Heed Hastie

 
However emotionally beneficial to those bereaved who deserve to be heard, Royal Commissions as cathartic events – the one announced today will make no civil or criminal findings – are not always useful. There is every possibility this Commission will end up hamstringing the ADF with yet more ‘cultural change’ policing. This in turn will do more harm to the longer-term national interest than good. Assistant Defence Minister Andrew Hastie’s insistence that the “core business” of Australia’s armed forces is the “application of lethal violence” rather than woke-feminist posturing is a timely ameliorant. Starting with recruitment.

Soldiering isn’t a netball derby. Advertise accordingly. Revise physical and psychological admission standards and make them not easier but harder. Affirmative action always destroys brand prestige. Those are just two logical corollaries of Hastie’s doctrine. If applied universally, the doctrine must also end the B-Team devitalisation of the regular army and attendant overuse of Special Forces in future conflicts. If Mr Morrison’s Royal Commission becomes solely an exercise in RU-OK welfare provisioning rather than a broad means to tune up an institution brought low by political termites, it will be a failure. Sadly, I am not optimistic.

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69 Responses to Heed Hastie

  1. Roger says:

    Defence has spent two decades + making the armed services an equal opportunity playground. Mr. Hastie should apply his not inconsiderable experience, intelligence and insights to his own department. He’s presents the best opportunity of achieving reform that we’re ever likely to have.

  2. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha says:

    Defence has spent two decades + making the armed services an equal opportunity playground

    Good luck countering that mindset “You go, girl!”

  3. Roger says:

    Good luck countering that mindset “You go, girl!”

    Indeed, but with Dutton & Hastie there there’s an opportunity, at least.

  4. Lord Snooty says:

    My understanding is that mental illness in returned or retired service people is no more prevalent than in the general population. Which, if accurate, is probably not unsurprising given that resilience is one of the qualities that the defence forces look for in recruitment.

    I think I have also heard from someone who has studied this, that suicide rates are also not dissimilar. This may turn out to be another ‘aboriginal deaths in custody’ type finding – i.e. nothing unusual.

    I don’t have the stats, so don’t take these comments as proven facts, but no doubt they will come out.

  5. billie says:

    I don’t know how many of you have sat around with military people of the lower ranks lately, listened to their talk of social lives and such. It sounds like a bunch of school kids, at best, high school kids. It’s encouraged by their superiors that they are so social and undisciplined when not under direct command. They socialise with their superiors in fact.

    The ADF went the way it has as a result of poor recruitment and retainment numbers.

    It’s all very well saying the special forces are misued but they are less likely to die because of their superior training and culture. The boys and girls who join up to get a free education and not too much hard work, are a danger to themselves and those around them.

    For instance, during their training they can call out their superiors with a red or yellow card if they “feel” unhappy with their treatment and the offender MUST take a timeout. Counseling follows. They cannot be failed during courses in their training, that would be unfair and discriminatory.

    They are not hardened any longer for the rigours of combat, rather, more like a suburban social drama club and everyone gets a participation medal (of course!).

    A Royal Commission will just reveal more shortcomings with fixes for such that are more woke and to many, more pretencious.

    Senior military people are too terrified of losing payscale and promotion opportunities to push back.

  6. B R says:

    The white-anting of our military and the resultant lowering of combat toughness by our inclusive, gender equitable and no-offence military leaders, is all part of the plan to drag down the West. In the meantime 2 million highly disciplined, highly trained, well equipped Chinese military stand at the ready for immediate mobilisation.

    They couldn’t give a rats about wokeness. They are there to win.

  7. Albatross says:

    Royal Commissions should not be used like this. What a disgrace. Is Morrison the weakest PM of our age?

  8. Albatross says:

    Anyhow: these spectacles are just designed to secure greater bureaucratic reach and influence.

  9. Wayne from Perth says:

    Red and yellow cards? What an absolute joke. The counselling should be for the card yielder. Eg this is obviously not the right career for you.

    It reminds me of the public sector. Ask someone to do their job and they take stress leave.

  10. Beertruk says:

    Ask someone to do their job and they take stress leave.

    And/or say they were ‘bullied.’

