Open Forum: May 1, 2021

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6,917 Responses to Open Forum: May 1, 2021

  1. calli says:

    Saw what you did there, Spurge! 😀

  2. Spurgeon Monkfish III says:

    Davo – a clear case of great minds thinking alike (about bloody awful alcoholic beverages).

  3. Albatross says:

    Shy Ted says:
    May 5, 2021 at 9:26 am
    A woman has dropped to her knees in front of Scott Morrison
    A lifetime ago you’d have got your **** out.

    Whip.

  4. Lysander says:

    And in other global news (strangely not reported given its significance), there’s been mortar shelling overnight in the Ukraine. It’s still early but may be Ukraine against pro-Russians inside Ukraine and not necessarily against Russian State.

    If only I had a laptop handy.

  5. 1735099 says:

    Now Bob, I’ve repeatedly posted this evidence of your dishonesty. I will not waste anymore time on you. I have no intention of further annoying people on this blog by posting the obvious, or the old.

    You’ve been doing nothing else for years, and you’re more annoying than just about anyone else who posts here with the possible exception of St Ruth.
    And as for “dishonesty” – how “honest” is a poster that follows a couple of widdershins to the point where he can be diagnosed as OCD?

    The time-worn strategy of using irrelevant snarks to distract from the substance of reality has lost its gloss.

    Read some Judith Wright, and wake up to yourself.
    You’re the digital caricature of the bullocky.

  6. Infidel Tiger says:

    Nothing better than Rosè on a summer’s day.

  7. Cassie of Sydney says:

    Where’s Struth and his kvetchiness? I’ll take that any day over Bob the Racist and his ramblings.

  8. Leigh Lowe says:

    I just get the sneaking feeling that Mr Anger was hauling a fully laden troll-train for the last two days.

  9. Mater says:

    You’ve been doing nothing else for years, and you’re more annoying than just about anyone else who posts here with the possible exception of St Ruth.
    And as for “dishonesty” – how “honest” is a poster that follows a couple of widdershins to the point where he can be diagnosed as OCD?

    LOL!

    VVVVVIIIIIEEEEETTTTTNNNNNAAAAAMMMMM!

  10. Shy Ted says:

    Fresh from the impending separation, Bill Gates finds love. On Tinder.

  11. Roger says:

    So Israel has announced an investigation into Pfizer jab after many cases of myocarditis reported…

    Ditto France.

    But the numbers are small.

  12. Leigh Lowe says:

    Cassie of Sydney says:

    May 5, 2021 at 11:17 am

    Where’s Struth and his kvetchiness?

    The latest model Kenworth is going to be fitted with a Kvetchometer.
    Readings above 3 will trigger an aural tone and a flashing light.
    Above 5 and it shuts everything down.
    I don’t see St Ruth getting out of the depot.

  13. H B Bear says:

    Breaking the Sheep’s Back is quite a good read into what happens when farmers ( and the Nationals) think they can influence commodity prices, in that case wool obvs. Don’t know how close it is to the truth but seems plausible. Gives quite a sympathetic treatment to one time Treasurer John Kerin.

  14. Dr Faustus says:

    Saw what you did there, Spurge! 😀

    Very good for a Wednesday.

  15. Spurgeon Monkfish III says:

    Grate – Town Hall station in Sydney evacuated after a fire/gas leak.

    Looks like I’ll be walking home.

  16. Lysander says:

    Yeah thanks Roger. 🙂

    I’m temporarily working for a health organisation and I can’t tell you how much of this shite is being made up on the run. I’m not saying it could be done any other way as there’s no “playbook” for this but even our top Docs don’t know what they’re talking about. That’s not a conspiracy; just a fact (and I don’t criticise them for it).

    But taking advice from the Chief Health Officer (who means well) is still a bit like going for a trifecta with one horse that’s coming tenth half way through its race.

  17. H B Bear says:

    Read some Judith Wright, and wake up to yourself.

    NamBob’s equivalent to Jordon Peterson’s “Go and clean your room.” And people wonder what is wrong with public education.

  18. Lysander says:

    The Nats, generally, are a good bunch. They have their agrarian socialists and their nutters but I can’t thank Barnaby enough for having a chat with me in 2009 and convincing me of Climate Change realism (as opposed to alarmism). Only two years earlier I was working for the ALP. Gosh!

  19. Dave in Marybrook says:

    That Mia Davies is a good sort
    hurr hurr hurrr

  20. H B Bear says:

    Holding yourself out as knowing what you are talking about when you don’t is most certainly grounds for criticism.

  21. Zyconoclast says:

    Nothing better than Rosè on a summer’s day.

    Chilled Lambrusco?

  22. Roger says:

    I’m temporarily working for a health organisation and I can’t tell you how much of this shite is being made up on the run.

    I believe it.

    Despite public perceptions, science is messy.

  23. Dave in Marybrook says:

    Dexter Davies was a top bloke, Terry Redman was just o.k. but liked the sound of his own voice a bit too much. That’s it for the Nats I know, but Barnaby is the contender who shoulda been a gamechanger, if not for effing Turnbull.
    Watch that agrarian socialist streak, though. None of them will get a look in after me and Sahblok get hold of the mic.

  24. Lysander says:

    That Mia Davies is a good sort

    Wish I could say more…

  25. egg_ says:

    I’m temporarily working for a health organisation and I can’t tell you how much of this shite is being made up on the run. I’m not saying it could be done any other way as there’s no “playbook” for this but even our top Docs don’t know what they’re talking about. That’s not a conspiracy; just a fact (and I don’t criticise them for it).

    But taking advice from the Chief Health Officer (who means well) is still a bit like going for a trifecta with one horse that’s coming tenth half way through its race.

    It’s probably beneath the white coats to confer with the Safety Authority wrt risk management, let alone financial risk management (Treasury).

    “To a man with a scalpel, everyone needs surgery”.

    /To a man with a hammer, everything’s a nail

  26. JC says:

    Salvatore, Social Distance Martyr says:
    May 5, 2021 at 11:11 am
    Infidel Tiger is correct re the comments on grain pricing.
    It was clear the reference by I.T. was an exact match for that oft used by farmers adage of farmers being ‘price takers’

    Stay out of these discussions you moron. There is no such thing as price takers in this example. Grains have a very transparent price. That’s it.

    You need to stick to making sure the unused bar is dusted and being nice to creditors.
    Leave the rest others. You blowhard jerkoff, directing traffic at the car! FMD

  27. egg_ says:

    A Cat has posted that Epidemiologists are the low hanging fruit of the medical fraternity.

  28. Lysander says:

    Dexter and I were great friends until his death a few years back; really miss him.

  29. egg_ says:

    Read some Judith Wright

    Daughter of the landed gentry?

  30. Lysander says:

    And Dave, Redders was arguably the most liked MP in Parliament (next to Ben Wyatt). Sharpest mind I ever met, humble, laissez faire and fairly conservative.

    Brought GM crops to WA despite huge protests by greens and luvvies and heaps more. Shame he recently lost his seat.

  31. Dave in Marybrook says:

    I’ve heard great things about Ben Wyatt too Lysander- from a pinko lefty mate, who is stitching up a multi-million dollar supply deal, but I trust her judgement and her honesty. It’s probably a dang shame that the leadership is locked in above him, to all accounts he could have made a good first ATSI premier for all the right reasons.

  32. egg_ says:

    Town Hall station in Sydney evacuated after a fire/gas leak

    Some real world risk management.

  33. egg_ says:

    So Israel has announced an investigation into Pfizer jab after many cases of myocarditis reported…

    Teh Couf is the gift that keeps on giving.

  34. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha says:

    Don’t know how close it is to the truth but seems plausible.

    The Wool Reserve Price scheme wasn’t helped by a mentality that thought that you needn’t bother improving the quality if you were guaranteed a price for your wool clip, and the Australian wool industry took thirty years to recover.

  35. Herodotus says:

    Judith’s daughter Meredith was at ANU in the early 1970s. I recall her getting involved in some elementary student politics back then.

  36. egg_ says:

    “We are so lucky that we are blessed by a commodity super cycle”

    The mining downturn of 2013 bit hard – methinks the Hunter Valley hasn’t fully recovered, Bowen Basin likely similar.

    Moranbah house prices?

  37. Bar Beach Swimmer says:

    It looks like the ‘rona elimination strategy of the Chief Medical and Health Officers’ of the combined governments (federal and state) has blown up in their faces.

    We’ve had Australian citizens and residents stuck in various countries around the world who have wanted to return and for which the government has to date been able to bat away with some success any of that controversy because “they’re keeping us safe”.

    So we don’t have herd immunity; we’ve had “difficulties” with the vaccine rollout and because of that hestitancy in the community to get the jab. We’ve been told we can’t travel externally and nor can we do so internally when we want to, for if an outbreak arises somewhere across the country, no matter how small or contained it is, the state premiers will be stop us.

    Now, government concerns that the return to Australia of a large cohort of Indian-Australians and who are possibly infected will swamp quarantine and/or our hospital facilities and could enable the accidental and multiple release of ‘rona into the Australian population, which is something that the governments have prided themselves on stopping, and have crowed about, is the true covid nightmare.

    Well played, I say.

  38. Lysander says:

    Yeah, I’m not a luvvie (any more) but I think Wyatt was more of a pragmatist than an ideologue. He and Redders are good mates; which says a lot too.

  39. Bar Beach Swimmer says:

    Weird story about Stuart McGill on the news. Clearly, more to come.

  40. Arky says:

    So the same farmers who spent forty years wetting themselves with mirth over de-industrialising this country because they got to see townies reduced to welfare cases and sone of their inputs temporarily reduced slightly, take the slightest implication that our over reliance on their sector as a nation is stupid as a mortal insult.
    Go fuck yourselves.

  41. Dave in Marybrook says:

    What the hell Arky?
    Where did all that come from?

  42. Arky says:

    The lessons of South Africa and Rhodesia haven’t sunk in at all have they?
    The socialists coming for you and your farms had to go through our industrialised might first.
    By laughing yourself silly while it was degraded you fucked yourselves.
    No, I’m not happy about it.

