble profession.

    You know, the one you spent your lifetime in but never talk about, because Bob Menzies…

  53. johanna says:

    you need to have an in-depth understanding of child development

    Do these people ever listen to themselves?

    Apparently, there were never any good teachers before the pseudo-science called ‘child development’ was cooked up in the shonkier corners of academia.

    It is also the rationale for the phony credentialism which now surrounds baby-sitting, aka formal child care.

    There is a massive superstructure of well paid academics around the education industry which has to keep coming up with ‘new’ material to justify its existence. Hence the endless series of fads inflicted on pupils in the name of progress.

    Yet, kids are kids, no different than they were 100 or 1,000 years ago. And there were good teachers 100 and 1,000 years ago as well.

    Never let reality get in the way of a cushy little earner, eh?

  54. bespoke says:

    The reasons for the decline in men entering the teaching profession has more to do with the attitudes demonstrated daily here than “SJW ideology”, whatever that is.

    What “attitudes”? And how is promoting less able males over females going to help?

    There is a direct correlation between how teachers are regarded by their communities and great results. Refer Finland.

    I no it must be difficult for you to understand but titles don’t guaranty respect. The Finn’s possibly have education culture that reflects that.

    Something like 15% of students have “mental and learning disabilities” depending on definition. Are you suggesting that they be banned from attendance?

    No

    Which job? Parenting or teaching?

    The teacher after all aren’t they with the ones ‘qualified’ in child development.

    Most teachers would be happy with this. Do “the basics” include content like pet care, road safety and IT?

    No

  55. bespoke says:

    Nothing dismissive or evasive about that response.

    Thank you.

  56. bespoke says:

    The world is a little more complex than it was when you wnt to school.

    Stopped going long after you did.

  57. bespoke says:

    What use for vouchers if not for consumer choice?

  58. 1735099 says:

    What “attitudes”? And how is promoting less able males over females going to help?

    The attitude, frequently expressed here, that teaching is somehow unmanly.

    I no it must be difficult for you to understand but titles don’t guaranty respect. The Finn’s possibly have education culture that reflects that.

    They have a culture that values community. Some describe it as “socialism”. It works very well in their schooling system.

    The teacher after all aren’t they with the ones ‘qualified’ in child development.

    The child spends five hours daily with his/her teacher; nineteen hours daily with a parent.

    Most teachers would be happy with this. Do “the basics” include content like pet care, road safety and IT?

    No

    Define “the basics”.

  59. 1735099 says:

    What use for vouchers if not for consumer choice?

    Education is not a commodity subject to the vicissitudes of consumer society.
    It is a fundamental human right.

  60. bespoke says:

    Put up something intrinsic 1735099 and reply accordingly.

  61. bespoke says:

    I will reply accordingly.

  62. 1735099 says:

    Do these people ever listen to themselves?

    And do you take the time to read what you post?
    If your view of credentialism across the helping professions was to prevail we’d still be bloodletting based on the theory of four humours, teaching history by rote so that everybody conforms to one specific view of the world, and belting autistic kids to “cure” them.

    And 40% of the population would be functionally illiterate.

  63. Boambee John says:

    What percentage of the population is “functionally illiterate” now?

  64. Mater says:

    It is a fundamental human right.

    So are many of the things that you were recently cheering the government for curtailing, but don’t let hypocrisy get in your way.

  65. Albatross says:

    My position has hardened somewhat reading this thread. All current and ex-teachers ought be shot.

    Magistri delenda est

  66. Albatross says:

    And 40% of the population would be functionally illiterate.

    Hahahahahaha! Hahahahahaha! My fucking sides!

    All you’ve succeeded in demonstrating is that you’re functionally retarded. You will believe LITERALLY ANYTHING. You fucking IMBECILE!

  67. Rex Anger says:

    The attitude, frequently expressed here, that teaching is somehow unmanly.

    The specific is not the general, Chronic Logical Fallacy-Monger Bob.

    Diogenes and Arky are or have been teachers and educators. Ditto others on this site. Hell, I have been an Adult Educator and technical instructor for many years. None of them are derided as unmanly.

    We rip on you because you are an arse. And an embarrassment to any profession you lay claim to for the purposes of your leftwit virtue-signling and Class-Enemy-Bashing.

    Not because we hate teachers…

  68. Albatross says:

    Well said Rex. Perhaps my position was too extreme.

