Villainy personified

A bit of news from the Old Country: Statue of Egerton Ryerson on university campus toppled, police say. Here are the details:

A much-maligned statue of Egerton Ryerson was toppled in Toronto on Sunday.

The statue, prominently displayed on the campus of Ryerson University, has come under renewed scrutiny after the discovery in Kamloops, B.C., of what are believed to be the remains of 215 Indigenous children at a former residential school.

Ryerson is credited as one of the architects of Canada’s residential school system.

For background Residential School System

In Canada, the Indian residential school system was a network of free boarding schools for Indigenous peoples. The network was funded by the Canadian government’s Department of Indian Affairs and administered by Christian churches. The school system was created for the purpose of removing Indigenous children from the influence of their own culture and assimilating them into the dominant Canadian culture, “to kill the Indian in the child.” Over the course of the system’s more than hundred-year existence, around 150,000 children were placed in residential schools nationally. By the 1930s about 30 percent of Indigenous children were believed to be attending residential schools.

As for this chap Ryerson, after whom Toronto’s version of RMIT was named, this is who he was.

Adolphus Egerton Ryerson (24 March 1803 – 19 February 1882) was a Canadian educator and Methodist minister who was a prominent contributor to the design of the Canadian public school system and the Canadian Indian residential school system. After a stint editing the Methodist denominational newspaper The Christian Guardian, Ryerson was appointed Chief Superintendent of Education for Upper Canada by Governor General Sir Charles Metcalfe in 1844. In that role, he supported reforms such as creating school boards, making textbooks more uniform, and making education free. Because of his contributions to education in Ontario, he is the namesake of Ryerson University, Ryerson Press, and Ryerson, Ontario.

An obvious villain.

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14 Responses to Villainy personified

  1. Bear Necessities says:

    What stood out here is that Ryerson was a Methodist minister. My Father in the 1930’s boarded at Thornburgh College in Charter’s Towers. It was run by the Methodist and Presbyterian churches. You weren’t allowed to play on a Sunday any sport or have fun. You had to respect the Sabbath.

    He didn’t have much ‘good’ to say about the either the secular or spiritual education he received there.

  2. Splatacrobat says:

    We dismiss the achievements of our ancestors and fall short of them.
    They honoured their ancestors and surpassed them.

    – Anthony Esolen

  3. PeterW says:

    He didn’t have much ‘good’ to say about the either the secular or spiritual education he received there.

    I don’t have “much good to say” about any of the educational institutions that I attended. Keep in mind that some of us just aren’t suited to that kind of environment, no matter who runs it or what their beliefs.

  4. Damon says:

    Are the twitterati actually prepared to be judged by tomorrow’s standards today.

  5. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare says:

    Hairy (my husband) is currently, as in at this minute, in email exchanges with others from Jesus College, his old Cambridge College, about the window the seventeenth century window the loony left want to reef out of the College chapel; it honors a man who had very marginal contacts with the slave trade and who donated massive amounts of scholarship and other funding to poorer aspirants and to College betterment. The Church of England, the official owners along with the College too, are both backing off taking the window out because of huge legal costs that may be involved. A good thing too. But it would be good to see them also speak of the sheer immorality and ungraciousness of taking down tributes to well-meaning benefactors of the past. Canada seems to have a bad case of Year Zero in all of this.

    It’s beyond me why anyone thinks it is a good idea to judge minor actions of others in the past by the standards of today (which is putting the nicest view on today’s ratbags and their aims). As said above, how will the vile super-woke fascist tweeters of race hatred of ‘whites’ today be judged by future generations? Not well, I think.

  6. Whalehunt Fun says:

    You’ve got video. Place a bounty on the. Post it on YouTube. Private enterprise will ensure that feral pests are dealt with in the most economical way.

  7. Beertruk says:

    I don’t know why the university can’t or won’t identify the retards and expel them.

  8. B.A Lert says:

    So that’s where the stolen generation garbage came from.

  9. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare says:

    This Canadian example sounds rather like the ‘discovery’ in an Irish Catholic orphanage and school of a ‘suspicious gravesite’ containing the bodies of numerous children who had died at the orphanage. A later enquiry showed nothing underhand had taken place, the gravesite was not ‘hidden’, and that the children had died of diseases and natural causes not due to poor care. But none of this came out before a dreadful vilification of the religious carers, the Catholic nuns, had taken place.

  10. Andre Lewis says:

    This mass burial at the institution was at the time of the Spanish flue epidemic which causes millions of deaths worldwide. Mass graves abound at this time for the obvious reason they had many dead to bury as quickly as possible.

  11. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha says:

    So that’s where the stolen generation garbage came from.

    Ironic, given that that’s where the “First Nations” garbage comes from.

  12. cuckoo says:

    This Canadian example sounds rather like the ‘discovery’ in an Irish Catholic orphanage and school of a ‘suspicious gravesite’ containing the bodies of numerous children who had died at the orphanage.

    Exactly. Another day, another ‘mystery mass grave’. In 2008 we had the Jersey orphanage investigation, based on the discovery of a ‘skull fragment’ which was later identified by RBG botanists as “a piece of endocarp of Cocos nucifera, i.e. a piece of coconut.”

  13. Ed Case says:

    The Residential Schools in Canada were horrible places, that’s not in dispute and has been well documented.
    Ryerson was a Wokester of the 1840s, no different to his bureaucratic heirs of the current Era.

  14. Mike Ryan says:

    making education free

    Tear it down!

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