  43. Bar Beach Swimmer says:

    Lysander says:
    May 5, 2021 at 11:29 am
    The Nats, generally, are a good bunch. They have their agrarian socialists and their nutters but I can’t thank Barnaby enough for having a chat with me in 2009 and convincing me of Climate Change realism (as opposed to alarmism). Only two years earlier I was working for the ALP. Gosh

    For you, Lysander, that you’ve seen the light!
    https://youtu.be/IUZEtVbJT5c

  44. Zyconoclast says:

    Looming showdown as Michigan governor orders Line 5 pipeline to Ontario shut down
    Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer, a Democrat, in November ordered the firm to shut down the nearly 70-year-old lines by May 12

    TORONTO – For Michigan’s governor, the 645-mile pipeline jeopardizes the Great Lakes. For Canada’s natural resources minister, its continued operation is “nonnegotiable.”

    The clash over Calgary-based Enbridge’s Line 5, which carries up to 540,000 barrels of crude oil and natural gas liquids across Michigan and under the Great Lakes each day, is placing stress on U.S.-Canada ties – and raising questions about how the close allies, which have expressed a desire to work together to fight climate change, can balance energy security with the transition to a clean-energy economy.

  45. egg_ says:

    It looks like the ‘rona elimination strategy of the Chief Medical and Health Officers’ of the combined governments (federal and state) has blown up in their faces.

    An island continent masturbating about “zero cases” of the latest flu bug?

  46. Cassie of Sydney says:

    “Bar Beach Swimmer says:
    May 5, 2021 at 11:52 am
    Weird story about Stuart McGill on the news. Clearly, more to come.”

    Very weird.

  47. Shy Ted says:

    .gum. Perhaps a new domain name suffix. LOL.

  48. egg_ says:

    It looks like the ‘rona elimination strategy of the Chief Medical and Health Officers’ of the combined governments (federal and state) has blown up in their faces.

    An island continent [email protected] on about “zero cases” of the latest flu bug?

  49. Arky says:

    Where did all that come from?

    ..
    It comes from the conversations I had with the head of the NZ federated farmers in the late 80’a when I worked on his farm, as he told me of his and his members great happiness driving through town and seeing all the shut engineering shops because it meant:
    1. Townies were suffering.
    2. We would have to import cheap pumps, irrigation gear, balers, etc etc. Protection for industry was dead.
    3. He was lord of the fucking manor.

  50. Dave in Marybrook says:

    With respect Arky, it sounds like you’ve been seduced by a David Rowe cartoon of your own making there.

  51. H B Bear says:

    Very weird.

    I might hazard a guess some of the players are “known to police” as they say in the classics.

  52. Lysander says:

    Alleluia indeed BBS.

    Can’t believe I gave my time and effort to KRudd….Although I also worked for Harry Jenkins and he was ok for a Liebor member/speaker.

  53. Bar Beach Swimmer says:

    Arky:

    So the same farmers who spent forty years wetting themselves with mirth over de-industrialising this country because they got to see townies reduced to welfare cases and sone of their inputs temporarily reduced slightly

    The sale of Freight Corp, which was the bulk commodity carrier (I know, trains, again!) of coal and wheat in NSW to private interests in 2002(?) and for which the NSW wheat farmers were ecstatic, thinking that grain transport costs would be reduced, even though there was subsidising already, is a case in point.

    The rail lines had been maintained, even though the harvest is seasonal. The input of wages into those regional towns helped business and the community, and even the local sporting team numbers etc etc.

    Then when the sale went through…

  54. Roger says:

    Well played, I say.

    And let’s not forget that in most instances it was the government that allowed those stranded in India to travel there by granting them exemptions from restrictions. Exemptions available to any citizen/pr, to be sure, but accessed most by Indians, it would seem. You’d think someone would have been tasked with monitoring the numbers so as to anticipate the problem.

  55. Arky says:

    Dave in Marybrook says:
    May 5, 2021 at 12:04 pm
    With respect Arky, it sounds like you’ve been seduced by a David Rowe cartoon of your own making there

    ..
    No.
    New Zealand was first down the libertarian path of free trade.
    And I lived through it.
    It was the Lange Labour government with Roger Douglass as finance minister and their policies were in part shaped by the federated farmers. The head of the federsted farmers tokd me himselfThey won the election off the farmers switching away from Muldoon on this very point.
    And you. an go there today and see for yourself how far infiltrated the place is now by the CCP.
    Including TWO chinese language FTA channels.

  56. Shy Ted says:

    Ita Butt on Nat Press Club shortly talking about accountability at the ABC. Nah, just kidding, macular degeneration.

  57. mh says:

    No one ever seemed to like Stuart MacGill.

  58. Bar Beach Swimmer says:

    You’d think someone would have been tasked with monitoring the numbers so as to anticipate the problem

    +1, Roger.

  59. egg_ says:

    So we don’t have herd immunity; we’ve had “difficulties” with the vaccine rollout and because of that hestitancy in the community to get the jab. We’ve been told we can’t travel externally and nor can we do so internally when we want to, for if an outbreak arises somewhere across the country, no matter how small or contained it is, the state premiers will be stop us.

    The irony of the Hamish tard telling us to “stay home” – now it’s “travel Australia!”.

    Big Brother’s Stop/Go sign lollipop man.

  60. egg_ says:

    the government that allowed those stranded in India to travel there by granting them exemptions from restrictions.

    Politics being a numbers game, cowardly Scummo’s bus rolls over the most vulnerable.

  61. Spurgeon Monkfish III says:

    Town Hall station apparently closed due to “an unspecified threat”. So various imbeciles adhering to a certain medieval idiotology have now figured out they can cause daily chaos in Sydneystan by phoning in bomb threats to state rail.

    Grate.

  62. Bar Beach Swimmer says:

    Can’t believe I gave my time and effort to KRudd…

    https://youtu.be/YUQzE7ff8pQ
    😁

  63. Leigh Lowe says:

    mh says:

    May 5, 2021 at 12:11 pm

    No one ever seemed to like Stuart MacGill.

    Even his kidnappers threw him back after an hour and a half.

  64. Dr Faustus says:

    Weird story about Stuart McGill on the news. Clearly, more to come.”

    The weirdness starts with the timeline:

    April 14: Kidnapped, threatened about something, and released.
    April 20: Incident reported to the police.

    So, five days in between spent how?

  65. DrBeauGan says:

    Protection for industry was dead.

    The only protection industry needed was from politicians and the ignorant. Doubling electricity prices was incredibly stupid. Spreading global warming hysteria was criminal.

  66. Bruce of Newcastle says:

    I’m temporarily working for a health organisation and I can’t tell you how much of this shite is being made up on the run.

    Yah.

    The Narrative On Lockdowns And Masks Fails Yet Again (4 May)

    Government- and media-induced panic have blinded us to the data, which for the past thirteen months have consistently shown zero correlation between the timing, strength, and duration of mitigation measures and covid-19 incidence. Nowhere could this lack of correlation be more prevalent than among lockdowns and mask usage.

    Leaving aside the disastrous and deadly consequences of government lockdowns—see here, here, and here—the evidence for lockdowns’ ability to mitigate covid-19 mortality remains scant.

    The problem is the pollies want to be seen to do something. Masks and lockdowns are decisive, but don’t actually do anything except destroy people’s livelihoods. Contact tracing and quarantining are boring by comparison, with much less emotional engagement from the people.

    Unfortunately we’ve been in an era of we’re-from-the-government-we-know-best and they absolutely hate people defying them, even when they’re wrong. So anyone who disagrees gets crushed.

    I suspect they’re also terrified about the climate stuff. If people regard their covid experts as bullshit artists then they’re going to do the same about their climate experts…who are bullshit artists.

  67. So the same farmers who spent forty years wetting themselves with mirth over de-industrialising this country because they got to see townies reduced to welfare cases and sone of their inputs temporarily reduced slightly

    I don’t know a single farmer (as in primary producer) who was anything but heartbroken at de-industrialisation.
    High cost of inputs was generally restricted to anguish at high tariffs on those items which were not produced in Australia.

    Likewise just about everybody I knew was lived at Australian manufacturers being subject to tariffs, coz “imported” while fair dinkum o/s manufacturers brought in fully imported gear & got deemed “Australian” by some trickery (the coffee in the factory crib room being from o/s was about the standard for deeming an Australian manufacturer to be “substantially imported content”)

  68. Pedro the Loafer says:

    Gawdalmighty, sheep are stupid beasts.

    Many Flannerys here at Casa Pedro and the dumb Dorpers are standing at the back fence sodden to the skin and glaring balefully at me, nice and warm and dry up at the house.

    Feeling sorry for the poor gals, I wrangled them down to their custom built shed (which cost nearly $60 worth of CGI and a slab of beer) and the stupid sods immediately trot back to the fence to continue the hate fest.

    BTW, I like trains. *runs for cover*

  69. Dr Faustus says:

    Politics being a numbers game, cowardly Scummo’s bus rolls over the most vulnerable.

    Big ScoMo will be available to meet with Michael Slater, anytime anywhere.

  70. egg_ says:

    Town Hall station apparently closed due to “an unspecified threat”. So various imbeciles adhering to a certain medieval idiotology have now figured out they can cause daily chaos in Sydneystan by phoning in bomb threats to state rail.

    Unattended baggage is usually treated as a bomb threat.

  71. Roger says:

    3. He was lord of the fucking manor.

    Noblesse oblige doesn’t easily translate into Kiwi then?

  72. JC says:

    Deindustrialisation.

    Australia.
    Unions fucked everything they touch. Employers, potential entrepreneurs won’t come within an ocean of Australia. Literally!

    US

    Employees recently voted against unionisation in Amazon.

    I can’t quite spot the difference though. Can someone help?

  73. Bar Beach Swimmer says:

    BTW, I like trains. *runs for cover*

    Pedro, we wanted to get down to Rex’s weekend plaything but it was not to be…maybe we’ll be back…if the continued temporary insanity [edit: read megalomania] of our betters continues.

  74. TailgunneR says:

    Harder to shut down a highway over “unspecified threats”.
    And rivers/ports can be mined.

  75. Bruce of Newcastle says:

    No one ever seemed to like Stuart MacGill.

