Academic tin ear

Education Minister Alan Tudge gave a speech at the annual Universities Australia conference yesterday.

Here is how the AFR education editor described what he said (emphasis added):

Mr Tudge will instead push research commercialisation, student experience and freedom of speech, all of which are considered fringe agendas, as being among his main priorities, leaving the higher education sector to face an estimated $2.8 billion revenue shortfall for 2020-21.

I think if the education elites think that those issues constitute a fringe agenda, then there is going to be a lot of pain for the sector in the next few years.

Here are some of the things Alan Tudge said:

Let me start with what is my top priority in my portfolio, which is our research commercialisation agenda.  

For example, it is clear that nearly all the incentives for an academic are geared towards publishing and that there are few incentives for translating research down the commercialisation path.  

As one very senior scientist (who had been an entrepreneur) told me, when she told the university DVC that she wanted to commercialise her idea, the response was “well as long as it doesn’t interfere with your publications”. 

It is the same with tackling social challenges. I recall asking one Vice-Chancellor why so few of the 2,800 education academics are trying to tackle the core strategic challenge in our schools of standards declining despite funding increasing. His response: “It is arguably not knowledge creation, and even if it was, it would struggle to get published in global journals because it would be entirely Australia-based.”

Looks like the Minister doesn’t like being told that his real-world concerns are getting in the way of academic careers and publication.

My second priority is back on international students, but more at the strategic medium term level, as opposed to the work that is occurring presently to try and get pilots up and running this year and dealing with the fiscal challenges of today.

As I had indicated previously, as we come out of COVID and get our borders open again, we will need to think differently about international students, taking into account four broad objectives:

  1. Providing revenue for institutions and the economy
  2. Enhancing the learning experience of Australian students
  3. Ensuring that we have the workforce skills that we need
  4. Strengthening our people to people linkages.

All are important, not just the first.

The sector’s social licence to print money has just been revoked.

But wait there is more:

Former Vice-Chancellor, Greg Craven, has made strong statements how this should be achieved.

Greg Craven – as far as I can work out – is in favour of quotas for international students.

After warming up – Alan Tudge starts reading the riot act.

Our public universities were initially established for one purpose: to educate Australians.

Let’s not forget this. 

Then the killer line:

In the past several months, I have had almost every Vice-Chancellor talk to me about research and international students, but not many talk to me about their ambitions for Australian students.

Every VC should be sacking their government relations people. Today. Get new ones.

Let me finish with the essential value which underpins the very essence of a university: freedom of speech and freedom of academic inquiry.

It has been a long journey to protect what should be the core value of a university.

If it becomes apparent that universities remain unable or unwilling to adopt the Model Code, I will examine all options available to the Government to enforce it – which may include legislation.

Magnificent.

Mind you – Coalition governments tend to be all talk and no action. So whether Alan Tudge actually carries through remains to be seen.

Certainly this is most exciting thing I’ve seen from an Australian education minister since Brendan Nelson banned compulsory student unionism (only to be later reintroduced) and vetoed the funding of several post-modernist ARC grant funding decisions.

Nelson tended to speak softly but had a big stick. Hopefully Alan Tudge – who has already spoken loudly – also has a big stick. He is going to need it if he hopes to reform the university sector.

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60 Responses to Academic tin ear

  1. Roger says:

    Mr Tudge will instead push research commercialisation, student experience and freedom of speech, all of which are considered fringe agendas…

    The universities’ main agenda being the international student rort.

  2. Mango Man says:

    Tudge is of course on the money. One would hope that he will consider undoing the Dawkins “reforms” and sharply separate the teaching/vocational streams of universities from the research/academic. On the latter, we need much more focus in the research spend and much less airy-fairy quackery. On the former, our skills training is a very long way removed from the workplace demands.

  3. Big_Nambas says:

    While these are all laudable objectives, what about fighting Marxism in our Universities?
    Not much point in all the rest if the Marxists are allowed to continue to poison our young.

  4. Rosie says:

    Here here and hear hear.

  5. Gilas says:

    Big_Nambas says:
    June 4, 2021 at 8:46 am

    10,000% correct.
    Until that happens, this is hollow window-dressing designed to scamper a few election votes.

  6. Rosie says:

    My children emerged from university unscathed by Marxism.

  7. Sinclair Davidson says:

    what about fighting Marxism in our Universities?

    There are no Marxists in Australian universities. They have been hunted to extinction by the post-modernists.

