Feeling Trapped

Young Australians who were in their last year of high school will remember it as a generation-defining disaster.

The pandemic hit them in a fragile moment; the transition from school to the rest of their lives, when every decision they made felt life altering.

This period would normally be marked with a series of milestones. Instead, the class of 2020 said anti-climactic goodbyes from their bedrooms over Zoom. Many finished the year feeling trapped, disoriented and lost.

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28 Responses to Feeling Trapped

  1. Vicki says:

    Young Australians who were in their last year of high school will remember it as a generation-defining disaster.

    AKA my grandson.

    He’s now at uni doing Commerce. He has experienced benefits & drawbacks out of the chaos of 2020/1. Drawbacks of study period for HSC enormously disrupted – many face-to-face lessons cancelled & sent home from boarding facility. For a boy who struggles scholastically, that was a big downside.

    On the other hand, I suspect that Aussie students (particularly those who struggle academically) may have had better chances of university entrance than ever before, given the drought of foreign students.

    From my personal standpoint, he and his friends have appeared remarkably resilient. Part time work has been available over the break between school & uni, & most were able to attend end of year formals etc.

    His biggest grouch at the moment is the fact that his university only provides one day face-to-face teaching a week. Being a lad who requires personal learning interaction, this is a tremendous concern for him. It is also outrageous, given the significant debt he is acquiring through HECS which he will eventually have to repay. I understand this is soon to be rectified across the tertiary sector – I certainly hope so.

  2. FlyingPigs says:

    all animals will escape and find freedom after the great re-set.

  3. Nighthawk the Elder says:

    Poignant picture you posted there CL. Also an acknowledgement on the Cat’s banner for today. I just wonder how many of the quaranteens would even get the reference.

  4. Boambee John says:

    The soldier third back in the central row looks about fifteen.

  5. Timothy Neilson says:

    OK, C.L., but these things are relative.
    The 18 year olds of 1939-45 had a real problem to deal with, one that regrettably required them to take high risks of dreadful outcomes, and at best to waste several good years of their lives.
    The 18 year olds of 2020 didn’t suffer or sacrifice anywhere near as much as that – but they shouldn’t have had to go through even what they did, because there was never a problem of the magnitude to justify what was done to them by the incompetent, criminally negligent Maximum Leader and his clown troupe.

  6. Bruce of Newcastle says:

    Young Australians who were in their last year of high school will remember it as a generation-defining disaster.

    I thought that was supposed to be climate change.
    Oops, sorry it’s now called the climate emergency.
    Or is it the climate catastrophe or climate apocalypse?
    I forget what the latest term is. Maybe the Greens will know.

  7. Riversutra says:

    Vax Macht Frei
    well, I’m keeping in tone with the WW2 theme.
    Anyway, they don’t need to waste money and time on an education they’ll never get to use.
    Netflix Virtual Reality Porn (tactile gloves and fitted attachments included) , recurring stimulus payments(used to be called a wage, remember them?) and Soma (oh, Brave New World indeed).
    There’s your future, Snowflakes, you’re welcome.

  8. sfw says:

    My third daughter finished VCE last year, had her studies and social life ruined by these stupid rules, she’s now in Melbourne, and the latest imprisonment has here very down, probably developing depression, can’t see her friends and family and has to wear a muesli style face covering everywhere. No 6 son was in year 11 last year now in year 12, he did develop depression last year due to lockdown, he was probably susceptible to it but the lockdown did it, now in Y12 and started to get on top of things, the latest lockdowns and uncertainty has knocked him around and put him back to where he was a year ago. We need large scale civil disobedience in Vic.

  9. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha says:

    The soldier third back in the central row looks about fifteen.

    Private James Martin was 14 tears and nine months old, when he succumbed to typhoid at Gallipoli…

  10. Boambee John says:

    Zuu

    And the oldest Australian soldier known to have died in WW I was a Victorian farmer aged 63, killed by artillery on the Western Front. He was in the 14th Battalion, but unfortunately, I have forgotten his name.

  11. Boambee John says:

    Zulu, typing too fast.

