Open Forum: May 1, 2021

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5,584 Responses to Open Forum: May 1, 2021

  1. SFW, it would be a long way from everything, that far canal…

  2. That page podium may elicit a predicable response.

  3. Rorschach says:

    Speaking of Tel’ s clever ideas about inland shipping…

    Trains trucks ships zeppelins… nah. We just had a pretty good show of where the future is:

    https://twitter.com/SpaceX/status/1390069001892503553

    Why not put a couple of containers into the starship and move them to anywhere. It’ll take two in standard config:

    https://twitter.com/Neopork85/status/1277947493787906049?s=20

    But like for planes, the containers can be modified to fit better … 20 minutes to anywhere in the world. Future here we come! [by the way … how much does 1200 tons of kerosene cost?]

  4. Rex Anger says:

    How about a huge canal connecting Lake Eyre to the sea? There’s a chance it would produce more water vapour and evaporation over the area east of Lake Eyre and you could run tourist ferries up it and barges to carry the wool and livestock back to the coast.

    It would be an interesting development.

    Right up to the point where we had an MV Evergiven moment with a helmsman too proud to use the lane departure warning…

    You would also want a variation on the old Murray River paddlesteamers, which were rough as guts and crazy robust. That way, you could ‘walk’ them around said dickhead who felt fatigue-minimisation and safety aid automation was demeaning, and minimise disruptions.

  5. Rex Anger says:

    But like for planes, the containers can be modified to fit better … 20 minutes to anywhere in the world. Future here we come! [by the way … how much does 1200 tons of kerosene cost?]

    How much will that be subsidised? 🤔

  6. notafan says:

    I think Rex already mentioned coastal shipping was already the major competitor for bulk rail.

  7. bespoke says:

    Commitment to Aurizon values and a willingness to embrace a diverse work environment.

    Red flag.

  8. egg_ says:

    Amazon lays off drone employees in favor of outsourcing

    Amazon has let go of some of its research and development and manufacturing employees for its drone delivery service in favor of outsourcing. The company has already signed two deals with companies to manufacture some of the parts used in the custom delivery drones.

    Over the last few weeks, Amazon’s drone delivery division has been letting go of its employees as it finalizes deals with Austria’s FACC Aerospace and Spain’s Aernnova Aerospace (via Financial Times).

  9. Rex Anger says:

    @ Nelson Kidd-Players-

    Sadly not. WordPress strikes again in the name of kindness to Cats.

    But it’s easily reposted the next time our Wonder[word]wall artists reappears to ‘share’ his ‘wisdom’ with us…

    #SitOnYourCenotaphAndSpin,Struth

  10. Mitch M. says:

    sfw says:
    May 6, 2021 at 2:52 pm
    How about a huge canal connecting Lake Eyre to the sea? There’s a chance it would produce more water vapour and evaporation over the area east of Lake Eyre and you could run tourist ferries up it and barges to carry the wool and livestock back to the coast. Could easily be done with nuclear bombs as Lang Hancock(?) wanted to use to make a new harbor in NW WA.

    Ya think it might be worth thinking about finding a way to transform those largely useless tracts of land in Australia but the indigenous and Greens will go batshit crazy over your proposal.

    Forget the nuke bomb option though, that’s far too dangerous. There’s a lake in Russia that to this day you can’t get to within 100 metres of it because way back in nuke test heydays … . Automate the canal dig, is that feasible?

  11. Steve trickler says:

    Disclaimer:

    You cannot make out the media logo on the microphone or car. This could be a stage… but I doubt it.

    Heaps of MSM reporters have already been caught doing exactly this.

    News Reporter Getting Owned – He Puts Mask On For The Camera Only

  12. sfw says:

    Sal, read up on the weights or the canal?

  13. egg_ says:

    Four-Tonne Tyre Change

    Très deadly, if things go wrong!

  14. Rex Anger says:

    Commitment to Aurizon values and a willingness to embrace a diverse work environment.

    Red flag.

    Big company bullshit.

    In practice, it means that you are probably expendable the instant all the shinybums in Brisbane see the dividend price drop 0.000000001% one Tuesday, and divest themselves of an entire division countrywide.

    They will also cheerfully run a loss on certain contracts, if it means stifling an upstart rail or trucking firm elsewhere.