    I actually miss the Marxists.

  8. Gilas says:

    Rosie says:
    June 4, 2021 at 8:52 am

    My children emerged from university unscathed by Marxism.

    A common delusion, soon corrected when paying Australian tax.

  9. Cassie of Sydney says:

    “Big_Nambas says:
    June 4, 2021 at 8:46 am
    While these are all laudable objectives, what about fighting Marxism in our Universities?
    Not much point in all the rest if the Marxists are allowed to continue to poison our young.”

    Unlikely to happen….the universities are now fully captive…gone…it’s too late. The Marxists are in full control. As Jordan Peterson, James Lindsay, Peter Boghossian, Helen Pluckrose and others argue…..the universities as places to learn the humanities, social sciences and even law need to shut down and burnt to the ground.

    Universities might have a future for science, medicine and engineering but that’s it.

  10. Cassie of Sydney says:

    “Sinclair Davidson says:
    June 4, 2021 at 8:56 am
    what about fighting Marxism in our Universities?

    There are no Marxists in Australian universities. They have been hunted to extinction by the post-modernists.

    I actually miss the Marxists.”

    Quite so.

  11. Perfidious Albino says:

    Too much ‘research’ funding is just a backdoor means for Big Pharma and Big Medical Devices to incentivise doctors to use their products without being seen to be directly financing medicos boondoggles…

  12. C.L. says:

    Liberals never win these battles and their enemies know they won’t win.

    Why? Take compulsory student unionism: Labor re-introduced it.

    That is always their policy: smash what the Tories have done and re-establish their own policy.

    Liberals, on the other hand, try a reform maybe once but when it comes to reintroducing it – again and again, as they take and re-take government, if necessary – they always quit.

    Liberals eventually believe this conduct is ‘conservative’ in two senses: it preserves the status quo (the other side’s… but hey); and it shores up their credentials for bourgeois niceness – which will help them fight for things that really matter. Which things, of course, they won’t fight for either.

  13. Arky says:

    Yes.
    A lot of academics don’t really want to hear what conservatives have to say.
    Am I allowed to converse with you in real time again?
    You great big mung bean.

  14. C.L. says:

    There should be no more than, say, five universities in Australia.

    I’m reminded of Humphrey Appleby chatting with a fellow mandarin about how a Hacker policy will badly affect British universities.

    Both of them,” Humphrey laments.

  15. exsteelworker says:

    Seems to me that majority of these so called VCs of OUR University’s should be charged with treason. They have sold all Western University’s out to the highest bidder…CCP.

  16. Sinclair Davidson says:

    They have sold all Western University’s out to the highest bidder…CCP.

    Of all the criticisms of universities, that one is the least credible.

  17. C.L. says:

    This is by far the most interesting analysis of meritocracy, ‘equality’ of outcomes and universities in the US I’ve ever read.

    Generous blockquote posted by Glenn Reynolds this week. Full article in The Chronicle is paywalled.

    A fascinating essay on how the Ivy League ended up so left-wing.

  18. Mak Siccar says:

    First, start by getting rid of/ defunding pseudo-intellectual bullshyte like this and redirecting the $ to productive pursuits.

    https://www.latrobe.edu.au/courses/gender-sexuality-and-diversity-studies

  19. Arky says:

    Sinclair Davidson says:
    June 4, 2021 at 9:26 am
    “They have sold all Western University’s out to the highest bidder…CCP.”
    ..
    Of all the criticisms of universities, that one is the least credible.

    It’s the most credible, almost painfully bleeding obvious at this point:
    ..

    Chinese international students are gone and not coming back
    By Unconventional Economist in International Studentsat 12:10 am on July 9, 2020 | 41 comments
    Last month, the Chinese Communist Party’s (CCP) mouthpiece, The Global Times, published an inflammatory editorial instructing Chinese students to avoid Australia. This produced a panicked response from Australia’s elite Group of Eight (Go8) universities, which have grown fat on Chinese international student fees:

    -Macrobusiness.
    ..
    And:

    Australian universities have been pushed to self-commercialise and become increasingly reliant on international student fees as a result of the long-term decline in government funding for higher education coupled with rising domestic student numbers. Students from the People’s Republic of China (PRC) now make up the largest proportion of international students by a wide margin. In 2018, with more than 152,000 enrolments, they accounted for more than 38 per cent of international university enrolments, and their numbers continue to grow robustly year on year.