    I always did. He liked red wine and reading books rather than going to Cricket Australia functions, and could turn the ball square. His misfortune was to be born the same time as bogan ocker Shane Warne, otherwise he’d have 500 test wickets. Dunno what the current story means though.

  76. Dave in Marybrook says:

    Dorpers are not sheep, Pedro. They are man-hating kamikaze beavers disguised as goats.

  77. JC says:

    Yea mh, because you guys have such superior governance up there with the ugly faced chook.

  78. TailgunneR says:

    Lol, mh, it’d be very hard for me not to knock the mobile greenhouse over.
    Or get twitchy with the Stanley knife behind her at the toilet paper section.

  79. Infidel Tiger King says:

    Macgill has long been a nutter.

    I’d say his love of wine has become a love of other things.

    How he ever wedded Rachael Friend is one of life’s great injustices.

  80. Boambee John says:

    You’ve been doing nothing else but bleat about Vietman and national service for years, and you’re more annoying than just about anyone else who posts here.
    And as for “dishonesty” – how “honest” is a poster that obsesses about events more than 50 years ago to the point where he can be diagnosed as OCD?

    Still, he is accurate about widdershins. From Wiki:

    Widdershins (sometimes withershins, widershins or widderschynnes) is a term meaning to go counter-clockwise, to go anti-clockwise, or to go lefthandwise, or to walk around an object by always keeping it on the left.

    The ostrich certainly is oriented “lefthandwise”!

  81. Bar Beach Swimmer says:

    mh says:
    May 5, 2021 at 12:26 pm
    Coming to Victoria soon

    The news shopping trolley? Since it won’t go with my hat and gloves, I think I’ll get my stuff delivered 😁

  82. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha says:

    Gawdalmighty, sheep are stupid beasts.

    You took how long to realize that?

  83. Arky says:

    DrBeauGan says:
    May 5, 2021 at 12:18 pm
    Protection for industry was dead.

    The only protection industry needed was from politicians and the ignorant. Doubling electricity prices was incredibly stupid. Spreading global warming hysteria was criminal.

    ..
    Although similar, New Zealand is not Australia.
    New Zealand started down “free trade” route before Australia, and had a much smaller manufacturing sector than Australia. Both have now been obliterated, of course.
    New Zealand manufacturing was almost entirely jigged around the agricultural industry, but in the 80s firms were attempting to gear up to production runs of export items, such as items that were sold through Repco in Australia, in one case. Importing CNC machine tools and buildng modern factories in all types of industry from Aluminium to chip board mills. Muldoon, with “Think Big” wanted to develop the country as an exporter of manufactured products.
    And, unlike Australia, New Zealand really is at the end of the world, last stop, end of the line.

  84. PeterM says:

    Dr Faustus says:
    May 5, 2021 at 12:18 pm
    Weird story about Stuart McGill on the news. Clearly, more to come.”

    The weirdness starts with the timeline:

    April 14: Kidnapped, threatened about something, and released.
    April 20: Incident reported to the police.

    So, five days in between spent how?

    Could it be somehow related to IPL betting markets?

  85. Bar Beach Swimmer says:

    BJ,
    I’ve always thought it pretty low that “righties” keep having a go at us “lefties”! In fact, we are one of the most discriminated groups out there.

    And on top of that, we’re made to think of ourselves as sinister (i.e. lefthanded). Maybe you righties owe us reparations for what’s been done to us!

  86. Cassie of Sydney says:

    “Can’t believe I gave my time and effort to KRudd…”

    We all make mistakes…I once gave my time and effort to Turdbull.

  87. Leigh Lowe says:

    Infidel Tiger King says:

    May 5, 2021 at 12:29 pm

    Macgill has long been a nutter.

    B-grade roundarm pie-thrower.

  88. Infidel Tiger King says:

    Could it be somehow related to IPL betting markets?

    It’s Sydney. You only get kidnapped over betting, cocaine or house deeds.

  89. Arky says:

    We were exporting car hoists, car parts, centrifugal pumps, and mining gear, including rock crushers and rollers.
    Labour came to office, Rogernomics got under way, and it was like a big tap turned off. Almost everything stopped at once.
    The only thing that still got made was the rollers for mining conveyors.

  90. Leigh Lowe says:

    Below mh’s link at 12:26, there is this.
    Babylon Bee – Melinda Gates filed for divorce after discovering Windows95 launch video.

  91. Arky says:

    And New Zealand in those days had an actual air force with fighter jets, a navy with frigates and an army that retained traditions and a war fighting capability.
    I’ve lived through this story before, and I can fairly gauge which chapter Australia is at.
    It’s fucking depressing.

  92. Leigh Lowe says:

    It’s Sydney. You only get kidnapped over betting, cocaine or house deeds.

    Can I please have “Property Dispute” for the win?

  93. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha says:

    And New Zealand in those days had an actual air force with fighter jets

    It was an ill wind that blew nobody good – Royal Australian Air Force picked up several qualified fighter pilots when New Zealand canned the Skyhawks.

  94. DrBeauGan says:

    New Zealand started down “free trade” route before Australia, and had a much smaller manufacturing sector than Australia. Both have now been obliterated, of course.

    There are some legitimate arguments against genuine free trade, such as military and cultural reasons. Being afraid that foreigners are cleverer than us and better at engineering isn’t one of them. The biggest single factor in our industrial collapse was our education system going to the dogs, mainly because of infiltration by greenies. But government has also been disastrous by insane regulations, and the unions have spurred them on.

    Having a massive bureaucracy staffed by technical illiterates has exacerbated things. For these idiots, science and engineering are magic. You just tell engineers to reorder the system according to your stupid ignorant whims, and they just have to do it. Theirs not to point out it’s stupid, theirs but to obey and get on with it.

  95. Arky says:

    And no.
    What you thought your “culture” was, the fundamental assumptions you have about the nature of who you are. The hundered years of building up the story of what you thought Australia was, none of that is going to stop the forces undermining your ability to keep this continent.
    I’m 75% sure you’ve already lost.
    IT is right.

  96. Bar Beach Swimmer says:

    The AMA president of Sky. Another discussion about Australians’ hesitancy to get the jab.

    “For those Australians who don’t believe the government or the health fraternity, you could wait for the Pfizer vaccine but, remember, you’ll be at the back of the queue”.

    So now it’s passive-aggressive threats.

  97. Infidel Tiger King says:

    New Xi-Land is over.

    You Xiwis need to move on.

  98. Mater says:

    Weird story about Stuart McGill on the news. Clearly, more to come.

    Perpetrated by Right-wing terrorists who planned it around the dinner table (upon a Swastika encrusted table cloth, and a set of doilies embroidered with Hitlers bust)?

    Surely it’s the first line of enquiry for ASIO?

  99. Leigh Lowe says:

    Arky says:

    May 5, 2021 at 12:36 pm

    We were exporting car hoists, car parts, centrifugal pumps, and mining gear, including rock crushers and rollers.
    Labour came to office

    NZ was a bastion of cronyism and protectionism.
    I once worked for a metals company in Oz. When it came to exporting certain non-ferrous metals to NZ we had to seek approval each time from an individual named in the relevant NZ Act.
    The Trade Minister? No.
    The Secretary of Department of Trade? Nup.
    The owner of our competitor who had a monopoly in NZ? Yes.
    He allowed imports when he was running at 100% capacity with three months back-orders.

  100. Arky says:

    There are some legitimate arguments against genuine free trade

    ..
    THERE IS NO FREE TRADE.
    We live in a neighbourhood of monsters and criminals.
    Manufacturing was the bars on the windows and railway sleeper embedded in the driveway. It ensured we could always deliver high explosive and fragments onto those who want what we have.

  101. Infidel Tiger King says:

    THERE IS NO FREE TRADE.
    We live in a neighbourhood of monsters and criminals.

    Correct.

  102. H B Bear says:

    it be somehow related to IPL betting markets?
    It’s Sydney. You only get kidnapped over betting, cocaine or house deeds.

    Let’s ask Richo. He’ll know.

  103. Arky says:

    NZ was a bastion of cronyism and protectionism.

    ..
    Was? WAS?
    Fucking WAS?
    Listen smart guy, after damn near forty years of that which the free traders were selling, you know what one of the first buildings to get rebuilt after the Christchurch earthquake?
    Take a fucking guess.
    The Waterside union building.

  104. Bar Beach Swimmer says:

    Dr BG:

    The biggest single factor in our industrial collapse was our education system going to the dogs, mainly because of infiltration by greenies

    Last night on Credlin, the new national curriculum was discussed. One thing that was interesting was that Credlin said that the people who are on the curriculum “design panel” are anonymous! Why is that? Surely, parents and schools should know who if responsible for this sh1t.

    She also said that the state education ministers and the federal minister together decide the direction that the curriculum should take, which was set up by Gillard.

    So, Credlin said, that if Alan Tudge can’t win the argument against them, because he has “only vote”, he should simply defund it. (To the tune of 18mill(!) a year, I think she said)

  105. dopey says:

    Stuart McGill story. Could be just spin.

  106. Bar Beach Swimmer says:

    dopey says:
    May 5, 2021 at 12:56 pm
    Stuart McGill story. Could be just spin

    So he got hit for six, then…or maybe it was a boundary?

  107. Ed Case says:

    On the sale of FreightCorp:

    The rail lines had been maintained, even though the harvest is seasonal. The input of wages into those regional towns helped business and the community, and even the local sporting team numbers etc etc.

    Then when the sale went through…

    Moral of this story:
    Never get between thne Squatters and a big pile of money.

  108. jo says:

    Reply to the AMA president. That’ll be at the back of the farqueue.

  109. Zyconoclast says:

    Another one bites the dust

    RIP Indian Point Nuclear Power Plant, 1962-2021

    New York’s Indian Point Energy Centre, a nuclear power plant 57 kilometres from the heart of Times Square, shut down its last reactor on Friday.

    The closure of Indian Point ends a decade-plus dispute to shutter the plant. New York will lose its single biggest source of carbon-free energy, which at least in the near term, could lead to an uptick in greenhouse gas emissions as the state turns to natural gas to replace it. Proponents, though, have argued it was time for an ageing plant with major local opposition to shut down. The closure will be a test case in a state with strong climate policies in place on how fast the transition to clean energy can happen while shutting down nuclear power, which is currently the biggest source of clean energy in the U.S.