    (Gotta keep all those imaginarium subsidies for themselves, you know…)

  15. sfw says:

    Mitch, I wasn’t serious although a huge inland sea there would possibly produce rain eastwards, I think that the nuke scenario could work, they have (so I’m told) some bombs that leave little radiation. The problem with digging is you would need a very very wide canal, a km or more? Otherwise you would end up with an Australian version of the Dead Sea due to increasing salinity.

  16. Rex Anger says:

    Amazon lays off drone employees in favor of outsourcing

    Amazon has let go of some of its research and development and manufacturing employees for its drone delivery service in favor of outsourcing. The company has already signed two deals with companies to manufacture some of the parts used in the custom delivery drones.

    Speaking of big company bullshittery…

  17. Rex Anger says:

    The problem with digging is you would need a very very wide canal, a km or more? Otherwise you would end up with an Australian version of the Dead Sea due to increasing salinity.

    A very big, very straight and mostly-contained salt lake?

    Sounds like an excellent excuse to go break a Land Speed Record…

  18. Rex Anger says:

    Four-Tonne Tyre Change

    Très deadly, if things go wrong!

    Is that a CAT777? Or bigger model?

  19. feelthebern says:

    Upcoming drones versus zeppelins war will make Vietnam look like a Sunday picnic.

  20. sfw says:

    Rex saw a great article by an engineer the other day explaining why going faster than 300mph is so hard. I admire Donald Campbell all the more after reading it. I have a little 1972 Yamaha TA125, almost have it rideable, been thinking about going to Lake Gairdner and having a go. Trouble is I’m now 90kg and way to heavy for such a little thing. Need to find a flyweight jockey with balls.

  21. caveman says:

    That BBQ Galore covid guy , really wanted to cook that steak on Sunday.

  22. Rex Anger says:

    I have a little 1972 Yamaha TA125, almost have it rideable, been thinking about going to Lake Gairdner and having a go. Trouble is I’m now 90kg and way to heavy for such a little thing. Need to find a flyweight jockey with balls.

    You’re a braver man than I…

  23. Rex Anger says:

    @ Egg-

    This swarm of drones can think for itself

    Sounds like an oxymoron, or internet propaganda.

    If drones could think for themselves, the Western world would not be in its current predicament… 🤪

  24. egg_ says:

    A measly CAT 793D by the looks.

  25. Bar Beach Swimmer says:

    MatrixTransform says:
    May 6, 2021 at 8:32 am

    Mt, best wishes for a great night for you all!

  26. Speedbox says:

    Jarryd Hayne off to the big house for five years and eight months. Three years and eight months before eligible for parole.

  27. bespoke says:

    You’re a braver man than I…

    (standing in for albatross)

    Yes %$## it has handlebars and you have to balance. 😁

  28. egg_ says:

    Sounds like an oxymoron, or internet propaganda.

    Military use drone swarms.
    There’s thought of airborne aircraft carriers.

  29. Rex Anger says:

    A measly CAT 793D by the looks.

    I once spent a while sandblasting and painting earthmoving and mining truck wheel rims.

    57″ assemblies from 793s were about the biggest I regularly saw.

    My most frequent work was on 49″ rims from 777s and Komatsus, then 51″ after that.

  30. Rex Anger says:

    Yes %$## it has handlebars and you have to balance. 😁

    🙄

    Everything requires balance…

  31. Rorschach says:

    They couldn’t get a patsy judge to shut it down so now the Department of Justice and FBI about to shut down the Arizona Audit.

    Here is a letter sent to Az Senate saying that the ballots are now no longer under the control of “election officials” or under their direct supervision. And this means that the ballots are deemed at risk [of damage / change / loss].

    https://twitter.com/RealBasedMAGA/status/1390110216335802368?s=20

    So – I’m guessing – that the intent is to put the Audit back into the hands of those who refused to have it in the first place or – if that fails – to pre-emptively deem any audit results as inadmissible given official custody has been broken.

  32. Dr Faustus says:

    Singapore: Beijing has cut off all diplomatic contact with the Australian government under the China-Australia Strategic Economic Dialogue, a key channel of communication between the two countries.

    A key channel of communication?

    Established: 2014.
    Inaugural meeting: 2015.
    Last meeting: According to media reports, the latest round of dialogue, or the third round, was held in September, 2017.

    Incredibly key.
    A baby fairy dies whenever something as key as this is not cherished.

