Brittany demands sweeping changes

I have to say that this really is a surprise. From Former staffer Brittany Higgins demands sweeping changes from Scott Morrison, and the surprise is found in what it turns out Brittany wants:

On Friday she met Mr Morrison to outline changes she wants to the employment law covering staffers, known as the MoP(S) Act, and to advocate for an independent body to handle complaints relating to political workplaces and act as a “one-stop-shop” for human resources information.

Specifically, she wants the power removed for politicians to sack staffers on the spot or on the basis the MP or senator has lost trust or confidence in them – a clause she says is far too vague.

Must say, this is not how I thought the story would unfold. Turns out the core issue was job security.

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107 Responses to Brittany demands sweeping changes

  1. Lee says:

    I am sick of hearing about Brittany and what she wants.
    Who died and made her el supremo?

  2. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha says:

    Is the right to get paralytic drunk, and go flat on your face at workplace functions, to be upheld.

  3. Tezza says:

    So this would mean her alleged rapist could not have been summarily dismissed. Nor could the phantom masturbator. Very odd.

  4. egg_ says:

    Turns out the core issue was job security.

    Boyfriend claims he also had to throw in his job as he provided Govt with advice via his firm.

    What-a-farce.

  5. Simple Simon says:

    she wants the power removed for politicians to sack staffers on the spot or on the basis the MP or senator has lost trust or confidence in them

    So, if an MP or senator discovers that a staffer is a mole for the other side and so has lost trust or confidence in that person he/she/it/[your preferred pronoun here] cannot be sacked.

    What could possibly go wrong?

  6. Roger says:

    Specifically, she wants the power removed for politicians to sack staffers on the spot or on the basis the MP or senator has lost trust or confidence in them – a clause she says is far too vague.

    Parliament House staffers to have the same employment rights as other Australians?

    Personally, I’m in favour of anything that curtails the power of politicians.

  7. Petros says:

    The totalitarian force is strong in this one.

  8. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV) says:

    Must say, this is not how I thought the story would unfold. Turns out the core issue was job security.

    qu’elle surprise, one caught in flagrante delicto would be concerned about job shekuritat!

  9. Vicki says:

    This is what happens when you employ children who have little, or no, real life experience.

    I have always been astonished with this practice. It defies any common sense, in my limited understanding.

  10. Xenophon says:

    If pollies make workplace laws for us they should expect to be subject to them equally.

  11. Sinclair Davidson says:

    Having the government employ individuals under the same terms and conditions that they impose of the rest of the economy is a good thing.

  12. C.L. says:

    Indeed but investing in this girl the authority to say so at a high-level summit with the prime minister solely because she claims (without proof) to have been raped is perverse and bizarre.

    Only a corrupt political decision (or a confession) will see her alleged assailant charged with a crime and, thanks to the media’s new legal doctrine of extra-judicial prosecution, a fair trial is utterly impossible.

  13. Joanna Smythe says:

    Waiting to hear Morrison’s reply, as if we couldn’t already write it for him.

  14. Ed Case says:

    Only a corrupt political decision (or a confession) will see her alleged assailant charged with a crime

    He’s still a voluntary patient in a private Sydney Mental Facility, so his best chance might be a Medical Certificate that he’s unfit to plead, i can’t see Brittany being Impeached, due to the way she’s handled herself so far.
    Sydney’s private Mental Facilities won’t come cheap for a 2 monthy+ stay [and counting] so it’s likely he’ll be better represented than some others.

  15. KaaBee says:

    At sixteen I was was told you and the boss are square each payday. Whilst not literally correct today the sentiment is spot on. Insecurity often goes with the job, something political staffers have to learn to accept and should not be feared by those who are both confident and competent. They who hire should have the right to fire.

  16. Bruce of Newcastle says:

    Specifically, she wants the power removed for politicians to sack staffers on the spot or on the basis the MP or senator has lost trust or confidence in them – a clause she says is far too vague.

    Nope. Pollie is elected, staffer isn’t. We do not want the nation run by staffers, we want it run by people who are hired or fired by citizen voters.

    You want to be a political staffer? Accept the conditions with the pay.

    I do not include sexual exploitation, by either sex, for money, power or individual gain. Of which a noticeable odour hangs over this whole episode.

  17. Petros says:

    The rest of the employment sector should be able to sack people on the spot. That’ll improve the crappy service we currently get.

  18. Ed Case says:

    Those were the days when you could snatch it at lunchtime and have a better job to start in the morning.
    What happens if you relocate from Cairns to Perth and the Boss sacks you on the first day?
    Are youn still “All square”?