    Indian Point’s shutdown has been coming for years. In 2017, Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced the plant’s operator, energy giant Entergy, had reached an agreement with the state to shut down the facility. The first of the site’s two functioning reactors shut down in April of last year. On Friday, the second shut down, marking the end of an era.

    When fully operational, the plant had the capacity to generate 2,063 megawatts of electricity, making it the largest nuclear plant in the state. The power served the area and provided a quarter of New York City’s electricity — and it provided 1,000 jobs at its peak while filling local coffers. In comparison, data from the NYC mayor’s office and crunched by the Urban Green Council shows renewables are now responsible for only 7% of the city’s juice because it’s currently largely not connected via transmission lines to renewables hotspots in other parts of the state.

  110. Spurgeon Monkfish III says:

    Unattended baggage is usually treated as a bomb threat.

    The news reports (admittedly to be taken with a bucket of salt/gypsum depending on personal preference) state “a threat was made” and a police operation was conducted and nothing was found. Still sounds as if it was phoned in. Good luck identifying someone leaving unattended baggage there during peak hour.

    I avoid Town Hall and Wynyard as a matter of course.

  111. 132andBush says:

    I don’t know a single farmer (as in primary producer) who was anything but heartbroken at de-industrialisation.

    +1

    Arky,
    Who the hell are you talking to in Australia that would give this impression?

    All farmers I know (and that’s a lot from many sectors) would be all for retaining as much industrial capacity in this country as possible.

  112. Leigh Lowe says:

    Arky says:

    May 5, 2021 at 12:55 pm

    NZ was a bastion of cronyism and protectionism.

    ..
    Was? WAS?
    Fucking WAS?

    He, he.
    The past tense was meant to indicate “last time I looked”.

  113. Spurgeon Monkfish III says:

    Of course the Town Hall imbroglio may just be a nutter with a hatred of trains …

    (RFC)

  114. Arky says:

    You didn’t address the union problem.
    You didn’t address the cronyism problem.
    You didn’t address the undermining by communists.
    Instead you listened to people who had self interest and or were bought.
    You destroyed manufacturing because you thought that was somehow the source of those things.
    How stupid you were.
    Those things just metastasized and spread all through the system.
    Look at where you are. LOOK. Open your fucking eyes.
    The education system is now an indoctrination system.
    Does anyone here deny that? ANYONE?
    Vacating manufacturing left education vacated. No longer in the role of supplying entry workers to functioning industries, it was free to be taken over and used by marxists.
    And they have exploited that.
    The one feeds into the other.
    Less industry, more scope to sabotage education.
    Less education, less opportunity to develop industry.
    A death spiral.

  115. DrBeauGan says:

    THERE IS NO FREE TRADE.
    We live in a neighbourhood of monsters and criminals.

    Correct.

    Of course we do, we always have. And our politicians have gleefully joined them. But imposing tariffs doesn’t help in general.

    I fully agree with your positions on the lunacy of losing our industrial base. But it didn’t look important to the political class. Who know bugger all about technology beyond being able to use it. What’s to understand about electricity? You press the switch and the light comes on. That’s the core problem. They have no idea of how ignorant they are.

  116. Leigh Lowe says:

    I agree with IT.
    The MacGill thing will be related to punting, property or coke.
    My money is on property.

  117. Incoherent Rambler:

    Go away bob. P1ss orf. Fsck orf. Go stick your head up a dead bears bum.
    You have served you purpose as morning laxative, now go away.

    …and a marvelous, firm result obtained.
    No butter needed.

  118. Leigh Lowe says:

    Spurgeon Monkfish III says:

    May 5, 2021 at 1:06 pm

    Of course the Town Hall imbroglio may just be a nutter with a hatred of trains …

    I’ve already called ASIO.

  119. DrBeauGan says:

    And we all know where electricity comes from. It’s a socket in the wall.

  120. Arky says:

    These things don’t just coalesce by accident over decades.
    People make these decisions.
    It doesn’t just happen by accident that your child goes to school and every lesson happens to includes a component denigrating your forefathers.
    The story of that is a long and convoluted one. My own experience of it spans from watching the self interest of a bunch of NZ farmers to watching drugs, corruption and thievery on waterfronts, to having a teacher unionist say about me to a colleague describing their designs “Don’t worry about him. He’s one of us”, to watching the china lobby take over the design of language teaching in a regional centre.

  121. Infidel Tiger King says:

    https://twitter.com/JackPosobiec/status/1389651220353126410?s=19
    West Coast Eagles in neo-Nazi furore!

    Who knew there were Aboriginal neo-Nazis?!

  122. Spurgeon Monkfish III says:

    What’s to understand about electrickery?

    Our economy and society can be easily powered by pixie dust and unicorn farts. Oh – and fossil fuels are bad. Very, very bad.

  123. IT:
    Things are looking up – grain is pulling in big bikkies, iron ore and coal likewise.
    The government has decided to spend some of it on decent defence equipment.
    The only flies in the ointment is the national debt and the power grab under the WZV excuse.
    But things are looking up, I grant you.

  124. DrBeauGan says:

    New York’s Indian Point Energy Centre, a nuclear power plant 57 kilometres from the heart of Times Square, shut down its last reactor on Friday.

    The closure of Indian Point ends a decade-plus dispute to shutter the plant. New York will lose its single biggest source of carbon-free energy, which at least in the near term, could lead to an uptick in greenhouse gas emissions as the state turns to natural gas to replace it. Proponents, though, have argued it was time for an ageing plant with major local opposition to shut down. The closure will be a test case in a state with strong climate policies in place on how fast the transition to clean energy can happen while shutting down nuclear power, which is currently the biggest source of clean energy in the U.S.

    Indian Point’s shutdown has been coming for years. In 2017, Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced the plant’s operator, energy giant Entergy, had reached an agreement with the state to shut down the facility. The first of the site’s two functioning reactors shut down in April of last year. On Friday, the second shut down, marking the end of an era.

    It’s the last paragraph tells you who to hang from a lamppost.

  125. Arky says:

    But imposing tariffs doesn’t help in general.

    ..
    Does imposing a GST, a stamp duty or a income tax help in general, and why do you favour those over tariffs?
    And if you want to design the funding of government from the ground up, would you favor what worked in the USA as it was becoming an industrial power, lead by Republicans, or do you favour the regime in NZ as it nuzzles up to China?

  126. Leigh Lowe says:

    I am going outside for a while.
    But I have my alert buzzers set to go off if the Trains, Trucks and Tyranny thread fires up again.

  127. Arky says:

    Does it not occur to any of you that the great expansion of government power and intrusion into all our lives has occurred while tariffs were reduced and taxes and regulations increased?

  128. Spurgeon Monkfish III says:

    a state with strong climate policies in place

    How’s that working out, you f*cking imbeciles? Planning on conducting another population cull next winter, as the elderly and infirm freeze to death en masse?

    Hanging cuomo from a lamp post is too good for him.

  129. Speedbox says:

    From RT:

    This week a hundred or so Ukrainian nationalists marched in Kiev to celebrate the anniversary of the creation of the 14th SS Division ‘Galicia’ in 1943. The division was made up of Ukrainian volunteers and formed part of Nazi Germany’s Waffen SS combat force during World War II. Largely destroyed by the Soviet Army in July 1944, it was reformed and engaged in anti-partisan operations in Slovakia and Yugoslavia until it surrendered in May 1945.

    Although the division has not been definitively linked to major war crimes, many of its members previously served in German irregular forces guilty of atrocities against civilians. After the war, the SS, to which it belonged, was declared a criminal organization.

    One might imagine that celebrating an SS unit was beyond the pale, but last week’s event, though small, was unusual only in that it happened in Kiev. Commemorations of the 14th SS Division have been quite common in Western Ukraine for some time, and there is even a monument to the Division in Oakville, Ontario, in Canada.

    Unsurprisingly, opponents of the post-Maidan Ukrainian government have leapt on the march in Kiev as evidence that they are right to portray modern Ukraine as fascist. When enormous banners depicting Nazi soldiers as heroes are unfurled in the capital city, it’s hard to deny that there’s a problem.

    Even Anton Drobovich, the head of the Ukrainian Institute of National Memory, an organization generally known for its nationalistic line, felt obliged to condemn the march, saying that, “The glorification of the SS is unacceptable for a European country.”

    https://www.rt.com/russia/522555-ukraine-politics-nazi-past/

  130. Infidel Tiger King says:

    The fame whores and grifters who falsely accused Craig McLachlan of sex crimes – why aren’t they in jail?

  131. 1735099 says:

    Just watched Ita Buttrose at the National Press Club sit a reporter on his backside when he suggested the ABC could be privatised.
    She reminded him forcefully of three facts.
    1. The strongest democracies have publicly funded broadcasters.
    2. The ABC’s investigative journalism has historically exposed a plethora of debacles, amongst them the institutional abuse of children, police corruption in Queensland amongst other places and women’s rights in Saudi Arabia to mention just a few of the many.
    3. There is a linkage between countries with intrenched and dangerous political divisions and the lack of public broadcasters.
    Well done that woman!

  132. Boambee John says:

    Bar Beach Swimmer says:
    May 5, 2021 at 12:34 pm
    BJ,
    I’ve always thought it pretty low that “righties” keep having a go at us “lefties”! In fact, we are one of the most discriminated groups out there.

    And on top of that, we’re made to think of ourselves as sinister (i.e. lefthanded). Maybe you righties owe us reparations for what’s been done to us!

    Way back there was a Pommie cricketer named Dexter. On a notable occasion, one of the commentators commented that “Dexter is sinister”. I think he was threatening the Australian team with his batting performance at the time.

  133. DrBeauGan says:

    Does imposing a GST, a stamp duty or a income tax help in general, and why do you favour those over tariffs?

    I don’t. I favour reducing the size and cost of government to the level where I could drag it upstairs and drown it in the bathtub, as some wise man said. I’d abolish all three, but you can make an argument for a GST. On everything.

  134. DrBeauGan says:

    Does it not occur to any of you that the great expansion of government power and intrusion into all our lives has occurred while tariffs were reduced and taxes and regulations increased?

