Open Forum: April 17, 2021

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4,036 Responses to Open Forum: April 17, 2021

  1. thefrollickingmole says:

    Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare in action, 2020, colourised.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mXnJqYwebF8

  2. MatrixTransform says:

    Many believe, as I do, that these policies will ultimately destroy what was until recently, a wonderful educational institution. But as I am sure will come as no surprise to you, given the insidious cancel culture that has of late permeated our society, most parents are too fearful to speak up.

    read this letter

  3. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare says:

    The initiative offers grants between $25,000 and $480,000 for female-founded startups to expand into domestic and global markets, as well as providing expert mentoring and advice to meritorious applicants.

    Gentlemen, be nice to your sisters. They can be the financing front for your great new idea, and you can sew up the legals to suit for later.

  4. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare says:

    Or, of course, your wives.

    Wives are women too. 🙂

  5. custard says:

    It’s the 100th day of the military occupation of Washington DC and 88 days since Joe Biden held an unaccompanied press conference.
    On Tuesday (our time) Mike Lindell will be releasing his new documentary Absolute Interference and his new social media platform called Frank.
    http://www.frankspeech.com

  6. Knuckle Dragger says:

    ‘A physical illness being manufactured rather than have him dodder on out.’

    I think he mentioned at some point ‘getting some disease’ and letting the mattress auditioner Harris have a go should there be too many arguments, or if it all got a bit too much.

    I am unsure if Biden’s handlers share that point of view.

  7. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare says:

    I wonder if they will have rules about not funding any female who is a family member. Hard to see how that could work under equity provisions. Some men may not get on well with their sisters. Oh, and I forgot all about daughters.

    Or girlfriends (more of a risk there maybe? Like ex-wives).

  8. Knuckle Dragger says:

    ‘The initiative offers grants between $25,000 and $480,000 for female-founded startups’

    That’s how yoga pants kicked off.

  9. MatrixTransform says:

    Like ex-wives

    hmm, get a business grant to carve up you Ex-husband’s business

    sounds legit

  10. Albatross says:

    MatrixTransform says:
    April 18, 2021 at 9:24 am

    Good read MT.

  11. feelthebern says:

    I don’t get this Mokbel situation.
    He gets a retrial, wtf.

    Anyone who’s convictions are in anyway related to Gobbo should be released, convictions expunged & a compensation plan put in place.

    Then VicPol & the state can start from scratch.
    They don’t get a do over after they’ve been found to be so thoroughly corrupt.

  12. Nick says:

    Only an hour or so before Wallis Markle releases a comment about ‘her anguish’

  13. thefrollickingmole says:

    feelthebern

    If they dont do a retrial how much is fat Tony up for in compo?

    Note this is 100% not a defense of Vicpol, but an observation.

    He did his stretch, had most of his findable possessions confiscated etc.
    At this stage hes considered ass innocent as Pell
    Then there is the dozens/hundreds of other cases touched in the same way.

  14. feelthebern says:

    Then there is the dozens/hundreds of other cases touched in the same way.

    Every single one of them should have been released over 12 months ago.

  15. H B Bear says:

    The rule of law in Victoriastan died some time ago. No one seems to have noticed – or care.

  16. thefrollickingmole says:

    Every single one of them should have been released over 12 months ago.

    I agree, there cant be any “we cheated but we promise we will do it properly this time”for the plod.

    And more relevantly there should be a number of new occupants of vacated cells, anyone who signed off on this and knowingly secured a conviction using tainted evidence.
    Planet Cornelius, prosecutors, judges (if any did), pollies, all need to go to jail for at least conspiracy to pervert justice.

    https://www.criminal-lawyers.com.au/offences/perverting-course-of-justice

    Elements – Perverting the Course of Justice

    ‘Perverting the course of justice’ has the following elements:

    A course of justice has begun;
    The accused engaged in conduct which did pervert the course of justice;
    The accused intended for that conduct to pervert the course of justice.

    Element 1: A course of justice has begun
    A course of justice begins when a court or judicial body’s jurisdiction is invoked.3 Police investigations of an offence are not part of the ‘course of justice’ because it is the courts, not the police, that administer justice.4

    In a criminal proceeding, the court’s jurisdiction is not invoked until the filing of a charge sheet, a direct indictment or a direction to be tried for perjury.5 When one of these three things have occurred, a judicial proceeding will be on foot and the first element of the offence will be satisfied.

    In contrast, the offence of ‘attempting to pervert the course of justice’ may occur due to conduct that takes place before the initiation of court proceedings.6 Frustrating a police investigation before the instigation of court proceedings may result in a successful prosecution of ‘attempting to pervert the course of justice’ but not ‘perverting the course of justice’.7

    Element 2: The accused engaged in conduct that did pervert the course of justice
    The course of justice is the exercise of a court or judicial authority of its jurisdiction to enforce, adjust or declare the rights and liabilities of a party to a proceeding.8 The perversion of a course of justice occurs when an accused impairs, obstructs, adversely interferes or prevents the court from administering justice.9

    Ways in which an accused can pervert justice include (but are not limited to)10:

    Erosion of the integrity of the court or competent judicial authority; or
    Hindering access to the court or competent judicial authority; or
    Deflecting applications that would be made to the court or competent judicial authority; or
    Denying the court or competent judicial authority knowledge of relevant law; or
    Denying the court or competent judicial authority knowledge of the true circumstances and facts of the case; or
    Impeding the free exercise of the jurisdiction and power of the court or competent judicial authority including the power to execute its decisions.
    To satisfy the second element of this offence, the prosecution must prove that accused’s conduct has resulted in the perversion of justice.

    Element 3: The accused intended for that conduct to pervert the course of justice
    To satisfy the final element of the offence, the prosecution must prove that the accused deliberately engaged in conduct for a purpose that would pervert the course of justice, if the accused’s carried out their purpose successfully.11

    This element of the offence can be satisfied even if the accused does not have the concepts of ‘course of justice’ or ‘perversion’ in mind when they engage in their conduct.12 For example, an accused might intend to intimidate a person into pleading guilty without having in mind that this will pervert the course of justice. If the accused is successful in intimidating a person into pleading guilty, then they will satisfy the third element of the offence even though they did not have in mind that they were perverting the course of justice.

    “Can they prove that you intended to pervert the course of justice?”

  17. Black Ball says:

    Piers Akerman:

    As we remember Prince Philip, Carla Zampatti, Tommy Raudonikis and Andrew Peacock among the more notable to have died within days, there is a noteworthy link which ties them — none of them were snowflakes.

    None of them were whiners, whingers or bludgers.

    They were all outstanding individuals who suffered the slings and arrows of outrageous fortune pondered by Hamlet, and each in their own way rose above and conquered the disadvantages fate dealt them.

  18. Black Ball says:

    What a contrast between the manner in which they boldly approached life and overcame the challenges they faced and the manner in which so many of the Millennial generation volunteer to display their appalling weaknesses in the sewer of social media today.

    Members of Philip’s family were assassinated and his mother placed in an asylum suffering from severe depression. He was stateless and assisted to attend school in the UK by a sister, Cecilie, the only one of his four sisters not to marry a Nazi.

    Aged 18 in 1939, Prince Philip was serving as a midshipman on the battleship HMS Ramillies when he made the first of more than 20 visits to Australia.

    He served throughout the war with bravery and distinction, and barely out of his teens married the young Princess Elizabeth and surrendered a promising naval career to be her husband, companion and counsel.

    More than 775,000 young Australians have participated in the Duke of Edinburgh Award he established nearly 60 years ago.

  19. Black Ball says:

    Nine-year-old Carla Zampatti arrived in the Western Australian gold mining town of Bullfinch from northern Italy in 1950 unable to speak English, in a period when migrants were called New Australians. It was not a derogatory term or any sort of approbation, but a signifier of the genuine willingness of our young nation to accept those who were prepared to accept our way of life.

    There were not the abundant handouts now available to migrants, none of the resources and counselling on tap today were thought necessary, and from this outpost the determined young girl set her sights on fashion design and went on to build a much admired label and a hugely admired business career.

    The same year she landed on a migrant ship at Fremantle, young Tommy Raudonikis was born in Bathurst, the son of a Lithuanian immigrant father and Swiss immigrant mother. He became a true legend in the ranks of rugby league’s greats.

  20. Black Ball says:

    Prince Philip, Carla Zampatti and Tommy Raudonikis all knew what it was to be different within a prevailing culture, and each overcame the strangeness and embraced their new nations, becoming huge influences on the lives of others.

    Andrew Peacock, by comparison, was born into a successful Melbourne family and didn’t have to struggle as a child, but he chose a career in the very willing world of politics, and fought and lost his first campaign for the seat of Yarra in 1961 — though he did buck the national trend by increasing the Liberal primary vote.

    In 1966 he won Kooyong in the by-election brought on by Sir Robert Menzies’ resignation, and went on to have a long and varied political career — though not all easy by any means.

    He was twice Liberal Party leader in opposition, never an easy task, and doubly difficult when faced with a popular Prime Minister like Labor’s Bob Hawke.

  21. Black Ball says:

    But it is the measure of the man that Peacock didn’t give up politics after losing the 1991 election. He held various shadow portfolios until he was offered the role of deputy to possibly the weakest Liberal leader, John Hewson, and quit but didn’t complain.

    The old saw has it that wealth is created by the first generation, enjoyed by the second and squandered by the third. It would seem that the immigrant experience follows the same trajectory.

  22. Black Ball says:

    Those who came to Australia from other nations until recently sought opportunities and didn’t need handouts. Their children enjoyed the comforts their parents provided through their hard work, and the third generation seems less inclined to put in the hard yakka and more inclined to see what they can get from governments increasingly eager to buy votes.

    As we lose the leaders of the generation that gave us these individuals, we are at risk of losing a critical institutional and cultural memory.

  23. Dot says:

    Ah yes, good morning JC, good morning TonyN.

  24. H B Bear says:

    I’m not sure I would be happy as having helped shape the modern Lieboral Party described as my legacy.

  25. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha says:

    The old saw has it that wealth is created by the first generation, enjoyed by the second and squandered by the third

    Not an uncommon situation in farming families.

  26. thefrollickingmole says:

    Wangmaths everyone.

    The tachers know whats what!

    https://twitter.com/rweingarten/status/1383187926616530946

  27. Dot says:

    As I was too young to vote, I looked at Peacock’s 1987 policies.

    Pretty insipid. If only he, who was more media savvy, came in with Fightback! from the 1983 election.

  28. Dot says:

    Strange

    After All Shittian software was sledged here, a high level exec. from Mr Wife Swapping Isle had viewed my abandoned LinkedIn profile.

    All our base are belong to them?

  29. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha says:

    Pretty insipid. If only he, who was more media savvy, came in with Fightback! from the 1983 election.

    The whole irony of “Fightback” was that Paul Keating had supported a consumption tax, as part of a tax reform package being promoted in the late 1980’s. He was pulled into line by the A.C.T.U. Why he was never called to account for his previous support of a consumption tax, during the 1993 campaign, is a question that was never asked.

  30. Leigh Lowe says:

    thefrollickingmole says:

    April 18, 2021 at 9:41 am

    feelthebern

    If they dont do a retrial how much is fat Tony up for in compo?

    OK.
    So the appeal court have sent him back for re-trial.
    The DPP has immediately elected not to proceed with a second trial, as he has already served the sentence for that conviction.
    How very convenient.
    To get compo for that one he has to mount a case to show that he would not have been convicted, not simply point to a successful appeal or an acquittal at a second trial.
    The Club is working as intended.

  31. thefrollickingmole says:

    Find a nice girl they said.
    Settle down they said.
    Work hard they said.

    https://nypost.com/2021/04/14/onlyfans-covid-19-pandemic-have-spurred-a-new-sexual-revolution/
    Since the lockdown, OnlyFans reported a spike of 7.5 million users in November 2019 to 85 million in December 2020. The Guardian Australia reported that OnlyFans now claims 85 million global users with a 2020 payout of $2.7 billion to its content creators. As the Guardian put it, “Everyone and their mum is on it.”

    And here we have the epitaph of the civilized world.

    “OnlyFans and cam girls can only be seen as a good thing,” Adshade says. “If someone is a sex worker of their own accord — I see no downsides to this.”

    Kipling gunna Kipple.

    On the first Feminian Sandstones we were promised the Fuller Life
    (Which started by loving our neighbour and ended by loving his wife)
    Till our women had no more children and the men lost reason and faith,
    And the Gods of the Copybook Headings said: “The Wages of Sin is Death.”

