“Come With Us On a Journey”

THE Australian is very angry with Australians. Crisis-infatuated from the get-go, the newspaper’s pandemic obsession is now becoming shrill, if not sinister. Its chief national reporter Tom Dusevic today targets the vaccine “hesitant” in a lengthy piece outlining ‘expert’ opinions on how to ‘nudge’ dissenters towards compliance. Part of the ‘problem’ is that the state is not using the creepy cattle-prods at its disposal:

Right now, there are fully fledged behavioural insights units in Victoria and NSW focused on improving customer needs, a key theme in state systems. These multidisciplinary teams are results-oriented, rather than academic, and try to nudge citizens to comply with laws. “Nothing changes until a customer gets a better experience,” is the NSW team’s mantra.

Canberra has a crack squad known as the Behavioural Economics Team of the Australian Government, an innovation by Malcolm Turnbull in 2016 to help all arms of the public service. A spokesman for the Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet said: “BETA has not been involved with the government’s Covid-19 vaccination advertising or public information campaigns…”

[New South Wales infectious disease social scientist Holly Seale] says vaccination messaging and strategy will require tweaks. “Facts are important, but facts alone won’t necessarily lead to people moving forward. This is about getting people to come with us on a journey, explaining what vaccination means for them. Will it be so they can travel overseas? There’s no clear idea yet about that. People will need other nudges… maybe even incentives or reimbursement for their time.”

 
So many column inches and so many experts but at the snooty cafe where official propaganda and journalism meet, there is no understanding of something very simple. Namely, that an admirably sizeable number of well-informed Australians have made a choice about ‘vaccination’ based on an intelligent analysis of the alleged risk. They’re not coming on your journey and there is nothing you can do about it. Their actuarial reasoning is superior to this Nobel Laureate’s.

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30 Responses to “Come With Us On a Journey”

  1. cuckoo says:

    I think what we need are more ads urging vaccination, starring obsese lesbians, trannies and drag queens. That ought to do it.

  2. C.L. says:

    Imagine what a killing Bill Hunter would have done in the ‘nudge’ advertising space if he was still alive.

  3. woolfe says:

    I see the Dark Horse Podcast is getting investigated, aka banned from YouTube. Won’t be long till Twitter un persons them.

    Bret Weinstein
    @BretWeinstein

    The DarkHorse Podcast has been hit with a strike by
    @YouTube
    . It prevents us from livestreaming in the usual spot, Sat. at 12:30pm Pacific. They’ll be surprised to discover that their censoring us has activated an army. We won’t be intimidated or deterred. #FollowTheSilence

    Right over target.

  4. Mother Lode says:

    These multidisciplinary teams are results-oriented, rather than academic, and try to nudge citizens to comply with laws.

    What laws are the vaccine hesitant rushed-vaccine-wary breaking?

  5. Bad Samaritan says:

    3 or 4 younger fairly fit British Airways Pilots die in one week, after receiving an alleged vaccine, which it’s speculated might be along the lines of : vaccine+flying = death sentence.

    Social scientist Holly wonders if emphasising overseas travel by plane might entice more people to go get injected.

    That Holly is not a F’wit I tell’s ya!

  6. cuckoo says:

    Speaking of ads, I realize that in all the government messaging I’ve seen so far, the normally indispensable young women in hijabs are conspicuous by their absence.

  7. Megan says:

    I find the whole Nudge unit and it’s underlying premise of ‘for the public good’ so damned offensive and have done so since the Brits first thought it was a good idea some years back.

    It is the way social scientists, who are not actually scientists at all, justify the use of straight out propaganda on a public less and less able to sort out truth from spin.

    It is no surprise at all that Most Gigantic Waste of Space in Australian politics, the disgusting and despicable Turnbull, jumped on this particular bandwagon. And that we have to put up with the Holly Karens of this world telling us what to do. Just not directly. As if that makes it ok.
    Take a long walk off a short pier, Miss Persuasive, your approach won’t work on me.

  8. dover_beach says:

    What C.L. said. The ‘COVID-experimental vaccine-hesitant’ are making a prudent calculation about risk by sitting this one out for the time being. They will recalibrate as I information rolls in.

  9. Eddystone says:

    I was just about to post that article in the open thread.

    Here it is, from the Australian via CL’s link above.