  19. C.L. says:

    Ed, none of that has anything to do with what I wrote.

    1. no standing to be conferencing with the Prime Minister
    2. no proof she was raped.
    3. there cannot be a fair trial.

    …the way she’s handled herself so far.

    By “so far,” I presume you mean after the night on which Miss Pty Ltd fell over pissed at a party and woke up half-dressed in Parliament House.

  20. Ceres says:

    I don’t remember voting for this uppity whippersnapper of a girl.
    Morrison, since he stupidly agreed to meet with her, should have given her a lecture on what can happen when you become paralytically drunk.

  21. C.L. says:

    Nope. Pollie is elected, staffer isn’t. We do not want the nation run by staffers, we want it run by people who are hired or fired by citizen voters.

    Yep.

    Higgins should get married and have some children. Do something useful. As I’ve said before, the saddest utterance in this ridiculous saga is Brittany saying being a Canberra bubbleton was her “dream job.” What a dickhead.

  22. sam1250 says:

    No it’s about staffers having power over Pollies. You can’t sack me even when you find out I’m batting for the other side.

  23. BrettW says:

    So is she upset that her alleged attacker was sacked without notice ?

    Why is this aspect (ie. Job security) so high in her priorities. A hypothetical here. Is it possible for a female fearing for her job to make up an allegation in order to save her dream job?

    It is a travesty that she is some sort of role model to other females. She is but not in the way she and Lisa Wilkinson would think. My take out of her story is that no person should let themselves get so out of control that does not know what is going on or can’t protect themselves. Call me old fashioned but there are dickheads who will try to take advantage and the aim should be not to make it easier for them. Feminists seem to object to people saying that but to me it is common sense.

  24. Des Deskperson says:

    ‘Having the government employ individuals under the same terms and conditions that they impose of the rest of the economy is a good thing.’

    Indeed. So is imposing similar standards of responsibility, efficiency and conduct to those that we expect from other public officials who are paid from our taxes.

    Of course, removal of the power to arbitrarily terminate MOP(s) Act employees is going to have to impose a whole new structure of clear and enforceable standards covering duties, responsibilities, performance and behaviour as well as clear processes – and penalties – for dealing with breaches of these standards.

    Politician who have been perviously able to include, under the broad heading of ‘assisting with Parliamentary duties’ getting staff to walk the dog and pick up the kids, won’t like this or all the other constraints that such a structure would impose.

    It will be interesting to see how they balance their love affair with St Brittany with maintaining and defending their current MOP(S) Act, err, flexibilities.

  25. Ed Case says:

    1. no standing to be conferencing with the Prime Minister

    Morrison isn’t the Pope.
    Of course she has standing, anyone does.

    2. no proof she was raped.

    Yeah, but Reynolds CoS took her claim seriously, and I doubt that she is a babe in the woods of Canberra.If the [acting]CoS [from Scotty’s Office] had any doubts, why didn’t she sack Higgins anyway and see what happened?

    3. there cannot be a fair trial.

    The alleged assailant is unknown, but if he can afford a 2 months+ stay in a Private Mental Hospital, he, or his parents/backers can afford to pay for the Aussie Deluxe brand of Justice.

    …the way she’s handled herself so far.

    Sure.
    She’s stood up okay to a prime time 20 minute TV interview, spoken in public to reasonable crowds a few times, resigned before going public, hasn’t allowed herself to be bluffed by Morrison, and behaved appropriately, considering the pressure.

    By “so far,” I presume you mean after the night on which Miss Pty Ltd fell over pissed at a party and woke up half-dressed in Parliament House.

  26. Lee says:

    i can’t see Brittany being Impeached, due to the way she’s handled herself so far.

    Sure, handled herself all the way to the bank.
    Give up the Brittany apologia and encomium, Ed.

    She’s stood up okay to a prime time 20 minute TV interview, spoken in public to reasonable crowds a few times, resigned before going public, hasn’t allowed herself to be bluffed by Morrison, and behaved appropriately, considering the pressure.

    LOL

  27. Ed Case says:

    By “so far,” I presume you mean after the night on which Miss Pty Ltd fell over pissed at a party and woke up half-dressed in Parliament House.

    Heh, I missed that part.
    She woke up stark naked, and, according to her, a part of someone else’s anatomy was at that moment inside a part of her anatomy.
    Let’s just say, considering the since revealed Hi Jinks engaged in by other male Liberal staffers, those 2 discrete anatomical parts may not have been complementary.