  11. Roger says:

    I think I have also heard from someone who has studied this, that suicide rates are also not dissimilar. This may turn out to be another ‘aboriginal deaths in custody’ type finding – i.e. nothing unusual.

    I expect so.

  12. Primer says:

    I don’t get it.
    The Army trains troopers, refines arms, refines patrol tactics, adds recce capability, keeps thinking about how best to kill Taliban who are trying to kill them…..and our “hardmen” come home and do the Taliban ‘s job for them and kill themselves….weak as piss.

    So these blokes saw a friend get mutilated/killed…ok…..come home and kill yourself…idiot.
    The Taliban love it.

    Western Front WW1, these Afghanistan pussies are useless mental incompetents.

  13. Mustapha Bunn says:

    It would be interesting to know the military background of those who have committed suicide. As in what arm of the ADF they served in,combat experience or otherwise etc.

  14. C.L. says:

    One thing I object to is the gradual, sneaky alteration of what a “veteran” is.

    Leave aside for one moment that the word is an Americanism (returned serviceman used to be the official phrase; granted, it’s a mouthful).

    It no longer seems to be used exclusively by or about war veterans but vis-a-vis anyone who ‘served.’ Catherine McGregor made reference to being a “veteran” last week; even Jacqui Lambie is a “veteran.” This is malarkey.

  15. Fred says:

    You’re spot on with the devitalisation of the regular army.

    I recall serving in the 1st Brigade back in 2008 and the brigade commander was inspecting our unit. He quipped that we had state of the art equipment if it was the 1970s.

    He went on to become a major general. Even officers think the regular army is a joke.

  16. Tel says:

    They couldn’t give a rats about wokeness. They are there to win.

    When you look at the Afghanistan situation … can you really say they were there to win? It looks like it’s been carefully designed to take as long as possible, while achieving as little as possible. It’s not even clear what in fact they were trying to achieve, and the objective is now keeping girls in government schools, presumably to inflict feminism on the Middle East.

    We are truly a people in search of a purpose, and I’m coming to the conclusion that is the neatest explanation of most of the madness you see around you.

  17. Snoopy says:

    I think I have also heard from someone who has studied this, that suicide rates are also not dissimilar. This may turn out to be another ‘aboriginal deaths in custody’ type finding – i.e. nothing unusual.

    Yep.
    It’s just another lawyers’ boondoggle run at taxpayers’ expense to show that the government is doing something.

    In the latest 3-year period analysed (2016-2018) the age-adjusted rate of suicide in serving males was 37% lower than in Australian males. Among reserve males it was 47% lower than in Australian males. Between 2007 and 2018 the rate of suicide in ex-serving males who discharged on medical grounds was higher than in Australian males, while among those who discharged voluntarily it was similar.

  18. Epicurious says:

    Primer says:
    April 19, 2021 at 7:19 pm
    I don’t get it.

    No, its obvious you don’t get it. Obvious you have never worn the uniform and spent time in a war zone. If we were ever to have to rely on people like you for our future defence then God help our women and children. I say this as a returned from war serviceman (veteran) without any pathologies from my 12 months war zone experience, yet am aware of many who have returned and have been affected. It is rare that anyone without such experience is able to understand and you have provided an exemplar.

  19. Primer says:

    Epi…understand what?
    Come home alive and be “affected”?
    By what?

  20. Bruce says:

    Consider this:

    In the last few decades, we have seen and experienced the spectacle of te reduction of MOST of the ADF to the status of “armed social workers”.

    In the same time frame, witness the deep militarization of state and feral police ‘services”.

    And the icing on this cake is the endless stream of state and feral legislation and regulations, ever increasingly constraining the people who actually pay for this stuff.

    To what end?

  21. Tim Neilson says:

    Epicurious says:
    April 19, 2021 at 8:29 pm

    Epi, I’m assuming that “Primer” is a particularly malicious troll.
    No-one could be that much of a fuckwit sincerely.

  22. Rex Anger says:

    @ Bruce-

    The bugmen in our various levels of government have chosen their preferred enforcers?

  23. FlyingPigs says:

    Good ‘optics’ approaching Anzac Day.

  24. C.L. says:

    Western Front WW1, these Afghanistan pussies are useless mental incompetents.