  32. 1735099 says:

    Peacock’s passing is especially significant in that he was the last surviving member of Gorton’s second ministry.
    He wasn’t part of Menzies’ cabal that made those decisions fatal to 500 Australians (200 of them conscripts) killed fighting Vietnamese in their own country but went along with those failed policies long after the writing was on the wall in 1968.
    He can be forgiven for that. He was young and ambitious.
    His commentary on Vietnam was conspicuous by its absence after 1975.

  33. thefrollickingmole says:

    Fuck off wang.
    Your monomania is a sign of mental illness.

  34. Knuckle Dragger says:

    mole, 9.59:

    Lotta grey areas involved with pervert and attempt to pervert the course of justice, most of which involve whether the perversion of justice actually occurred.

    With Mokbel et al, there was probably enough untainted evidence to get them over the line or at least have a decent crack at it at their drug trials without the improperly obtained material. Hitting them with pervert the course of justice would result in months, if not years of coloured legal argument ending in nothing but legal bills from silks.

    I’d smack Overland, Nixon, Cornelius and Pope (and Sheridan, of Pell infamy) right in the nuts with perjury. It’s a relevant offence when giving evidence to Royal Commissions, and although you need to prove that a) the information given was demonstrably false and b) that the person giving the evidence knew that information to be false, these cockheads’ overt acts and denials should be well and truly enough to get over the line. 15 years, it’s got attached to it.

    Overland’s ‘I didn’t take or keep notes or diaries for years’ followed by the production of those diaries from an archive shed in Laverton, followed by ‘Oh, they’re not diaries. They’re journals’ is enough. It really is enough for perjury.

    All it needed was a recommendation from the Commissioners and political will to pursue it. Obviously, there was neither.

  35. Dot says:

    If there was a way to data scrape all western women who were either on OnlySimps or SugarBaby websites….

    Half of the population between 18 to 45 (child bearing, very generously) in the West is how many persons?

    Now take into account morbid obesity and/or mental illness.

    ((Not to mention “dating apps” (yes I am old fashioned and it means I will probably never get married).))

    Sorry I am not interested.

  36. Knuckle Dragger says:

    ‘Peacock’s passing is especially significant in that he was the last surviving member of [John McBain’s] second ministry.’

    Cut and paste or cockup? Who knows?

  37. Arky says:

    And the Gods of the Copybook Headings said: “The Wages of Sin is Death.”

    ..
    The entire ideology is a death cult.
    Celebrating the destruction of family, masking more and more children easy pickings for the next iteration of “liberation”.
    ..
    Consider an ordinary business: it has suppliers and it has customers. Imagine a business model that turns it’s suppliers into customers, and makes money at both ends.
    Which, with the selling of baby parts, is what the abortionists do.

  38. Arky says:

    making not masking

  39. Dot says:

    Oh no! Australia fought the most evil political regime in human history and we won!

    Wang…”does that mean I support the baddies?”

  40. Knuckle Dragger says:

    ‘If there was a way to data scrape all western women who were either on OnlySimps or SugarBaby websites….’

    Mel Greig then. Yes please.

    Oh wait. Yerg. Bingo Wings Greig will have nobody to watch her masticate buffalo wings with extra ranch for the next 40 years.

  41. thefrollickingmole says:

    Lotta grey areas involved with pervert and attempt to pervert the course of justice, most of which involve whether the perversion of justice actually occurred.

    I vote making the process part of the punishment.
    If the government didnt condone these actions then there is no responsibility for the state to pick up the tab.
    If they did condone it then they can join in having their dedicates dipped in molten lead at their own expense.

    Heads on Pikes, or the rule of law means nothing.
    I want most of those involved driven into penury and dying with investigations still ongoing 15 years later.

  42. Nick says:

    OnlyFans and cam girls can only be seen as a good thing,” Adshade says. “If someone is a sex worker of their own accord — I see no downsides to this.”

    Give it five minutes and there will be whining about them being victims and that they didn’t know what they were doing

  43. stackja says:

    USA PP fighting for baby body parts industry in USA courts. Comma LA helping USA PP.

  44. Dot says:

    Just wait until some blue pill simp gets sued or prosecuted for being a part piggy. Or it forms part of a Kennon adjustment in a court ordered divorce settlement.

  45. Knuckle Dragger says:

    ‘I vote making the process part of the punishment.’

    They could have had both with perjury beefs. Nobody pulled the trigger on it.

  46. Black Ball says:

    Others have noted the appalling display of the ladies’ football showpiece event. On a perfect day conducive to high scoring. Such mediocrity of course immortalised in stone. Get a load of the 2021 numbers.

  47. Dot says:

    PAY

    PIGGY

    FFS, autocorrect.

  48. Knuckle Dragger says:

    Tayla Harris, R9 2021.

    Kicks – 1. Handballs – 1. Marks – 0.

    Stunning and brave. Someone pay her a million a year for nine years.

  49. thefrollickingmole says:

    If there was a way to data scrape all western women who were either on OnlySimps or SugarBaby websites….

    It was done, then banned/brought out/ never to be spoken of again..

    Only wealthy and powerful people should be able to find out if their prospective wife was a THOT or e-whore.

    The guy who made a tool to track women in porn videos is sorry
    The programmer supposedly used face recognition to match social-media photos with images from porn sites. Collecting that data would have been illegal in some countries but not others.

    Still, the technology is possible and would have had awful consequences. “It’s going to kill people,” says Carrie A. Goldberg, an attorney who specializes in sexual privacy violations and author of the forthcoming book Nobody’s Victim: Fighting Psychos, Stalkers, Pervs, and Trolls. “Some of my most viciously harassed clients have been people who did porn, oftentimes one time in their life and sometimes nonconsensually [because] they were duped into it. Their lives have been ruined because there’s this whole culture of incels that for a hobby expose women who’ve done porn and post about them online and dox them.” (Incels, or “involuntary celibates,” are a misogynistic online subculture of men who claim they are denied sex by women.)

    The European Union’s GDPR privacy law prevents this kind of situation. Though the programmer—who posted about the project on the Chinese social network Weibo—originally insisted everything was fine because he didn’t make the information public, just collecting the data is illegal if the women didn’t consent, according to Börge Seeger, a data protection expert and partner at German law firm Neuwerk. These laws apply to any information from EU residents, so they would have held even if the programmer weren’t living in the EU.

  50. H B Bear says:

    Option C

    I was taking a gap year on my Old Man’s station near Port Hedland. I would listen to PM on a portable radio sitting by the fire under a 44 gallon hot water system waiting for the water to get hot enough to take a shower.

  51. Nick says:

    How did the Swans lose yesterday?

  52. Dot says:

    HMMM YES.

    “You want a wife who was never a sex worker – you evil, hypermasculine…..INCEL!”

    😅😂🤣

    Good lord what a load of crap.

  53. thefrollickingmole says:

    Dot

    But its just what an evvvvil partiarchymanbearpig society would do, pass a law banning blokes from finding out anything about their partners e-thot life.

  54. Bruce of Newcastle says:

    The guy who made a tool to track women in porn videos is sorry

    Sorry, n, feeling like a dinosaur caught under a 10 km asteroid. There are grades of ‘sorry’, and I think he has a very real claim to the topmost ranking.

  55. Knuckle Dragger says:

    ‘But its just what an evvvvil partiarchymanbearpig society would do, pass a law banning blokes from finding out anything about their partners e-thot life.’

    Steady on you blokes.

    It is natural justice that the entire country knows Christian Porter got a root in 1988.

  56. Knuckle Dragger says:

    On this day in 1938, Superman made his debut in Action Comics #1.

    Probably an incel.

  57. Tailgunner says:

    ((Not to mention “dating apps” (yes I am old fashioned and it means I will probably never get married).
    OK, Boomer

  58. Bruce of Newcastle says:

    The entire ideology is a death cult.

    Which, with the selling of baby parts, is what the abortionists do.

    Yep, and Democrats just love doing the latter.

    Federal Officials Reverse Limits on Fetal Tissue Research (16 Apr)

    Federal officials on Friday reversed Trump administration restrictions on using human fetal tissue for medical research.

    Government scientists now will be able to resume research that uses tissue from elective abortions. Scientists at universities also can now apply for federal grants without getting approval from a special ethics panel for any such work.

    Health and Human Services Secretary Xavier Becerra determined there were “no new ethical issues that require special review,” so the agency will return to using procedures that had been in place for decades before then-President Donald Trump’s administration changed the policy in June 2019, a statement from the agency said.

    I wonder if Mr Becerra is related to a guy called Mengele?

  59. Tailgunner says:

    Is a chicky that was an online femdom acceptable?
    Asking for a hopeful friend…
    The irony is too tempting to pass up. Plus, hottie.

  60. thefrollickingmole says:

    On this day in 1938, Superman made his debut in Action Comics #1.

    Probably an incel.

    They never mention lex Luthors most successful and cunning plan.

    Putting a bit of kryptonite in Supermans ‘hand lotion”jar.
    Tore the bloody head off on the vinegar strokes.

  61. dover_beach says:

    From mole’s link, Today in Liberalism:

    “OnlyFans is no different than the [old-fashioned] peep shows,” says Marina Adshade, a professor specializing in the economics of sex and love. But with peep shows, there were still owners, typically men, who controlled hiring, salaries, frequency of work and work hours, to say nothing of the abysmal sanitary conditions.

    Can you imagine any sex worker in 2021, liberated by modern technology, putting up with any of that?

    “OnlyFans and cam girls can only be seen as a good thing,” Adshade says. “If someone is a sex worker of their own accord — I see no downsides to this.”

  62. Tailgunner says:

    Watching the Imola GP qualifying replay.
    Hamilton not in a fiery bingle yet.
    But it’s only Q1.
    Where’s an F1 Robbie Muir when you need one?

  63. Tailgunner says:

    An old flame of mine made a Mirza as a cam girl.
    She was a vet nurse when I knew her!
    BlueXStacey for those with internet access.
    😃😎

  64. Tailgunner says:

    Mirza? Miata?
    Motza!

  65. Bruce of Newcastle says:

    OK, Boomer

    Gunner – Careful, son, make sure you check for hidden cameras. A dating app is how Project Veritas mousetrapped a director of CNN.

    A CNN source told Mediaite that Project Veritas found Chester through the dating app Tinder, where he boasted of his work for CNN. A Veritas employee claiming to be a nurse matched with him and met him for several dates.

    Is that commitment to the job or what? The lady is a true heroine!

    ‘They’re all on the same team’: Twitter is slammed for ‘protecting’ CNN after Project Veritas founder James O’Keefe is banned from the site days after publishing expose on network’s liberal bias (Daily Mail, 16 Apr)

  66. thefrollickingmole says:

    Tailgunner
    Is a chicky that was an online femdom acceptable?
    Nearly anything for fun.

    But do you want to wife it?

  67. Dot says:

    I out myself as a lawn mowing Xoomer.

    Damn, where’s my can of Monster energy drink?

  68. Tailgunner says:

    Project Veritas mousetrapped a director of CNN

    Counter-intel is important.
    Messaging app(no phone number exchange), fake surname, no social media.
    She’d need more than a few dates to entrap me. How far would she go for the information??
    🤣🤣

  69. Tailgunner says:

    But do you want to wife it?
    No.
    But optimism remains high!
    Find a church going lass perhaps?

  70. dover_beach says:

    Government scientists now will be able to resume research that uses tissue from elective abortions.

    What possible significance does the qualifier ‘elective’ serve here? Were the tissues of emergency abortions still used or are they alone still prohibited? Or is this another example of liberals/ feminists treating the child as if it is the chattel of the mother, who having ‘consented’ to the murder of her child, can also consent to the child’s usage in scientific research?

    What we allow to happen to the child in utero is barbarous.

  71. P says:

    Black Ball
    April 18, 2021 at 10:00 am to 10:08 am

    Thank you for all those good and interesting comments above.
    —————————————————-

    Pontifical Mass of Christian Burial for His Eminence Cardinal Edward Idris Cassidy –
    Tomorrow 19th April 2021. Live on youtube at 10:30am.

    Cardinal Cassidy had a difficult childhood, born to non-Catholic parents who divorced when he was one-year-old, leaving him to be raised by his maternal grandparents.

    His grandmother, Mary Cassidy, was Catholic and she had him secretly received into the Catholic Church while on holiday with relatives in the country.

    Young Edward attended public schools throughout Sydney, winning entrance to the selective Parramatta High School, which he studied at until his grandfather died. Financial difficulties required him to work to support his grandmother and himself.

    Cardinal Cassidy was initially discouraged for the priesthood because of his family background and lack of Catholic schooling.