  28. Ed Case says:

    BrettW says:
    May 1, 2021 at 2:31 pm

    So is she upset that her alleged attacker was sacked without notice ?

    While it is true that the bloke packed up his desk and left the building after his meeting with Reynolds acting Chief of Staff on 26/03/2019, it doesn’t appear that he was sacked, and Reynolds herself refused to confirm that he was Sacked, that he didn’t get a Lump Sum Payout, and that she didn’t give him a favourable reference.
    What sounds more likely is that it was made to look like they’d sacked him, in the hope that Higgins would be more compliant about accepting the bullet, with the intention of bringing him back on board after B.H. had left Canberra.
    However, Brittany summoned her inner Karen, said to herself “Fuck this for a joke”
    and put the acid right back on Brown.
    Anyway, the result was Reynolds made the wrong move every step of the way thereafter and her career lies in ruins.
    Why did she end up Defence Minister after 5 years in Parliament, even tho Scotty had to have known about this monumental clusterfuck?
    Looks like no one is ever going to ask that question.

  29. Candy says:

    After the tawdry events the bloke was sacked and Brittany given the cold shoulder professionally. What employer would trust and promote her?
    Maybe all this is to retrieve her reputation but that prestigous career path is over.

    Whether she was assaulted can never be proved. I don’t think she knows anyway. A mess of a situation.

  30. Mick Gold Coast QLD says:

    This Bonce / Britney imbroglio is all too funny – while I think about it though I must say the most amusing part now is that White Knight Grigory has gone at it like a dog on a bone and CL, the venerable CL, has fallen into the same trap as the boofheaded Scott Morrison and is responding to him! 😁

  31. Ed Case says:

    Sure, Mick.
    You’re an old Labor bloke, and that’s an old Labor bloke type opinion
    Scott Morrison has come out of this as a winner, tho, so I can’t see how his offer to meet with Higgins can be faulted.

  32. Paul says:

    Our politicians should have the power to sack any lefty bureaucrat

    This is clearly the fascists lefty bureaucrats entrenching themselves into power.
    Its got to stop.

  33. Perfidious Albino says:

    If that is her chief concern then it certainly implies being a response to finding herself in a situation where she could lose her ‘dream’ job at the whim of a politician, probably having checked or been advised that the MoPs act facilitates that.

    ‘Woe is me that my burgeoning career as a superstar political staffer could be ended by just one poor personal choice, what can I do to avoid the consequences of my actions? Aha…’

    2 months later… ‘you know PM, if only I’d had more job security as a staffer, I might not have had to do what I did and we could have avoided this kerfuffle…’

    *may not have happened like this.

  34. Roger says:

    We do not want the nation run by staffers, we want it run by people who are hired or fired by citizen voters.

    Bruce, nothing these kids do comes anywhere close to running the nation.

    The public service does that.

    They are glorified gofers.

  35. BrettW says:

    Because Brigadier in the Reserves and “equality”.

    “Why did she end up Defence Minister after 5 years in Parliament, even tho Scotty had to have known about this monumental clusterfuck?

  36. Snoopy says:

    They are glorified gofers.

    But with significant power if not influence. The most senior public servants are at their beck and call.

    “A request from the Minister’s office is to be regarded as a request from the Minister him/herself.”

  37. Xenophon says:

    Hard to understand the certainty of some here. One thing is clear: the Parliament is not lacking in security and rules. Yet two staffers, both seriously pissed, we’re given access to a ministerial office. One left in such a way as to prompt a security check of the office and twice it was observed that the other was undressed and unconscious in the ministers office. Rape or not this isn’t acceptable office behaviour anywhere else. The bloke involved was with a junior of some weeks’ standing. Seems to me she and the rest of us should expect some better accountability and it’s got to start at the leadership.

  38. Roger says:

    But with significant power if not influence. The most senior public servants are at their beck and call.

    If so we’re really in trouble, Snoops.

    One thing is clear: the Parliament is not lacking in security and rules.

    The problem appears to be that these staffers are regarded as extensions of the Minister and Ministers are untouchable by anyone but the PM (no double entendres intended!). So the security and rules are mere window dressing.

  39. Xenophon says:

    Roger: effectively no rules.

  40. Tim Neilson says:

    Having the government employ individuals under the same terms and conditions that they impose of the rest of the economy is a good thing.

    “Would be” a good thing but ain’t never going to happen.

  41. Squirrel says:

    They’ll spend taxpayers’ funds setting up an “independent body”, and in a few years time, will come to the stunning conclusion that there’s no such thing, because the people running the “independent body” will be appointed by politicians, or by senior officials who answer to politicians.