    Yes. I’ve noticed. And I really, really don’t like it.

  135. Arky says:

    These things are not all or nothing.
    There isn’t one answer.
    You don’t ensure survival by protecting manufacturing alone and you don’t ensure wealth by reducing tariffs to zero alone.
    Simplistic, one answer for everything does not work.
    We required an industry policy. One that did something about unions and cronyism.
    We needed to ensure manufacturing wasn’t at the expense of wheat and iron ore, but complimented them.
    We had to transition our education into the information age.
    We had to offshore some things. We didn’t have to just hand it to the FUCKING CCP.

  136. Arky says:

    We needed an energy policy.
    One that prepared for increasingly hard to extract fossil fuels.
    Not one that went off into fairyland of sunshine and lollipops fuelled by the desire of the CCP to have a competitive edge in manufacturing and the hatred of a handful of billionaires for most of humanity.

  137. Boambee John says:

    1735099 says:
    May 5, 2021 at 1:35 pm
    Just watched Ita Buttrose at the National Press Club sit a reporter on his backside when he suggested the ABC could be privatised.

    Always back self-interest, you know that she will be trying. In Ita’s case, very bloody trying.

    As for the rest of the propaganda prepared for her by her self-interested staff, see Rice-Davies, Mandy for relevant comment.

  138. DrBeauGan says:

    I don’t mind the Chinese people getting rich. Then we can sell them stuff. I object to them doing it on slave labour, but mainly they’ve been doing it by having low labour costs for jobs that we should be doing by automation, and hence even lower cost. But we haven’t got the brains or education in the political class.

  139. 1735099 says:

    You don’t address the Union problem.

    I tried that a before I retired a few years ago with a colleague.
    The context was relevant.
    She was a recently appointed teacher – a married woman, the daughter of Lebanese immigrants without much knowledge and understanding of our industrial history.
    She was loudly mouthing off that she had resigned from the QTU because it “wasn’t doing anything for her.”
    I asked her if she was happy with her salary, and the various benefits (LSL, sick leave, study leave and remote area allowance) that were part of the award she worked under.
    She said she was, but asked what that had to do with the QTU.
    I gently reminded her of some basic history, much of which I had lived through as a QTU member since 1968, and that my union fees and those of her colleagues had contributed to the development of that award.
    She went very quiet very quickly.

  140. Roger says:

    This week a hundred or so Ukrainian nationalists marched in Kiev to celebrate the anniversary of the creation of the 14th SS Division ‘Galicia’ in 1943.

    These are Joe Biden’s friends.

  141. Bar Beach Swimmer says:

    Entergy

    So the thing that gives you enteritis from enterotoxins and lead to enteropathy?

  142. Infidel Tiger King says:

    Numbers has a history of assaulting foreign women who step out of line.

  143. Bar Beach Swimmer says:

    numbers:

    She reminded him forcefully [that]…
    The ABC’s investigative journalism has historically exposed a plethora of debacles

    Memo to Ita, you’re only as good as your last game, and it’s sometime since the ABC had a good game; see the Pell inquisition et al.,

  144. Lysander says:

    China Flu outbreak in Sydney – sorry Cassie and others but Nanna’s coming to lock you down….

  145. Arky says:

    I don’t mind the Chinese people getting rich.

    ..
    I don’t giving a flying shit for the chinese people, and nor should our politicians.
    Our politicians are elected to represent us.
    Increasingly however, it appears as if many of them are paid to represent the CCP.
    You might think it was obvious, as a producer of primary produce, it was in our interest over the last forty years to have many customers.
    That if industrialisation was to be encouraged overseas, then it would be in our interest that it progresses EQUALLY in a number of countries.
    Why then have our politicians and companies pushed china for so long and so hard?
    Did it never occur to any of them that having only one customer for your goods was STUPID?

  146. Bar Beach Swimmer says:

    “Dexter is sinister”

    Now, think about the quality of sports commentary that we get.

  147. Knuckle Dragger says:

    ‘1. The strongest democracies have publicly funded broadcasters.’

    Exhibits A and B: The USSR and North Korea.

    I hope that Lebo chick wasn’t in a crew cab at the time.

  148. Arky says:

    1735099 says:
    May 5, 2021 at 1:50 pm

    ..
    You are truly a moron.

  149. DrBeauGan says:

    We needed an energy policy.
    One that prepared for increasingly hard to extract fossil fuels.
    Not one that went off into fairyland of sunshine and lollipops fuelled by the desire of the CCP to have a competitive edge in manufacturing and the hatred of a handful of billionaires for most of humanity.

    Yep. And it should have centred on high efficiency high temperature coal power stations. The fairyland has been a disaster, but again the problem was an uneducated political class who bought into fairy tales put about by the bad guys who had zero interest in the wealth of the nation, but a lot of interest in conning people for their own private benefit. See Al Gore for an example.

  150. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha says:

    Memo to Ita, you’re only as good as your last game, and it’s sometime since the ABC had a good game; see the Pell inquisition et al.,

    See the millions of dollars damage done to agriculture by the live trade to Indonesia fiasco.

  151. Lysander says:

    See Al Gore for an example.

    Well, I’m glad he invented the internet.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BnFJ8cHAlco

  152. Bar Beach Swimmer says:

    +1
    Zulu.

  153. Rex Anger says:

    She reminded him forcefully of three facts.
    1. The strongest democracies have publicly funded broadcasters.
    2. The ABC’s investigative journalism has historically exposed a plethora of debacles, amongst them the institutional abuse of children, police corruption in Queensland amongst other places and women’s rights in Saudi Arabia to mention just a few of the many.
    3. There is a linkage between countries with intrenched and dangerous political divisions and the lack of public broadcasters.

    Never yet in human history has a Turkey ever voted for Christmas, Collaborator Bob…

  154. bespoke says:

    Shall we all catch up for a “rosé vs. India Pale Ale” blowup later on tonight?

    That has been settled, Woodstock cans nothing come close.

  155. Roger says:

    The ABC’s investigative journalism… exposed…police corruption in Queensland

    4 Corners did the story and credit to Chris Masters & his cameraman for their persistence in the face of criminal threats, but it was all handed to them by Qld police Jim Slade & Nigel Powell and NSW criminal intel analyst Peter Vassallo. They “exposed” the crime syndicate at the heart of Qld police.

  156. DrBeauGan says:

    I don’t giving a flying shit for the chinese people, and nor should our politicians.
    Our politicians are elected to represent us.

    I do. I want them to be rich so we can sell them stuff. And charge them lots. And I’d like them to be educated and knowledgeable so they can see the advantages of hanging the CCP from lampposts.

  157. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha says:

    WA Government extends state of emergency until 2022
    Charlotte EltonThe West Australian
    Wed, 5 May 2021 11:59AM
    Comments

    The WA Government will extend the state of emergency until 2022 – but Premier Mark McGowan has promised that the “extraordinary” powers will end “at some point in time.”

    WA has been in a state of emergency since March last year, when the COVID-19 pandemic shuttered businesses and schools across the state.

    Today, Mr McGowan said the Government would introduce legislation to extend the powers until January 4.

    “Today we will be re-introducing our state of emergency legislation — we brought in that (legislation) back at the start of last year,” he said.

    “We renew this basically every six months — the idea is, we will renew the state of emergency legislation to start on July 4, it will go through to January 4 of next year.”

    The legislation gives governments special powers to issue mask-wearing and self-isolation directions, implement the hard border, and run hotel quarantine.

    It also creates special penalties for people who spit or cough on police after claiming to have COVID-19. Offenders could face ten years in jail.

    Mr McGowan recognised that the powers are “extraordinary” and “unusual” but insisted the Government had little choice.

  158. Rex Anger says:

    Very easy to vote extensions in perpetuity when everybody is on the same side as you…

  159. Zyconoclast says:

    They “exposed” the crime syndicate at the heart of Qld police.

    Is Queensland materially better because of the expose?

  160. DrBeauGan says:

    Very easy to vote extensions in perpetuity when everybody is on the same side as you…

    I’m not.

  161. Spurgeon Monkfish III says:

    More grate news from Sydneystan:

    NSW records locally transmitted case
    A Sydneystan man in his 50s has tested positive and is believed to have been infectious since April 30.

    Via the Oz. No doubt we’re about to be gifted with more interminable stupid arbitrary and entirely illogical schlockdowns, face nappie mandates, stupid fat uglee menopausal slags nasally and upscreechingly banging on keeping the community safe, stopping the transmission, blah blah blah, topped off with an incoherent guest appearance from Health Hazzard, (once they’ve dragged the fat moron out of the parlyfax house boozer).

    F*cking clown world.

  162. notafan says:

    ‘Women’s rights in Saudi Arabia’

    Does anyone honestly think that the abc running a story on this has made an iota of difference to ‘Women’s rights in Saudi Arabia’

    Risible.

  163. Roger says:

    Is Queensland materially better because of the expose?

    Not sure what you mean by materially better.

    I’d put it this way, the shake up that resulted was the best thing to happen to this state since its founding.

  164. 1. The strongest democracies have publicly funded broadcasters.

    Correlation is not causation.
    (Something that more people would know if only we had better curriculum)

    2. The ABC’s investigative journalism has historically exposed a plethora of debacles, amongst them the institutional abuse of children, police corruption in Queensland amongst other places and women’s rights in Saudi Arabia to mention just a few of the many.

    20 years ago.
    What have they done lately?

    3. There is a linkage between countries with intrenched and dangerous political divisions and the lack of public broadcasters.

    Yep, the Soviet Union didn’t, & China & North Korea do not have;
    govt funded newsmedia outlets.

  165. Steve trickler says:

    Just watched Ita Buttrose at the National Press Club sit a reporter on his backside when he suggested the ABC could be privatised.

    Just goes to show how useless the reporters in the National Press Club are. Ita, shielded in a bubble.

    Bubble Girl…

  166. Is Queensland materially better because of the expose?

    The price of smokes, grog, petrol, rego, stamp duty, & so on, have all risen.

    Case closed.

  167. Lysander says:

    The ABC’s investigative journalism has historically exposed a plethora of debacles, amongst them the institutional abuse of children, police corruption in Queensland amongst other places and women’s rights in Saudi Arabia to mention just a few of the many.