    He eventually worked up the courage to approach the Archbishop of Sydney directly, who encouraged him to finish his high school education, which he did at night and then gained admittance to St Patrick’s Seminary, Manly.

    EXCLUSIVE: Cardinal Cassidy interview – ‘Friends in high places’

  72. Tel says:

    These laws apply to any information from EU residents, so they would have held even if the programmer weren’t living in the EU.

    Yeah! And if North Korea makes it illegal to criticize Fat Boy Kim, then it would hold even for people not living in North Korea … right?!?

  73. Mick Gold Coast QLD says:

    MatrixTransform says at 9:21 am:

    “If you are involved with … a startup that is … led by women, the Federal Government’s Boosting Female Founders Initiative should definitely be on your radar.

    … grants between $25,000 and $480,000 for female …

    part of … Women’s Economic Security Statements … meeting Australia’s international obligations under the Convention on the Elimination of all forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW).

    Who knew?

    Seems that in order to get a business grant, all you need to do is cut your dick off and start a new dickless company

    When will wymminses be formally declared as disabled? … Centrelink cripples-pension-worthy, front of the bus queue, special early shopping hours at Coles supermarkets, mauve placard on the windscreen announcing “Feeble Wymminses On Board”, push their way to the front, dedicated parking spots, corporate CEO under the anti discrimmeration statute quotas … whinging pommie Holgate could win her multi million dollar pocket money back! 🤣🤣

  74. Bruce of Newcastle says:

    A new aeon has arrived!
    Went into loungeroom just now. Television is dead. It has ceased to be.
    I said a while ago on the Cat that once my current TV died I’d not get another.
    Conveniently it’s Council Pickup week.
    So expired TV will shortly get a fine burial in a garbage truck.
    It’s now the Brucenotvian Era.

  75. dover_beach says:

    Today in Liberalism, encore:

    Consensual incest’ should be decriminalized, advocates say:
    Consensual incest advocates are rooting for an anonymous New York parent who wants to marry their own adult child.

    Australian Richard Morris, who is pushing to change incest laws in about 60 countries, said he supports the legal push in Manhattan Federal Court and that such behavior between consenting adults “should not be criminalized.”

    Keith Pullman, who runs the blog Full Marriage Equality, also cheered on the New York lawsuit.

    “It is absurd to say that an adult can’t consent to marry their parent. That same adult can be sent to war, take on six or seven figures of debt, operate heavy machinery, be sentenced to death by a federal court, and consent to sex with five strangers (and marriage with one of them) but can’t consent to marry someone they love?” he told The Post.

    Supporters of SS’M’ could not be reached for comment.

  76. Des Deskperson says:

    Strolling through the Parliamentary Triangle just now and I noticed the the several hectares of lawn in front of Old Parliament that are partially occupied – for nearly five decades now – by the Aboriginal Tent Embassy are now protected by fence.

    It’s a three wire fence supported by star pickets, not permanent but a significant barrier to anyone who wants to enter the area. Its erection would have involved a considerable amount of money, time and effort. Normally any such structure would have had to be agreed by the National Capital Authority, which is usually particularly picky about what happens within the Triangle.

    Prima facie, the purpose of the fence seems to be to enforce the expropriation of public land by the Embassy with the connivance if not the support of the authorities. Embassy, err, officials can still access the site through a gap at the front.

    The size of the Embassy fluctuates but it has been declining over the years and at present there only seems to be a skeleton staff on duty. This may be a COVID thing but it may also reflect the onset of the colder seasons.

    Depending on your point of view, the Embassy is either an in-your-face example of the conditions under which many Indigenous Australians suffer or an ugly, slovenly, unlawful confection of fake poverty. The latter is the view the traditional owners of the area, who are in competition for the coveted status of victim.

  77. Dot says:

    Consensual incest advocates are rooting

    Phrasing.

  78. Bruce of Newcastle says:

    TV now on the side of the street, plug removed, remotes sans batteries. An arduous task helped by encouragement from several noisy miners and blue-faced honey eaters.

  79. 1735099 says:

    Oathleeper Shaffer guilty plea has him singing like a canary.
    Could get very interesting….

  80. Top Ender says:

    Not exactly sure what this bloke is after…

    ‘We need peacekeepers’

    GARY SHIPWAY

    AN NT politician wants the Territory and federal governments to invest in remote community based peacekeepers for solving conflict and creating order.

    East Arnhem independent Member for Mulka Yingiya Guyula (inset) says he is tired of seeing boatloads of Milingimbi people heading to court in Ramingining each month.

    “The system is not working and things are only getting worse,” Mr Guyula said.

    In a column for the Sunday Territorian he said, with commonwealth funding for remote policing coming to an end, the time was right to look to local communities for solutions to create long lasting change.

    “In East Arnhem Land, gumurr watjarrmirr is a elders and leaders who intervene in community unrest in order to keep the peace … the literal translation is gumurr – chest/frontline and watjarr – peace,” Mr Guyula said.

    “I want to see the employment of community leaders and elders to do the work of gumurr watjarrmirr as peacekeepers, who are properly resourced to work with communities and police, to create solutions for our people who need help.”

    Mr Guyula said the current discussion by NT government and CLP opposition about reversing the bail laws worried and frightened him.

    Opposition Leader Lia Finocchiaro says her bail reforms target serial offenders who repeatedly put the community at risk and make them accountable for their crimes.

    She said repeat offenders, who make up most of those committing crimes, had to face tougher penalties.

    However, Mr Guyula said it was Aboriginal children who would be most affected by the changes proposed by the government and opposition.

    “The more contact that our people have with the justice system, the more we see them become hardened and proud of a jailbird status,” he says.

    “Elders want to keep our children away from this system. Our Yolngu education system, Raypirri, is underpinned by the teaching of selfdiscipline, care for kin and community, and care for country. This is how we grow our children. Rather than becoming hardened by the system of correctional services, we want our children to become strong future leaders.”

    Mr Guyula said damage from “oppressive government policies like the Intervention, the Stronger Futures Policy, Super Shires and Growth Towns” had had a devastating impact on communities.

    “Investment in local peacekeepers is not the only answer – this needs to come with an investment in solving the underlying problems,” he said. “We need to see an investment in housing and infrastructure, a genuine two-ways approach to education, small business development, training and job development, a fair and equal approach to funding homeland towns.

    “We need to see all these as well as other local solutions.”

  81. 1735099 says:

    BRS and the quad bike.
    The quad bike is not the only thing that’s stuffed……

  82. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha says:

    “We need to see an investment in housing and infrastructure, a genuine two-ways approach to education, small business development, training and job development, a fair and equal approach to funding homeland towns.

    More money?

  83. Arky says:

    New lighting in the shed.
    Should be able to see what the hell I’m doing in there now rather than relying on my senses of touch and smell to restore the Model A.

  84. C.L. says:

    Can somebody explain to me why there was ‘social distancing’ at Prince Philip’s funeral – even to the extent of physically abandoning the Queen – when everyone involved was vaccinated?

  85. C.L. says:

    What remains to be done on the A, Ark?

  86. Bill Thompson says:

    Outside Insiders – I wasn’t sure I could accept at face value, the good news regarding Australia’s economic revival, following the Covid downturn but if Phil Coorey is convinced, that’s good enough for me. Mind you, there’s still the little matter of $Gazillions in Aussie national debt, which presumably has to be eventually paid off by somebody, not to mention the inexorable rise of the ChiComs…
    https://youtu.be/lClIqJtiZ5w

  87. miltonf says:

    Can somebody explain to me why there was ‘social distancing’ at Prince Philip’s funeral – even to the extent of physically abandoning the Queen – when everyone involved was vaccinated?

    Again proves that the royals are just puppets of the marxist establishment.

  88. C.L. says:

    AN NT politician wants the Territory and federal governments to invest in remote community based peacekeepers for solving conflict and creating order.

    East Arnhem independent Member for Mulka Yingiya Guyula (inset) says he is tired of seeing boatloads of Milingimbi people heading to court in Ramingining each month.

    “The system is not working and things are only getting worse,” Mr Guyula said.

    No, the system is working. Offenders are not learning, that is the problem. Guyula simply wants crime to be ignored.

  89. C.L. says:

    Clearly the vaccine doesn’t work. It’s just a placebo.

  90. Bar Beach Swimmer says:

    Jupes, if you’re about, I found this article, which was published the same day as the Federal Govt restricted AstraZeneca to the under 50s.

    https://time.com/5953653/astrazeneca-vaccine-blood-clots-studies/

  91. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha says:

    This one’s for Pedro.

    Life of a skimpy in Kalgoorlie is pure gold
    Tegan Guthrie
    Kalgoorlie Miner
    Sun, 18 April 2021 9:34AM

    Having done skimpy and stripper work in various towns across four countries, Sophie Summers says Kalgoorlie-Boulder is one of the nicest places to work in the industry.

    Sophie has been working for Brief Encounters as a skimpy barmaid here in Kalgoorlie-Boulder for about two years, but has previously worked elsewhere in Australia and the UK, including 15 years as a stripper.

    Having experienced the stigma that comes with working as a stripper or a skimpy over the years, Sophie said it was refreshing to be in a town where skimpies were so socially accepted.

    “There seem to be a lot more open-minded people here than in England,” she said.

    “When I tell people here that I used to strip they are just like ‘oh, that’s fair enough’.

    “I don’t really experience any rudeness or lectures here, the people are just lovely and that’s why I keep coming back. I think it’s because skimpies are so ingrained here, they are in almost every pub.

    “They are more normal than abnormal.”

    While she loved her time as a stripper, Sophie said she gave the industry up in exchange for skimpy barmaid work to ensure she had a more stable income.

    “With stripping you don’t get paid an hourly rate, so you’re never guaranteed what you will make,” she said.

    “When you have a brilliant night, it’s absolutely amazing, but without those tips you have nothing.

    “Some places even make you pay to work there, like hairdressers who rent a chair in a studio.

    “But stripping is a very sales-orientated job, so if your heart isn’t in it that is going to project on to the customer and they are going to know you’re not into it. “And I guess I just fell out of love with it. I definitely won’t go back now.”

    She said Kalgoorlie-Boulder patrons were “really generous” with their tips, and even though she is only working part-time now, she was still able to save up easily for a house deposit.

  92. DrBeauGan says:

    Clearly the vaccine doesn’t work. It’s just a placebo.

    If it cuts down on the hysteria it will be useful.

  93. Colonel Crispin Berka says:

    New lighting in the shed.
    Should be able to see what the hell I’m doing in there now..to restore the Model A.

    The lights were first turned on and BEHOLD! it had been a Miata all along.

  94. Arky says:

    C.L. says:
    April 18, 2021 at 12:44 pm
    What remains to be done on the A, Ark?

    ..
    Put the rear end back together after preloading the diff bearings. Put back in car. Install modern shockers. Finish building out all the surfaces that the interior has to attach to, install interior and wind lacing. Final coats of paint. Remove steering column for new worm gear and lighting switch rod. Finish install lighting switch. Choose indicators and install. Get some dude to fit rear hubs to new brake drums and machine drums. Do something about front brake drums. Join Model A Club. Put on road. Make videos about driving Model A around looking smug, or make videos about how I couldn’t get Model A on road and look depressed and angry.

  95. C.L. says:

    Keep us posted. Will you be adding those fancy club membership badges on the grill? Have never been a fan of those.

  96. shatterzzz says:

    Can somebody explain to me why there was ‘social distancing’ at Prince Philip’s funeral – even to the extent of physically abandoning the Queen – when everyone involved was vaccinated?
    All for the gummint/TV peasants circus’ .. if the Queen had gone maskless and worn a tutu whilst letting the corgis run riot .. who would have dared say anything!
    They played on her sense of duty and loyalty to the max knowing she ALWAYS does the right thing ….

  97. Colonel Crispin Berka says:

    Damn, where’s my can of Monster energy drink?

    In the same closet as the New Balance shoes. Never to be used.

  98. Leigh Lowe says:

    Nick says:

    April 18, 2021 at 10:50 am

    How did the Swans lose yesterday?

    Well, it was a close finish and they didn’t have Dane Rampe playing King Kong on the goalpost for a start.

  99. johanna says:

    I suppose using some of the mining royalties that flow into Arnhem Land Aboriginal communities to ‘resource’ a bit of community order is out of the question?

    What a nerve! They get millions of dollars for doing nothing and them demand more because they refuse to discipline their own and don’t want anyone else to do it either.

    Someone should tell these people to get their head out of their collective arse.

  100. incoherent rambler says:

    Clearly the vaccine doesn’t work. It’s just a placebo.

    Yep.
    Like the pedestrian button at intersections.