  12. Mick Gold Coast QLD says:

    “The pandemic hit them in a fragile moment; the transition from school to the rest of their lives, when every decision they made felt life altering.” … how rude!

    Did Angry Face Greta from Finland or Luxembourg or somewhere similarly pointless write that … errr … cry for help?

    The poor dears! After high school they endure three more demanding, exhausting years in Year 12+ at university with a guaranteed pass from lecturers whose futures rely on proof of successful teachery. It used to be four years plus a couple more of post graduate but that was too challenging and arduous for these following generations.

    These kiddies have, after all, been weakened by the realisation that their greedy parents aren’t dying quickly enough to release their entitlement – the capital gain in the family home which they simply have not earned and should surrender.

    Others here have pointed out today is important in ancient history. Boambee John commented on the apparent age of one of the fellas up top there, sailing in to Utah, Omaha, Gold, Juno or Sword Beach on a day when 10,000 Allied soldiers died. Their average age was 20.

    The bloke who, half a century ago, led us into the first years of our cadetship was, at 23, flying for the Pathfinder force – seriously dangerous stuff. Four years later he had a DFC and Bar, great respect, admiration and no job. His deputy told us that, to caution that the shake in the man’s hands was not a sign of weakness or inability. He added that the boss had lived with the knowledge that near 50% of RAAF pilots with the RAF were killed; and that he, at the same age as us, was en route to England to face the same when news of Germany’s surrender made him smile every day since!

    That deputy’s message was subtle but well remembered – that we really ought to be grateful for our good fortune. It is too cruel and emotionally damaging a message for the 2020’s young, evidently.

  13. Squirrel says:

    When they get around to looking for people to blame, I hope they will note that the politicians and officials who have done this to them have, with very few exceptions, been of the Gen X variety – the same cohort who have, in so many cases, been paid fat salaries to pretend to work at home, while kids in casual jobs have been smashed. The same cohort who will eventually be getting decades of stonking great pension payments funded by these kids.

    If one good thing comes from the inevitable anger and resentment which comes from this episode, it will be those not on the public teat waking up to the extent to which they are being ill-served and ripped off by those who are.

  14. MACK says:

    Best balanced expert paper on Covid – by Peter Collignon. (Plenty to read between the lines) https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/epdf/10.1111/imj.15287

  15. John A says:

    Boambee John says: June 6, 2021, at 4:51 pm

    Zulu

    And the oldest Australian soldier known to have died in WW I was a Victorian farmer aged 63, killed by artillery on the Western Front. He was in the 14th Battalion, but unfortunately, I have forgotten his name.

    OK, now BJ, tell us for real: were you in his battalion, too? 🙂

  16. Pedro the Loafer says:

    From the Australian War Memorial website: Boy Soldiers.

  17. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha says:

    From the Australian War Memorial website: Boy Soldiers.

    One of the graves “on the beach” at Gallipoli was that of a 16 year old from Coolgardie.

  18. Crossie says:

    His biggest grouch at the moment is the fact that his university only provides one day face-to-face teaching a week. Being a lad who requires personal learning interaction, this is a tremendous concern for him.

    My granddaughter was horrified that all her lectures were via zoom when, like your lad, she needs the face to face interaction. At first I thought she was making too much of it and advised her to simply keep asking question. I was shocked when she said no questions were allowed during the zoom sessions and that they could only email their questions. In the end she deferred and said she’ll wait until at least it’s half and half.

  19. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha says:

    And the oldest Australian soldier known to have died in WW I was a Victorian farmer aged 63, killed by artillery on the Western Front

    The oldest British soldier known to have died in WW1 was a Henry Webber – he had three sons serving in France, and he longed to join them. He tried to enlist several times, and eventually went to France as a battalion transport officer, aged 68. Webber was killed on 21st July, 1916, but his three sons all survived. (“The First Day on the Somme”, Martin Middlebrook, P 24 and P294.)

  20. Boambee John says:

    John A

    OK, now BJ, tell us for real: were you in his battalion, too?

    I ran across him while looking some casualties up on the Roll of Honour. He enlisted, I think in 1917, claiming to be 43. This was pushing the margins to enlist as a private. He was killed by artillery fire in 1918. His 28 year old son had enlisted earlier (can’t remember the son’s unit, but probably another Victorian battalion). IIRC, the son survived the war.