  33. Boambee John says:

    1 2 3 4

  34. Rorschach says:

    But like for planes, the containers can be modified to fit better … 20 minutes to anywhere in the world. Future here we come! [by the way … how much does 1200 tons of kerosene cost?]

    How much will that be subsidised?

    As well as govt subsidy, Elon will just make the rockets run on ethanol, get it from corn or such, and get the carbon credits.

  35. egg_ says:

    I’ve seen semis hauling mine haul truck tyres up the Bucketts Way taking up the whole road.

  36. egg_ says:

    Looks like a Liebherr T284 (363 t payload) uses a stock 59/80R63.

  37. Rex Anger says:

    So – I’m guessing – that the intent is to put the Audit back into the hands of those who refused to have it in the first place or – if that fails – to pre-emptively deem any audit results as inadmissible given official custody has been broken.

    I like the whole intimation that doorknocking addresses to confirm the names of the people.who allegedly voted there qualifies as intimidation of voters or people attempting to vote in general, and minority voters in particular.

    You couldn’t get a more transparent example of racist projection (maybe even Confession by Projection?) if you got our own Collaborator Bob to write that memo…

  38. Rorschach says:

    Singapore: Beijing has cut off all diplomatic contact with the Australian government under the China-Australia Strategic Economic Dialogue, a key channel of communication between the two countries.

    Just a hint of what’s next if Morro cancels the Colin Barnett WA Belt and Road deal from 2011. [As well as the Dan Andrews one].

    https://www.parliament.wa.gov.au/publications/tabledpapers.nsf/displaypaper/3813884a5e693982278ef55348257911005af567/$file/3884.pdf

  39. Rex Anger says:

    I thought Chairman Dan’s deal was ready dead?

  40. custard says:

    #MarxistMcGowan has flicked the ChinaVirus switch because apparently as of midnight Friday night you cant catch a thing….

  41. egg_ says:

    As well as govt subsidy, Elon will just make the rockets run on ethanol, get it from corn or such, and get the carbon credits.

    Von Braun’s legacy to deliver freight?

  42. Rex Anger says:

    #MarxistMcGowan has flicked the ChinaVirus switch because apparently as of midnight Friday night you cant catch a thing….

    If only the world had had such a considerate virus in the past…

  43. H B Bear says:

    Ask Emperor Barney about canals. They don’t fly in Oz.

  44. H B Bear says:

    About time that virus got the memo in WA. Thanks Sneakers focus groups.

  45. Rex Anger says:

    #MarxistMcGowan has flicked the ChinaVirus switch because apparently as of midnight Friday night you cant catch a thing….

    And all those cursing those apparent sheep who wear masks in each others’ presence, clearly choose not to pay attention to the many more who did not and would not and will not.

    When the rules become so bureaucratically stupid that practically nobody does it outside of being forced to as an employee, then of course it cannot be sustained.

    The contact tracing ‘good news’ is peripheral and a mere frippery.

  46. Rex Anger says:

    Von Braun’s legacy to deliver freight?

    A slightly different ‘payload…’

  47. Herodotus says:

    Forget hydrogen. The future is helium, lots of it. In the Zeppelin fleets.

  48. Bruce of Newcastle says:

    The problem with digging is you would need a very very wide canal, a km or more?

    It’d always go supersaline just because of water plus salt going in, water only going out. The salt will build up. But hey, it’d be a good industry recovering it from the bitterns.

    I did a quick bit of mental arithmetic just now. Instead of a canal build a 2 m diameter concrete pipeline. Of-the-shelf pipeline sections. You need some pumps at the Gulf end, but only for starting up. Then once the pipeline is full and air is removed it can siphon water into Lake Eyre with about a bar of head.

    If it gave you 1 m/s of water velocity that would be enough to fill the whole of Lake Eyre 1 m deep in a year. And cost nothing to run, gravity does it for you.

    I can’t see how a business case could be developed though. A pipeline would be lots cheaper than a canal but aside from the salt you can’t really monetize the rain benefit in the Eastern states. It’s a fun idea though.

  49. H B Bear says:

    Whoever is left in the WA Lieborals should have a FOI request in for Sneakers medical advice.

  50. Keith Forwheels says:

    Forget hydrogen. The future is helium, lots of it. In the Zeppelin fleets.

    This. Jobs of the future will be in Zepplin driving. An uplifting career.

  51. Rex Anger says:

    An uplifting career.

    But will it have lane departure warnings?

