This is a real wind drought

This is about as low as it gets across the whole of the NEM (National Energy Market) that integrates the grids of the SE states, including Tasmania and Queensland.

Approaching dinnertime the mills are delivering less than 2% of installed (plated) capacity and providing less than 1% of the power in the grid.

This is the widget live to see how the picture evolves.

Queensland is the standout performer, generating 79MW. Tasmania (the battery of the nation) is contributing 3MW, SA (the wind leader) 48MW, followed by NSW with 29MW and Victoria (with the most installed capacity) 16MW.

Be thankful for coal and gas. In Queensland coal is contributing 66% of the power + gas 28%. In NSW the score is 75 +5+20 hydro, Victoria 62+17+21, SA gas 94% and Tasmania, mostly hydro as usual, plus 3% from gas that is very rare.

In Tasmania the wind was under 5% of installed capacity all day, and under 10% for the last 24 hours.

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17 Responses to This is a real wind drought

  1. Bruce of Newcastle says:

    Australia is thoroughly becalmed.
    Can’t wait for the Age of Sail v2.0.
    Who will be the new Jack Aubrey?

  2. Nicholas (Unlicensed Joker) Gray says:

    Still, there is hope for the future. I saw recent articles in The Australian about British Researchers being able to manipulate plasma gas, and a link to a French site about success in fusion, which emits plasma. They thought that success would come in less than a decade! This is great news because whenever people had previously talked about fusion, they had said, ten years, same as ever. Now they are claiming in less than a decade! That is progress!

  3. Tintarella di Luna says:

    Rafe thank you – your ever watchful eye on the natural environment is like a taking Gaia’s pulse – she’s trying if only the wind would co-operate.

  4. Roger says:

    Queensland is the standout performer, generating 79MW.

    The recent fire at Callide has prompted media and their political monkeys to aver that we are too reliant on coal.

    Enjoy the benfits if a grid propped up by Qld while you still can.

  5. Professor Fred Lenin says:

    How is Japan going with its new lowemission power stations burningAustralian coal ? How much woud it cost to put one on each of our major coalfields ?
    Maybewecan stop exportingcoal and keep it for our own use ,bugger the globalist carpetbagger billionaires .

  6. Roger says:

    How is Japan going with its new lowemission power stations burningAustralian coal ?

    Queensland coal, to be precise, Fred.

  7. Muddy says:

    I purchased a car based on the manufacturer’s claim I’d get X number of kilometres to the litre in circumstance blue. Now that I’ve parted with my money, I find that when driving in circumstance blue, on average, I only get V km to the litre.

    I purchased a new fridge. The manufacturer claimed in its documentation, that it would keep my food – in the main compartment – at Blah degrees Celsius. Imagine my confusion when I discovered that it only keeps my food at Meh degrees Celsius.

    Tintarella – Gaia is a Siren.

  8. mem says:

    But, but, but some teenage girl down at the local community market at the Victorian Conservation (read greens and nutters) stand accosted me with a petition only last week to close down coal immediately! Let’s do it I say. The state will grind to a halt, but don’t you worry about it. The total airhead just blinked at me.

  9. Siltstone says:

    Take 2,000MW out of NSW (Liddell coal fired station) in a year or so’s time and see what happens!

  10. Eyrie says:

    Talked to my former power station engineer mate this arvo. He can’t understand how the fire at Calide could have occurred. The alternators run in a hydrogen atmosphere at 300KPa. Lower aerodynamic drag and better heat transfer. There are all sorts of alarms. Did say it was hard to get staff at Callide. Greenie infiltration and sabotage?

  11. Patrick Kelly says:

    I’d like an analysis of the fake 100% renewable claim by the ACT. How does this bear out in the scheme of things. Obviously they can’t be renewables powered all the time. Are they buying it when it’s cheap and they don’t need it? What’s the story behind this?

  12. Boambee John says:

    Patrick

    My understanding is that they have bought the output of some wind and solar farms (some readily accessible to the ACT, some not). Their claim is that these provide output to “offset” ACT usage. It looks like a glorified indulgence purchasing scam. The output does not necessarily match actual ACT usage on any given day.

    If they wanted to be intellectually honest, the ACT would “use” the output staggered by a few days. So if the offsets produce XX megawatt hours one Monday, the ACT is limited to that usage the following Monday. They would soon have to face the reality of wind and solar droughts, and ration themselves on days when the offset day produced very little.

    But there is no chance that they will do that. Because “national capital and vewwy important”!

  13. Mark A says:

    Roger says:
    May 30, 2021 at 6:07 pm

    Queensland is the standout performer, generating 79MW.

    The recent fire at Callide has prompted media and their political monkeys to aver that we are too reliant on coal.

    Akin to say cars break down, stop making cars.

  14. Mark M says:

    Warren Buffett sinks climate measure, says world will adapt

    “I think Chevron’s benefited society in all kinds of ways, and I think it continues to do so..We’re going to need a lot of hydrocarbons for a long time, and we’ll be very glad we’ve got them.”

    https://www.eenews.net/stories/1063731533

  15. Nighthawk the Elder says:

    Mark A says:
    May 31, 2021 at 1:27 am

    The inconvenient truth about Callide is that the incident was a failure of the turbo generator and nothing to do with the boiler. The steam supply could have just as easily come from a nuclear reactor, a gas fired boiler or even the once vaunted solar thermal generator (remember when that was a thing?).

    It’s also as if they are arguing wind turbines or solar panels never fail.

  16. Herodotus says:

    Since new hydro is off the menu, it’s coal, gas, or nuclear.
    We live in an age of stupid and hysterical adherence to falsehoods.
    The politicians and media both have much to answer for.

  17. old bloke says:

    Patrick Kelly says:
    May 30, 2021 at 8:49 pm

    I’d like an analysis of the fake 100% renewable claim by the ACT.

    I don’t know where they get their juice from these days, but they were 100% renewable in the ’70’s, wholly powered by hydro from the Snowy Mountains.

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