    Victoria’s recent Covid-19 outbreak and subsequent lockdown cost it billions in forfeited economic activity and revived torment, especially for parents of school-age children. But there was an attendant bonus, one that could pay big in coming months, not least in saving lives and changing the political psychology of pandemic management: vaccination rates surged.

    Analysis by the University of Melbourne’s Anthony Scott and Ou Yang shows in the week after restrictions began on May 28, the proportion of Victoria’s population who had been vaccinated rose by 4.6 percentage points compared to 1.6 per cent in the rest of the country.

    Certainly, vaccination was one of the few reasons a person was allowed to leave home, while federal and state authorities lifted their game, especially the latter, whose mass hubs did a roaring trade.

    “Governments need to build on this progress and sense of urgency,” Scott told Inquirer, adding they should also make better use of behavioural insights to nudge people to get vaccinated and to improve messaging. “Our research shows that people listen less to politicians compared to health professionals.” The latest phase of the national advertising campaign uses Nick Coatsworth, a trusted voice as an infectious disease expert and former deputy chief medical officer.

    But the updated advice on the use of the AstraZeneca vaccine is a setback, even though the risk of dying from blood clotting due to the vaccine is extremely low. As Nobel laureate Peter Doherty tweeted on Friday: “Numbers who might die in Australia per 100,000 people from: AstraZeneca vaccine: 0.3, road accident: 4.7, (2019 figure), unvaccinated & contract Covid: 300-800. There are age effects in all of these, but massively weighted in favour of the vaccine for older people.”

    This week Scott Morrison, Health Minister Greg Hunt and chief medical officer Paul Kelly sent a letter to 1.4 million Australians aged 70 and over, outlining the importance of those most at risk to get vaccinated, the availability of providers and how to book an appointment.

    Federal officials managing the $41m information campaigns point to outbreaks as the best motivator for the complacent and hesitant. The rise to four cases in Sydney’s eastern suburbs cluster on Friday should lead to an increase in demand for jabs.

    Health’s communications chief, Rachel Balmanno, told Senate estimates this month that “even little localised outbreaks and the situation we have now in Victoria changes the community’s sense of urgency around the vaccine more than anything else”.

    But even after the outbreak, the proportion of Victorians unwilling to be vaccinated remained stubbornly high at 17 per cent, according to the Melbourne Institute’s Taking the Pulse of the Nation survey, while in the rest of Australia the percentage of those who do not want to be vaccinated fell from 19.5 per cent to 15.9 per cent in the first week of June.

    The Pulse survey also showed the unvaccinated have a very strong preference for Pfizer: of the 80 per cent who expressed a preference (20 per cent said they would be willing to have any vaccine), 78 per cent prefer Pfizer.
    The proportion of Victoria’s population who had been vaccinated rose by 4.6 percentage points compared to 1.6 per cent in the rest of the country.
    The proportion of Victoria’s population who had been vaccinated rose by 4.6 percentage points compared to 1.6 per cent in the rest of the country.

    The advice that only those aged 60 and over get AstraZeneca will put pressure on imported Pfizer stocks, and may test the willingness of a motivated cohort: two-thirds have had at least one jab. “Our message is clear: to those 3.8 million Australians who have had their first dose of AstraZeneca, go and get your second dose,” Health secretary Brendan Murphy said on Thursday.

    University of New South Wales infectious disease social scientist Holly Seale says people can find it extremely difficult to navigate the burgeoning information on vaccines, including official communications. “I also don’t think we are doing enough about misinformation,” she says, a lot of which is circulating in closed systems among ethnic communities, “some of which is outrageous, causing confusion among vaccine brands and feeding conspiracy theories”. Like the Melbourne Institute’s Scott, Seale argues funding has been slanted to developing vaccines and is calling for more behavioural research to improve uptake. Ahead of the rollout, Seale and colleagues in the Collaboration on Social Science and Immunisation group wrote a policy paper, based on adult and childhood programs.

    “Provision of information and well-crafted messages alone, and then assuming that the community will make the ‘correct’ decision to be vaccinated, will not work,” the authors concluded in November. “Vaccination behaviours are shaped by a multitude of factors such as access, cultural beliefs, community, a person’s identity and their norms, education, and socio-economic status, as well as by philosophical beliefs.”

    COSSI called for behavioural research on the barriers and drivers of immunisation to guide revisions in communication and delivery. Right now, there are fully fledged behavioural insights units in Victoria and NSW focused on improving customer needs, a key theme in state systems. These multidisciplinary teams are results-oriented, rather than academic, and try to nudge citizens to comply with laws. “Nothing changes until a customer gets a better experience,” is the NSW team’s mantra.