    My great uncle was decorated MM on the Western Front during WWI. He served again in WWII.

    From speaking with my cousin, his grandson, I know that he was a big drinker who never really got soldiering out of his mind. I think he came to believe it was all he was. The Great War damaged him.

    There is a happy medium between listening to Jacqui Lambie’s Lumbago Is Hell tales of a bad back and expecting men to say nothing of war’s enduring demons.

  25. jupes says:

    Assistant Defence Minister Andrew Hastie’s insistence that the “core business” of Australia’s armed forces is the “application of lethal violence” rather than woke-feminist posturing is a timely ameliorant.

    True. But can you guess which of the following statements the current Chief of the Defence Force made?

    1. “As soldiers our purpose is to serve the state, employing violence with humility always and compassion wherever possible.

    2. The object of war is not to die for your country but to make the other bastard die for his.

  26. jupes says:

    They couldn’t give a rats about wokeness. They are there to win.

    When you look at the Afghanistan situation … can you really say they were there to win?

    B.R. was referring to the Chicoms Tel.

    Nevertheless, to address your question the answer is an obvious no. But it is worse than that. Western armies no longer know how to win a guerrilla war. The strategy of counter insurgency warfare (COIN) is totally useless and has probably only worked once ever (Malaya). The doctrines it is based on such as Just War Theory are equally flawed.

    I think the military leadership considers COIN just like socialists consider communism. Next time they will get it right for sure.

  27. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha says:

    The strategy of counter insurgency warfare (COIN) is totally useless and has probably only worked once ever (Malaya).

    Malaya, Greece and the Philippines.

  28. Crossie says:

    If Mr Morrison’s Royal Commission becomes solely an exercise in RU-OK welfare provisioning rather than a broad means to tune up an institution brought low by political termites, it will be a failure. Sadly, I am not optimistic.

    Neither am I, ScoMo ruins everything he touches simply because he is a reactionary, no real or original thought comes from that man. It also doesn’t help that his advisors are younger and stupider than him.

  29. Snoopy says:

    Sri Lanka?

  30. Rex Anger says:

    The strategy of counter insurgency warfare (COIN) is totally useless and has probably only worked once ever (Malaya).

    Malaya, Greece and the Philippines

    It does work, but it relies on you being willing and able to use as much calculated brutality in the right time and place as those with whom you are competing for governance.

    There was no stomach for that sort of thing in Vietnam, as the politicians had no objective strategy. Particularly after the propaganda coup that was 1968’s Tet Offensive. Similarly in Northern Ireland. HM Armed Forces carried the day long enough to get to the Good Friday Agreement, but their efforts were repeatedly hamstrung by weak-kneed politicians, agaenda-driven media and interference from the Irish side of the IRA.

    And I would argue Vietnam was more inspirational for what happened post-2003 in Iraq and Afghanistan than should have been. Malaya, Algeria, Greece and the Philippines should have been the model.

    But when the Leftists in charge of you are hell-bent on making sure you lose despite every effort you make, will you ever get the chance to show the teeth you and your civilian populace need to show to the enemy? The same sort of teeth they are permitted to display unhindered?

  31. Crossie says:

    Western armies no longer know how to win a guerrilla war.

    They don’t need to win it or even to be there. Just carpet bomb from the air and go away. When they become troublesome again repeat the bombing mission and leave. Eventually the guerrillas will get the message.

    No need to even have an army or even pilots, drones can do this just as well.

  32. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha says:

    Malaya, Algeria, Greece and the Philippines should have been the model.

    Interesting point – Algeria – the French used calculated brutality – won the war – lost the peace?

  33. Rex Anger says:

    Interesting point – Algeria – the French used calculated brutality – won the war – lost the peace?

    Well, they are the French…

  34. Rex Anger says:

    And Islaaaaam is Islaaaaam, no.matter who is the convert.

  35. FlyingPigs says:

    1. “As soldiers our purpose is to serve the state, employing violence with humility always and compassion wherever possible.

    I actually blame the proliferation of so called “self development courses” conducted by charlatans and devotees of some of the weirdest brainwashing/psychological clap trap all paid for by gov and specifically aimed.