    Not really. Most of their GayBC’s “journalism” is utter guff as Hendo often outlines. 730 Report used to be THE premiere show to watch. Now its crap. The only other current affairs program “using” journos on their ABC is Four Corners (most of which is bought off the shelves of Al Jazeera or their BBC).

  168. Woolfe says:

    This week a hundred or so Ukrainian nationalists marched in Kiev to celebrate the anniversary of the creation of the 14th SS Division ‘Galicia’ in 1943.

    Loads of Russians joined with the Germans to Fight against Stalin. This didn’t end well for them, nor for any Russians that were captured by Germans if they fell back into Russian hands.

    Currently reading Antony Beevors Stalingrad. Horrific

  169. DrBeauGan says:

    We have a very unsatisfactory system in which power goes to the people who want it. In practice it’s the power to fuck things up. They couldn’t make wise decisions for the benefit of the people if they wanted to, they’re too dumb and too ignorant. And they don’t want to, they get their rocks off making obedient slaves do stupid things. Like wearing masks. There’s a hellish coalition between power hungry shits on the one hand and natural born slaves on the other. And here we are, caught in the middle.

  170. Rex Anger says:

    Very easy to vote extensions in perpetuity when everybody is on the same side as you…

    I’m not.

    Me either, but WA Parliament certainly is…

  171. egg_ says:

    stupid fat uglee menopausal slags nasally and upscreechingly banging on keeping the community safe, stopping the transmission, blah blah blah, topped off with an incoherent guest appearance from Health Hazzard, (once they’ve dragged the fat moron out of the parlyfax house boozer).

    Kerry Chant and Health Hazzard make a fugly set of bookends.

  172. Mitch M. says:

    Chronic attack on the aging nervous system

    It is surprising to see CD8+ cells(damaging cells) in the CNS of the rodents. Those cells can release messenger molecules like interleukin 1 and tumour necrosis factor which promote inflammation. The result is that the resident immune cells in the CNS, microglia, slowly change from the healthy “house keeping” function to becoming inflammatory mediating cells, compounding the damage. White matter damage is a key feature of aging brains, it correlates very well with cognitive impairment and dementia. With age microglia become more inflammatory.

    The mystery is what stimulates those cells to enter the CNS. One way to approach that is when microglia change function some can develop a dendritic cell like function and a key function of dendritic cells is to promote the migration of various immune cells to a damaged area. That change of function requires a messenger molecule that is a “colony stimulating factor” and I don’t know if cd8+ cells release that messenger. Brain injury of any kind will promote the penetration of inflammatory mediating immune cells, even concussion. It isn’t just CD 8+ cells that enter the CNS, macrophages, dendritic cells, and perhaps even mast cells can also enter the CNS; all of which are potentially inflammatory. It is a vicious cycle because even one small incident is enough to set of a cascade of slowly increasing damage. I read a study which found that over time amyloid deposition slowly spread out from a small injury site.

    Finally, the scientists could find very similar T cell reactions as observed in mice also in autopsies of CNS white matter from older humans. CD8+ T cells might therefore represent a putative target for therapeutic approaches to mitigate aging-related decline of structure and function of the nervous system.

    Yeah nah there is at present no realistic therapeutic approach because stopping cd8+ cells will reduce resistance against infection. Lifestyle wise though it is worth considering have bloods done to check for systemic inflammation. Hence their observation:

    “In addition, we show that T cell-mediated damage in aged but not adult mice is aggravated by systemic inflammation

    White matter is particularly sensitive to immune mediated damage. It is continually produced and stimulated by nerve activity(activity dependent myelination). There are lifestyle factors which can help reduce age associated inflammation(inflammaging) but that will requires more personal discipline than I possess.

    The issue is more complicated than above but in the interests of brevity the following will suffice.

    An immunologist and a cardiologist are kidnapped. The kidnappers threaten to shoot one of them, but promise to spare whoever has made the greater contribution to humanity. The cardiologist says, “Well, I’ve identified drugs that have saved the lives of millions of people.” Impressed, the kidnappers turn to the immunologist. “What have you done?” they ask. The immunologist says, “The thing is, the immune system is very complicated …” And the cardiologist says, “Just shoot me now.”

  173. Roger says:

    If the ABC was serious about jouranlism keeping politicians accountable in a democracy they’d bring back state based current affairs.

  174. Cassie of Sydney says:

    “women’s rights in Saudi Arabia”

    LOL…Bob the Racist indulging in fantasy yet again.

  175. egg_ says:

    Ita defending Aunty?

    If Aunty had a Cleo style centrefold, it would be the Skywhale?

  176. Mitch M. says:

    DrBeauGan says:
    May 5, 2021 at 2:29 pm
    We have a very unsatisfactory system in which power goes to the people who want it. In practice it’s the power to fuck things up. They couldn’t make wise decisions for the benefit of the people if they wanted to, they’re too dumb and too ignorant. And they don’t want to, they get their rocks off making obedient slaves do stupid things. Like wearing masks. There’s a hellish coalition between power hungry shits on the one hand and natural born slaves on the other. And here we are, caught in the middle.

    Exactly. Politicians are not interested in learning. Their goal is persuasion, they spend most of their time trying to persuade people. Politicians all too often come from professions which mostly requires book work rather than dealing with complexity on a daily basis. I don’t see that there is much we can do about this.

  177. egg_ says:

    “women’s rights in Saudi Arabia”

    They have choice as to their style of female circumcision?

  178. Infidel Tiger King says:

    The ABC should be a 100% rural and regional based broadcaster.

    It is completely unnecessary in the metro areas.

  179. Speedbox says:

    Woolfe says:
    May 5, 2021 at 2:28 pm

    Loads of Russians joined with the Germans to Fight against Stalin. This didn’t end well for them….

    Yes, several hundred thousand by most reports with a high percentage emanating from the Ukraine. But, as you say, God help you if you were caught.

    To this day, some older Russians regard older Ukrainians as duplicitous and beneath contempt. (even though neither were probably alive at the time or had no role due to their very young age.)

  180. Bar Beach Swimmer says:

    No doubt we’re about to be gifted with more interminable stupid arbitrary and entirely illogical schlockdowns, face nappie mandates, stupid fat uglee menopausal slags nasally and upscreechingly banging on keeping the community safe, stopping the transmission, blah blah blah, topped off with an incoherent guest appearance from Health Hazzard, (once they’ve dragged the fat moron out of the parlyfax house boozer)

    The really great thing now, however, is that the pollies can’t do anything if no-one wants the jab.

    Pleading, cajoling, threatening, none of it seems to be working! There’s nowhere for us to go and no-one will let us go, anyway, so not even any room for incentives either.

    As far as the Indian ban, which is in place until mid May, they’ve already been accused of racism, which the PM to his credit has denied.

    So don’t think they’ll go down the path of manhandling everyone in through the “Vaccine Door”👮‍♂️👮‍♂️👮‍♂️👮‍♀️ and be accused of being stasi-like functionaries. (Unless we’re talking about Victoria).

  181. Roger says:

    To this day, some older Russians regard older Ukrainians as duplicitous and beneath contempt. (even though neither were probably alive at the time or had no role due to their very young age.)

    Grudges are a long time dying in that part of the world.

  182. TailgunneR says:

    Antony Beevors Stalingrad. Horrific
    Best WW2 book.
    Ever

  183. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha says:

    Grudges are a long time dying in that part of the world.

    Some regions of the Ukraine treated the advancing German Army as “Liberators..”

  184. Knuckle Dragger says:

    ‘Best WW2 book.
    Ever’

    By a street.

  185. Arky says:

    God bless you, Sir:
    ..

    Donald J. Trump
    11:20am May 3, 2021

    So nice to see RINO Mitt Romney booed off the stage at the Utah Republican State Convention. They are among the earliest to have figured this guy out, a stone cold loser!

  186. Arky says:

    “Stone cold loser”
    ..
    Snork!

  187. Roger says:

    Some regions of the Ukraine treated the advancing German Army as “Liberators..”

    Given how Stalin treated Ukrainians in the 1930s one can understand that sentiment, even if it can’t be justified. They were betwixt the devil and the deep blue sea.

  188. Mother Lode says:

    See the millions of dollars damage done to agriculture by the live trade to Indonesia fiasco.

    True.

    It was an activist hit piece where it turns out that the people on the ships had been paid to set up conditions that suited the agenda.

    It should have got no further than a a website for hippes and vegans, but the ABC loaned it their ‘reputation’ by airing on 4-Corners and with that it was able to ruin an industry.

  189. Arky says:

    It occurs to me that the vindictive marxist media whores in the USA are trying to do with Trump what the ancient Egyptians did to that Pharaoh after the regime change. Accuse him of some awful blasphemy and chisel his face off all the stone reliefs.
    They will expunge Trump from history altogether if they can.

  190. Cassie of Sydney says:

    “Given how Stalin treated Ukrainians in the 1930s one can understand that sentiment, even if it can’t be justified. They were betwixt the devil and the deep blue sea.”

    Correct. The Holodomor was a recent experience.

  191. Arky says:

    If you do nothing else in life, if you keep the memory of Donald Trump’s presidency dear in your heart, and remind others of it with fondness, you will be thwarting the plague of marxist shits and helping defeat their evil plans.

  192. Knuckle Dragger says:

    ‘I tried that a before I retired a few years ago with a colleague.
    The context was relevant.
    She was a recently appointed teacher – a married woman, the daughter of Lebanese immigrants without much knowledge and understanding of our industrial history.’

    Uh huh.

    Might just put that one in the same file as the ‘indig bloke segregated in the Melbourne pub during the 80s’ chestnut.

    Which is the same file as the kid in a chair going ‘I’m not a flamin’ pot plant’ story.

  193. Boambee John says:

    1. The strongest democracies have publicly funded broadcasters.

    So do the worst dictatorships.

    2. The ABC’s investigative journalism has historically exposed a plethora of debacles, amongst them the institutional abuse of children, police corruption in Queensland amongst other places and women’s rights in Saudi Arabia to mention just a few of the many.

    The ABC’s investigative journalism has also produced some disastrous “set ups” made for purely (or impurely) ideological reasons. See above by others.