  101. Notafan says:

    How can there be more small businesses in remote communities?

    Who will be the market?

    How much has been built then trashed within a few years?

    My advice, as always, is leave.

  102. Bruce of Newcastle says:

    For GM: a hellscape live cam. Who needs CGI when you can have the real thing?

  103. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha says:

    because they refuse to discipline their own and don’t want anyone else to do it either.

    It’s part of their culture….

  104. custard says:

    Just got this one from Spacechook

    Labor. Victoria.

    Long article from The Sun Newspaper posted by Era Goberman. Worth a read
    ~~~~~~~

    Shocking involvement by all bodies of government to destroy this business, they should all be Prosecuted.
    In France, snails are served with garlic butter. But in Dandenong, according to an outraged family and their lawyers and private investigators and a scientific expert, Garlick can accompany a slug. Allegedly.
    This is the starting point for an astounding allegation of an orchestrated cover-up after a council health inspector named Garlick was accused of planting a garden slug in a state-of-the-art food production plant in an act of apparent commercial sabotage.
    Sounds far-fetched?
    Not once you hear the story in the huge detail that two former detectives have gathered to fill a 6000-page brief of evidence.
    That brief will be the centrepiece of a $50m civil damages case the food company is preparing against the state health department and Dandenong Council— unless, of course, the case is settled to avoid more damaging publicity about an abortive cover-up that stretches from Dandenong to Spring St via certain police officers and senior health officials.
    Advisers to the chief police commissioner, to the Premier, the state health minister and to federal opposition leader Anthony Albanese will be reading this and feeling sick.
    But nothing like the fear and loathing certain people at Dandenong Council are suffering after the clumsy sabotage attempt that has destroyed a blameless business — and blown up in their faces.
    The Day Of The Slug is February 18, 2019, when a health inspector recently appointed by Dandenong Council turns up at the I Cook Foods plant in Zenith Rd, Dandenong, to inspect the premises.
    There is nothing strange about officer Elizabeth Garlick doing her job. Regular and thorough inspections of commercial kitchens are necessary to prevent the risk of food contamination that can cause illness or death.
    But what strikes the I Cook Foods office manager as unusual is that Garlick is wearing a cover-all smock of the type sometimes used by nurses, with large apron-style pockets in front.
    What the office manager also notices is that a bunch of tissues is sticking from one of these pockets. It seems oddly untidy, even unhygienic, for a health inspector.
    Officer Garlick is ushered into the plant and asked to put on a clean gown and hairnet, as routinely worn in food production premises.
    The gown seems to disconcert her.
    She is apparently unaware of a security camera that films her leaving buttons partly undone so she can still reach the pocket of the smock underneath.
    But why would she want to do that?
    Judging from the security film and witnesses, the answer comes shortly afterwards.
    Garlick walks through the plant, politely escorted by Michael Cook, brother and partner of the business principal Ian Cook, whose son Ben also works there.
    The camera films Garlick crouching down in the far corner of the factory with her back turned so no one can see her hands.
    She crouches for a full 17 seconds.
    When she stands up, she makes what Michael Cook later describes as a theatrical announcement that she has “found” a slug.
    She produces a camera and photographs a slug she is pointing at, which is next to a piece of wet (or slimy) tissue that has also appeared on the floor in the short time since the floor was washed down with powerful chlorine disinfectant, as it is every day.
    But, unfortunately for Garlick and her employer, Michael Cook also snaps a picture of the scene, which will eventually show that Garlick’s photographs are later “photoshopped” to eliminate or minimise the tissue.
    Michael Cook’s photograph shows the tissue near the slug but images later produced by Garlick do not — a mysterious anomaly solved when a fellow council health inspector, Kim Rogerson, turns whistleblower and tells the Cooks there’s a conspiracy against them.
    Rogerson, known to the Cooks as a “hard but fair” inspector, admits taking leave to avoid being party to evidence tampering she says was meant to drive I Cook Foods out of business — which it did, due to a strangely rushed decision by the health department, despite laboratory testing that cleared the company of any breach of food safety rules.
    That sudden decision condemned more than three tonnes of perfectly good food, worth $700,000, to be sent to the tip after an extraordinary media conference in which health department head Brett Sutton did irreparable damage to the Cooks’ brand.
    Sutton claimed — wrongly, despite evidence his department had to the contrary — that I Cook Foods was the source of a serious listeria outbreak which could kill “thousands” of people.
    He gratuitously made a point of using the business name, totally unnecessary in any circumstances, as none of its products are sold directly to the public.
    Once the I Cook Foods name was publicly trashed, the family business was dead.
    The malevolent publicity could never be undone.
    The best the Cook family and their growing group of supporters could do after that was expose the true story behind the slimy trick.
    Context is everything. The Slug-gate plot did not really begin the day the slug was “found”. And it did not start when an elderly woman, Jean Painter, died in hospital in late 2019 after taking ill at a Knox aged care home supplied by I Cook Foods.
    The short lived (and totally disproved) allegation that Jean Painter died of listeria contracted from catering was just an excuse seized by Dandenong Council to harm I Cook Foods.
    She in fact died of a longstanding heart condition unrelated to the listeria symptoms of diarrhoea and headache — a temporary illness soon proven to have no link with I Cook Foods.
    But why would anyone conspire to destroy I Cook Foods?
    The main reason, as the Cooks’ barrister Dr Michelle Sharpe will argue if it gets to court, is that the council CEO John Bennie is on the board of I Cook Foods main commercial competitor, Community Chef, a lame duck enterprise cooked up by several councils, the State Government and the Federal Government in 2010 in response to the GFC.
    After an initial flurry of interest in Community Chef, most of the hospitals and aged care homes on the I Cook Foods client list either stuck with the established business or returned after being disappointed by Community Chef’s prices, performance and produce.
    Community Chef lost so much money it became an expensive embarrassment to the three tiers of Government funding it — notably to Dandenong Council (among others) but also to the 2010 state health minister, Daniel Andrews, and to the then federal infrastructure minister Anthony Albanese, who sank millions of dollars into Community Chef.
    Community Chef’s options were bleak. It could drown in red ink and close down — or it could try to become an “essential service”, which would protect it from competition indefinitely.
    But the only way to get on that gravy train, permanently funded by ratepayers and taxpayers, was to eliminate its competitor.
    That, says Ian Cook, was the motive for bringing in Elizabeth Garlick as a “rainmaker”.
    It is not just a wild allegation by an angry man heartbroken at seeing his 35-year-old family business crushed, and 45 jobs die with it.
    It is backed up by more than a year of investigation done for nothing by former detectives Paul Brady and Rod Porter, who became interested in the case after being tipped off by a police source.
    After a year of collating massive amounts of detailed material into a watertight brief, Brady is outraged about what has happened to the Cook family.
    He has pursued every angle — including other businesses effectively closed down or fined heavily after a certain inspector found “evidence” of the type easily planted.
    But why would councils want to monster food businesses so blatantly?
    The real reason, Brady says, is financial.
    Under an intriguing Victorian law, councils directly pocket the massive fines levied on businesses prosecuted for alleged breaches of food handling rules.
    “In other words, the Food Act is a direct source of revenue,” Brady says.
    “It’s a cash cow for council, so their inspectors get the coach’s address from their bosses — and some of these useful idiots want to impress because if they bring in fines they get promotion and pay rises.”
    Why would hard bitten ex-cops volunteer to work on a case like this, alongside communications expert Rohan Wenn and others?
    Because, Brady says, “if this can happen to someone like Ian Cook it can happen to anyone.”
    There are many aspects to the case but some stand out.
    A slug expert, Dr Michael Nash, has pointed out that the slug photographed at the factory was not a local variety — it must have been carried in from elsewhere.
    When a similar slug was tested at the site, it refused to slide off a clean plastic lid onto the clean floor because slugs (like snails) hate strong cleaning chemicals like the chlorine mixture used daily at the food factory.
    Besides, slugs are nocturnal and move around on cool, damp nights — not in the middle of a hot day as it was on February 18, 2019.
    The Cook family are not the only people to have suffered.
    Among the 45 employees who lost their jobs after Brett Sutton’s brutal “naming and shaming” were several disabled people who worked on full wages under a philanthropic program.
    One of them, a profoundly deaf woman, has been unable to get another job, so her elderly parents have lost their house because she was paying it off for them.
    If and when it goes to a court, it could be a bruising experience.
    For the “useful idiot” Elizabeth Garlick. For Dandenong Council boss John Bennie. For Brett Sutton and key staff who advised him. For the police hierarchy. Even for Daniel Andrews and Anthony Albanese.

  105. thefrollickingmole says:

    Well this snuck through quietly…

    I was unaware native title monies was exempt from tax (as individuals).

    I also assume they dont affect welfare payments or entitlements as is “special’.
    https://www.ato.gov.au/General/Aboriginal-and-Torres-Strait-Islander-people/In-detail/Receiving-native-title-benefits—what-it-means-for-your-tax-obligations/
    Example 1 – Individual receiving a native title benefit

    Mae is an Aboriginal woman who lives in Western Australia. Every year, she receives a $100,000 native title benefit from a mining company. The mining company uses the land to mine for iron ore.

    Mae is not taxed on this $100,000 because it is a native title benefit, which is NANE income and is not taxable.

  106. Mick Gold Coast QLD says:

    Zulu Kilo Two Alpha says at 12:33 pm:

    ” “We need to see an investment in housing and infrastructure … funding homeland towns.

    More money?

    The answer you are seeking Zulu is even earlier in the piece, in the sixth paragraph:

    “I want to see the employment of community leaders and elderswho are properly resourced to work with communities … for our people …”

  107. custard says:
    April 18, 2021 at 1:25 pm

    I’ve followed that one for quite a while, coz it could happen to me.
    I’ve seen most of the photos they used.
    I’ve seen photos of the premises before & after.
    The whole thing looks like a complete fake up. (Can I say it is completely faked?)
    I hope the family get the full Fifty Million Dollars from Dandenong & Vic govt.
    or even more.

  108. incoherent rambler says:

    If and when it goes to a court, it could be a bruising experience.

    I doubt it.
    A vik court, with ALP appointed judges.
    Nuffink will happen.

  109. Mick O’Gold Coast:

    I saw the galah entering the Capitol in January – with his Davy Crockett hat and buffalo horns, no shirt, war paint, pulling stupid faces, a village idiot – all pith and wind and concluded I was watching a typical “American patriot”.

    Perhaps the penny will drop, but I have my doubts, Mick. The fact that after a clearly corrupt election, not one shot has been fired fired in defence of the US Constitution.
    It looks like the 2nd Amendment is just an excuse for a bit of yippee.
    That was the fact which shocked me – the apathy of the “patriots” who just went home and spouted nonsense about “We are a Nation of Laws.”

  110. thefrollickingmole says:

    There is nothing strange about officer Elizabeth Garlick doing her job. Regular and thorough inspections of commercial kitchens are necessary to prevent the risk of food contamination that can cause illness or death.

    Yes, because killing your clients is a great business model and thats the only thing stopping you adding super-AIDs to every dish.

    I hope they all are bankrupted.

  111. Top Ender says:

    Reading Slugs-R-Us it looks like some people may end up in jail.

  112. Top Ender says:

    Also from the Idiot State. Looks like the poll at the end shows maybe the public circus management are out of touch with the readers of the Herald-Sun:

    A new trend to use gender pronouns in official communications is gaining traction within the Victorian Public Sector, but critics have labelled the shift an example of “woke” public service.

    Public servants are using their pronouns – such as he/him, she/her and they/them – in their email signatures in a bid to promote inclusivity and support for transgender and non-binary colleagues.

    The use of pronouns helps avoid assumptions about a person’s gender identity and allows people to affirm their identities, according to the [email protected] initiative.

    A Victorian government spokesperson said an increased use and discussion around pronouns helped “normalise” the language.

    “Public servants are encouraged to use inclusive language to demonstrate respect in both our workplaces and in developing and delivering policies, programs and services for all Victorians,” the spokesperson said.

    One senior public servant said the trend was noticeably becoming more common, but said it was self-directed rather than an instruction.

    “There are some middle managers encouraging it,” she said.

    Victoria Police officers and staff have the option to include their preferred pronouns in official communications, but the title isn’t mandatory.

    “Employees are encouraged to adopt this initiative to help eradicate negative discussions around gender diversity and show support for trans and non-binary colleagues,” a police spokesperson said.

    Dr Bella d’Abrera, foundations of Western Civilisation Program director at the Institute of Public Affairs, said the use of pronouns was “dehumanising”.