    An annual statement to Parliament, which gives stats on turnover in every MP’s and Senator’s office (not just Ministers) and details of any extra costs incurred by taxpayers due to staff termination payments – all of which could be scrutinised by opponents and the media – might be a more practical way of discouraging capricious staffing decisions by pollies.

  42. Ed Case says:

    “A request from the Minister’s office is to be regarded as a request from the Minister him/herself.”

    Sounds fair.
    It also sounds reasonable that if the request hadn’t been on the Ministers behalf, the staffer would be getting the bullet.

  43. Des Deskperson says:

    ‘ So the security and rules are mere window dressing.’

    Yep! always have been.

  44. Roger says:

    Roger: effectively no rules.

    Yep! always have been.

    So the place where workplace laws are made that the rest of us have to follow is probably the most antiquated and dysfunctional place of employment in Australia.

  45. Ed Case says:

    Xenophon says:

    Yet two staffers, both seriously pissed, we’re given access to a ministerial office.

    Brittany Higgins was practically helpless.
    There’s no evidence that the other person was drunk at all, in fact he appears to have been chillingly lucid.

    One left in such a way as to prompt a security check of the office and twice it was observed that the other was undressed and unconscious in the ministers office. Rape or not this isn’t acceptable office behaviour anywhere else. The bloke involved was with a junior of some weeks’ standing.

    No.
    The situation was:
    Brittany Higgin s was a holdover from Steven Ciobo’s time in the Portfolio, she’d been there since July 2016, when she was about 21 years old.
    Reynolds was the new Minister, Higgins organised the Drinks so she and the 2 other holdovers could meet Reynolds staffers socially.
    Ciobo was the only Turnbull Shadow Minister that Abbott dumped, and when Turnbull returned [as P.M.] he elevated Ciobo.
    According to other sites, the staffer involved had worked for Brandis from 2013, so at first sight it seems a significant comedown to be working for the non Cabinet Assistant Minister for Defence Appliances after that.
    Yet a few months later Reynolds was Defence Minister, how about that?

  46. Fair Shake says:

    Just so I can be clear it’s still ok to get shitfaced, go to the office and ‘hey it orn’.

    Or as George Costanza would say ‘was that wrong?’

  47. Fair Shake says:

    Should be ‘get it orn’.

  48. Des Deskperson says:

    ‘It also sounds reasonable that if the request hadn’t been on the Ministers behalf, the staffer would be getting the bullet.’

    An APS employee must assume that any request is on the Minister’s behalf. We were always told that, once a brief, submission or response to a question went into the Minister’s office, what happened next was no concern of ours. What came back out represented the Minister’s view. Whether the Minister had actually seen it was, again, not our concern.

    I’m fairly certain that one lazy but high profile Fraser Government Minister never actually saw most of his briefs,

  49. Des Deskperson says:

    ‘So the place where workplace laws are made that the rest of us have to follow is probably the most antiquated and dysfunctional place of employment in Australia.’

    Yep again. It may be helpful to think of the APH as analogous to some sort of Downton Abbey style large Victorian or Edwardian English estate/country house, with its own internal and rigid hierarchy, its own internal support systems – gardeners, cooks, handymen – and its own idiosyncratic employment rules and customs, all underpinned by large amounts of money.

  50. Roger says:

    It may be helpful to think of the APH as analogous to some sort of Downton Abbey style large Victorian or Edwardian English estate/country house…

    Yes, except those places served a vital purpose, Des.

  51. Roger says:

    I’m fairly certain that one lazy but high profile Fraser Government Minister never actually saw most of his briefs,

    You’re inviting speculation Des. A bit of a raconteur? I’ll leave it at that.

  52. roman says:

    Ministers MUST have the power to hire and fire as they choose. We vote for these people to make choices and take actions. They can’t do that if the people around them are passionate hold-overs from the previous boss – that was voted out.

    Get married Brit, have three kids, you won’t have to worry about all that workplace stuff.

  53. egg_ says:

    The bloke involved was with a junior of some weeks’ standing. Seems to me she and the rest of us should expect some better accountability and it’s got to start at the leadership.

    Wasn’t li’l Miss Innocent the host of the office party?

  54. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha says:

    Wasn’t li’l Miss Innocent the host of the office party?

    That’s my understanding.

  55. Ed Case says:

    They can’t do that if the people around them are passionate hold-overs from the previous boss – that was voted out.