    3. There is a linkage between countries with intrenched and dangerous political divisions and the lack of public broadcasters.

    Not too many intrenched dangerous political divisions in totalitarian states.

  194. Speedbox says:

    Roger says:
    May 5, 2021 at 2:46 pm

    Hell yeah. I said ‘older Russians’ in my post but in fact I have met a few much younger (35-50 y/o) Russians who were very vocal in their description of the Ukrainian’s traitorous actions in WW2. Maybe a consequence of stories passed down from grandparents to parents to children etc. but yes, the grudges run deep.

    Several years ago I was wandering around Sevastopol with a Russian friend and there were a few homeless also about begging for money. My friend would spit (seriously!) at them and offer up a stream of abuse. It was explained to me that the beggars were children of the traitors and the sooner they died, the better.

  195. Knuckle Dragger says:

    ‘They were betwixt the devil and the deep blue sea.’

    Like being compelled to choose between Szubanski and Lee Rhiannon.

  196. Cassie of Sydney says:

    The ABC’s investigative journalism has historically exposed a plethora of debacles, amongst them the institutional abuse of children, police corruption in Queensland amongst other places and women’s rights in Saudi Arabia

    I’ve been searching for the ABC programme which “exposed” women’s rights in Saudi Arabia. Perhaps it was on Q&A during that infamous episode where star guest Yassie Abdel-Magied described Islam as “the most feminist religion”. That one still makes me laugh.

  197. Bar Beach Swimmer says:

    Infidel Tiger King says:
    May 5, 2021 at 2:43 pm

    +lots

  198. Cassie of Sydney says:

    “The ABC’s investigative journalism has historically exposed a plethora of debacles, amongst them the institutional abuse of children, police corruption in Queensland amongst other places and women’s rights in Saudi Arabia “

    I’ve been searching for the ABC programme which “exposed” women’s rights in Saudi Arabia. Perhaps it was on Q&A during that infamous episode where star guest Yassie Abdel-Magied described Islaaaaaaaaaaaaaam as “the most feminist religion”. That one still makes me laugh. Yes…that was an exposure all right.

  199. Roger says:

    My friend would spit (seriously!) at them and offer up a stream of abuse. It was explained to me that the beggars were children of the traitors and the sooner they died, the better.

    When I was growing up a Russian lady lived near us. Unlike most Russians in Brisbane’s significant exile community her family were educated and middle class. Of course, they’d lost everything in the revolution, fleeing to the city of Harbin in China sometime in the 1920s, where she was born and her professional father had to work as a bartender in the Russian club among other menial jobs. She was stateless until Australia acceptd her family in the early 1950s. She remains one of the kindest and most gracious people I’ve ever encoutered. She was also, I discovered, a rabid antisemite who blamed you know who for the revolution and everything that had happened to her since. It was quite a shock, as I’d never met an antisemite before; if there were any around in Brisbane they kept pretty quiet! It’s (or was?) very difficult for an Australian to understand these deeply held sentiments held by otherwise normal people.

  200. egg_ says:

    The news reports (admittedly to be taken with a bucket of salt/gypsum depending on personal preference) state “a threat was made” and a police operation was conducted and nothing was found.

    Usually disgruntled ex employees – an ex train driver put out of work by the bots on the new Sydney Metro?

  201. Bar Beach Swimmer says:

    numbers:

    She was a recently appointed teacher – a married woman, the daughter of Lebanese immigrants without much knowledge and understanding of our industrial history.

    So she’s an ignorant immigrant, then?

  202. Cassie of Sydney says:

    Alexander Kerensky lived in Brisbane for a time in the late 1940’s.

  203. Top Ender says:

    Meet the male Karens

    ByMatt Purple / The Spectator

    Several weeks back, I went for a run in the Del Ray neighborhood of Alexandria in Northern Virginia. It’s the sort of place where ‘Black Lives Matter’ signs cry out of security-alarmed windows and the dollar-to-fried-pickle exchange rate is instantly available upon request. I was hoofing it along when suddenly a guy leaned out of nowhere and shouted, ‘Why don’t you wear a mask if you’re going to jog on the sidewalk?!’

    I told him to screw off and ran on, but my first reaction was one of pity. In Northern Virginia, the danger of getting mown down by a waif on a Lime scooter is real and ever-present; maybe he was just on edge. It was only later that I realized he may as well have just wished me dead — people have asphyxiated from wearing masks while exercising. And it was only after that that I realized something else: I had seen that man before.

    I flashed back to four months earlier when I’d been visiting family in Charlotte, North Carolina. A guy had tapped me on the back and demanded that I pull up my mask, which had slipped beneath my nose. That we were in church, mass was about to start, he was two pews back and he’d broken every rule of social distancing in order to ward off the mortal threat of distant nasal exhalation not in his direction had not deterred him. There he was, short, thin, silver-haired, polo shirt, the grim eyes of one perennially disappointed by America’s gun ownership rate.

    Just like the guy I’d seen in Del Ray.

    I don’t want to assume too much from these encounters. It’s certainly possible that they’re unique to me, that I’ve been assigned the ghost of some former Sierra Club local chapter president who will continue to haunt me long after COVID has passed. But I can’t help but think there’s a more universal lesson here. Much has been made over the last year about Karens, white, upper-middle-class women whom the coronavirus has driven to hysteria. Yet all of the plague paranoiacs I’ve encountered have been men — and men of a certain type.

    So why has the national conversation been so focused on the ladies? Is that a whiff of sexism I detect? Certainly the Karen label gets at something real — if you doubt me, head on down to your local daycare center without a gas mask on and see what happens. But by calling out Karens, we seem to have underrepresented all the male COVID neurotics out there. And underrepresentation is something we cannot tolerate. It’s time to accept that Karen has a male counterpart — and his name is Joel.

    Joel isn’t just real; he’s often in a position of great power. Many of America’s most prominent COVID worriers are men: Joe Biden, Anthony Fauci, Bill de Blasio, Chris Cuomo (except when he’s yukking it up with his own friends, of course). And while the governor who’s overreached the furthest with coronavirus restrictions is probably Gretchen Whitmer, the runners-up — Andrew Cuomo, Gavin Newsom, Ned Lamont, Jay Inslee, Phil Murphy — are all men.

    Admittedly there’s something like a battle of the sexes being fought here. Research shows that women are more inclined to fret about the coronavirus than men are. A Dartmouth College study from last October found that ‘men are less likely to favor precautions for COVID across the board’. Per Dartmouth, 40 percent of men thought it was time to start getting their lives back to normal rather than staying at home, compared to 28 percent of women. (Interestingly, these differences held up regardless of partisanship. Republican women were more worried than Republican men.)

    But there’s also a difference between exercising good-faith precautions — wearing masks, working from home when possible — and getting in another’s face because he didn’t don a balaclava before heading out for a hike in the middle of the woods. And it’s on the other side of this line that we find our Karens and Joels. There’s no data available as to which sex is more likely to be confrontational over COVID restrictions. But given the anecdotal evidence — and given that men have a, shall we say, historical proclivity towards the use of force — I think we can at least conclude that Joels are a real phenomenon in need of sociological study.

    Until then, the best we can do is to stereotype them. Your average Joel is around 50 and lives in a well-to-do suburb. He’s forever bragging about how his wife works, yet he pulls in most of the family income as head of that graphic design firm he started back in the 2000s. He has a ‘Biden/Harris’ bumper sticker on his car; he lodges constant noise complaints against the construction workers building the median-income housing development up the street. He’s vice president of his local HOA and once every couple of weeks cruises around the neighborhood in search of unlawfully decorated mailboxes. He’s still pissed about that Game of Thrones finale and does, in fact, have half an hour to explain to you why.

    What sets Joel apart isn’t his left-wing politics or even his concern for the safety of others. It’s his hunger for a set of rules and conventions that provide him with both validation and a sense of superiority over others. History is full of just such men. Now, in a modern society that cherishes equality, we’re forced to admit: men can be just as totalitarian, petty, shrewish, haranguing and busybodied as women.

  204. Arky says:

    You only have to find which group someone most strongly identifies as belonging to, and attack that, and you can push most anyone into enraged unreason.
    “I’m a farmer”.
    “I’m a train driver”.
    “I’m a baby boomer”.
    “I’m a teacher”.
    “I’m a truckie”.
    “I’m a catholic”.
    “I’m an Australian”.
    “I’m a kiwi”.
    “I’m a libertarian”.
    “I’m a trader”.
    “I’m a publican”.
    ‘I’m in the union”.
    “I’m a woman”.
    It is my sincere hope that over the last eight years I have been scribbling shit on here that I have enraged you all.

  205. Mitch M. says:

    Roger says:
    May 5, 2021 at 3:13 pm
    It was quite a shock, as I’d never met an antisemite before; if there were any around in Brisbane they kept pretty quiet! It’s (or was?) very difficult for an Australian to understand these deeply held sentiments held by otherwise normal people.

    My mother shocked me when she said that during WW2 there were rumours of the Holocaust to which some people replied, “thank god someone is doing it.”

  206. Roger says:

    Maybe a consequence of stories passed down from grandparents to parents to children etc.

    No doubt…and perhaps embellished with each retelling? It must be difficult to let such things go if you’ve imbibed them with mother’s milk.

    Although ordinary people in eastern Europe did experience truly horrible things.

  207. Leigh Lowe says:

    Alexander Kerensky lived in Brisbane for a time in the late 1940’s.

    If I recall correctly, I think he arrived on the same boat as Boris Kvetchy, who settled in rural Queensssland.

  208. Zyconoclast says:

    I’d put it this way, the shake up that resulted was the best thing to happen to this state since its founding.

    I will take that as a yes.

    From a non Qld perspective, It give Qld Goss who hired Rudd who then went onto bigger and better things.

  209. Farmer Gez says:

    It is my sincere hope that over the last eight years I have been scribbling shit on here that I have enraged you all.

    “I’m a married man.”

    Immunised against second hand abuse.

  210. Arky says:

    “I was conscripted”.

  211. Roger says:

    My mother shocked me when she said that during WW2 there were rumours of the Holocaust to which some people replied, “thank god someone is doing it.”

