The Covid class divide

Sounds a lot like Australia Victoria.

From a lefty source:

There’s a huge Covid class divide. The economy has not just bounded back for upper income Americans Australians; it’s given them higher housing values and lower interest rates. Meanwhile, 12 million service industry workers are still out of work. Small businesses are struggling. The affluent see Covid as a health problem, while for the working class it’s about economic survival. And liberals are doing the same thing they did with Trump: Clothing their class privilege as science and facts and morality.

The politicians are even worse. Instead of coming up with a clean Covid bill, Democrats are now trying to pressure Biden into student loan forgiveness. Can you believe it? What kind of society thinks it’s ok to ask 12 million people who lost their jobs to Covid to foot the bill for the student loans of the top 40% of earners? Sure, maybe it will accidentally help someone in a food line who dropped out of college. But college-educated Americans are back at work. The Covid recession is over for them. Why are the Democrats designing legislation to help the people who need it least, in the belief that some of the benefits might trickle down to help those who need it most?

Oh, I think I know why.

For all of those oh so concerned upper-middle-class lefties, helping “the poor and disadvantaged” comes right after helping themselves. You know, like all those public servants who never lost a day’s pay over the whole of the last year. Victoria remains Exhibit A.

Via Instapundit.

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19 Responses to The Covid class divide

  1. m0nty says:

    The Cat railing against trickle down economics! Come to my arms, comrade!

  2. Squirrel says:

    “What kind of society thinks it’s ok to ask 12 million people who lost their jobs to Covid to foot the bill for the student loans of the top 40% of earners?”

    Indeed – don’t be surprised if something along these lines is one of Albanese’s desperado policies for the next election.

    In the meantime, some of the highest paid public servants in the world (Straya’s) having a hissy fit because they’re not getting the pay rises they think they should get, while others are worried about keeping a roof over their heads, takes a lot of beating in the “let them eat cake” stakes.

  3. The Beer whisperer says:

    Because a year’s pay for you is no price to pay whatsoever for their illusion of safety.

  4. Gorilla Dance Party says:

    The Cat railing against trickle down economics! Come to my arms, comrade!

    The old saying about bullshit taking more effort to clean up than produce. I’ll settle with calling you a retard.

    I heard a public servant acquaintance just the other day saying they were hoping for another lock down to get a “break”. She still gets paid so no big deal for her. No children or family to care for either of course.

  5. I heard a public servant acquaintance just the other day saying they were hoping for another lock down to get a “break”. She still gets paid so no big deal for her.

    Jesus wept!
    She must have no family, & have nobody in her wider circle, who has a real job.
    (or she’s learned to keep this chatter away from them)

    About halfway through the lockdown – the big one of 2020 – I had dealings with a public servant who was (I’m not making this up) totally unaware of the lockdown.

  6. Barry says:

    VIC public serpents actually got an extra allowance during WFH.

  7. Roger says:

    I heard a public servant acquaintance just the other day saying they were hoping for another lock down to get a “break”.

    A break from what?

  8. Sinclair Davidson says:

    You know, like all those public servants who never lost a day’s pay over the whole of the last year.

    It’s not clear to me that people should have had to take a pay cut if they were still doing their jobs. Now we can argue whether those jobs are valuable or not – many of them are not – but that isn’t the argument being made here.

  9. Primer says:

    I dunno, the poor and incompetent we have with us always. If the silly buggers ever recognised the size of their club they’d understand they can vote themselves anything. Thank god for the chaff countermeasure politics that mostly keeps them from massing.

  10. min says:

    Sinc , they got a pay rise . Now for the likes of the frontline health workers I can agree as I know they were working extremely long hours in vulnerable situations . Fortunately unlike other countries we had no deaths in our health workforce. However not so happy about public servants like those in contact tracing and infection control.

  11. Sinclair Davidson says:

    Sinc , they got a pay rise .

    Maybe – if that was written into their EB then fine.

  12. Des Deskperson says:

    VIC public serpents actually got an extra allowance during WFH’

    It was $20 a week to cover the cost of ‘home office consumables and utilities’, stuff that the employer would normally provide in the workplace: reasonable, I would have thought.

    Please be clear that I am not defending the VPS as an institution, from my observation, it’s by far the most politicised public sector in Australia

  13. Joanna Smythe says:

    This week, in America, the CDC updated their figures on Covid. They admit that only 6%
    of the 153,504 deaths recorded, actually died from Covid. That’s just over 9,000 deaths. The other 94% had 2 or 3 other serious illnesses and the overwhelming majority were elderly.

  14. Sinclair Davidson says:

    It was $20 a week to cover the cost of ‘home office consumables and utilities’, stuff that the employer would normally provide in the workplace: reasonable, I would have thought.

    I think so – I would have also have thought that if they didn’t spend the $20 per week that it should be added to their taxable income.

    Many of my colleagues felt that the university should have offered a similar payment as they had to stock up their home offices (not just with consumables but also hardware). The replay came back to claim that additional expenditure on tax.

  15. lee says:

    It’s not clear to me that people should have had to take a pay cut if they were still doing their jobs. Now we can argue whether those jobs are valuable or not – many of them are not – but that isn’t the argument being made here.

    What bothers me is that so many were forced not to earn a living – they were isolated completely from the issue. If the private sector can be penalised, why not the public?

  16. “We are all in this together”

    Scott Morrison, Prime Minister of Australia, 23rd of March 2020
    (still tracking down the date of original quote – believed to be that date)

  17. Boambee John says:

    This week, in America, the CDC updated their figures on Covid. They admit that only 6%
    of the 153,504 deaths recorded, actually died from Covid.

    Hasn’t the ostrich, head still up his bum, been claiming more than 300,000 deaths in the US?

  18. Luke73 says:

    I followed the link Steve included and this paragraph stuck out to me and made me have a think;

    I, too, have been shocked at the refusal to acknowledge Trump’s wins, many of which were actually really progressive. Thanks to his economy, the base pay of the lower 25% of wage earners rose by 4.5%, which is unprecedented in recent history (certainly, nothing like this happened under Clinton or Obama). He brought truly unprecedented employment to marginalized communities and gave millions and millions of dollars to HBCUs. He freed over 4,000 Black men from prison; men sent to prison because of Joe Biden’s crime bill, the irony of ironies. Had the Democrats not been so totally committed to their loathing of Trump, they could have gotten much more out of him.

    As a person who didn’t/doesn’t support Trump (not that it really matters what those of us who are not American think of him but anyway) ..I think these are fair points. To state the obvious (but often forgotten), it is important to be fair and truthful when critical someone we don’t agree with or those criticisms lose credibility. In relation to the last point of the quote, Democrats probably would have been able to get more deals done with Trump on matters dear to them like infrastructure, policing reform, over incarceration of minorities on minor drugs charges and such, if they had played more of a long game, ignored his tweets, stroked his ego a little etc.

  19. Greg J says:

    Look, we all know that the lockdowns in schools benefit the lesbian land-whales who appear to make up a majority of teachers in our schools.

    They no longer have to work to earn their income which comes in irrespective of whether they work or not, and they no longer have to deal with “disruptive” young males, who they so clearly hate.

    It is hardly surprising therefore that these lesbian land-whales are so in favour of continued lockdowns.

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