    Or fatigure monitoring? 🤔

  52. Top Ender says:

    Q+A spreads mistruths on Indigenous history
    THE MOCKER
    Follow @Oz_Mocker

    If you travelled to Canberra as part of a school excursion in the 1970s, you too probably visited a mausoleum-like building that was home to the Australian Institute of Anatomy. The natural history museum was disbanded in the mid-1980s, and the building now houses the National Film and Sound Archive.

    Although interesting, it was a morbid and ghoulish place to take primary students. Two specific exhibits stood out in my mind. The first was Phar Lap’s heart, and the second the skeleton of an Aboriginal woman. Her skull had been smashed, the accompanying notation speculating she had been clubbed to death by raiders from another tribe.

    This would not be surprising to paleopathologist Stephen Webb, who during the mid-1990s analysed the skeletal remains of 4500 Indigenous people, many of whom had died before the arrival of Europeans. Among his findings was that Indigenous women were far more likely to have sustained such injuries.

    Evidently this is unknown to Channel 10 presenter and Indigenous woman Narelda Jacobs. “Women were equal, if not the leader of their families and their mob,” she told an ABC Q+A audience last Thursday week. “When the colonisers came and invaders came along, they brought with them the patriarchy. And the symptoms of the patriarchy and colonialism is misogyny, sexism, racism, discrimination, homophobia, transphobia. None of those things existed before the colonisers came.”

    Her comments were echoed by Greens senator and fellow panellist Sarah Hanson-Young. “As a white Australian, I wasn’t taught the history of this nation when I was in school,” she declared. That is painfully obvious. After all, it was Hanson-Young who in 2018 issued a press release referring to the “important national debate about changing the date of Australia Day, away from Captain Cook’s landing, at Botany Bay”.

    Jacobs’ claims were both extraordinary and absolute. To assert that patriarchy, misogyny, and sexism were unknown in Australia prior to European settlement contradicts not only the findings of Webb, but also the observations of First Fleet marine officer Watkin Tench. “Condemned not only to carry the children, but all other burthens, they meet in return for submission only with blows, kicks and every other mark of brutality,” wrote Tench, noting that Indigenous men treated women with “savage barbarity”. Yet Q+A host Hamish MacDonald did not so much as question Jacobs’ assertions.

    Likewise, MacDonald did not correct Indigenous artist Ziggy Ramo, who last year stated on the program “My father was born before ‘67. So my father wasn’t even classed as a citizen when he was born.” The belief that Indigenous Australians were not classified as Australian citizens before the 1967 referendum is a common misconception, but it has been debunked enough times for ABC presenters to know it is a furphy. Ironically, the theme for this particular Q+A program was ‘Media and Misinformation’.

    To the ABC’s credit, its fact-checking unit had, two years before Ramo’s appearance, refuted the myths about the 1967 referendum, including the claims that Indigenous Australians could not vote before then, or that they were classified under the so-called “Flora and Fauna Act”.

    “In searches of Commonwealth and state legal databases, Fact Check found no record of a flora and fauna act that administered the affairs of Indigenous Australians at either a state or federal level,” the unit concluded, noting these fallacious claims originated in the early 1970s.

    So why does the national broadcaster still allow them to be perpetuated uncorrected? Last year ABC journalist Lucy Thackray wrote an article about Wiradjuri man, Bourke Shire councillor and Vietnam veteran Victor Bartley, who claimed that when called up for service in 1966, he was at first rejected when the authorities discovered he was Indigenous.

    “I received a letter back stating I was exempt from national service because I was Indigenous under the National Flora and Fauna Act,” he told Thackray. “To this day I still don’t know if I’m a kangaroo or a flower.”

    Bartley nonetheless enlisted in the Army by declaring in a subsequent application he was of British nationality. He saw active service and served honourably. Yet his claim about the reasons for his initial rejection was not pursued by Thackray, who also noted erroneously: “Victor was 20 when Aboriginal people were finally recognised as Australian citizens”.

    Sky News presenter and The Australian associate editor Chris Kenny reported these errors almost 12 months ago. To this date the ABC has not amended the online article as required by its editorial policies.

    The National Museum of Australia’s so-called digital classroom also disseminates this misinformation. “On 27 May 1967 nearly 91 per cent of Australians voted ‘yes’ to change the constitution and legally recognise Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people as Australian citizens,” its website notes.