    Brisbane wasn’t so sophisticated!

    I always remember what Frank Knopfelmacher said: although some Australians might be antisemitic, they are too polite to say so.

  212. Cassie of Sydney says:

    “Leigh Lowe says:
    May 5, 2021 at 3:22 pm
    Alexander Kerensky lived in Brisbane for a time in the late 1940’s.

    If I recall correctly, I think he arrived on the same boat as Boris Kvetchy, who settled in rural Queensssland.”

    LOL…you are too funny!

  213. Roger says:

    From a non Qld perspective, It give Qld Goss who hired Rudd who then went onto bigger and better things.

    None of which could be foreseen at the time.

  214. Dave in Marybrook says:

    Engaged, yes.
    Enraged? Not so much.
    Thick skins, us farmer-muso-HRlicense-rightwing-cisgender-SpeysideMaltOnly-gunsndogs-IsuzuDMax-PrinceOfWalesCheck- types.

  215. Roger says:

    Alexander Kerensky lived in Brisbane for a time in the late 1940’s.

    Yes; he’d married the heiress to the Trittons department store fortune overseas. When she became terminally ill they returned to Brisbane so she could die at home.

  216. Infidel Tiger King says:

    As my grandmother said of Sidney Myer “They may be Dhuish, but they run a fine department store”.

  217. Bons says:

    Roger, the Russian lady around the corner had a similar background. Born in China, they initially moved to SA but were treated so badly by the Boers that they scrounged a ticket to Oz.
    Classic larger than life Russ, foodie, gregarious, brilliant scientist who still does the odd uni stint, but do not mention commos. The bear emerges and is terrifying, especially after a few Baileys.
    I think I might pass on asking her about the Semites.

  218. Leigh Lowe says:

    Kvetchy.
    Not just word of the day, it is word of the month.
    One of those words where the phonetic tells you exactly what the word means.

  219. Mater says:

    I asked her if she was happy with her salary, and the various benefits (LSL, sick leave, study leave and remote area allowance) that were part of the award she worked under.
    She said she was, but asked what that had to do with the QTU.

    Let’s put aside the fact that such ‘conditions’ might easily be obtained by a potentially valuable employee through an employment contract. If you are a good employee, and add value, you can achieve better conditions than an EBA.

    I gently reminded her of some basic history, much of which I had lived through as a QTU member since 1968, and that my union fees and those of her colleagues had contributed to the development of that award.

    Awards do two things:
    1. Ensure good workers are under paid.
    2. Ensure bad workers are over paid.

    Seen it time and again.
    “From those according to their ability, to those according to their need!”

  220. Leigh Lowe says:

    I’ll bet that most of those mouthing anti-semantic stuff during WW2 had never encountered a Chew or, if they did, they didn’t know it because they didn’t match the stereotype.
    You would hope they all STFU in shame when the deathcamp newsreels surfaced post war.

  221. Leigh Lowe says:

    Awards do two things:
    1. Ensure good workers are under paid.
    2. Ensure bad workers are over paid.

    3. Ensure union-only establishments are left with an overrepresentation of the bad, as the good leave for better pay and conditions that they can demand on the open market.
    This explains why the public sector has so much deadweight dregs.

  222. Speedbox says:

    Roger says:
    May 5, 2021 at 3:13 pm

    My wife is Russian and we live in Brisbane. Unsurprisingly we have many Russian friends both here and of course, in Russia. My wife’s extended family are all in Russia.

    Your comments are interesting – over many years, both here and in Russia, not once have I heard an antisemitic whisper from family/friends. They can be pretty vocal on lots of other subjects, especially after sculling litres of vodka, but not an antisemitic word. (not among our network anyway).

    Those who have those views must hold their cards very close to their chest. (it’s always possible they don’t say anything whilst I’m about, as I’m not Russian, but that seems very unlikely given the extent of frank, sometimes drunken, often meandering conversations over more than 20 years.)

  223. Leigh Lowe says:

    So.
    Trains or trucks.
    Which is better?
    Any thoughts?

  224. Rex Anger says:

    It is my sincere hope that over the last eight years I have been scribbling shit on here that I have enraged you all.

    Please note the missing link:

    “I like restoring Model As…”
    “I Have a Miata…”

    #GlassHouses,Baby!

  225. dover_beach says:

    3. There is a linkage between countries with intrenched and dangerous political divisions and the lack of public broadcasters.

    If only the communist states of world had state broadcasters.

  226. Roger says:

    I think I might pass on asking her about the Semites.

    Best policy, I think.

    I’ll bet that most of those mouthing anti-semantic stuff during WW2 had never encountered a Chew or, if they did, they didn’t know it because they didn’t match the stereotype.

    I’m sure you’re right.

    John Monash was held in high regard by all, esp. the diggers.

    The only Abrahamic family I knew ran a popular bookstore “in town”, as we used to say.

  227. Rex Anger says:

    So.
    Trains or trucks.
    Which is better?
    Any thoughts?

    Nope.

    Somebody else can volunteer to have Struth vent his rage at life, the universe and fatigue-minimisation technology at.

    His conceit remains incorrect, and damned if I am going to bother explaining otherwise…

    #DangerousGoods

  228. Roger says:

    Your comments are interesting – over many years, both here and in Russia, not once have I heard an antisemitic whisper from family/friends.

    Might depend on the vintage, Speedbox.

    Antisemitism was a well known trope among White Russian exiles.

    Might not have survived the Soviet era?

  229. Arky says:

    “I like restoring Model As…”
    “I Have a Miata…”

    ..
    They are hobbies. Not who I think I am.

  230. Infidel Tiger King says:

    So.
    Trains or trucks.
    Which is better?
    Any thoughts?

    Chardonnay and sour beers.

  231. I’ve been searching for the ABC programme which “exposed” women’s rights in Saudi Arabia. Perhaps it was on Q&A during that infamous episode where star guest Yassie Abdel-Magied described Islaaaaaaaaaaaaaam as “the most feminist religion”. That one still makes me laugh. Yes…that was an exposure all right.

    Perhaps it was the episode of Q&A where the foreign minister of our nation, a female, got asked to pop her tits out, right there on TV in the middle of a panel discussion.

    That women’s rights ABC, is that the one you’re thinking of?

  232. Ed Case says:

    … it’s a lot easier for the base to get itself a new elite than for the elite to find itself a new base.

    — Mark Steyn

    Perhaps it is, but i’ve never read of it happening.
    E.g., English Civil War, the Elite rid themselves of a pesky King, ditto the French Revolution, George Washington led more troops against his own citizens over the Whiskey Rebellion than he ever did against King George.

  233. Roger says:

    My wife is Russian and we live in Brisbane.

    Do you know about the history of Russian exiles in Brisbane?

    Up until c. 1919 it was Bolsheviks and other political undesirables from Tsarist Russia. They’d march in the May Day parades with their red flags. When diggers started returning from overseas there’d be street brawls between them.

    Then in the 1920s the White Russians arrived and settled mainly in Woollongabba where they built St Nicholas cathedral on Vulture Street c. 1926. By that time the Reds had left.

  234. Rex Anger says:

    They are hobbies. Not who I think I am

    Same answer in return to “I am a train driver.”

    I now just get paid for it…

  235. Cassie of Sydney says:

    “By that time the Reds had left.”

    Not all…one went to live in Toowoomba.

  236. egg_ says:

    The trains were built at Alstom’s rolling stock manufacturing facility in India, with the first six-car Sydney Metro train arriving in Rouse Hill on 26 September 2017 to undergo testing.

    Sydney Metro – Wikipedia

    Eh, Scummo?

  237. Rex Anger says:

    Perhaps it is, but i’ve never read of it happening.
    E.g., English Civil War, the Elite rid themselves of a pesky King, ditto the French Revolution, George Washington led more troops against his own citizens over the Whiskey Rebellion than he ever did against King George.

    Uh huh.

    Grigory the anti-anthropology and ahistorical expert weighs in.

    I am thinking it’s time we threw all Grigory’s boxes of gypsum, traffic paddles and crystalline salt in the harbour…

    #BostonGrigsParty

    #NoVexationWithoutInvestigation

  238. bespoke says:

    They are hobbies. Not who I think I am.

    Nope they tell allot about a person. Grig’s hobbie is tanning remember.

  239. Rex Anger says:

    #NoVexationWithoutInvestigation

    Winston!

    Winston!

    Where’s you Moron Labe image link?

  240. dover_beach says:

    I’ve been searching for the ABC programme which “exposed” women’s rights in Saudi Arabia.

    How about their groundbreaking work that exposed the colour of arseholes? Until then a great mystery.

  241. Arky says:

    Same answer in return to “I am a train driver.”

    ..
    Then why raise it Rex?
    We know that some here go ballistic when boomers are mentioned, other see themselves as “conscripts” and still others cannot argue with reason or logic if you attack libertarianism.
    What you might attack to drive me to unreason you have not identified.
    It isn’t kiwis, Fords, Mazdas, teaching or living in this useless state of Victoria.

  242. Ed Case says:

    Shouldn’t you be getting some shuteye in preparation for your Midnight Casey Jones shift, Rex?

  243. Arky says:

    I would say that the libertarians on catallaxy have been the major influence on my thinking in the last ten years.
    But that doesn’t mean that they are immune from being held to account for providing the ideological support for some of the stupidest policies adopted by governments.

  244. DrBeauGan says:

    I always remember what Frank Knopfelmacher said: although some Australians might be antisemitic, they are too polite to say so.

    Dunno about too polite. I’d be afraid of Cassie.😇

  245. bespoke says:

    What you might attack to drive me to unreason you have not identified.

    When the targets already at point you have no comparison tell the difference. 😎

  246. Arky says:

    I would say that libertarians have provided me with a framework to think about the total shit show that I encountered teaching in state schools.
    Although I could already see the stupidity and inadequacy of the system, libertarians provided the language to describe it.

  247. calli says:

    Bar Beach Swimmer says:
    May 5, 2021 at 1:00 pm
    dopey says:
    May 5, 2021 at 12:56 pm
    Stuart McGill story. Could be just spin

    So he got hit for six, then…or maybe it was a boundary?

    Silly point. Your first slip of the day.

Comments are closed.