What was that about RE getting cheaper all the time?

A bit of a jolt from Tesla.

Elon Musk’s 2019 proclamation that Tesla’s integrated solar roof would grow “like kelp on steroids” is looking more optimistic than ever this week, with reports emerging in the US that the company has jacked up the price of the integrated PV tiles in its home market – and not just for new customers.

US Tesla customers have told various sources over the past few weeks about drastic and unexpected price increases on existing Solar Roof orders, adding between $SU20,000 and $30,000 to the cost of installation – an eye-watering extra hit that appears to come down to a combination of increased component costs and increased cost of installation.

The unceremonious price hike adds a new chapter to the troubled history of Tesla’s solar roof, which has been taking two steps forward and three steps back since its inception in 2016.

As One Step has reported, in Australia, the product is nowhere to be seen, despite having opened to orders – with a $1000 deposit – over a year ago. In response to an inquiry through the Tesla Australia website, One Step was told that the Solar Roof could still be 12 to 24 months away from being available.

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8 Responses to What was that about RE getting cheaper all the time?

  1. Jock says:

    A friend was telling me about his local club. Its very successful and its managed very well. But they put hundreds of solar panels on the roof a few years ago to save on electricity. However they now need to replace the substantial roof. And guess what? The cost of taking the panels down and then putting them back up is very very expensive. I suspect the supposed savings made will be gone very quickly and then some. I asked him whether the club had made provisions for getting rid of them. Chirrups! Without the subsidies they would never have been purchased.

  2. exsteelworker says:

    Wait until the bill comes in when its time to get rid of your old solar panels. Fee for tyre’s is $5 bucks each. Can anyone guess how much the solar panel disposal fee will be. Im guessing about $1000 plus per panel easy. Renewables will be the new asbestos of the future.

  3. Entropy says:

    Wouldn’t it be cheaper to integrate a bunch of solar panels into a colourbond sheet? It would certainly lower the install cost, although it would weigh a bit.

  4. Snoopy says:

    Elon Musk’s 2019 proclamation that Tesla’s integrated solar roof would grow “like kelp on steroids” is looking more optimistic than ever this week, with reports emerging in the US that the company has jacked up the price of the integrated PV tiles in its home market – and not just for new customers.

    Until this is confirmed by reneweconomy.com.au I won’t believe it. Sorry.

  5. Squirrel says:

    This wonderfully inconvenient truth will, of course, be completely ignored by the MSM.

  6. Rockdoctor says:

    exsteel worker, I’d say there’ll be a lot of fly tipping as well.

  7. RobK says:

    Entropy,
    Wouldn’t it be cheaper to integrate a bunch of solar panels into a colourbond sheet?
    Most colourbond has an anti-condensation blanket under it so there’s little cooling. The corrugations orientation is also an issue. I think Musks roof tiles still need a bit of work in the design department.
    In the US thinfilm PV coating on windows is pretty popular.

  8. Brian Taylor says:

    What a joke! Solar roof tiles? Yeah right. Every other company that has tried them has stopped trying them. Some reasons:
    1. The entire roof has to be wired so that the tiles can be plugged in. This raises concerns for water egress, corrosion, fires from electrical shorts, etc.
    2. Current roofs allow for considerable movement in rafters, tiles, battens, mounting points, etc. Glass tiles on glass tiles won’t be so tolerant of deviations.
    3. Glass tiles are incredibly slippery. An installer who slips will invariably break tiles.
    4. Roof tilers can throw tiles from the ground to catchers on the roof. The expense of handling solar tiles onto a roof won’t be minuscule.
    5. Will probably be able to identify bad solar tiles with an IR camera, but try changing out one or two tiles on a slippery roof.
    6. When installers put on a concrete or clay tile roof, they stack tiles in small lots in advance. Unlikely they’ll be able to do this with glass tiles.

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