    Canberra has a crack squad known as the Behavioural Economics Team of the Australian Government, an innovation by Malcolm Turnbull in 2016 to help all arms of the public service. A spokesman for the Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet said: “BETA has not been involved with the government’s Covid-19 vaccination advertising or public information campaigns.”

    “There’s no point in having a vaccine unless you put funding into researching how to get the best strategies to raise the uptake of them,” says UNSW’s Seale. “That needs understanding of vaccine perceptions and behaviours and what various population groups think. Too little effort has been put into this.”

    Seale says vaccination messaging and strategy will require tweaks. “Facts are important, but facts alone won’t necessarily lead to people moving forward. This is about getting people to come with us on a journey, explaining what vaccination means for them. Will it be so they can travel overseas? There’s no clear idea yet about that. People will need other nudges…maybe even incentives or reimbursement for their time.”

    In Israel, for instance, the “green pass”, as the country’s vaccine certificate is known, was introduced in February. Former Jerusalem deputy mayor Rachel Azaria says the green pass has brought people together. “The public instinctively understood that, more than anything, it was a way to nudge people to get vaccinated, not a way to discriminate against those who had received their doses and those who had not,” Azaria wrote in The Economist in April.

    Scott argues understanding the cause of vaccine hesitancy is the first step in designing strategies and policies to reduce it. “A clear plan to research and address this concerning trend should have been put in place last year but is still nowhere in sight. In the meantime, the cost of prevailing low vaccination rates becomes increasingly large when outbreaks occur,” he wrote in a paper with Yang this week.

    “Incentives are being suggested and used in some countries, including whether people should be able to work without vaccination, and whether they should be able to travel or go to restaurants or sporting events. Softer and more positive ‘carrots’ rather than ‘sticks’ include vouchers, discounts, perks, lotteries, or cash payments”.

    Of course, some will find payment a turn-off, suspecting that something must be intrinsically wrong with vaccines. “We don’t yet know how incentives in other countries are working,” Scott tells Inquirer. “Generally, in other settings, including childhood immunisation, cash incentives are effective. They are useful as their effect can be immediate.

    “The sense is that they may not persuade people who are against vaccination, for whatever reason, but could nudge people who are not sure. Or at least persuade them to get vaccinated quicker and not wait around for ‘better vaccines’. If it takes a cash payment to ‘take a risk’ that actually is so low it is zero risk, then that is fine.”

    Health’s comms chief, Balmanno, told the Senate about two-thirds of the population now are ready, willing and able to be vaccinated. “That is the current focus of our communication and campaign efforts – to vaccinate those ready, willing and able while continuing to work on persuading those who are not,” she said.

    “One of the important elements of persuading the people who are a bit more on the fence, shall we say, is norming the behaviour. Seeing other people you know get vaccinated safely and effectively makes quite a considerable difference to a lot of people. It is not about what they hear from an expert … For a lot of people, as the gradual vaccination of the population becomes normed, it will shift a lot of people.”

    Here’s my (pending) comment.

    Eddystone
    just now

    The fact that there are groups of people, no doubt tax-payer funded, that exist to “nudge” people to comply with government diktats strikes me as alarmingly Orwellian.

  10. Tel says:

    Facts are important, but facts alone won’t necessarily lead to people moving forward.

    The nobility of the noble lie.

    Hey wait … wasn’t that the place where people stopped trusting their government to begin with? Once they figure out they have been lied to once or twice, everything else gets quite correctly screened out. Who still takes Tony Blair seriously with his magic dossier? Who still remains able to hold back a chortle when we hear about the latest caper dose wascally Wussians are up to?

    Central banks tell us not to worry about inflation, it’s all under control … really? How convenient that this allows unlimited spending.

  11. Tel says:

    I find the whole Nudge unit and it’s underlying premise of ‘for the public good’ so damned offensive and have done so since the Brits first thought it was a good idea some years back.

    https://delingpole.podbean.com/e/britains-state-of-fear-laura-dodsworth/

    Have a listen … you might not be properly offended yet.

  12. Primer says:

    Can be a vote for AZ from the inventor of mRNA?
    Enough to create suspicion.