    “Gender pronouns are dehumanising because they encourage the divisive notion that Australians should be defined by their gender and sexual proclivities rather than as individuals,” Dr d’Abrera said.

    “This is forcing the recipients of the email to actively participate in something in which they don’t necessarily believe, which is that there are more than two genders.

    “Are people who don’t put their ‘pronouns’ on the bottom of emails going to be singled out by their colleagues? This is another example of a woke public service that is fundamentally at odds with the values of mainstream Australians.”

    Poll Results
    Is the labelling of gender pronouns inclusive or divisive?
    Inclusive 5%
    Divisive 95%
    1,175 Voters

    Link

  113. custard says:

    How evil are Sutton and Andrews?

  114. Mitch M. says:

    johanna says:
    April 18, 2021 at 1:11 pm
    I suppose using some of the mining royalties that flow into Arnhem Land Aboriginal communities to ‘resource’ a bit of community order is out of the question?

    What a nerve! They get millions of dollars for doing nothing and them demand more because they refuse to discipline their own and don’t want anyone else to do it either.

    Someone should tell these people to get their head out of their collective arse.

    Howard was the last politician who had the will to tackle the problem(the intervention). It failed because it was perceived as racist. All attempts will fail until aborigines acknowledge that most of their problems are not about systemic racism or lack of money but about personal behavior. Personal behavior requires solutions at the individual level. Activists and politicians too much think about big programs and big solutions. Their frame of reference is political interests. Doomed to fail.

  115. Farmer Gez says:

    Gone are the days when you can buy a new tractor and just hook up and go.
    We’ve spent a week installing monitors and auto steering gear. Cameras in the air seeder, variable rate control, auto headland control, block monitors and the whole harness sets for electronics.

    Next we need to set lag times for the auto shut off and check the viable rate is varying on the roll. The new main screen has two dozen touch buttons to adjust this and that.

    I’m starting to think I’m getting too old for this.

  116. thefrollickingmole says:

    A small list of totally-not-designed-to-kill-your-business I had done trying to run a fast food/cafe type operation.

    1: too close to another business: It wasnt, their own maps clearly demonstrated that.
    2: 50 year old buildings toilets not big enough for disabled access, knock out 3 pans and make disabled toilet.
    3: No markings on the bitumen for parking: Markings placed
    4: Disabled toilet about an inch not wide enough “cant i just push the wall out a little”.
    5: Measure new chicken treat buildings disabled toilet, its smaller, mention this to inspector who storms off saying I threatened him when he said hed approved it.
    6: 1 year on, allowed to serve food, but not allowed to use the large “public seating” area.
    Other highlights: Told to get lighting survey/upgrade done, do, then get told it was not needed. Hiring ex-council planner who eventually gives up as they appear to be referring to 3 differing sets of standards at whim. Raise at council meeting only to find out elected reps arent allowed to question council employees as the CEO runs the show.

    Step 7: Out of money, go bust.

    Councils: Full on scum on 6 figures fucking over people on 5 figure incomes.

  117. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha says:

    I’m starting to think I’m getting too old for this.

    I switched over from combines, to an air seeder, on land my grandfather tilled with horses.

  118. Flyingpigs:
    Dave in Marybrook says:

    April 18, 2021 at 12:12 am
    Christmas Island pub crawl / doorknock boozer to try to find Kristina Kenneally. Will report as to whether or not she’s
    1. Getting among it, and/or
    2. A close quarters hag, and/or
    3. Up for it

    and or, eaten by the crabs!

    Oh! The imagery!

  119. thefrollickingmole says:

    “Public servants are encouraged to use inclusive language to demonstrate respect in both our workplaces and in developing and delivering policies, programs and services for all Victorians,”

    My preferred pronouns, thanks for asking, its.

    “His Excellency, President for Life, Field Marshal Al Hadji Doctor Moley Amin Moley, VC, DSO, MC, CBE, Lord of All the Beasts of the Earth and Fishes of the Seas and Conqueror of the British Empire in Africa in General and Uganda in Particular”

  120. Snoopy says:

    Thanks Custard. Business as usual in Victoria.

  121. shatterzzz says:

    Mae is an Aboriginal woman who lives in Western Australia. Every year, she receives a $100,000 native title benefit from a mining company. The mining company uses the land to mine for iron ore.
    Mae is not taxed on this $100,000 because it is a native title benefit, which is NANE income and is not taxable.

    Goes a long way to explaining last week’s reports of high end card games and the size of the pots amongst NT Race That Stunts the Nation royalty payments with NO mention of CentreLink payments ………

  122. Snoopy says:

    Reading Slugs-R-Us it looks like some people may end up in jail.

    Forget it, TE. It’s Chinatown.

  123. mh says:

    Paywallian

    Ankle bracelet option for home quarantine
    A senior minister has left open the possibility of ankle bracelets in home quarantine, as PM flags staggered international border re-opening

  124. Arky says:

    Step 7: Out of money, go bust.

    Councils: Full on scum on 6 figures fucking over people on 5 figure incomes.

    ..
    …and yet libertarians often say that local government is the best because of the proximity to it’s victims.
    Step 1 in getting rid of corruption and over government in this shit brown country is to replace all councils with covenants. These should include strict tendering requirements for services and a strong anti- corruption watchdog with the power to sodomise culprits.

  125. Raise at council meeting only to find out elected reps arent allowed to question council employees as the CEO runs the show.

    At that point, any elected reps worth electing would sack the CEO.

  126. Arky says:

    Civic participation has plummeted.
    By design. The same little box of tricks to keep parents and teachers from questioning the diktats of cliques of dodgy fuckers are used by the larger institutions like councils. Making people defer to so called expertise is just part of the scam.

  127. incoherent rambler says:

    How evil are Sutton and Andrews?

    Rasputin, Stalin, Eichman, Mengele, Milat.

    Up there with them.

  128. Farmer Gez says:

    I switched over from combines, to an air seeder, on land my grandfather tilled with horses.

    My great grandfather sat backwards on a horse, controlling the reins with his feet and broadcast seed by hand over worked soil that was then harrowed to bury the seed.

  129. Farmer Gez says:

    He had it lucky.

  130. incoherent rambler says:

    How evil are Sutton and Andrews?

    Is there an evil rating system?

  131. thefrollickingmole says:

    Sal.

    It was done.
    The response was pap.
    Guess what redress you have?

    The CEO is designed as a position where accountability stops.

  132. thefrollickingmole says:

    My grandfather fed his team of Clydesdales to the pigs once they went mechanised.

  133. Arky says:

    Not a lot of sentiment in the Mole family then.

  134. Farmer Gez says:

    Killed them first, I hope.

  135. incoherent rambler says:

    My grandfather passed his team of Clydesdales onto to his son, who allocated them a retirement paddock. They had a long retirement.

  136. Bar Beach Swimmer says:

    Albatross says:
    April 18, 2021 at 9:32 am
    MatrixTransform says:
    April 18, 2021 at 9:24 am

    Good read MT.

    +1

  137. Farmer Gez says:

    Most plough horses were Clydesdale crosses.
    The pure breed was too slow for Australian acres.

  138. Bar Beach Swimmer says:

    Mitch M. says:
    April 18, 2021 at 1:58 pm

    Spot on, Mitch.

  139. Sal.
    It was done.
    The response was pap.
    Guess what redress you have?

    That’s the reason I video record (with audio) every second spent on the premises by a compliance inspector from either the Fire Brigade or the Council (usually the health inspector)
    It mitigates/prevents the worst of their outrages.

  140. Bar Beach Swimmer says:

    incoherent rambler says:
    April 18, 2021 at 2:30 pm
    How evil are Sutton and Andrews?

    Rasputin, Stalin, Eichman, Mengele, Milat.

    Up there with them

    Over on the vaccines passport thread Prof Fred put up this comment.

    Professor Fred Lenin says:
    April 18, 2021 at 2:31 pm
    Just going to have a look at the Nuremberg Code,the guidelines for medical,research drawn up after the Nuremberg Trials where National Socialist “doctors”~performed horrenus”experimets ” on concentration camp inmates .
    The Codewas put forward as a guidline to any future medical experiments and research . There is a possibility that the big pharma companiesand ppliticians have breached the code by pushing people to participate in the covid vaccine experiment and it isan experiment ,in the first year of its trials . Trials often take up to 10 years to complete positivity about the products safety and any side effects .
    I am not sure bout penalties for breaches of the ]code but I imagine there would be considering the atmosphere at Nurmberg when it was first drafted

  141. Eyrie says:

    What remains to be done on the A, Ark?

    As we say in the homebuilt aircraft world – 90% done and 50% to go.

  142. Eyrie says:

    Step 1 in getting rid of corruption and over government in this shit brown country is to replace all councils with covenants. These should include strict tendering requirements for services and a strong anti- corruption watchdog with the power to sodomise culprits.

    I’m good with 20% of Councils are put into administration each year at random and a team of forensic accountants investigates the finances of the council, the CEO, the councilors and their close families. Substantial jail time for any anomalies or funds whose origin is unexplained.

  143. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha says:

    My grandfather passed his team of Clydesdales onto to his son, who allocated them a retirement paddock. They had a long retirement.

    The last farmer in our district to mechanize, was still using horses in 1960.

  144. Zyconoclast says:

    Find a nice girl they said.
    Settle down they said.
    Work hard they said.

    https://nypost.com/2021/04/14/onlyfans-covid-19-pandemic-have-spurred-a-new-sexual-revolution/

    Old and ugly.
    What is wrong with people.

  145. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha says:

    Out of Afghanistan: SAS veterans reflect on ‘graveyard of empires’

    Joseph Lam
    Journalist
    21 minutes ago April 18, 2021
    4 Comments

    Mark Wales said the first thing that struck him about Afghanistan when he arrived for the first of four tours of duty was the terrain.

    “You felt like you were on another planet,” said the former SAS major.

    Between 2006 and 2010, Mr Wales, 41, was deployed every year to the warn torn country as Australia joined an international effort to fight the Taliban and foster the fledging democracy that had been installed in the wake of the September 11 terrorist attacks on New York and Washington.

    The 16-year veteran said Afghanistan was unlike anything he had encountered before.

    “It was rugged, stark, a bit stunning and completely separated from anything we understand to be a civilised society.

    “This notion that we could install some sort of democracy there is far fetched.’’

    Mr Wales spoke to The Australian after Prime Minister Scott Morrison announced on Thursday all Australian troops would return home from Afghanistan by September, following United States President Joe Biden’s decision to pull out American troops.

    He believes it is a decision that should have been taken a decade ago.

    But a lack of transparency between military capability and political leadership kept soldiers grounded.

    Mr Wales said he formed doubts over Australia’s efforts in Afghanistan, some of which are detailed in his book Survivor: Life in the SAS.

    “I think it’s the right decision, I think they should have done it in 2010. We would have saved ourselves a lot of heartache,” Mr Wales said.

    “We’re in the same place we were in back then — the only difference is about 100,000 were killed in the war.’’

    Each of Mr Wales’ tours lasted around six months, with missions gradually shifting from reconnaissance to kill and capture.

    “I think that by 2010 I’d picked up on the fact there was a real split between what the military thought was achievable and what the political leadership of the war wanted,” he said.

    “We invested too much hope and we were too much in bed with the Americans when we should have walked away.”

    Former SAS sergeant Harry Moffitt, 53, who spent two thirds of his 30-year military career in special operations, said part of him was relieved with Thursday’s announcement.

    Moffitt deployed seven times to Afghanistan, the longest of which was eight months and the shortest of which was one.

    “It’s a beautiful and curious country, but of course it’s the graveyard of empires,” he said.

    “Everyone from the British to the Russians and going way back the Greeks and Macedonians came unstuck and were sent packing and it appears that’s exactly what’s happening with us now.”

    Both Mr Moffitt and Mr Wales, who know each other well, were proud of their service and said they had a lot of respect for the Afghani people. They agreed it was time soldiers came home and called for reflection over the two-decade long war.

    “We’ve sunk a lot of resources and time and effort and people’s lives into this and I’m not sure the returns have been as great as what they could have been,” Moffitt said.

    “I don’t have a sense that there’ll be a great range of people saying that we should stay and we should compete more.
    “I think everybody gets it now that we’ve done our best.”

  146. Dover Beach:

    What we allow to happen to the child in utero is barbarous.

    You expect anything better from the Left, DB?

  147. jupes says:

    That was the fact which shocked me – the apathy of the “patriots” who just went home and spouted nonsense about “We are a Nation of Laws.”

    I still have faith in Americans. Traditionally, they are slow to rouse, but once they do, they go nuclear. (Literally in WW2.)

    They’ll sort this shit out.