    In this situation, Australian universities have expressed concerns about over-reliance on the Chinese market, especially in light of the prospect of slowing growth over the coming decade as China invests heavily in improving the quality of its own higher education system. But although Australian universities are eager to diversify their export markets, the reality is that, despite strong growth in enrolments from alternative source countries including India and Nepal, it appears unlikely that these countries will be able to match China’s demand for Australian degrees anytime in the near future.

    In addition to university managers’ understandable anxieties about the paradox of a national public higher education system that is financially dependent on a single overseas market, others have raised concerns about the situation’s impacts on academic integrity, citing a proportionally small number of cases in which entry requirements and assessment standards have been compromised at some universities. Public anxieties over the political actions of Chinese students at Australian universities are also running high; in recent months, especially in relation to a handful of pro-Chinese Communist Party zealots challenging the right of students supporting democracy in Hong Kong to express their views on campus.

    _Asia Society.

  20. Spurgeon Monkfish III says:

    almost every Vice-Chancellor talk to me about research and international students, but not many talk to me about their ambitions for Australian students.

    Being the students who’ve suffered the most from this dishonest treasonous anti-intellectual idiocy.

    universities as places to learn the humanities, social sciences and even law need to be shut down and burnt to the ground

    Exactly. To paraphrase the Perfesser, these faculties have lost their social(ist) license to exist.

    As for students from Asia (i.e. bloody china) – distance learning only. Asia is not in any inconvenient time zone for this and if these “students” aren’t physically in this country they’ll no longer be automatically gifted citizenship (or placing additional strain on urban infrastructure and already overstretched taxpayer funded “services”).

    There are few things that infuriate me more than these illiterate ingrates cheating their way through some utterly worthless degree, only to be then allowed to reside here permanently.

    Enough.

    P.S. Yes, the gliberals are utterly useless and they will not pursue any of Tudge’s points above with any semblance of vigour – in fact they probably won’t bother at all – too distracted by baseless sexual harrassment/assault claims, bailing out Disasterstan’s latest schlockdown with OPM and destroying the electrickery grid through the Year Net Zero agenda.

  21. Arky says:

    Table 1: International Student (OS) Numbers Studying in Australian Universities Relative to Total Student Enrolments
    Uni Total OS OS%
    RMIT University (rmit) 57433 26590 46.3%

    -International University Rankings.

  22. Arky says:

    If you exclude distance education students such that you are only looking at the students attending campuses, some Australian universities had more international students than domestic ones.

  23. Primer says:

    Tudge knows he’s pretending. The Coalition is still as terrified of the media as when Abbott presided. Run rabbits, run.

  24. Figures says:

    Who knows? Maybe there are some Liberals who can see what is happening with DeSantis and realise that actually bothering to fight the cultural wars can reap dividends.

  25. Tim says:

    Tudge needs to stop talking and start doing. Dont threaten to legislate, do it. Then there is no turning back unless another federal government changes it.

  26. Sinclair Davidson says:

    Arky – you do realise that not all Chinese students coming to Australia are CCP agents?

  27. Gavin R Putland says:

    …. It is the same with tackling social challenges. I recall asking one Vice-Chancellor why so few of the 2,800 education academics are trying to tackle the core strategic challenge in our schools of standards declining despite funding increasing. His response: “It is arguably not knowledge creation, and even if it was, it would struggle to get published in global journals because it would be entirely Australia-based.”

    Looks like the Minister doesn’t like being told that his real-world concerns are getting in the way of academic careers and publication.

    The Minister has been told that the incentives faced by academics are perverse and that it’s his job to fix them. Whether he likes that remains to be seen.

  28. gardez bien says:

    The postmodernists age Marxists, just they expanded from class analysis into PC stuff.

    I used to hang about with the Marxism Today crowd in London in the mid 1980s. The Equalities agenda was pushed by people like Stuart Hall, Martin Jacques and Bea Campbell. It was taken up enthusiastically by the Greater London Council under Ken Livingstone. The universities became rife with it. Of course, as well as the PC we also had Trots and Tankies and grim old bastards like Hobsbawm. I’m certain it was taking hold in the US universities at the same time.

    I’m pleased to hear the Minister say these things, but don’t see much point in modern universities. Ten would be ample in Australia.

    Or one should hit them in the pocket by defunding far left studies, Political Economy and sociological.