    “According to the data in the Japanese study, lipid nanoparticles were found in the whole blood circulating throughout the body within four hours, and then settled in large concentrations in the ovaries, bone marrow and lymph nodes.

    Malone said there needed to be monitoring of vaccine recipients for leukemia and lymphomas as there were concentrations of lipid nanoparticles in the bone marrow and lymph nodes. But those signals often don’t show up for six months to three or nine years down the road, he said.

    Usually, signals like this are picked up in animal studies and long-term clinical trials, but this didn’t happen with mRNA vaccines, Malone said.”

    https://welovetrump.com/2021/06/18/watch-inventor-of-mrna-vaccine-sounds-the-alarm-of-lipid-nanoparticles-from-experimental-covid-19-vaccines-accumulating-in-vital-organs/?utm_source=website_link_trending1

    (A pro-Trump site so Malone likely didn’t say that at all, probably dubbed).

  13. Eyrie says:

    If the sheep who get convinced by government propaganda start dying in their millions I’m looking forward to a far more cynical electorate afterwards. Long pitchforks, torches and boiled rope.

  14. Bruce of Newcastle says:

    THE Australian is very angry with Australians.

    The Australian has wanted a better class of reader for a while now.
    Which is why they have a shrinking number of them.

  15. Chris M says:

    the risk of dying from blood clotting due to the vaccine is extremely low

    But if it saves one life!

    Wanting the opposite to the leftrash communist media is always a winning position. They say good, we know it’s bad.

  16. Ellen of Tasmania says:

    I see the Dark Horse Podcast is getting investigated, aka banned from YouTube.

    “How to save the world, in three easy steps.”
    “Dr. Robert Malone is the inventor of mRNA Vaccine technology.
    Mr. Steve Kirsch is a serial entrepreneur who has been researching adverse reactions to COVID vaccines.
    Dr. Bret Weinstein is an evolutionary biologist.
    Bret talks to Robert and Steve about the pandemic, treatment and the COVID vaccines.”

    Great timestamps – so pick your subject:

    https://odysee.com/@BretWeinstein:f/how-to-save-the-world,-in-three-easy:0

  17. Vicki says:

    The MSM seem to think we all need help crossing the road. The extraordinary hauteur of commentators in assuming “the deplorable hesitaters” are stupid and fearful is annoying.

    Yet, in the last two days Queensland medical “expert” told the ABC that is was perfectly OK to “mix and match” vaccines, while Chief medical Officer Paul Kelly
    cautioned that such a procedure was “neither safe nor effective”.

    In view of such incompetence and “expert” inconsistency, I contend that Aussies are showing amazing good sense in their reticence.

  18. Matt says:

    We all get nudged every waking moment. Don’t think for a second that you aren’t.
    And government is only a small player in this space.

  19. Steve trickler says:

    Views from Doc Coleman.

    Why and How Doctors have Betrayed Patients

    Transcript from the clip:

    Once upon a time, many years ago, shortly after I had qualified as a doctor, I got a job as a GP. I’d always wanted to work as a GP and I’d worked in hospitals for just one year.

    This is a true story, by the way.

    In those days, young doctors were thrown in at the deep end. When I sat down behind the desk to see my first patients it was the first time I’d been in a doctor’s surgery since I’d been poorly as a kid and my mum had taken me to see our GP. I can’t remember what was wrong with me. I can however remember that the GP smoked a pipe and puffed at it constantly.

    So, I sat down behind the desk and pressed a button which rang a bell in the waiting room. And then I started to look for the forms I’d need in order to write prescriptions, sick notes and so on. I didn’t have a clue which forms were for what.

    Things were different in those days.

    First, there was no appointments system.

    Patients didn’t ring up to fix an appointment a week, a fortnight or three weeks ahead. They just turned up in the morning or the evening. Five days a week. And Saturday mornings.

    That was the first difference.

    Second, there were no computers. Everything was far, far more efficient. Medical records were kept on bits of cardboard in a little folder. The folder went where the patient went.

    The third difference was that if patients weren’t well enough to make it to the surgery, or were too frail to manage a bus journey, they could ring up, or send a message if they didn’t have a telephone and ask for the doctor to visit them at home. Lots of patients didn’t have the telephone. I had some patients who didn’t have electricity. You think I’m making this up but I’m not. I once took a consultant cardiologist to visit a patient of mine in his home. The cardiologist spent ages looking for a socket so that he could plug in his ECG machine. He was terribly disappointed when I told him there were no sockets because there was no electricity. They had oil lamps and a coal fire.