  148. JC says:

    Custard:

    I don’t like dishonesty either from the left or right.

    The piece says here:

    The Cook family are not the only people to have suffered.
    Among the 45 employees who lost their jobs after Brett Sutton’s brutal “naming and shaming” were several disabled people who worked on full wages under a philanthropic program.
    One of them, a profoundly deaf woman, has been unable to get another job, so her elderly parents have lost their house because she was paying it off for them.
    If and when it goes to a court, it could be a bruising experience.
    For the “useful idiot” Elizabeth Garlick. For Dandenong Council boss John Bennie. For Brett Sutton and key staff who advised him. For the police hierarchy. Even for Daniel Andrews and Anthony Albanese.

    These aren’t philanthropy programs as such, are they? Theses are programs where the employer, in this case the Cooks, puts up very little of the wages and the rest come from the taxpayer.

    If the piece can’t be totally honest about this then we should treat it as fake news.

  149. Bruce O’Newk:

    A new aeon has arrived!
    Went into loungeroom just now. Television is dead. It has ceased to be.
    I said a while ago on the Cat that once my current TV died I’d not get another.

    Stick with it – you won’t look back, and you’ll wonder just how you put up with being harangued by the idiot box about how empty your life was without product X or opinion Y.

  150. If the piece can’t be totally honest about this then we should treat it as fake news.

    Are you saying the whole story is bullshit?
    Or that the reporter should have digressed into the nitty-gritty of wage subsidy programs?

  151. Tom says:

    Thanks for the belly laughs, Arky and frollickingmole.

  152. calli says:

    The Club VeeDub had a great show in Berry this weekend. Many…many split-screen Kombis and a variety of beetles.

    One even backfired on the way out. Good memories.

  153. JC says:

    Some people think this letter could trigger an tidal wave against the woke. I’m not sure, but it’s damned good.

    You Have to Read This Letter
    A New York father pulls his daughter out of Brearley with a message to the whole school. Is the dam starting to break?

    Brearley used to be know as the elite school WASP parents would send their daughters so as to turn them into raging, screaming left wing harridan lezzos.

    Now it’s gone 100% woke.

    https://bariweiss.substack.com/p/you-have-to-read-this-letter

  154. johanna says:

    To add insult to injury, these council CEOs routinely rip off ratepayers to the tune of $400k+ a year. Anyone who managed in the private sector the way these grifters do would not even get a job.

    They can’t deliver on roads, rates and rubbish – their core responsibilities. But when it comes to wasteful greenie virtue signalling, creating regulatory mazes and spending money on pointless ‘promotional’ activities, they are keen as mustard.

    What’s more, every year we have councils being taken over by administrators because they can’t even balance their books and/or are riddled with corruption.

    What are these wastes of space being paid astronomical salaries for?

  155. JC says:

    Are you saying the whole story is bullshit?
    Or that the reporter should have digressed into the nitty-gritty of wage subsidy programs?

    We don’t know if the entire piece is mostly bullshit, because the writer lied about a small detail.

  156. Dover Beach:

    Today in Liberalism, encore:

    I cannot think of a more unhealthy relationship than this. Except, of course, the mind of a person who wants to remove societal protection against such
    a disparate power arrangement.
    And they said the slippery slope wasn’t going to happen!

  157. Some people think this letter could trigger an tidal wave against the woke. I’m not sure, but it’s damned good.

    The response from the school’s Headmistress was a corker.
    She not only doesn’t get the point of Mr. Gutman’s letter, she actually proves his point.

    She says his letter is ‘deeply offensive and harmful.’

  158. We don’t know if the entire piece is mostly bullshit, because the writer lied about a small detail.

    The writer did not lie.
    They did not digress into the nitty gritty of a wage subsidy program (if there is one)
    This does not change the substance of the story.

    Besides, the story is well known in the foodservice industry, where it has received a lot of mention for a long time.
    Most of us have seen the photos of the premises, including several of the ‘slug find’

    There is no way it happened the way the authorities say it did.
    It was a deliberate destruction of the business.

  159. Mater says:

    1735099 says:
    April 18, 2021 at 12:29 pm
    BRS and the quad bike.
    The quad bike is not the only thing that’s stuffed……

    Hey Bob,
    My own counsel will I keep on the BRS saga, but I’d suggest that if you are going to link to post about the situation, you pick posts that are sufficiently informed enough to get the very basics right.

    From what we now know, that fuel mistake was the least of his misdemeanours. The media has been exploding with Roberts-Smith stories for a long time. Who could blame them? His story is a lush garden ripe for constant picking. He soared to the pinnacle by being awarded the highest decoration for valour when he picked up a Victoria Cross in 2010. Five years later, on another deployment to Afghanistan, he was awarded the Medal for Gallantry. And then, according to media reports and official inquiries by Justice Brereton and the Australian Federal Police he is alleged to have been involved in the most scandalous and criminal behaviour.

    The mistake is obvious, but given facts seem to allude you, I’ll elucidate.
    He won his MG in 2006, not five years after his VC (2010).
    If the author can’t get these simple (and publicly available) facts correct, why would anyone give the rest of the article any credence?

  160. Entropy says:

    johanna says:
    April 18, 2021 at 3:23 pm
    To add insult to injury, these council CEOs routinely rip off ratepayers to the tune of $400k+ a year. Anyone who managed in the private sector the way these grifters do would not even get a job.

    Jus to point out something to make you even angrier, CEOs of even the most pitiful country shire council, say 500 or so ratepayers, or sometimes even less, demand equivalency of pay or the council just won’t get decent quality in their CEOs. Apparently.
    Mind you, in those country shires the Mayor can still bone the CEO if they don’t get on.

  161. Entropy says:

    We don’t know if the entire piece is mostly bullshit, because the writer lied about a small detail.

    We are talking a Sunday newspaper.

    Reminds me of a Joe Jackson song.

  162. 1735099 says:

    The mistake is obvious, but given facts seem to allude (sic) you, I’ll elucidate.

    I didn’t write that article.
    I posted it.
    I understand that minor detail has escaped you.
    This piece (by someone who does know what he’s on about) is relevant.

  163. thefrollickingmole says:

    I might add, the farm went mechanized, not the Clydesdales.
    That would be silly, theyd never fit in the old seats and the steering wheel would need significant adjustments.

    Not a lot of sentiment in the Mole family then.

    Zero, dad went to work after doing his morning chores, which included feedibng & watering the horses and came home to find happy pigs an some redundant tack left hanging in the shed.

    At least he was “kind” enough to do them all at once instead of stringing out at a horse a week.

    But if we could make councils redundant and treat them like granddad treated the team, Im all for that.

    One of the bitches we dealt with as called Nerada, or as I called her “Darth Nerada”.
    She had one child, and she was never going to make the mistake of saying yes to anything again.

  164. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV) says:

    I see nambob doesn’t have a life and is squandering his last few years on the blog… noice

  165. Jo says:

    Mater my name is rambob spud and the truth is anything I say even when I contradict myself. By the way did I ever tell you I volunteered to go to South Vietnam, I won’t boor you with the details. Tents hide when they see me coming. Got to go, there’s blankets to fold and hide under.

  166. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha says:

    I posted it.

    You posted it, without checking for accuracy? Does anyone else see the irony, here?

  167. Mater says:

    I didn’t write that article.
    I posted it.

    And made comment based on it’s content.

  168. Cassie of Sydney says:

    “This piece (by someone who does know what he’s on about) is relevant.”

    If you want an insight into why Bob the Racist thinks the way he does, the piece he links to is rather illuminating..it’s a well known purveyor and spruiker of far-left anti-Semitism, conveniently hidden, of course, behind “anti-Zionism”. It hosts well known anti-Semites such as Stuart Rees, founder of the Sydney Peace Prize (LOL) and former ABC correspondent Sophie McNeill…both Sophie and Stuart advocate the “dismantling” of the state of Israel….hmm…wonder how many Jooos will be left alive if that happens? Here’s my guess…not many.

  169. 1735099 says:

    Confirmed – Paul Manafort (Trump’s campaign manager from June – August 2016) was sharing information with Konstantin Kilimnik, a known Russian intelligence operator.

    The purpose here is to point out that Paul Manafort, his campaign manager for a key stretch of the campaign, appears to have worked regularly with a Russian intelligence agent during that time. Actually, that part is not totally new: a report from the Senate Intelligence Committee published in 2020—when the committee was controlled by Republicans—found that “on numerous occasions over the course of his time on the Trump campaign, Manafort sought to secretly share internal Campaign information with [Konstantin] Kilimnik.” Specifically, Manafort’s deputy, Rick Gates, said he was instructed to share campaign polling data with Kilimnik. The report—which, again, Republican allies of Donald Trump signed their names to—characterized Kilimnik as a “Russian intelligence officer.”

  170. thefrollickingmole says:

    I didn’t write that article.
    I posted it.

    So you are even stupider for not picking up the error?
    Or only 3/4 as much of a dickhead for posting an article with an obvious incorrect bit in it?

    And BTW, the lectures on morality by an aging Asian sex tourist really dont carry much weight here.
    Because we will judge you by what you have confessed to doing, not how FIGJAM you say you are.

  171. 1735099 says:

    And made comment based on it’s content.

    Which flew (as many things do) right over your head.
    What is “stuffed” is the relationship between senior elements of the ADF and the government they are supposed to work for.
    The eternal and universal truth (soldiers are political collateral) that has held since about 1964 still holds.

  172. thefrollickingmole says:

    Wang wanders into school wearing a pair of beshitted pants.

    When its pointed out he shouts
    “Well they arent mine, they were shit in by someone else and Im just wearing them”..

  173. One of the bitches we dealt with as called Nerada, or as I called her “Darth Nerada”.
    She had one child, and she was never going to make the mistake of saying yes to anything again.

    The council here had a bitter lush, late middle aged, single & lived with cats.
    She was allowed free reign, set back the development of the town’s amenity by 20 yrs, & tried to put at least two local businesses out of operation.
    (She was too stupid & too embittered to comprehend the damage she was doing to people’s lives)

    I’ll use your saying without mercy, if her name ever comes up.

  174. kaysee says:

    Cymatics
    A visual demonstration of the power of sound to create order out of chaos.

  175. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha says:

    The council here had a bitter lush, late middle aged, single & lived with cats.

    Does local council breed them?

  176. will says:

    Arky says:
    April 18, 2021 at 2:38 pm
    Not a lot of sentiment in the Mole family then

    what sort of funeral service does Arky consider suitable for a horse?

    A landrover herse and 21 gun salute?

  177. Mater says:

    This piece (by someone who does know what he’s on about) is relevant.

    Really?
    Greg Lockhart served in Afghanistan with Matthew Locke, et al?
    If not, why is his opinion* any more informed about the situation than every other historian or pundit who has a ‘take’ on the situation?

    *I know, he wrote a book about ‘The Minefield’ which agrees with your biases, but despite him actually getting the dates correct, his opinion is still just that.

  178. Colonel Crispin Berka says:

    What are these wastes of space being paid astronomical salaries for?

    To toe the line at ICLEI and co-operate in Agenda 2030? Just a random guess there.

  179. Mater says:

    Keep pivoting, Bob.
    I’m enjoying the spectacle.

  180. thefrollickingmole says:

    Wand miraculously manages to wrangle a reference to ‘Nam and his innate morality (sex pest edition) onto this blog.
    Again.
    Because hes not mentally ill or anything.
    Not cuckoo for coco pops.
    Or a bent and twisted moral vaccum.

    Nope.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qLrnkK2YEcE

    Lyrics
    Is Wang ill, Is Wang ill, Is Wang ill
    Is Wang ill today, Mr Sinc, Wangs in school
    I’m afraid he’s not, Miss Prostatot
    Wangs Monomania problem is way out of hand
    The Blog County school board have decided to expel
    Wang from the entire Catallaxy system
    Oh Mr Sinc, I’m as upset as you to learn of Wang monomania
    But surely, expulsion is not the answer!
    I’m afraid expulsion is the only answer
    It’s the opinion of the entire commentariat that Wang is criminally insane
    That boy needs therapy, psychosomatic,
    That boy needs therapy, purely psychosomatic
    That boy needs therapy
    Lie down on the couch! What does that mean?
    You’re a nut! You’re crazy in the coconut!

  181. Does local council breed them?

    Attracts them & empowers them.
    The council has no input into the Fire Brigade inspectors, but the bitter lush usually chooses the food/health inspector – who is then owned by her, despite the health inspector being ‘impartial’

  182. thefrollickingmole says:

    Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Bitter lushes or cats??

    The Feraldton council was allowed to blob and amalgamate with some surrounding councils, this included taking over their old offices etc.