    Holdover isn’t the best word I could have chosen.
    Ciobo wasn’t voted out, he announced his retirement and Morrison appointed Reynolds to his portfolio 2 months out from the election.
    Reynolds only kept 3 of his 20 personal staffers, Higgins was one of those 3.
    Higgins says she was implicitly given the choice of keeping her job or going to the cops.
    No one involved has denied that, so it stands as the truth.

  56. Ed Case says:

    It wasn’t an Office Party, it was Drinks at some Canberra Bar.
    It sounds like Higgins drinks were spiked, she collapsed, and Reynolds senior staffer offered to drop her off at her flat.
    Drinks are usually around 7 pm, and the pair signed in at Parliament House at 1.45 am.
    There’s 6 hours unaccounted for.
    There’s a lot more to this story, but so long as Bizzaro Rudolf Valentino stays holed up in a Private Mental Health facility, we won’t be hearing it.

  57. Rafiki says:

    A matter of concern here is that Morrison’s taking Higgins seriously gives her an amount of credibility that might well be taken by any jury as evidence that she has told the truth. He is no doubt unthinking about the consequences, but it seems that his idea of a fair trial in a rape trial us that it’s only fair if the accused is convicted. So much for his liberalism.

  58. egg_ says:

    Drinks are usually around 7 pm, and the pair signed in at Parliament House at 1.45 am.
    There’s 6 hours unaccounted for.

    Repeat: Wasn’t li’l Miss Innocent the host of the office party?

    Regardless of the venue, obtuse sockpuppet.

  59. Ed Case says:

    What’s your point then?

  60. Rafiki says:

    My understanding is that the drinks party she hosted finished up, after which she, the accused, and another male and female kicked on at a night club. At some point, she had separated from the date she invited to her party, a step she has said she took to send a message to the accused that he was not of interest to her. And then she got pissed as a newt etc.

    By ACT law, the more pissed she was the more likely it is that the Crown can show that she did not consent. In one NSW trial, the defence argued that the complainant exaggerated.

    Critical here will be what any tapes of the night club and it’s environs show, and what the taxi driver can say.

  61. egg_ says:

    What’s your point then?

    NOT a shrinking violet.

  62. egg_ says:

    a step she has said she took to send a message to the accused that he was not of interest to her

    Proof?

    The SMS will reside on Telco servers.

  63. John A says:

    Des Deskperson says: May 1, 2021, at 2:32 pm

    ‘Having the government employ individuals under the same terms and conditions that they impose on the rest of the economy is a good thing.’

    Indeed. So is imposing similar standards of responsibility, efficiency and conduct to those that we expect from other public officials who are paid from our taxes.

    Of course, removal of the power to arbitrarily terminate MOP(s) Act employees is going to have to impose a whole new structure of clear and enforceable standards covering duties, responsibilities, performance and behaviour as well as clear processes – and penalties – for dealing with breaches of these standards.

    With all respect, I suggest that you two are looking at this from the wrong end of the telescope.

    What we need is for private employers to ALSO have the facility to summarily dismiss for cause.

  64. Dot says:

    Tezza says:
    May 1, 2021 at 12:57 pm
    So this would mean her alleged rapist could not have been summarily dismissed. Nor could the phantom masturbator. Very odd.

    Indeed. Very bizarre demands.

  65. candy says:

    I watched the Wilkinson interview of Brittany and she said she was drunk and fell at the drinks party. She said she said to herself, “I’m done”, and so thought she had better go home, and the the guy offered to share a taxi. They did, and it was cold so she went into Parliament House with him as he had to collect some paperwork or something on the way to dropping her off home. Ok, sounds believable.

    But apparently she went to a nightclub in the hours between leaving the drinks party and rolling drunk into Parliament House. She never mentioned that to Lisa Wilkinson.

  66. Ed Case says:

    That’s a good point.
    Does Brittany Higgins have any recollection of the missing 5 or 6 hours?

  67. Ed Case says:

    He dismissed the taxi, so she followed him into the building rather than stand outside by herself in the dark at 1.45 am.

  68. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha says:

    He dismissed the taxi, so she followed him into the building rather than stand outside by herself in the dark at 1.45 am.

    The version I heard was that she didn’t want to wait in the taxi, so that was when the taxi was dismissed.

  69. egg_ says:

    Does Brittany Higgins have any recollection of the missing 5 or 6 hours?

    Probably as reliable a witness as Joanne Lees.

  70. egg_ says:

    Defence Minister Reynolds called Higgins a “lying cow” for misrepresenting her – would you trust YOUR reputation to her?

  71. Snoopy says:

    The version I heard was that she didn’t want to wait in the taxi, so that was when the taxi was dismissed.