    “It wasn’t until the 1967 referendum that Indigenous Australians were seen as more than flora and fauna,” noted one contributor last year to the National Library of Australia’s website. “My Mum, Nan, other family members and Indigenous Australians born prior to 1967, were not classified as human by the Australian government until this time.” The library does not provide a correction to this account.

    You can be sure that the drafters of the revised Australian curriculum, which was released last week, had none of the above errors in mind when they referred to the need for “truth-telling” regarding the experiences of Indigenous Australians since the arrival of Europeans.

    Incidentally, the terms ‘Indigenous’ and ‘Aboriginal’ will be replaced with ‘First Nations Australians’ or ’Australian First Nations Peoples’. Call me mean-spirited, but this nomenclature – a Canadian import – is verbose and bombastic.

    Student will now be taught that Indigenous people experienced colonisation “as invasion and dispossession of land, sea and sky”. As well as the humanities, teachers will be expected to incorporate Indigenous perspectives into subjects such as maths, science, and English.

    As to whether the teaching profession can present this material impartially, I am not hopeful, particularly if the Australian Education Union is an example. Last week I wrote about a council youth worker ordering male Year 11 students at Parkdale Secondary College to stand, labelling them “oppressors” for being white, male, and Christian.

    Last December, the AEU lauded the achievements of Parkdale teacher and Indigenous woman Katrina Amon, who oversees a five-week course for Year 10 students on Indigenous Australians, including subjects such as the Stolen Generation, land rights, deaths in custody, and Closing the Gap.

    “In the Year 9 CONNECT program, students learn about the 1967 Referendum, before which Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people were considered ‘flora and fauna’ by the Australian government,” noted the AEU in an online article. “’The students are very surprised that I was not a citizen of my country for the first four years of my life,’ Katrina says.” Has not a single member of the AEU Victoria’s 50,000 strong branch noticed these errors?

    No reasonable person would object to students learning about Indigenous society, including the catastrophic upheaval that followed European settlement. But I fear history is increasingly subordinated to ideology, and that students, instead of being taught to objectively assess Indigenous claims of fact, will be browbeaten into accepting them as an article of faith.

    Many a time I have mused on the dogmatic, even quasi-religious, nature of the lengthy acknowledgments of country that prefaced school concerts, assemblies, and graduations. You too probably could recite them in your sleep. Yes, we live on unceded sovereign land, and we pay our respects to Indigenous people, past, present, and future. We acknowledge their rich heritage, their incredibly diverse culture, their amazing skills that have enabled them to live in harmony with land and nature, their generosity in allowing us settlers to live on their country, their magnanimity in harbouring no bitterness toward us, their unsurpassed ancient wisdom that has been passed down since the dawn of time, and their inventing democracy, astronomy, and advanced and complex systems of government. What are these fulsome and far-fetched platitudes achieving?

    It was often said – not without justification – that for many years Australia had a whitewashed past. There is a stain on our history. But it does not follow that we allow the cultural Marxists to do the cleansing.

    THE MOCKER
    The Mocker amuses himself by calling out poseurs, sneering social commentators, and po-faced officials. He is deeply suspicious of those who seek increased regulation of speech and behaviour.

    Oz

  53. Herodotus says:

    Filling Lake Eyre would improve the climate in the “ dead heart”. Meanwhile here in Sydney the Flannery Effect is in full swing again.

  54. Keith Forwheels says:

    An uplifting career.

    But will it have lane departure warnings?

    Or fatigure monitoring?

    No, but it will have lasers, to clear the skyways of pesky drones. Zepplins with lasers. You know it makes sense. Bern, IPO’s back on 😁

  55. H B Bear says:

    Forget hydrogen. The future is helium, …

    One of my mates is trying to get a helium project away on the ASX. I think they are drilling somewhere in the US. Don’t put your house on it.

  56. Shy Ted says:

    And in an “only the bureaucracy could have come up with this”, if you buy tobacco online – In Australia seller must have to establish customer legal age to sell tobacco products. Therefore .com.au cannot process any order until we don’t get Government acceptable IDs such as driving license/ Passport/ Proof of age card.
    Isn’t this how identities are stolen? Anyway that’s only for cigrattes and E-cigrattes
    I recently got conned into buying some Indian tobacco. Foul stuff and didn’t want to stay alight.

  57. Farmer Gez says:

    Super saline water also has a much lower evaporation rate. The water in a saline lake tends to stratify with the denser saline brine sinking with fresher water at the top.