    So they expanded the offices in town and, this is gods own truth, used the offices of the Grenough shire council (nearly the same size) to house feral cats/ as a cat pound.
    https://thewest.com.au/news/mid-west/the-claws-are-out-in-the-council-chambers-ng-ya-262713
    Then after it smelt suitably of cat piss put it up for sale.

    Top…men…
    Thats who work there top….men….

  183. JC says:

    Does anyone else see the irony, here?

    No we all missed it. We need a retarded mongoose to make us aware. On the prowl for another mobbing. As always.

  184. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha says:

    Bitter lushes or cats??

    The first.

  185. 1735099 says:

    *I know, he wrote a book about ‘The Minefield’ which agrees with your biases,

    The Minefield was impeccably researched, and completely factual.
    There was no bias, just a revelation of incompetence, ambition, and tragedy. Find one instance of “bias” in this review –

    In June 1966 the Australian government sent a small Task Force to support the US war in Vietnam. The Task Force was located in a rubber plantation around a small hill called ‘Nui Dat’, roughly in the centre of Phuoc Tuy Province, approximately 60 kilometres south-east of Saigon. The Task Force then was under the command of Brig. Oliver David Jackson and within a few months (August 1966) the iconic battle at Long Tan was fought. Five months later the newly appointed Task Force commander, Brig. Stuart Graham decided to lay a “barrier fence and minefield” from the Dat Do village southwards to the coast, 11 kilometres away. Graham believed the minefield would separate the people in the province’s heavily populated southwest from the enemy in the north and east as well as free up his battalions to conduct more of the “search and destroy” operations that constituted the US war-fighting strategy. Graham was a likely future Chief of the General Staff but chose to lay the minefield against fierce opposition from his senior advisers. His motivation appeared to have been a mixture of operational pressures and personal ambition. Author Lockhart (a Vietnam veteran) discusses these issues and examines them with great insight. Whatever Graham’s motivation, the minefield became an unmitigated disaster. As prophesied by Graham’s advisers, enemy troops lifted the mines soon after being laid. The mines became the local guerrillas’ primary killing weapon. More than half the Australian casualties were caused by those mines. The tragedy was the eventual realisation that the ‘people’ and the ‘enemy’ the barrier was intended to separate them from was more often than not one and the same. The minefield exposed not only tactical ineptitude but also, unwittingly, geostrategic ignorance. The minefield quickly became recognised as one of Australia’s worst military blunders, yet when Graham returned the Army promoted him. Aided in his research by his fluency in Vietnamese and French, Lockhart’s book is very well researched and very insightful.

    Don Tate’s article provides the infantryman’s perspective. It’s harrowing stuff.

  186. Mater says:

    Nice deflection.
    Not buying.

  187. Colonel Crispin Berka says:

    Strap on your LOLerskates for this one.

    Manafort sought to secretly share internal Campaign information with [Konstantin] Kilimnik.” Specifically, Manafort’s deputy, Rick Gates, said he was instructed to share campaign polling data with Kilimnik.

    I know the intelligence agencies sometimes have a problem with overclassification of records, but this is ridiculous. The “internal” information was… public opinion poll data, which anyone could recreate with their own surveys, which foreign intelligence probably has a better handle on than CNN anyway, this is the “internal” data which could hand the presidency to Russia if it were leaked?
    Oh numbers, don’t ever change.

    Note also the suggestion that any conversation that isn’t recorded and published on the nightly news is described as an attempt at “secrecy”. Just like all your other daily conversations which are not recorded and published and yet nobody describes them as secret conversations. Manafort may have been naive, but you can’t blame him for Russian intelligence being good at their jobs. Gotta get that super secret “internal polling” information, LOL.

    RB: Vee haff got zee secret polling data of zee trump campaign, comrade Putin.
    VP: Excellent, comrade Rob Brough, but how did you achieve such tricky task?
    RB: We asked 100 people to name their favourite candidate….

    Numbers is a comedy gold mine.

  188. 1735099 says:

    The Frolicking Moll* spends his Sunday afternoon writing doggerel.

    Lyrics
    Is Wang ill, Is Wang ill, Is Wang ill
    Is Wang ill today, Mr Sinc, Wangs in school
    I’m afraid he’s not, Miss Prostatot
    Wangs Monomania problem is way out of hand
    The Blog County school board have decided to expel
    Wang from the entire Catallaxy system
    Oh Mr Sinc, I’m as upset as you to learn of Wang monomania
    But surely, expulsion is not the answer!
    I’m afraid expulsion is the only answer
    It’s the opinion of the entire commentariat that Wang is criminally insane
    That boy needs therapy, psychosomatic,
    That boy needs therapy, purely psychosomatic
    That boy needs therapy
    Lie down on the couch! What does that mean?
    You’re a nut! You’re crazy in the coconut!

    But he’s not mentally ill or anything.
    *And he can’t spell his own tag 😂

  189. 1735099 says:

    Nice deflection.
    Not buying.

    Apology accepted.

  190. Snoopy says:

    Is it too soon to post the Brearley story for a third time?

  191. 1735099 says:

    The “internal” information was… public opinion poll data, which anyone could recreate with their own surveys,

    No, it was not “public opinion poll data”.
    It was the Trump campaign’s internal polling, not available to the public.
    There was a total of 75 pages of it, labeled “exhibit 233” in the indictment.

  192. The snail story is disgusting.
    Hopefully the Hunchback of Victoriastan slipped on one at the top of the stairs.
    Are there any links I can help publicise this travesty about?

  193. thefrollickingmole says:

    Wang again demonstrates his incisive and scorching use of …. the cut and paste function.

    But only after another expedition into monomania territory.

    Its said the smell of certain hair products sets him off.

  194. JC says:

    Grandpa Schnupy, what did you did you do on Sunday?

    Jaggarr, I read every single comment posted at the Cat and attacked aboriginals. Usual stuff.

  195. thefrollickingmole says:

    It was the Trump campaign’s internal polling

    Much wow.
    Very exciting.

    Now tell us how that “swung” the election for Trump.

    Did Putin parachute in a million postal votes into key areas which didnt require ID to vote or something?

  196. Jupes:

    I still have faith in Americans. Traditionally, they are slow to rouse, but once they do, they go nuclear. (Literally in WW2.)

    How I wish you were right, Jupes. But the US of 1941 is a different society to the US of 2021.

  197. Mater says:

    Apology accepted.

    And imagined.

  198. incoherent rambler says:

    Agreed jupes.
    Underestimate Americans at your peril.

  199. Jo says:

    Appears rambob is more manic than usual after his sojourn. Joh

  200. Cassie of Sydney says:

    “Snoopy says:
    April 18, 2021 at 4:24 pm
    Is it too soon to post the Brearley story for a third time?”

    Here is Gad Saad’s superb takedown of the Brearley tale….

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FXJaBKXf-Ws&t=855s

  201. Dot says:

    57 year old Sonja Morgan will probably want a sugar daddy at 60 then to settle down with a good guy at 70.

    It’s okay, she’s frozen her eggs and had a successful career pre COVID.

  202. thefrollickingmole says:

    Dot.

    Only one reply to that nonsense.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L2W8A942JWQ

  203. The snail story is disgusting.
    Hopefully the Hunchback of Victoriastan slipped on one at the top of the stairs.
    Are there any links I can help publicise this travesty about?

    If you can get hold of a bunch of photos of the place, & of the slug that was found, it really puts it in perspective.

    The typed word does not impart the scale nor the evil, of the fitup being carried out.

  204. 1735099 says:

    Now tell us how that “swung” the election for Trump.

    It didn’t.
    But the fact is that his campaign manager was sharing information with a Russian intelligence officer. The relationship was the problem.
    If Trump knew about it he was corrupt.
    If he didn’t, he was incompetent.
    The fact that he pardoned Manafort in the end, suggests the first situation was in play.
    He owes Trump big time and will keep quiet.

  205. JC says:

    Cassie

    It was just the former Queensland Regional Water Board employee having a go at me for not reading up the backpages. He’s not interested in story, but just trying to tally up worthless points. Worthless piece of shit he is.

    By the way, you mentioned those three schools earlier.. I had a look back. Spence, Chapin and Brearley as being the most expensive. It so happens our kid went to Chapin and it was truly excellent then teaching young girls to excel in life. They’re not the most expensive as all private schools there are around a similar vig… give or take.

    Even The Little Red School. I’m serious, this is the school communist parents send their kids and it’s just as expensive.

  206. JC says:

    The snail story is disgusting.
    Hopefully the Hunchback of Victoriastan slipped on one at the top of the stairs.
    Are there any links I can help publicise this travesty about?

    It’s not even a pun, but a smell a huge fucking rat with the snail story. I’d rather wait to read about the evidence presented to court rather than swallow the bait along with the sinker.

  207. custard April 18, 2021 at 1:25 pm

    Just got this one from Spacechook

    Labor. Victoria.

    Can’t wait to see if that impacts the next rates notice… 😳

  208. Snoopy says:

    What’s the vig for a kilo of premium scotch fillet in Melbourne?

  209. It’s not even a pun, but a smell a huge fucking rat with the snail story.

    While anything is possible, the circumstances under which the slug was found are highly questionable.
    To say the council response from that point onward was disproportionate would be like saying an atom bomb dropped on the oval is a disproportionate response to a batsman appealing a catch.

  210. thefrollickingmole says:

    JC
    I’d rather wait to read about the evidence presented to court rather than swallow the bait along with the sinker.

    If you accept the bit about the photoshopped tissue Vs unphotoshopped tissue slug being accurate then it looks pretty damning.

  211. Geriatric Mayfly says:

    Bruce of Newcastle says:
    April 18, 2021 at 1:17 pm
    For GM: a hellscape live cam. Who needs CGI when you can have the real thing?

    And whilst monitoring the fissures, I note a certain amateur ornithologist (par excellence) offering gratuitous advice to the Icelanders on the vague links between climate and flat batteries servicing the cameras in situ. One camera remains down and all that energy around going to waste.

  212. JC says:

    Dunno Gramps. Weird question.

    By the way, what made you choose Schnupy as a blog name? Was it the manliest blog name you could think of?

  213. JC says:

    Mole

    The writer basically lied about the philanthropy thing dealing with the Cooks allegedly hiring the impaired. I’d rather wait for the stuff to surface in court before I run with it. There’s no great hurry to reach a conclusion anyways.

  214. The business in question is a yuuuuge area of near mirror-polished stainless steel & impeccable coolrooms, they look(ed) better than most any foodservice operation I’ve seen.

    The lone slug was ‘found’ in the middle of a bare polished floor in a long wide corridor with bare walls, several metres or so from the nearest anything, even a corner.

    However the slug got there, it sure as hell didn’t walk.
    Nor is it something anybody would walk past – the floor was so clean the ruddy thing stood out like …er.. a slug in the middle of a mirror-polished floor.

    The whole slug find smells like king sized bullshit.

  215. Snoopy says:

    Was it the manliest blog name you could think of?

    Says the amateur interior decorator who as a child was cruelly discouraged from realising his dream of being a window dresser at Myer.

  216. JC says:

    Notafan says:
    April 18, 2021 at 5:02 pm

    Dandenong council fights release of body cam footage at vcat at the abc

    You know what, I would disallow ALL video from court cases. You never kno9w what is omitted and if the vid has been fiddled. The Floyd case is a perfect illustration of what I’m talking about.

  217. The writer basically lied about the philanthropy thing dealing with the Cooks allegedly hiring the impaired.

    This is hardly the first time the incident has been written about.
    The business is (was) a non-customer service bulk preparation facility. Perfect for utilising sheltered workshop types.

    The payroll arrangements for the staff have no bearing, none whatsoever, on the conduct of a health inspector.

  218. thefrollickingmole says:

    Clicking through a couple of slug-gate stories and got to this bit.

    A Melbourne council has dropped all charges against a family-owned catering business which was shut down and accused of having a slug in its kitchen.

    8 months after they shut them down.
    8 months of deliberate council bastardry.

    I hope the owners of the ex-business recoup their money by hiring out the bodies of the council turds for unscientific experiments.

  219. Farmer Gez says:

    Numbers source of choice.
    More from Jack Holmes Esquire magazine.

    https://www.esquire.com/news-politics/a36106825/daunte-wright-brooklyn-center-shot-at-traffic-stop/

  220. JC says:

    Schnupy..

    You’re getting weirder and weirder with your stupid stories. It’s verging on creepsville though just not there yet.

    You’ve been told before, quit trying to be witty and funny as you’re not. Live the life you were meant to, which was as a former Queensland Water Board employee from the billing department.