  29. Andre Lewis says:

    If they don’t take notice of Tudge’s issues then really reverse the Dawkins ‘reforms’ by only retaining the original eight national universities and relegate the faux one’s Dawkins elevated back to teacher training colleges and attach them to major TAFE campuses to provide sub degree qualifications directly articulating from the vocational programs. They would struggle because the experienced vocationally competent lecturers they once had have been replaced with green/left socialists (same thing?) who could not teach advanced engineering, accounting etc. just gender studies and other woke rubbish that students realise wont get them a decent career. Tough luck they can close down altogether.

  30. Mark M says:

    Here is some advice to help the honourable Mr Tudge balance the books:

    Don’t waste Australian taxpayer money and time …

    31 May, 2021: How a fight about the Great Barrier Reef has become a free speech test

    https://www.smh.com.au/politics/federal/how-a-fight-about-the-great-barrier-reef-has-become-a-free-speech-test-20210528-p57w3f.html

  31. Real Deal says:

    There are no Marxists in Australian universities. They have been hunted to extinction by the post-modernists.

    I actually miss the Marxists.

    Whoever are in the universities, they appear to have my daughter in their clutches. Smart, thoughtful but now had thoroughly imbibed the woke culture. My wife and I hope we get her back one day.

  32. Jessie says:

    Helen Hughes was one of the first economists to recognise the importance of export-orientated growth to rapid and equitable development. Australia’s third-largest services export industry, education, emerged from her advocacy in 1984 of a policy of selling education to overseas students. Her skill in teaching economics remains legendary.
    source: Distinguished Fellow of the Economic Society of Australia, 2004: Helen Hughes (with some historical reference papers of interest)

    RBA 2020 The COVID-19 Outbreak and Australia’s Education and Tourism Exports

  33. Jessie says:

    Andre Lewis @10.35
    +1

  34. billie says:

    commercialise research?

    no, that’s not what reseaarch is for, it’s for white papers, promotion and pay rises

    these are not commercially minded people (duh!)

    when people defend Australian research it is inevitably wifi (which Australia had a tiny role in) Hills Hoists and the Victa mower (last 2 did not come out of universities)

    all old news and we do nothing these days except produce graduates who are near useless and depend on established old school business for employment, or

    they join the hordes of moochers .. the arts, charities (1 million people in Australia work in charities) the state and federal public services in all their varied forms (including the ABC and SBS), the list is long

    the taxpayer gets scant value for any of this, as all the moochers see the taxpayer as a cash cow who can be ignored

    they are correct of course, they can ignore the taxpayer as only the noisy activists get any hearing

    B ark stuff

  35. Des Deskperson says:

    This morning’s Canberra Time has an op/ed – paywalled – in which Jenna Price compares stunted Tory Tudges’s miserly approach to tertiary education with that of the visionary Plibster reply, the latter now apparently the custodian of the Light on the Hill, at least when it come to education.

    Typically, Price is high on emotion but lacking any analysis, depth or even information, so she doesn’t go into much real detail about what Plibster actually said, and it may be unfair to judge her simply on the basis Price’s reporting. but basically it seemed to be a rather facile commitment to build on Chifley’s – apparent – post war vision of a job and a home for all Australians with Whitlam’s vision of a university place for all Australians.

    This brought slobberer Price out in ‘goosebumps ‘.

    Plibster also played the ‘I grew up in desperate poverty in the Shire but rescued by Whitlam’s big government vision’ card. We will doubtless hear more of this.

  36. Arky says:

    Sinclair Davidson says:
    June 4, 2021 at 10:12 am
    Arky – you do realise that not all Chinese students coming to Australia are CCP agents?

    ..
    Define “agents”.

    agent

    noun
    1.
    a person who acts on behalf of another person or group.
    2.
    a person or thing that takes an active role or produces a specified effect.
    ..

    ..
    Does the CCP use it’s students to produce an effect?
    As soon as they used the withdrawal of those students from Australian universities as a threat, the CCP turned them into agents in the sense of the 2nd definition above.
    That an unknown number of them continue to act as an agent in the 1st sense of the definition, can be seen from the fact that they organise on campuses and act to keep the others in line.
    I have a great many friends who are Chinese, Hong Kongese and Taiwanese. For most of my adult life these three groups have comprised most of my friends. I think you are incredibly naive about how the CCP uses them.
    The fact that they are my good friends does not blind me to incentives they act on or the incentives they produce in others, or in whole systems taken cumulatively.