  58. Rorschach says:

    Von Braun’s legacy to deliver freight?

    A slightly different ‘payload…’

    Yeah Baby! Now we’re talking. Pffft on your 45ton B-Double! Which truck or train can deliver the megatons that Von Braun’s legacy can!!!

  59. egg_ says:

    Four-Tonne Tyre Change

    Très deadly, if things go wrong!

    I’d like to see a bunch of p1ssant CHOs do a risk assessment on that one!

    If one of those tyres explodes….

  60. Bruce of Newcastle says:

    Oops, two orders of magnitude out – Lake Eyre is 9500 km2. One metre per second is 1 sq km by one metre deep every four days. So it would take about 100 years to get 1 m deep in the whole basin. I should’ve used a calculator not mk 1 brain matter.

  61. Rex Anger says:

    No, but it will have lasers, to clear the skyways of pesky drones. Zepplins with lasers. You know it makes sense. Bern, IPO’s back on 😁

    So long as they do not resemble the Skywhale…

    #Lasernipples

  62. Woolfe says:

    When the rules become so bureaucratically stupid that practically nobody does it outside of being forced to as an employee, then of course it cannot be sustained.

    Will never happen in Oz.

  63. H B Bear says:

    BoN – always check your workings. Well let it pass this time, you’re no Gagooglery.

  64. Farmer Gez says:

    Evidently this is unknown to Channel 10 presenter and Indigenous woman Narelda Jacobs. “Women were equal, if not the leader of their families and their mob,” she told an ABC Q+A audience last Thursday week. “When the colonisers came and invaders came along, they brought with them the patriarchy.

    My wife’s great uncle wrote a diary dating back to the 1850’s in northern Victoria.
    He mentioned seeing a tribe moving single file along the top of a range of hills. He said the chief was in front, then the strong young men with the women, children and the elderly bringing up the rear.

  65. Rex Anger says:

    Which truck or train can deliver the megatons that Von Braun’s legacy can!!!

    Well, not in the same way…

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=2jzugX2NMnk

  66. Keith Forwheels says:

    So long as they do not resemble the Skywhale…

    #Lasernipples

    Magda won’t get a look in. Promise.

  67. Shy Ted says:

    The all-English European Cup Final between English clubs Man City and Chelsea will be played in…. Istanbul.
    So – A resurgence of COVID-19 cases has recently been observed in Istanbul, marking the metropolis with more than 16 million population as a red province with very high-risk.
    And
    If only there was an obvious solution.

  68. Dr Faustus says:

    Just a hint of what’s next if Morro cancels the Colin Barnett WA Belt and Road deal from 2011. [As well as the Dan Andrews one].

    Yes.
    I take this to be China saying: “Pay attention fluckheads: We’d much prefer to keep control of Port of Darwin rather than have the money back + $500 million.

    It’s actually quite hard to blame the CCP for being pissed off when the Australian polity can’t get its shit together and keeps reaching for the win-win-win money – and then yanking the rug.

    Sets a bad example to other scumboi clients in Shitholistans everywhere.

  69. Rex Anger says:

    When the rules become so bureaucratically stupid that practically nobody does it outside of being forced to as an employee, then of course it cannot be sustained.

    Will never happen in Oz

    Bugman stupidity and obtuseness does not equal effective enforcement.

    Plenty of obsolete and contradictory (yet still enforceable) civic rules broken on a daily basis by people, by accident or deliberate commission.

    I would expect to see masks, social distancing and all the measures to keep the government’s Electoral Margins and Public Service budget ‘Saef’ wither and die at the hands of public indifference. Despite regular scares.

    It happened in WA prior to the February Election ‘Flare-up,’ and it will happen again.

  70. Rex Anger says:

    It’s actually quite hard to blame the CCP for being pissed off when the Australian polity can’t get its shit together and keeps reaching for the win-win-win money – and then yanking the rug.

    Sets a bad example to other scumboi clients in Shitholistans everywhere.

    Like all leftists everywhere, it’s only OK when they do it…

  71. egg_ says:

    “When the colonisers came and invaders came along, they brought with them the patriarchy.

    Is Ernie Dingo still doing comedy?

  72. Struth says:

    We could live without trains, but that was not what I was saying, as people drift off into musings.
    Trains have their place, and can do some jobs better than trucks.
    Coal into QLD ports and the Iron ore trains etc.
    Mine to port scenarios.
    Bulk transport.
    Where it is more feasible it does not require subsidy.
    The market will work that out, and fast.