    Because the driver wanted to sit in the cold and refused to run the heater?

  72. Rayvic says:

    Higgins’ demonstrated complete indifference to her behaviour. Her conduct was such that it warranted immediate dismissal by Reynolds.

  73. Xenophon says:

    I remain bemused at the fact that the security people tested this as normal

  74. Rex Anger says:

    @ Xenophon-

    It says a lot about our political classes, and none of it good.

    That they are desperate to present themselves as ‘normal’ as us mere mortals suggests they are more dismayed at their exposure than their behaviours and the culture they perpetuate.

  75. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha says:

    I remain bemused at the fact that the security people tested this as normal

    I’ve worked in the security industry – I’d cite you incidents that would have made the Emperor Caligula blush…

  76. Roger says:

    Critical here will be what any tapes of the night club and it’s environs show, and what the taxi driver can say.

    Mmm…even if the worst came to light, absent a confession and forensic evidence it’s a brave prosecutor who would stake his or her career on this case. Video from the parliamentary office would be more critical. I’m given to understand that ACT police are waiting on the DPP’s advice presently.

  77. Ministers MUST have the power to hire and fire as they choose.

    Only if the rest of us can have that power.
    I’m 200% with Sinclair Davidson on this one.

  78. Crossie says:

    Paul says:
    May 1, 2021 at 3:33 pm
    Our politicians should have the power to sack any lefty bureaucrat

    This is clearly the fascists lefty bureaucrats entrenching themselves into power.
    Its got to stop.

    No matter how much I despise our politicians they are still more respectable and responsible than the top bureaucrats who are the real power in the land. No need to go any further for proof than the CMOs who have destroyed our economy and lives and expect us to be thankful. That a majority population agree with them is truly scary.

  79. Bar Beach Swimmer says:

    Ceres says:
    May 1, 2021 at 2:14 pm
    I don’t remember voting for this uppity whippersnapper of a girl

    Nor do I remember voting for Drs Brendan Murphy, Paul Kelly, Kerry Chant, Brett Sutton or the idiot in QLD, Janette Young etc.

    The fact is these people are not accountable to the electors and should be given no free hand for anything.

    Completely agree with BoN above. Brittany should not have any input into anything.

    But given the PM has been railroaded by everyone – premier, bureaucrat, health official/expert?, he’s sure to enthus over Brittnee’s idea.

    Yet I can’t see any politician from any party agreeing to Brittnee’s demand. Maybe Labor, seeing the indiscriminate danger this change risks to all politicians, may just rescue Morrison from any chance of having this passed into law.

  80. Bar Beach Swimmer says:

    Only if the rest of us can have that power.
    I’m 200% with Sinclair Davidson on this one

    Sal, careful what you wish for. And I don’t mean for the ‘rest of us’ (which is never going to happen anyway); I mean for them. If you haven’t already done so, take a look at the Second American Revolution post.

  81. Ed Case says:

    Maybe Labor, seeing the indiscriminate danger this change risks to all politicians, may just rescue Morrison from any chance of having this passed into law.

    The Media has made it a Women’s Issue and Scotty has filled his boots.
    Sure, Labor and the Greens can stymie it in the Senate, but they risk being outflanked on the Left by the wily chancer Morrison.

  82. PB says:

    “Why did she end up Defence Minister after 5 years in Parliament, even tho Scotty had to have known about this monumental clusterfuck?

    This to me is the take-home in all of this. Moral questions aside, Brittany is playing the political game as far as it will take her, which seems to be a long, long way these days. Reynolds on the other hand seems to come out of this as an object lesson on the dangers of placing diversity targets above competence.

  83. Bar Beach Swimmer says:

    Rafiki:

    He is no doubt unthinking about the consequences, but it seems that his idea of a fair trial in a rape trial us that it’s only fair if the accused is convicted. So much for his liberalism

    Nor did Morrison think about the wider ramifications for stating that victims should be believed/we believe victims (or words to that effect) on Oct 22, 2018. This was but weeks before Cardinal Pell’s second trial in Dec, 2018, which had him convicted of historic abuse of children. Yet after his first trial, which was held before (Aug) the date of Morrison’s National Apology, the result was a hung jury.

    https://www.sbs.com.au/news/i-believe-you-your-country-believes-you-pm-s-apology-to-child-sex-abuse-survivors

  84. Des Deskperson says:

    ‘Ministers MUST have the power to hire and fire as they choose.’

    Yes, but bear mind that this power works both ways.

