Andrew Peacock, 1939-2021

How strange that I should have mentioned him in a post yesterday. I always liked him.

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30 Responses to Andrew Peacock, 1939-2021

  1. Lazlo says:

    Previously posted on the OT:

    Andrew Peacock was Minister for Foreign Affairs in the Fraser Government. He dated Shirley MacLean.

    Shirley MacLean: “I’ll give him a foreign affair he will never forget”. Vale.

  2. FlyingPigs says:

    C.L.

    He might have been a ‘good bloke’ but he was elected at the age of 27! The poor bastard.

    Filth like Turbutt probably think they carry the torch for Peacock when in actual fact he was far better than all of them.

    And didn’t trouserless Fraser and little mad Johnny hate him so.

    Vale Andrew.

  3. Rex Mango says:

    Only thing I know about Peacock, besides that telephone call with Kennett, was he was the go to man on ABC RN for Melbourne Cup tips. He knows his horses & regularly got them home.

  4. Rex Mango says:

    Ok, rereading this seems Peacock no more. He did offer the punter a lot of worthwhile investment advice on the first Tuesday in November.

  5. Ozman says:

    Andrew and his wife Susan were part leasees in the Bart Cummings trained Leilani, which after running second in the Melbourne Cup, won the 1974 Mackinnon Stakes held on the last day of the Carnival, as odds on favorite. The daily double won by Leilani and another favorite paid less than $4.00.

    Not long after, Peacock’s wife, Susan, hooked up with Robert Sangster, who ran the British Football Pools, which made me think less of her.

    As CL infers, Andrew Peacock was a likable fellow. Rather oddly, during his election campaign for Prime Minister, as leader of the opposition, I remember him more for his frequent, “I said it before, and I will say it again.” Vale.

  6. Petros says:

    Given the current bunch of ratbags, Peacock looks like a true statesman in hindsight.

  7. miltonf says:

    I always preferred Howard but in retrospect maybe I was wrong. Peacock was treated very badly by the meja (par for the course) during the Hawke era. Got put thru the wringer for telling the truth. Also remember Kelly ‘Peacock a danger in the lodge’.

  8. miltonf says:

    I always detested Hawke. His tariff cuts in the early 90s hurt many decent working people. Up the workers. Not.

  9. Up The Workers! says:

    Susan Rossiter-Peacock-Sangster-Renouf…

    Her pen would frequently run out of ink before she finished signing her name.

    I wonder how much she made every month out of the alimony payments she got.

  10. Bad Samaritan says:

    Peacock coulda been a champion, but the giant of Aussie politics got the chocolates instead, even with a triple bypass. Sure Andrew was a silvertail defeated by the most working-class Lib leader ever, but he still had a certain charm. Sure he lead the Libs to crushing defeats while the Titan of Bennelong strolled it in 4 times in a row, but Andrew still seemed OK.

    Winners are grinners and the losers can please ’emselves, eh what?

    BTW: I can’t hold his rabid support for John Hewson against him. Birds of a feather and two peas in a ,,,,,etc. Vale AP.

  11. miltonf says:

    The visiting professor ha ha

  12. Dot says:

    miltonf says:
    April 17, 2021 at 7:51 am
    I always detested Hawke. His tariff cuts in the early 90s hurt many decent working people. Up the workers. Not.

    Which then led to a massive inflow of FDI. Why should workers, or potential workers in every other industry be beholden to workers in PMV & TCF…in jobs that actually paid like crap?

    The unemployment rate went down from 1982 to 1990, with rising population and immigration.

    The idea that we were better off under Fraser in 1982 before the not really true “recession we had to have” is absurd.

    The idea we could just subsidise Holden, Mitsubishi and Pacific Brands and thereby society generally into an economic golden age is poisonous.

  13. miltonf says:

    The idea we could just subsidise Holden, Mitsubishi and Pacific Brands and thereby society generally into an economic golden age is poisonous.

    You live in a world of glossy textbooks.

  14. miltonf says:

    You don’t like people actually making stuff do you.

  15. yackman says:

    The Kooyong by election launch in 1966 was held in the Kew Civic Centre. The first Military Service Ballots had been held in 1965 so the atmosphere was a bit tense. Voting age of course was still 21. Andrew was on the stage with Susan, John Rossiter, Harold Holt and John Gorton. Andrew Peacock was asked why as a man of military age he was not joining up if he was so convinced about the need. The answer as I recall was to the effect that there were “other ways to serve your country”. Didnt go down well with some of us.
    Some years later when Minister for the Army, Andrew Peacock came to speak to quite a small group (10) about politics. Not too many Ministers would have bothered, particularly with a primary vote around 60% plus.

  16. Roger W says:

    You are right, Dot.
    In addition, maybe he was a nice bloke privately, but I remember Peacock arrogantly (or through ignorance?) repeatedly not bothering to reply to/debate Hawke in at least one election debate. He always acted as if he was entitled to be PM. Not a good look.

  17. Bad Samaritan says:

    miltonf (9.o7am) It depends on how the subsidy is applied, and also on how the money for the subsidy is raised.