  221. JC says:

    Driller.

    No one is forcing you not to believe the story. Go right ahead. It’s all yours. You own it.

    There’s absolutely no fucking reason to accept it all because time isn’t off essence.

    Smarter people will wait.

  222. Snoopy says:

    Ricky Slater was murdered.

  223. JC says:

    Okay. Interesting. Typical water cooler chatter at the billing department digs.

  224. Geriatric Mayfly says:

    However the slug got there, it sure as hell didn’t walk.

    Sometimes found hiding in lettuces. The horror!

  225. Top Ender says:

    Wonder where Struth has gone to?

  226. Bruce of Newcastle says:

    GM – I’m not an ornithologist amateur or otherwise, and that comment was on VolcanoCafe not the RUV youtube feed. 😀

    Highlight of the day at Cafe Bruce was this morning when I went into the back yard and saw Mrs Nthn Magpie on the clothesline. So I did what I do, stuck out my arm and offered some meat. She has learned to jump onto my arm.

    The fun thing is she didn’t. Instead one of the noisy miners did, and I was able to give it a few bits of meat and bread before it took off. First time that I recall I’ve had that happen. Normally if they do it noisies will land on an arm or a hand, say eww, icky! then bounce off in disgust.

  227. Tom says:

    Looks like the Paywallian has posted Chris Miychell’s excellent Monday media column early:

    Two Senate hearings last week highlight how shallow modern journalism and politics are.

    Senate Estimates heard from former Australia Post chief executive Christine Holgate on Tuesday. The hearing was chaired by Greens senator Sarah Hanson-Young, as was Monday’s Senate inquiry into media diversity in Australia, when former PM Malcolm Turnbull claimed Rupert Murdoch was a threat to democracy.

    Reporting of both hearings shows why conservative voters are grateful they have the Murdoch papers. Most other news sources are driven by the values of social media platforms that inform the coverage of the ABC, most free-to air television, most of the Nine newspapers, Guardian Australia, the trade union-owned New Daily, Crikey and The Conversation.

    ABC 7.30 political editor Laura Tingle on Tuesday and Fran Kelly on RN Breakfast on Wednesday covered the Holgate story. Neither Tingle’s interview with Holgate nor Kelly’s with Hanson-Young discussed the origins of allegations that precipitated Holgate’s departure over the award of four $4988 Cartier watches to senior executives in 2018. Nor did another of Turnbull’s media favourites, the Guardian, see much need to discuss Labor’s role in the affair.

    While Prime Minister Scott Morrison went over the top in his reaction to the watches story last October, the pursuit of Holgate was driven by Victorian Labor senator Kimberley Kitching. Holgate was heavily criticised at the time by Hanson-Young, and Opposition Leader Anthony Albanese demanded Holgate resign. The role of Labor and the Greens in the Holgate pile-on did make the front page of this newspaper and page two of The Australian Financial Review. Yet the left media has allowed Holgate to claim she was the victim of sexism even though two of her initial pursuers were women: Kitching and Hanson-Young.

    Morrison should never have joined that initial left-wing attack. He played the politics because the government was fending off damaging allegations on a number of fronts — there were serious questions over a $30m Western Sydney Airport land deal, the sports rorts affair was in full swing and there were clouds over spending by former ASIC boss James Shipton. The PM should have defended Holgate, knowing that spending on the watches was tiny compared with bonuses in other publicly owned enterprises, such as the $80m in bonuses paid to NBN executives last year.

    As usual, Turnbull could not resist another pile-on against Morrison, tweeting: “The public bullying of Christine Holgate is one of the worst episodes of brutish misogyny I have seen in politics. The PM should apologise.”

    Turnbull did not mention Labor’s role in the affair. And few reporters mentioned the hypocrisy of Kitching who wore “suffragette white” to the hearing in solidarity with Holgate when she had led the lynch mob in the first place.

    Nor did journalists reporting on Turnbull’s criticism of News Corp (publisher of The Australian) observe that he received unanimous support in the 1990s from the company’s newspapers for his failed push for a republic — a fact pointed out by this paper’s Dennis Shanahan on the Credlin program on Sky News on Monday night.

    Nor were the News Corp papers unanimously negative about Turnbull as PM. Some senior writers were critical while others, such as Paul Kelly and Greg Sheridan, were even-handed.

    Like failed Labor PM Kevin Rudd, his partner in the push for a media royal commission, Turnbull did not lose the prime ministership because of Murdoch’s power. Both men were disliked by their own party rooms and lost the prime ministership in internal votes.

    The two richest people to have served in federal parliament were never aligned to the values of their parties. And they lacked political skill and courage. Both should have called early elections which they could have won: Rudd had the option to go to the polls in early 2010, rather than dumping the Emissions Trading System he had claimed would solve “the greatest moral challenge of our time”, and Turnbull, who was riding high in late 2015 after toppling Tony Abbott and leading the preferred prime minister polling.

    Turnbull went on to lose 39 straight Newspolls, worse than the 30 consecutive losses he used to justify his successful challenge against Abbott.

    Turnbull and Rudd consider themselves media experts. They are not, but at least Turnbull has worked as a journalist and legal adviser in media deals. It is worth reading his statement to the inquiry — some of which is thoughtful, but much of it is self-serving.

    First point: both men link Rupert Murdoch personally to every slight they suffer in the News Corp papers. In my experience, Murdoch almost never involves himself in news coverage and, living in the US, is not close to individual stories.

    Both former PMs use the ownership of print as evidence of Murdoch dominance. Yet print newspaper sales and readership are tiny compared with online media traffic.

    Turnbull and Rudd both focus on the Queensland print market after News Corp in 2016 bought the APN regional newspapers. They cite front pages hostile to the state Labor government. Yet Labor convincingly won the Queensland elections in 2020 and 2017.

    Turnbull says it is not Murdoch’s power with voters that worries him, but the influence of the newspapers and Sky News with Coalition party members. “It’s as though my branch members are having a meeting with Alan Jones and Peta Credlin every night,” he quoted a Queensland Liberal as saying.

    Many people during his prime ministership urged Turnbull to do interviews on Sky News. Why not speak to your branches if that is what you think Sky News does? Senior Labor people have done so. Albanese, Labor deputy leader Richard Marles, Joel Fitzgibbon, Kitching and others appear on Sky News regularly. Turnbull even claimed the Morrison government’s news media bargaining code — which requires Facebook and Google to pay for news — is like a mafia shakedown by News Corp.

    Yet most media organisations in the country joined the push for the code and many countries in Europe are looking at similar measures.

    And then there’s climate change. Turnbull — Mr Harbourside Mansion — and Rudd, who owns on the oceanfront near Noosa, have always sought to curry favour with global elites at the expense of the jobs of blue-collar workers in coal seats. The politics has failed and that’s why Turnbull lost his NSW Clean Energy job on April 6. The NSW government is facing a by-election in the coal seat of Upper Hunter on May 22.

    There will be no royal commission into media diversity. Rudd and Turnbull need to shoulder blame for their own failures.

    Link.

  228. JC says:

    FBI’s Wry has red hot poker stuck up rear end by Congressman Brad Wenstrup.

    This is just wow.

    https://citizenfreepress.com/breaking/msm-will-never-show-you-this-stunning-moment-in-congress/

  229. Sometimes found hiding in lettuces. The horror!

    That’s the odd part.
    It was a country mile from anywhere you’d expect to find a slug.
    The place (despite what Suicide Sutton’s mates may say) was as clean as a whistle, there would not have been a speck of dust in the entire building, nor the slightest stain or dullness to any metal.
    The slug could not have got to where it was found under its own steam.

    One slug, & they’ve gone nuclear.

    And the council have gone above & beyond to keep the bodycam used by their health inspector from being tendered in court.

    Now, why would that be?
    The bodycam would show the health inspector chancing upon a lone slug in the corridor – it would prove the council’s case. Would it not?

    These bodycams are worn for the purpose of producing the video in court as part of a prosecution.

    The council chose to drop the prosecution rather than risk exhibiting the health inspector’s bodycam.

    Now, why would that be?

  230. thefrollickingmole says:

    I think we should take a moment to remember the potential greatness revealed by this line in that article.

    Turnbull went on to lose 39 straight Newspolls, worse than the 30 consecutive losses he used to justify his successful challenge against Abbott.

  231. Bruce of Newcastle says:

    FBI’s Wry has red hot poker stuck up rear end

    One of the best things about Trump is he outed the FBI elites in front of God and everyone. Wray has turned out even slimier than Comey, and Comey, Mueller and Rosenstein go back decades together.

    Pretty much anything that the FBI does is detested by the conservative half of America, who would now cross the street if they saw a G-Man.

  232. Snoopy says:

    The council chose to drop the prosecution rather than risk exhibiting the health inspector’s bodycam.

    Now, why would that be?

    I’m fairly certain it had something to do with a wage subsidy for a blind woman.

  233. JC says:

    Bruce
    The Orange Oaf installed Wry as FBI head. It’s the worst decision he ever made as prez. I do forgive him though because at the time, he’d fired the noxious giraffe and was under pressure with calushion accusations. He made a mistake with Wry.

  234. Rockdoctor says:

    Murdoch almost never involves himself in news coverage and, living in the US, is not close to individual stories.

    Remember Bill O’Reilly saying something similar on one of his monologues on media bias before he was cancelled by Fox.

  235. JC says:

    I’m fairly certain it had something to do with a wage subsidy for a blind woman.

    It wasn’t presented as a wage subsidy, you water board billing department troll. It should have been, but it wasn’t. It was presented as the philanthropic Cooks.

    Philanthropy.

    But go ahead, believe what you want to about the case even though there’s no penalty in waiting.

    This is really side discussion at the Water Board water cooler, Schnupsie. Schnupes..

    On point as always.

  236. Snoopy says:

    Rockynats!

    Easter 2022 sorted.

    Rockynats Day 2

  237. Geriatric Mayfly says:

    GM – I’m not an ornithologist amateur or otherwise, and that comment was on VolcanoCafe not the RUV youtube feed. 😀

    Ooops! Those fissure fumes again. I must stand upwind.

  238. Snoopy says:

    It was presented as the philanthropic Cooks.

    There was no mention that the Cooks were the philanthropists. You assumed that.

  239. Bruce of Newcastle says:

    Six o’clock! So I go into loungeroom to turn on the television for the news.
    Oops, no television.
    I see I’m going to be having withdrawal symptoms for a while.

  240. thefrollickingmole says:

    Lets face it, repubs are screwed when they enter government.
    Its a state that hasnt voted republican since Reagan and installed ‘Lester in chief with 60% of the vote.
    https://www.270towin.com/states/Washington

    Even worse if you district.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_presidential_elections_in_Washington,_D.C.

    Joe Biden: 92.1% of the vote.

    Now this is where your upper echelons of the “talent pool” you have will hail from.

  241. JC says:

    There was no mention that the Cooks were the philanthropists. You assumed that.

    Of course I assumed that, you billing department clerk.
    What, they used the word as a filler? No intention to persuade through deception.

    How about..

    They hired a couple of retards, limbless spastics and blind grandmas because of a very generous wage subsidy scheme. There’s a absolute zero reason to even use the philanthropy.

    But go ahead, keeping pretending, you dullard. It’s fun.

  242. Bruce of Newcastle says:

    Bruce
    The Orange Oaf installed Wry as FBI head.

    Yeah I know. It turns out there wasn’t anyone he could’ve chosen, they were all corrupt down to fairly low levels in the organization. I suppose that was to be expected after 50 odd years of J. Edgar Hoover then 50 more years of Gramsci.

    DoJ is just as bad, from what we’ve seen. And, as discussed today, VicPol.

  243. Dot says:

    Trump should have gutted the FBI, CIA, NSA.

    Oh no said Pollyanna, Chicken Little and Maude Flanders.

    Conservative Inc:

    No! Don’t do that, he won’t get elected again.

    Also, libertarians wish to be eaten last by the left.

    PS we’re not RINOs. You are.

  244. JC says:

    Lets try a little edit here

    Among the 45 employees who lost their jobs after Brett Sutton’s brutal “naming and shaming” were several disabled people who worked on full wages under a philanthropic program.

    Reality

    Among the 45 employees who lost their jobs after Brett Sutton’s brutal “naming and shaming” were several disabled people who worked on full wages under a generous Federal government subsidy program.

    According to Water Board’s Schnupy, these two sentences convey exactly the same thing.

    FMD.

  245. Knuckle Dragger says:

    ‘Ricky Slater was murdered.’

    Ahahahahahaaaaaa.

    Haha. Aaaaaah, haha.

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