    My sole point here was that a choo choo driver claimed his highly efficient rail system is far cheaper to put containers on to get across country, than using trucks, when the rail network needs subsidies from taxpayers to achieve those rates.
    So you just can’t make that claim and be taken seriously.

    Couldn’t let that bullshit slide.
    On the calculations shown to you today, just the minimal basic expenses, no truck damages a road more than it pays in tax.
    Are trucks ruining roads?
    Of course they are.
    That’s undeniable and I’ve never claimed they are not.
    They shouldn’t be, but they are.
    And in some areas, very quickly.
    Poorly built by corrupted unionised workforces, and maintained poorly and slowly, our roads are a national embarrassment and deadly.
    My point is the government gets much more from just the road transport industry in taxes to maintain and build new roads than it needs, the industry is in no way subsidised and it is screwed by government every which way it can be. Add what ordinary motorists pay to use the roads and it is criminal.

    People should be fuming with government for not providing safe , smooth roads with the billions it receives from taxing the road transport industry and then not putting it back into the roads.
    This is killing people.
    Imagine these billions, and add that from the taxes car drivers pay in fuels and regos, and there is no excuse.

    People with no vision of what SHOULD be possible, think of those terrible trucks clogging up their roads and dream of it going by rail.
    You’ll never get rid of trucks, you’d be screaming for them back, so fixing the roads car drivers want to use is the only viable option.
    Not fucking around with “inland Freight corridor ” rail and fast trains and other bullshit.
    All will end up subsidised or trucks will do it, and people will continue to die on our roads unnecessarily.
    The truth of course, is with the money government gets in revenue from the road transport industry, your road that you want to rid trucks from, shouldn’t be a goat track, but a major multi lane, well built, freeway.
    The yanks worked all this shit out in the 1950’s and did something about it, increasing and cementing themselves with the interstate freeway system as a superpower and opening up development everywhere.
    Infrastructure that creates more wealth than the taxes used to create it.
    You’ll never get rid of trucks, unless we want to go back to bullock teams and choo choos.

    You shouldn’t be dealing with trucks and they shouldn’t be dealing with you.
    A lot of all that should, and can be minimised.
    Caravanners and other frustrating and dangerous situations on our roads have us fighting each other, when the truth is, it’s failed corrupt government doing this to us.
    Instead they throw this massive revenue away in corruption and ignorance.

  73. egg_ says:

    So long as they do not resemble the Skywhale…

    Helium fun bags could be smaller dropoffs?

  74. calli says:

    Back from Morpeth on the mighty Hunter River.

    No paddle-wheelers spotted. Not one. But many…many vintage Rollers and Bentleys! There must be a rally on this week. Loved the guys in the convertibles wearing leather coats and goggles. Very dashing.

  75. egg_ says:

    two orders of magnitude out – Lake Eyre is 9500 km2. One metre per second is 1 sq km by one metre deep every four days. So it would take about 100 years to get 1 m deep in the whole basin.

    A worthwhile exercise, anyway.

  76. Mother Lode says:

    It’s actually quite hard to blame the CCP for being pissed off when the Australian polity can’t get its shit together and keeps reaching for the win-win-win money – and then yanking the rug.

    I should be very surprised if the CCP did not know that these agreements would have had to go through the Federal government. But they saw a value in the contingency where the Feds tear up the invalid contracts.

  77. Roger says:

    “Women were equal, if not the leader of their families and their mob,” she told an ABC Q+A audience last Thursday week. “When the colonisers came and invaders came along, they brought with them the patriarchy.

    File together with “Islaaaaaaam is the most feminist religion”.

  78. Rex Anger says:

    Cenotaph Man now says it’s all the caravanners’ fault…

  79. Keith Forwheels says:

    We could live without trains, but that was not what I was saying, as people drift off into musings.

    Don’t let it bother you too much Struth, we’re all dead in the end. But how many of us get a Zepplin ride before it’s all over?? That is the real question.

  80. egg_ says:

    Back from Morpeth on the mighty Hunter River.

    Home of y’ole Arnott’s bakery.

  81. Rex Anger says:

    Who’s living in whose head rent-free, Struth?

    I love Nanna-killing, one containerised road at a time…

    #Choochoo,MFer

    #Chuglyfe😎

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