  36. Rex Anger says:

    Agreed.

    Humility comes from practiced professionalism. Not being taught how to do so by some stooge with a big paycheck and some wafty words.

  37. jupes says:

    Sri Lanka?

    Sri Lanka tried COIN for a few decades with no gain. Then they switched to the novel strategy of killing ALL the enemy. It worked a treat and now there is peace in Sri Lanka and the Tamil Tigers are gone.

    Of course, in the stupid world we now live in, the UN wanted to prosecute them for war crimes (wars cannot be won without committing acts which are currently considered war crimes). Unlike craven western countries such as ours, the Sri Lankans told them to get fucked.

  38. jupes says:

    It does work, but it relies on you being willing and able to use as much calculated brutality in the right time and place as those with whom you are competing for governance.

    Hence COIN as it is practiced by modern armies does not work. Hasn’t done so for over six decades.

  39. FlyingPigs says:

    Hence COIN as it is practiced by modern armies does not work. Hasn’t done so for over six decades.

    Peace!

    In their Time.

  40. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha says:

    My son gave his life for our country’
    Greg Sher, a reservist from the 1st Commando Regiment, was killed in 2009, well before the majority of alleged war crimes by Special Air Service Regiment troops.

    Ben Packham
    Foreign Affairs and Defence Correspondent
    @bennpackham
    Paul Garvey

    A father who challenged General Angus Campbell to retrieve his dead son’s Meritorious Unit ­Citation from his grave has thanked Peter Dutton “from the bottom of my heart” for overturning the Chief of the Defence Force’s order to revoke the awards.

    Felix Sher joined the outpouring of thanks from veterans for the decision, which was condemned as a “knee-jerk reaction” by CDF Angus Campbell to the Brereton war crimes report.

    A close associate of General Campbell, Australian Defence Association director Neil James, said Mr Dutton risked “improperly undermining the authority of the CDF”.

    “Civil control in a democracy is a reciprocal arrangement,” he said. “Just as the military should never interfere in politics, ministers and politicians have to think very carefully before they interfere in what are military professional matters.”

    Mr Sher, whose son was killed by a Taliban rocket attack in 2009, said Mr Dutton’s ruling, revealed by The Australian on Monday, was “a great relief for our family”.

    Greg Sher, a reservist from the 1st Commando Regiment, was killed in 2009, well before the ­majority of alleged war crimes by Special Air Service Regiment troops.

    “Our son gave his life in the service of his country,” said Mr Sher, who keeps his son’s citation in a framed display.

    “He was upset about girls ­getting acid thrown in their faces, and women getting stoned.”

    Mr Sher galvanised opposition to the citation decision last Nov­ember when he told General Campbell he could collect the award “from my son’s gravestone”.

    “I commend Peter Dutton from the bottom of my heart for what he has done,” he told The Australian on Monday.

    “It is unfortunate the CDF ­attempted to implement this recommendation from the Brereton report before thinking it through a little bit more.”

  41. jupes says:

    A close associate of General Campbell, Australian Defence Association director Neil James, said Mr Dutton risked “improperly undermining the authority of the CDF”.

    I wish someone would undermine the authority of Neil James.

    Just fuck off you pathetic prick.

  42. Rex Anger says:

    The whole concept of Civil Control of the Military hinges on both sides being able to pull each other up and/or back from the brink.

    A General is expected to rein in the enthusiasm of his Ministers in their desires about strategy. And the Ministers rein in the General(s) in turn. Failure sees the situation of WW1 Germany, where Generals Paul von Hindenburg and Erich Ludendorff called all the shots. And this was ultimately deleterious.

    I would argue that Steve Smith vs. Peter Leahy and Chris Barrie in 2010 over ADFA was a gross overreach. Just as Angus Campbell and his subordinates 2020 against SOCOMD was.

    Peter Dutton has demonstrated what effective Civil Control looks like. Even if the 2 SQN and revoking MCU for all SOCOMD members were argued as being purely internal Army mattters…

  43. FlyingPigs says:

    Rex Anger says:
    April 19, 2021 at 10:29 pm
    The whole concept of Civil Control of the Military hinges on both sides being able to pull each other up and/or back from the brink.