  69. Entropy says:

    To give you an idea of the bullshit that has taken over the education system, Little Miss Entropy is studying specialist maths in grade 12. Recent assignment she got all the answers right, and had detailed mathematical workings on how she arrived at the answers, including alternative proofs. However, she did not get 100 percent as she was marked down slightly as her “narrative” apparently could have been more fulsome.
    An unreconstructed hunter type focussed on the outcome would have no chance. It’s all about process and feelz.

  70. 1735099 says:

    However, she did not get 100 percent as she was marked down slightly

    There there.
    I never got 100% for anything and always was second in class by 1 mark during the four years (Grade 4 to 8) when my father was my teacher in a small bush two-teacher school.
    I got over it.
    Your daughter will too if you don’t make an issue of it.

  71. bespoke says:

    I got over it.

    🤣

  72. Entropy says:

    The dickhead doesn’t understand that maths doesn’t give a shit about the narrative, it’s either right or wrong. She made no mathematical errors, but the teachers still found a way to mark her down. Probably as they have decided the class ranking already, and they have someone else in mind for numero uno.

  73. 1735099 says:

    Probably as they have decided the class ranking already, and they have someone else in mind for numero uno.

    Parental paranoia writ large. Teachers recognise it in a heartbeat.
    It’s common in those who are disappointed in their life outcomes and seek to relive their lives through their children.
    It’s very bad for these children.

  74. Boambee John says:

    On the subject of “functional illiteracy”, does anyone (apart from the ostrich, who isn’t aware because his head is stuck in his rectum) concerned that we used to teach Latin and French in secondary school, and now teach remedial English at university?

  75. Albatross says:

    1735099 says:
    March 18, 2021 at 1:05 pm
    […]
    Parental paranoia writ large. Teachers recognise it in a heartbeat.

    Fuck me you’re a self-important bore.

  76. Boambee John says:

    Fuck me you’re a self-important bore.

    Also a pompous prat.

  77. Rex Anger says:

    It’s common in those who are disappointed in their life outcomes and seek to relive their lives through their children.
    It’s very bad for these children.

    No wonder your spawn ‘refuse’ your assistance…

  78. Farmer Gez says:

    Much of the problem in outcomes derives from the lack of assessment of individual kids.
    They’re all there to be educated but many are left behind to flounder when they could be given alternative work that will give them some skills and knowledge but not to the set standard.
    These kid’s very poor performance in standardised testing helps nobody and gives a false impression of the competence of average kids, remembering most are average.

  79. 1735099 says:

    Much of the problem in outcomes derives from the lack of assessment of individual kids.

    Depends on what you’re assessing them against.
    When the kids have severe disabilities, the most productive measure is of distance travelled, rather than a comparison with some imposed (often arbitrary) standard.
    The same principle could be applied to kids who don’t have disabilities, but there is always this obsession with “standards” which is generally meaningless.
    Summative and formative (rather than comparative) assessment is the hallmark of most successful education systems.
    Again, Finland provides an example.

  80. twostix says:

    The QLD public school system 1970-~2010 (when numbers was helping run it) was the absolute laughing stock of Australia.

    Only improving with the vast importation of southerners who blew into SE QLD during the late ’90’s – 2000’s, put their kids in school and immediately all died of shock and embarrassment.

    A QLD public school administrator from that exact time, is probably not the best person to be pontificating about this stuff.

  81. Rex Anger says:

    but there is always this obsession with “standards” which is generally meaningless.

    Bob, what was I saying before about The specific is not the general, Chronic Logical Fallacy-Monger Bob?

    Just because you do not like any form of accountability that might make your co-ideologists look bad, does not mean that any form of accountability is fundamentally wrong.

    Having said this, you have proven remarkably impervious to any reality that might disturb your life-Narrative, so I’m writing this for an audience…

  82. 1735099 says:

    Only improving with the vast importation of southerners who blew into SE QLD during the late ’90’s – 2000’s, put their kids in school and immediately all died of shock and embarrassment.

    Many of those southerners were Victorian teachers who were laid off when Kennett flensed the Victorian Education system.
    As far as I know (and I worked with a few of them) there were no fatalities due to shock and embarrassment in that cohort.
    Twostix doesn’t know what he’s talking about.

  83. Rex Anger says:

    Twostix doesn’t know what he’s talking about.

    You’re so cute when you buck like a stung horse, Consternation Bob…

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