  37. Boambee John says:

    C.L. says:
    June 4, 2021 at 9:20 am
    There should be no more than, say, five universities in Australia.

    None of which should be from the so-called Group of Eight, all of which are now totally corrupted.

  38. Primer says:

    “not all Chinese students coming to Australia are CCP agents”.
    Yeah, but every one of them is a potential arm of the CCP. When you have family in China the CCP own you, no matter where you reside. Same with so called non PLA Chinese businesses, compliance is fixed with a phone call.
    But you know that.

  39. Boambee John says:

    gardez bien says:
    June 4, 2021 at 10:24 am
    The postmodernists age Marxists, just they expanded from class analysis into PC stuff.

    Much as all the Trotskyites joined the Greens after the collapse of the Soviet Union.

  40. Arky says:

    Or to put it another way:
    As no chinese student with a low social credit score is going to be allowed to study abroad, and the CCP uses it’s own people as unwitting agents of it’s policies, then yes, they are all agents of the CCP.
    To illustrate the point: In 2019 the CCP banned it’s tourists from visiting Taiwan.
    It did so after a few years of flooding Taiwan with mainland tourists.
    I know this, because I was there.
    The withdrawal of the tourists was done to try to influence the Taiwanese election.
    The logic being that a whole bunch of businesses making a lot of money from the mainland tourist trade could be bribed / threatened to produce a result in the elections.
    This is how gangsters do business.
    Those who go into business with gangsters should not be surprised when it all inevitably turns to shit.
    What happened with the mainland tourists in Taiwan?
    In the middle of the CCP attempting to strong arm Taiwanese voters by withdrawing their tourists the covid hit.
    Turns out not having hundreds of thousands of mainlanders entering your country at that time was a good thing.
    But then, it never is a good thing at any time, because they are always used as agents of the CCP gangsters.

  41. Colin Suttie says:

    Arky

    Much respect for trying to explain to a libertarian why open borders are a disaster. I suspect there are easier battles to fight though – getting blood from a stone, understanding women, that type of thing. This single issue is the biggest blind spot in libertarian thought.

  42. duncanm says:

    Tim says:
    June 4, 2021 at 10:11 am
    Tudge needs to stop talking and start doing. Dont threaten to legislate, do it. Then there is no turning back unless another federal government changes it.

    I’m currently looking over the fence from the other side – business helping uni ideas commercialise – and there is definitely a significant push from the feds on funding. It is happening.

  43. MatrixTransform says:

    There are no Marxists in Australian universities. They have been hunted to extinction by the post-modernists.

    well, that’s only funny because it isn’t true

    If you check the boots of a post-modernist you’ll find the Marx stuck there in the tread from all the time they spent stepping in it to get to the newer philosophers

  44. Baa Humbug says:

    There are no Marxists in Australian universities. They have been hunted to extinction by the post-modernists.

    I actually miss the Marxists.

    Oh pulleese!! Just because the class path is shut down, doesn’t mean these very same people are gone. They are just using other paths like race, sex, sexual orientation and Social Justice.

    The same fvcking people with the same fvcking goal of central control.

  45. Squirrel says:

    The self-serving spin from the uni sector lobbyists about getting all those poor, benighted foreign students back on shore, together with the conceptual bullshit about such students not being part of the “quarantine quota” (or whatever the jargon is) for others wanting to get into/back into the country will piss off a lot of the punterariat – this is not a bad time for the government to be sinking the boot in.

    As to the Labor alternative it’s basically herbal tea and sympathy – little, or nothing, in the way of extra funding and a decision to stick with the stage 3 income tax cuts will somewhat reduce the chances of the unis getting the funding bonanza they obviously think they deserve.

  46. DM OF WA says:

    Sinclair Davidson says:
    June 4, 2021 at 10:12 am

    … do [you] realise that not all Chinese students coming to Australia are CCP agents?

    I am shocked by this man’s naivety.

    Not all German5 were Na21s. But there only needed to be a small number in society with the power to terrorise the rest of the population into obedience. The same situation has occurred in Russia, China and elsewhere with communism. Come to think of it, it is the same here in Australia with the present day Marxists.

    By the way, post-modernists and Marxists may have different ideas but they are political allies who have the same goal: to destroy Western civilization; and they use the same deceitful methods to achieve their goal.

  47. Tel says:

    I am shocked by this man’s naivety.