    It would be nice if there was some actual intelligence on either side.

  44. BrettW says:

    Wow. Is Neil James funded by ADF HQ ? I guess this means he was all for taking away the Unit Citation.

    Veterans groups should make a point of saying this guy does not represent the thoughts of the soldiers and their families.

    “A close associate of General Campbell, Australian Defence Association director Neil James, said Mr Dutton risked “improperly undermining the authority of the CDF”.

    “Civil control in a democracy is a reciprocal arrangement,” he said. “Just as the military should never interfere in politics, ministers and politicians have to think very carefully before they interfere in what are military professional matters.”

  45. FlyingPigs says:

    BrettW says:
    April 19, 2021 at 11:22 pm
    Wow. Is Neil James funded by ADF HQ ?

    Sounds like ADF and Parliament are co-equal partners in governing Australia.

    Who knew?

  46. FlyingPigs says:

    No wonder China Dan refused to have ADF personnel ‘help’ in Victoria!

  47. FlyingPigs says:

    And pardon me, I have no faith in a Hastie Dutton cosmetic change at all.

  48. Crossie says:

    “A close associate of General Campbell, Australian Defence Association director Neil James, said Mr Dutton risked “improperly undermining the authority of the CDF”.

    Campbell is the one who did the undermining to the point where the top brass are so on the nose with the general public that only their complete ouster would restore trust in the military leadership again. Neither Dutton nor Hastie will be able to change that opinion because they will just tinker around the edges, it’s as much as the caucus will allow.

  49. m0nty says:

    Affirmative action always destroys brand prestige.

    Mmyes CL, only white people carry prestige.

  50. Bad Samaritan says:

    What is it with all these cry-babies? Get on with the job ya wimps!

    Here’s the late Prince Phil on exactly this theme….https://youtu.be/pX5UNcFUNN4?t=1072

  51. Fair Shake says:

    Bolt last night had on the Director of the Aust Defence Association. The Director was furious about the whole Unit citation thing. His position 1. Never give a Meritorious Citation to the whole unit. This should be given to sub units. That way if the shit hits the fan the citation can be withdrawn from a sub unit without damaging the other units. 2.and he was quite vocal on this the the chap who offered the government to take the medal of his sons gravestone was wrong. It is not a medal, it is a citation 3. The minister has set a precedent and overstepped by over ruling the military. This should never have happened. He then went on a rant comparing the SAS treatment of prisoners to the Waffen SS. Bolt pulled him up on this.
    The Director went on to blame social media, shock jocks for uninformed opinions that has led to this terrible decision by Dutton.

    There may have been some truth in his statements but overall this bloke appeared to be living on another planet. He appeared quite angry (or as the Duke would say rather excited).

  52. C.L. says:

    I was obviously referring to gender quotas, not skin colour, Monty.

    Interesting tell from you, though: blacks are too dumb to pass a test.

    Thanks for sharing, Imperial Wizard.

  53. Dot says:

    m0nty says:
    April 20, 2021 at 8:53 am
    Affirmative action always destroys brand prestige.

    Mmyes CL, only white people carry prestige.

    You fucking idiot monty. You don’t even understand your low key, bigotry of low expectations.

  54. Mother Lode says:

    Campbell is the one who did the undermining

    Funny. Usually it is the military staff who are depicted as lusting for war and combat and the civilian officials trying to hold them back.

    We have senior military hell bent on gelding the troops in their charge, seeming to be treating them like a girl with her dolls playing out dainty tea parties, projecting into them her idea of grown ups.

  55. Nato says:

    A combat-effective defence force is incompatible with our 21st Century Australian culture. Australians are too weak to handle life without our gilded cage.

    What military aged male has not come through an education system training them to be a political termite in any and every institution? Which Australian youth could understand an environment without RU-OK welfare provisioning?

    Application of lethal force? 25 years of propaganda around firearms means Australians can’t distinguish between Helpless and Safe, no threat is real enough to workaday Australian’s future that will overcome our catharsis.

  56. candy says:

    I seem to remember Morrison, Reynolds and Hastie all saying the Brereton report would bring change and the SAS criminals be brought to justice and so on, and take all the medals away.
    After a week or or they changed their tune because it was pretty obvious you can’t go around saying certain SAS men are guilty without a trial first.