    The story only came out when his widow filled out a Casualty Card, giving his correct age. I happened across it looking for something else, and remembered his name for a while, but have now forgotten it.

    No, I wasn’t his CO.

  21. Rex Anger says:

    No, I wasn’t his CO.

    Nah. BJ was his Platoon Sergeant… 😉

    ( 🤪 )

  22. twostix says:

    Every single child aged 0-18 has had an entire year of their life stolen off them, utterly robbed, arbitrarily forced in and out of house arrest for weeks and months, into the most degenerate state of existence, spoken of as ‘carriers’, looked at with suspicion and contempt in shopping centres, so fuckhead boomers like Mick from the Goldcoast – who as a generation never gave up or sacrificed a single solitary thing for the last 70 years for any other generation – not for their parents – the people in that picture, who they dumped en-masse into the worst most abusive cheap arsed aged care homes in history, nor their children, who after 40+ years or robbing blind, they now demand the government hold a gun to the head of and imprison us and our children in homes, at will, all so they can go waltzing about in public pretending that aged 70 that they’re not the old people now.

    Pretty shit play C.L, what is the point you’re trying to make? That 18 year old soldier in 1940 had a rougher time than an ten year old placed under months of house arrest arbitrarily for 12 months by his own government? An entire generation of children now believe that ‘freedom’ – literally the freedom to simply exist and walk out of your front gate does not exist as a concept in our world. It’s gone, that idea is simply not in their brain and never will be ever again.

    Well, some people certainly got to have childhood where they lived in a world that assuredly believed that you’re free to walk down the street whenever you like – like every one of those men in the picture, they had that world and then some, Mick from the Goldcoast and his shit generation gorged like a gluttonous pig on the those freedoms, you and me we got to taste that world.

    My children don’t, it’s gone for them, it was robbed from them at gun point. And for their sacrifice, they are mocked.

  23. twostix says:

    The poor dears! After high school they endure three more demanding, exhausting years in Year 12+ at university with a guaranteed pass from lecturers whose futures rely on proof of successful teachery. It used to be four years plus a couple more of post graduate but that was too challenging and arduous for these following generations

    This generation of children have already sacrified and given more to this shit society than your entire generation did in 70 years.

    Do we tell them? Do we tell them that?

    We won’t.

    But someone might.

    Right after they show colour footage of how you’ll behaved in the 70’s.

  24. Fat Tony says:

    twostix says:
    June 6, 2021 at 9:49 pm

    Mick of GC would be the most miserable old fuck on this site.

    All he does is put shit on people – just think of how miserable your life would be if you had to live with it.

  25. duncanm says:

    Vicki says:
    June 6, 2021 at 2:36 pm

    ditto with my #2.

    They’ve been a pretty resilient bunch. Just get on with it..
    .. but this is NSW.

    I hope the Vic kids get angry. They have the right to.

  26. Boambee John says:

    twostix says:
    June 6, 2021 at 9:13 pm
    Every single child aged 0-18 has had an entire year of their life stolen off them, utterly robbed, arbitrarily forced in and out of house arrest for weeks and months, into the most degenerate state of existence, spoken of as ‘carriers’, looked at with suspicion and contempt in shopping centres,

    And with no DVA benefits, surely this must be worse that being conscripted and sent to Veetman?

  27. Mick Gold Coast QLD says:

    It would appear I have lost the overwrought, angry pre-pubescent schoolboys’ vote! 🎼♪♫

  28. That Jo says:

    I hope the Vic kids get angry. They have the right to.

    Mine’s just sad and even more introverted than ever. Won’t leave the house for anything.

    She doesn’t understand the references to a real war, she never got to hear my grandparents stories from Europe, and what real suffering is like.

    I feel bad that the kids are all woe-is-me, but really they have no point of reference. The schools only teach them how to thank the traditional land owners at assembly – no thanks for our elders sacrifice and certainly no appreciation of real suffering. I wonder if teachers even could convey it, were they allowed?

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