    A subsidy to the buyer / consumer (see current housing grants etc) creates demand for the product, while a subsidy to the producer only incentivises producing stuff that may not ever be demanded (see the car industry).

    In simple terms….Buy a certain model of Aussie-produced vehicle and get say $5000 back. This means that the pressure to make a good car is still there since the sale depends upon it.

    Also, any borrowings to finance govt deficit budgets caused by spending too much must be according to MMT (Modern Monetary Theory, or else Magic Money Tree): govt borrows from the central bank only, which can later become a forgiven debt (cancelled).

    Anyhow. You are correct.

  18. John64 says:

    One of the memorable moments of the Norman Gunston Show had Gunston interviewing Shirley MacLaine when Peacock emerged from the bathroom wearing nothing but a robe, walked up with a smile and shook Gunston’s hand. I’m pretty sure he was still married to Susan at the time.

  19. miltonf says:

    Also, any borrowings to finance govt deficit budgets caused by spending too much must be according to MMT (Modern Monetary Theory, or else Magic Money Tree): govt borrows from the central bank only, which can later become a forgiven debt (cancelled).

    Yes fiscal discipline seems to be been flushed down the toilet. Weimar and Zimbabwe here we come. MMT is the intellectual justification for this. Is it by design?

  20. miltonf says:

    *seems to be have been flushed down the toilet

  21. Bad Samaritan says:

    miltonf (12.48pm) The Oz economy is now in boom phase. The dollar is very strong, while interest rates are at zero or thereabouts. The shops are full of both goods and shoppers. Unemployment is very low, and falling. Consumer prices are also static or falling

    All this is the direct opposite to what everyone (except me, of course) predicted a year ago. It is also the direct opposite to what every classic / neo-classic economist and follower theorises should happen with money printing.

    About 5 years ago I started looking at what was wrong with the usual interpretations and predictions based on various theories: took the analytical, rather than ideological or dogmatic, approach.

    Fiscal discipline has not been flushed down the toilet. The Oz Govt is one of the most fiscally responsible govts in the world. See the cutting of Jobseeker and axing of Jobkeeper despite the squealing.

    An analogy: you break your leg whilst out bush and have only heroin as a painkiller. You use it and splint your leg, and keep using it for two weeks as you hobble the 50 kilometres to safety. Then you give it up, or greatly reduce the dosage, and then recover. Sure, heroin-taking is a bad thing, but the resultant non-addiction and return / near return to reasonable health with few side-effects is worth breaking the rule against it…..for a while.

    BTW: In the US we are seeing a potential addiction to unlimited stimulus / money printing., just beginning. The key to containing inflation is in the average person (the market) knowing that money-printing is limited

  22. 1735099 says:

    Perhaps the greatest significance around Peacock’s death is to note that he was the last survivor of the second Gorton Ministry, the cabal that sent conscripts to Vietnam in peacetime to fight Vietnamese people on their own soil in a civil war.

    I can forgive him for that, although given his flight to the USA in 1996, and the fact that he spent most of the rest of his life there, he may have never have forgiven himself.
    Like many in that cabinet, he grew to regret many of the decisions made in the Vietnam era.

    May he rest in peace…..

  23. Miltonf says:

    Interesting perspective BSam. Question is why haven’t we seen 70s levels of inflation? Or why did we have it in the 70s?

  24. Cassie of Sydney says:

    “although given his flight to the USA in 1996, and the fact that he spent most of the rest of his life there, he may have never have forgiven himself.”

    What flight? More codswallop from the racist. Andrew Peacock was appointed Australian Ambassador to the US by John Howard in 1996. He married an American woman in 2002…..Penne Korth…..herself once a diplomat…and only then did he spend most of his time there.

  25. Squirrel says:

    AP’s 1981 revival of “manic determination to get his own way” made for one of the more entertaining leadership challenges.

  26. John A says:

    Miltonf says: April 17, 2021, at 4:32 pm

    Interesting perspective BSam. Question is why haven’t we seen 70s levels of inflation? Or why did we have it in the 70s?

    Inflation has moved into assets. Why are houses “worth” a million now when they were bought for under 50K in the 70s? Where is the stock market compared to the 70s?

    Yes, the ASX is a more complex matter but houses and land have not expanded thirty times in terms of content and features from the 70s to now. We still get paved roads, all services (telephone is called NBN now, of course) and minimal public transport.

  27. Notafan says:

    What flights of fancy from mr lived history

  28. Rex Anger says:

    Codswalloper Bob forgets that if you haven’t something nice to say about someone, best not to say it at all.

    But Codswalloper Bob is afflicted with terminal cases of both Narcissism and Ideology, so expelling him is about the only practical solution.

    Sorry Cats…

    Vale and RIP Andrew Peacock.

  29. Geriatric Mayfly says:

    Was my local Member. Telegrammed him once on a matter involving family and immigration. Was ushered into his office in Treasury Pl. within the week. No airs and graces, trying his best to help.

  30. miltonf says:

    Good points JohnA- thanks

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