    I don’t think Dutton had a view on this at the time because it was not his portfolio.

  57. MatrixTransform says:

    Nato says: April 20, 2021 at 9:33 am

    well said too

  58. Boambee John says:

    m0nty says:
    April 20, 2021 at 8:53 am
    Affirmative action always destroys brand prestige.

    Mmyes CL, only white people carry prestige.

    Racist.

  59. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha says:

    Defence Minister Peter Dutton vows significant resources will be ploughed into war crimes inquiry
    Lanai Scarr
    The West Australian
    Tue, 20 April 2021 9:47AM

    New Defence Minister Peter Dutton hopes an investigation into alleged war crimes by our troops in Afghanistan will not drag on for years, vowing the significant amount of resources ploughed into the inquiry means matters can be dealt with “very quickly”.

    Speaking to The West Australian during a lightning trip to WA to visit the SAS at Campbell Barracks, Mr Dutton said he was confident the timelines would be different.

    “It is not in anyone’s interests for things to be drawn out longer than they need to be. If somebody is charged then you’re really in the hands of the courts,” he said.

    “If you look at the resources we’ve applied to the OSI — for example up to 75 investigators — we’ve got redundancy built in so that matters can be dealt with very quickly.

    “I think you’ll see a different timeline than what you’ve seen in the Brereton report.”
    Speaking to The West Australian during a lightning trip to WA to visit the SAS at Campbell Barracks, Peter Dutton said he was confident the timelines would be different.

    Mr Dutton said he met Justice Mark Weinberg last week to get an update on the investigation.

    “I think Justice Weinberg is very practical and an incredible legal mind, and he has the capacity along with the team around him to work through these matters very quickly,” he said.

    Mr Dutton said he was working hard to rebuild the trust of the Australian Defence Force and for the SAS in particular, most of whom did not serve in Afghanistan. “They just want to get on with their job,” he said.

    On the decision about the full-cycle docking of Collins class submarines, which has been delayed for 17 months, Mr Dutton said he understood there was frustration.

    “I’ve had a number of briefings on different acquisitions and those briefings continue,” he said.

    “I’ve got more questions to ask on a number of those, including full-cycle docking, so I don’t have any announcements that are imminent and I want to get a better understanding. I’ve been in the job 18 days, so I will be getting on to it as quickly as I can.”

    Asked about China’s increasing cyber espionage, Mr Dutton said it was “well known to us and other Western countries” without specifically naming the Asian superpower. “It’s a vulnerable space if you don’t have the right systems and the ability to resist those attacks,” he said.

    Mr Dutton also said the next global conflict “could be in our region and we are prepared”.

    “The unknowns of this environment is what keeps us awake at night,” he said.

    But Mr Dutton said he believed the Government had the balance right in navigating Australia’s business interests in China with its defence concerns.

    “We have not changed our values. We haven’t been provocative. We haven’t been untruthful, we haven’t exaggerated or misrepresented our concerns,” he said.

  60. Kneel says:

    “For instance, during their training they can call out their superiors with a red or yellow card if they “feel” unhappy with their treatment…”

    FMD.
    Just as repetitive training is designed to make you an excellent judge of conditions and make your reactions reflexive, the entire point of them screaming at you is to train on the “red line” – physical and mental stress pumped up to the max. That way, when it’s for real, you have a better chance of making a difference – because you practiced it under conditions of extreme stress and so you have a chance to think and act, and don’t just cower in the corner quivering and whining.
    This stuff isn’t some sado-masochist fruit-loop looking for his jollies, it’s a proven strategy to keep you alive!

  61. PeterW says:

    Talking to the Iraq and Afghanistan vets that I know.

    “Fobbits”, or the non-combat personnel who spend their deployments behind the relative safety of hesco barriers and wire on the Operations Bases, seem more likely to return with PTSD than the combat troops who went outside the wire. Possibly because the combat troops got to hit back. Possibly because the combat troops are those who signed on accepting that it might include danger, while many more of those in the non-combat roles signed on for a career or trade other than the Profession of Arms.