    When Sinclair eats a bowl of M&M’s he even swallows the red ones.

  48. MatrixTransform says:

    he even swallows the red ones.

    but he never swallows the ones marked ‘W’

  49. Crossie says:

    The universities’ main agenda being the international student rort.

    I work in the sector and I know that there is very little interest in the domestic students. Only fifteen years ago most of the students were domestic with a smattering of international ones and universities did well financially. What’s more, most universities employed more staff than they do today. Another difference is that in those days the VC’s pay was much more modest than today’s over a million dollar salary.

  50. Crossie says:

    Helen Hughes was one of the first economists to recognise the importance of export-orientated growth to rapid and equitable development. Australia’s third-largest services export industry, education, emerged from her advocacy in 1984 of a policy of selling education to overseas students.

    We were not selling them education, they were buying permanent residency which eventually made them eligible for citizenship.

  51. Arky:

    A lot of academics don’t really want to hear what conservatives have to say.
    Am I allowed to converse with you in real time again?
    You great big mung bean.

    Good to see you back – you were missed.

  52. They had it good while it was going, especially since we were shown what permanent residency seems to get you in terms of repatriation.

  53. Nebia Hill says:

    The Roman Carthaginian model – burn, plough, salt – should apply to all current Western Universities.

    They wouldn’t be missed, not for one second.

  54. Arky/Colin:

    This single issue is the biggest blind spot in libertarian thought.

    True.
    Libertarians are naive, and they and their ilk are usually first against the wall when a Communist/Marxist regime takes power.
    That’s what the purges are all about.

  55. BorisG says:

    Commercialisation is strongly encouraged at Australian universities.

    As for international students, I don’t see a problem if they cover full cost of their education. As for permanent residency – this is a an issue of government policy. Universities cannot grant residency or citizenship, and hence cannot be held responsible for the so called sham. There is no reason why students should get residency after completing their course.

  56. Mark A says:

    BorisG says:
    June 5, 2021 at 2:36 am

    Commercialisation is strongly encouraged at Australian universities.

    As for international students, I don’t see a problem if they cover full cost of their education. As for permanent residency – this is a an issue of government policy. Universities cannot grant residency or citizenship, and hence cannot be held responsible for the so called sham. There is no reason why students should get residency after completing their course.

    Agree completely.
    Problem is gutless governments.

  57. Ed Case says:

    As for international students, I don’t see a problem if they cover full cost of their education.

    Every International student enrolled limits the opportunity for Australian students.
    The Universities were built by Australia for Australians to be educated, not for grifters to turn into money making machines.

  58. Ed Case says:

    The Liberals have form on this type of stunt.
    They put it forward in the tail end of their term, presumably to fire up sections of their base.
    Compulsory Student Union dues was another one, from memory Barnaby Joyce crossed the floor, but a few Minor Party Senators got it over the line.

  59. duncanm says:

    Sinclair Davidson says:
    June 4, 2021 at 10:12 am

    … do [you] realise that not all Chinese students coming to Australia are CCP agents?

    they don’t need to be. How about 1 in 20, or 1 in 100.

    Some of our Uni’s do great commercialisation, but much of the time its not local. Zhengrong Shi and others from the UNSW Photovoltaic ARC formed what at one time the largest crystalline solar cell company in the world… in China.

    https://newsroom.unsw.edu.au/news/asian-deals-unsw-solar-technology

    What I want to know (and can’t find out quickly from any of the ARC annual reports), is how much of the profit from any successful technology flows back into the Unis for the future?

    Tech comes out, there’s a (necessary) injection of cash from investors, and hopefully at some point some profit. Do the Uni’s retain the IP?

    Macquarie Uni still making money out of wifi?
    UNSW should have received gobs of cash from Solar.. but did it?

    This fills me with zero confidence. “Equity and Diversity Metric” my arse.

  60. The Sheriff says:

    Real Deal says:
    June 4, 2021 at 10:55 am
    There are no Marxists in Australian universities. They have been hunted to extinction by the post-modernists.

    I actually miss the Marxists.

    Whoever are in the universities, they appear to have my daughter in their clutches. Smart, thoughtful but now had thoroughly imbibed the woke culture. My wife and I hope we get her back one day.

    Very sorry to hear about your daughter. You should consider cutting all financial support and eviction from home to help bring her to her senses. Only when she hits rock bottom will she recover her faculties; Marxism is no different to a heroin addiction.

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