    Under the MOP(S) Act, a Minister can also protect, more or less indefinitely, an incompetent, lazy, corrupt or badly-behaved staffer. This isn’t a private business. We are forced to pay taxes to fund these people. Either there is a better, consistent framework to manage these people to ensure we get value for money, or they should be funded totally by the Party.

  85. Ed Case says:

    I may have read [here?] that Scotty [unsurprisingly] wasn’t exactly enthused about Reynolds as Defence Minister, but Josh Frydenberg championed her cause in Cabinet.

  86. Ed Case says:

    Under the MOP(S) Act, a Minister can also protect, more or less indefinitely, an incompetent, lazy, corrupt or badly-behaved staffer.

    Okay, but Reynolds has come a huge gutser doing just that, so it’s buyer beware.
    No framework can ever weed out every deadbeat among hundreds of political staffers, tho it’s more likely to become an avenue for Get Squares, Set Ups and Political Games.
    Higgins’ Issue was being given the implicit choice between going to the cops and keeping her job.
    All she is seeking is to make it harder for incompetent Ministers and bloodthirsty Chiefs of Staff to employ Emotional Blackmail where there’s a power imbalance.

  87. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha says:

    Brittany Higgins on how the last three months have transformed her life
    By James Massola
    May 2, 2021 — 5.00am

    In less than three months, Brittany Higgins’ life has been transformed.

    Once a little-known political staffer, the 26-year-old has been thrust into the national spotlight as the face of Australia’s belated me-too movement after blowing the whistle and publicly revealing allegations that she was raped by a colleague in Parliament House back in March 2019.

    Now, a day after meeting Prime Minister Scott Morrison – and Opposition Leader Anthony Albanese – in Sydney’s Commonwealth Parliamentary Offices, Ms Higgins pauses for a moment to gather her thoughts when asked about the enormity of being thrust into the national spotlight.

    “It has been surreal, it has been devastating and like I said in the meeting [with the Prime Minister] this has altered my life forever. It will have a life-long impact on my trajectory, about where I will go and what I will do. That’s a privilege and it’s also very sad,” she tells The Sun-Herald and The Sunday Age.

    “I was so isolated and disempowered and I felt fundamentally alone in the shame of this horrible event. Now I’ve come to terms with it and I’m able to speak about it and that’s been quite healing.”

    Possessed of a preternatural poise and courage beyond her years – an idea Ms Higgins dismisses, declaring “I’m quite normal” – she expresses careful disappointment about the lack of concrete outcomes arising from her meeting with the Prime Minister and the not-quite apology in a room in which three lawyers, including a neutral observer, were present.

    Mr Morrison thanked Ms Higgins for her service to the Liberal Party in government but, as she puts it, both parties danced around the specifics of the alleged rape – and who knew what, when, and in which offices – because of the delicate legal situation and ongoing investigation.

    “At the start of the meeting he made a concession that he was sorry for my feelings, but it was a qualified apology. It doesn’t really mean much. [But] I don’t think he can apologise for the conduct of the Minister, of the office and so, within the confines of our limited conversation. That was as far as he could go or as far he was willing to go,” she says.

  88. Albatross says:

    Zulu Kilo Two Alpha says:
    May 2, 2021 at 8:34 am
    Brittany Higgins on how the last three months have transformed her life

    Has enriched her considerably.

  89. Ed Case says:

    Higgins has handled it well.
    She didn’t quite bag Scotty, but she did keep it real.
    Big loss for the Liberal Party, meanwhile they’ve got scads of token female Ministers, most of them completely out of their depth.

  90. min says:

    What absolute bullsh ## about courage and maturity beyond her years . How about a a girl ? of similar age , managing an enraged drug addict in hospital corridor , coping with three emergency Caesarians at 3 in the morning until consultant could arrive , working frontline during epidemic and Working 70 plus hours a week at times . Her reward that she took up , a night at a boutique hotel at cut price for health workers .
    BH has no one but herself to blame for her predicament , alleged crime who knows . Who undressed her? Why would he have bothered ?

  91. RJH says:

    Britany comes across as either someone who can be easily manipulated or not very bright in personal decision-making or possibly even both? It would be more interesting to know who is actually behind her advising her/manipulating her present decision-making, is it the new “journalist” boyfriend? At present, I can’t see an outcome that will benefit her in the long term, as she presently comes across as an amateur main chancer in the Look at Meeeee mold?

  92. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha says:

    At present, I can’t see an outcome that will benefit her in the long term, as she presently comes across as an amateur main chancer in the Look at Meeeee mold?