    One of the biggest “mind-fxxxs” reported to me is coming back from a place where getting things wrong can result in someone getting killed, while minor discomforts and frustrations are part of the job.
    Back home, the majority don’t seem to give a damn about important things but lose their minds over the trivial.

    Most of the senior officers are regarded as being more worried about their careers than the objectives of war or the lives of their men.

  62. jupes says:

    “If you look at the resources we’ve applied to the OSI — for example up to 75 investigators — we’ve got redundancy built in so that matters can be dealt with very quickly.

    He says that as if it’s a good thing. FMD, 75 ‘investigators employed full time with the sole aim of putting diggers in jail!

    “I think you’ll see a different timeline than what you’ve seen in the Brereton report.”

    Five months and counting. Still no charges.

    Dutton is a disgrace.

  63. Rex Anger says:

    He says that as if it’s a good thing. FMD, 75 ‘investigators employed full time with the sole aim of putting diggers in jail!

    “I think you’ll see a different timeline than what you’ve seen in the Brereton report.”

    Five months and counting. Still no charges.

    If Dutto is going to force them to run the clock down at double speed to obtain the result most of us know is coming (I.E. No charges to answer, and/or dismissed trials), then that is still a positive.

    Because the bugmen and the media have set the ball rolling, he cannot kill the whole 3-ring circus on the spot (or throttle it back i to the back pages of the papers) like a Laborite could. And since a decade of operations and 6 years of ‘investigations’ could only produce strong convictions of something rather than court martial-ready charges, they are going for the eternal smear and character assassination route instead.

    The fact that Fairfax are desperate to achieve a victory using the Truth Defence against Ben Roberts-SmIth VC’s defamation proceedings using unteliable witnesses from overseas, salacious leaks of audio and alleged pictures of doubleplus badacting being dripfed to the public consciousness, etc. tells us as much.

  64. jupes says:

    Just try and imagine exactly what those ‘investigators’ do all day. They are investigating historical events. There is only a limited amount of evidence available.There are 75 of them to ‘investigate’ 19 diggers. Almost 4 per digger. How many times, and for how long, do they have to interview witnesses? How many reports do they have to read? What else could they possibly be doing?

    I reckon there would be a lot of meetings, coffee breaks and early knock-offs. Good work if you can get it.

  65. Rex Anger says:

    I reckon there would be a lot of meetings, coffee breaks and early knock-offs. Good work if you can get it.

    The rage against Dutto hurrying them the hell up will be apocalyptic… 😉

  66. Bad Samaritan says:

    OK, so since no Cat has admitted to clicking on the Prince Phil link up-thread at 8.54am, I’ll transcribe a couple of choice observations from the Australian-Knighthood Recipient…and the implication that many of today’s military are cry-babies.

    Journo: Your Uncle lord Louis lost his ship in the battle of Crete. Was that a major blow for morale?
    Phil (looking perplexed): No. Lots of ships were lost. If anyone was lost it was a blow, but you need to remember it was different back then. People accepted that such losses were part of the fortunes of war. I mean we didn’t all have counsellers rushing around every time someone fired a gun “ooooh are you alright? (Phil rolls his eyes and adopts a mocking tone). Are you sure you haven’t got some ghastly phobia?” My uncle just got on with it too.

  67. Vicki says:

    “Fobbits”, or the non-combat personnel who spend their deployments behind the relative safety of hesco barriers and wire on the Operations Bases, seem more likely to return with PTSD than the combat troops who went outside the wire.

    This is pretty much what Sebastian Junger argued in his recent book “Tribe”

  68. Rex Anger:

    The rage against Dutto hurrying them the hell up will be apocalyptic… 😉

    This whole witch hunt is a bloody disgrace.
    I cannot for the life of work out why a lot of people haven’t fallen afoul of the skills of the SAS blokes. That there are 75 lawyers with not one suspicious car accident/OD/UD with a dodgy weapon on a hunting trip speaks volumes for the self discipline of the aggrieved diggers.
    There are a lot of people out there who think they are untouchable because of their position in life and society. This lets them behave in ways that they would not tolerate if the boot was on the other foot.
    OK perhaps it’s a bit over the top, but people become radicalised about justice when they see the lady with the scales and blindfold fiddling with the weights.

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