    I’ll bet good money on a Senate seat with the Greens.

  93. Albatross says:

    At present, I can’t see an outcome that will benefit her in the long term

    Are you mad?

  94. RJH says:

    Are you mad? – You seem to have overlooked my qualifier? Checked out your mirror lately?

  95. Ed Case says:

    Britany comes across as either someone who can be easily manipulated or not very bright in personal decision-making or possibly even both?

    Where’s the evidence for that?
    She appears to have been the victim of a cunning psychopath who enjoyed the protection of several Minsters [at least], Senior Political Staffers, and 3 Wise Monkeys behaviour of work colleagues and Parliament’s security.

  96. candy says:

    I still don’t think the Liberals are going to offer her any kind of staffer’s job.
    She is going to have to get a new career path and receive some counselling to deal with feelings of regret/guilt/confusion.

  97. stackja says:

    Who would ever employ BH?

  98. Ed Case says:

    She’s not looking for anything from the Liberals, she snatched her job back in February.
    You may recall that shortly after BH went public, several other female staffers went public with similar stories, then the Gay Mafia/Desks fake brouhaha sent it all down the memory hole.
    An unnamed Coalition Staffer also claimed at the start that both male and female staffers had been Rapped in similar circumstances.

  99. Arky says:

    Brittany demands sweeping changes

    ..
    I’m all for it.
    Your modern chick shouldn’t have to sweep at all.
    That’s why men invented vacuum cleaners.

  100. Albatross says:

    stackja says:
    May 2, 2021 at 10:29 am
    Who would ever employ BH?

    The Academy, the media, the left-wing political establishment…

  101. Frank says:

    Of course, removal of the power to arbitrarily terminate MOP(s) Act employees is going to have to impose a whole new structure of clear and enforceable standards covering duties, responsibilities, performance and behaviour as well as clear processes – and penalties – for dealing with breaches of these standards.

    So H.R. will be doing alright out of it then, now hiring for the extra demand.

  102. Ed Case says:

    Was Brittany a spinner for Ciobo, Reynolds, and Cash?
    Then she won’t have any trouble finding work, plus the Liberal Party owe her, one because of it’s office holders disgusting behaviour, and two, because she didn’t go public in March 2019, and wreck the election campaign.

  103. Yarpos says:

    “Who would ever employ BH?”

    are you kidding? She will be hot property in the lefty swamp.

  104. Mick Gold Coast QLD says:

    min says at 9:24 am:

    “What absolute bullsh ## about courage and maturity beyond her years . How about a a girl … of similar age , managing an enraged drug addict in hospital corridor … .
    BH has no one but herself to blame for her predicament … Who undressed her? Why would he have bothered ?”

    It is ever so pleasing to see good sense stride in and dismiss all the other convoluted contrivances in such concise terms.

    Grigory has been fussing about for days now defending our Bonce’s absent honour, inventing little details here and there, building a case on them and finding the rooter guilty and the young woman – not a child – innocent on all counts. It has been entertaining.

    The fact that dim Scott Morrison set aside time to see the chancer is ridiculous. I have long wondered why Australian Prime Ministers choose to act all presidential when there are ostensibly capable deputies to handle the daily housekeeping. Mind you, the minister responsible in this case and the legal stuff minister had both gone running home to mummy, to hide under the doona from their demanding jobs (whilst continuing to draw their $5,000 pw salary).

    The linked report here states three solicitors were present – good. If she continues drawing public attention beyond a week or so Morrison’s bloke, and the departmental media manipulator, ought to be sacked.

    Des Deskperson has outlined how it is no simple task to change regulations and procedures as demanded by the kiddie, let alone legislation, and any competent leading legal practice can manage to have something like this run doggedly nowhere for a couple of years.

    Victim Tame will be most displeased at the subordination of her brand in a crowded market.

  105. Ed Case says:

    Morrison invited Brittany Higgins to the meeting.
    She accepted, with the proviso that she be allowed a couple of witnesses, declined his offer of airfares, and paid her own way.

  106. Albatross says:

    Ed Case says:
    May 2, 2021 at 6:15 pm

    ShitEd, you don’t have to white night, simping and seething, to get into Brittany’s good graces. A half-dozen Bacardi Breezers and she’s good for it mate.

  107. Mick Gold Coast QLD says:

    Albatross says at 6:20 pm:

    “ShitEd, you don’t have to white night, simping and seething, to get into Brittany’s good graces. A half-dozen Bacardi Breezers and she’s good for it mate.”

    Grigory’s on a mission alright!! 😁😁🤣

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