    Sometimes if the patient were elderly or very ill or had just come out of hospital, the doctor would call in anyway – to see how things were. GPs even visited their patients when they were in hospital – just to check up on things. This wasn’t special or unusual. This was normal.

    And I’m not talking about 100 years ago. I’m talking about the 1970s.

    Those of you who think I’m making this up, ask someone older. They’ll confirm what I’m telling you. If you really want to know what it was like, I’ve written 15 books about a young country doctor in rural England.

    I found that I learned more about people if I saw them in their own surroundings. And you learn more about people when they aren’t in a consulting room.

    There was a fourth big difference.

    Doctors didn’t work the same sort of hours as accountants and librarians.

    When I was a hospital doctor I worked ridiculous hours. When another junior doctor was on holiday, I once worked a 168 hour week. Even when I was asleep I was on call and I didn’t sleep more than two or three hours at a time.

    And as a GP, I worked hours that would be considered ridiculous these days.

    GPs used to provide a 24 hour service for 365 days a year. You could ring your GP any time of the day or night, weekends and bank holidays included. And he or she or a partner would come and visit. It would almost certainly be a doctor you knew or had seen before. At night I’d ask patients to turn on all the lights so that I could find their house quickly and easily. A doctor could take the patients’ little cardboard records folder with him so that he was up to date and could add in anything new. Brilliantly simple. The record cards never seemed to get lost. And they never had an outage or a virus or got hacked.

    And I have to say that night time visits were one of the best bits of being a GP. Driving home at 4.00 am, having helped someone out of a bad attack of asthma, it was impossible not to feel content. It was the only time of my life when I was up and around to see the sunrise.

    And there was one other thing.

    Doctors were very independent minded in those days. They didn’t take kindly to being told what to do by bureaucrats and politicians.

    But then things changed and everything went wrong. It was the beginning of Agenda 21 – though I didn’t realise it at the time. The start of the new world order, the very beginning of the new normal. Out with the old, out with tradition and in with the new.

    The bureaucrats and the rule makers buggered up everything. They insisted that GPs introduced appointments systems and they created a health care system where patients are the least important element.

    Britain, incidentally, was probably affected more than anywhere else in the world because Britain used to have the best GP service anywhere. You could see your GP at any time of day or night – every day of the year. Britain has gone from having the best family doctor service anywhere to having what is probably the worst. GPs still do night calls in other countries.

    Today, the only place you’re likely to come face to face with your GP is on the golf course.

    In various books of mine I’ve written before about how things went wrong. New rules about working hours and the end of a sense of vocation among young doctors all destroyed what we had. Doctors who retired were unable to keep their licences because of bureaucracy – thereby depriving the community of years of wisdom and caring skills.

    This probably sounds mad but it was, of course, all part of the plan to reduce the quality of health care and to kill people.

    The service provided by GPs in many countries, but particularly the UK, has been deteriorating for years but it reached the pits in the early part of 2020 when many GPs pretty well closed their doors for no reasons other than misplaced fear, trust in drug company inspired government lies and, I’m afraid, good old-fashioned laziness. If GPs had examined the evidence about covid-19 they would have seen through the tissue of lies deliberately and wickedly spread by politicians and advisors around the world. And, of course, they would have seen the truth about the experimental jabs which I have for many months now said will kill far, far more people than the rebranded flu.

    From March 2020, the service provided by most GPs (family doctors) in the UK has varied between appalling and virtually non-existent. Hospital care has been cut back because of pseudoscientific social distancing rules and pointless and damaging lockdowns but it is the GP service which has really been destroyed – by GPs themselves.

    Could doctors really be so stupid as to believe the nonsensical statistics provided by the Government and its advisors? Were GPs cowed by the Government’s threats that anyone who spoke out would lose their job and their licence to practise? If that were the case then those doctors should have been hounded out of their jobs and forced to retrain as traffic wardens. Or were many of those doctors simply lazy and eager to grab a chance to enjoy a long, well-paid holiday from their responsibilities?

    During the cold winter months patients who were allowed an appointment – usually with a nurse or assistant of some kind – were forced to wait outside in the rain and cold. Was this part of the culling process? Nothing would surprise me. Relatives were told that they could not accompany patients. This wasn’t science or medicine. It was politicised black magic. Doctors complained that their 40 hour working week was too onerous. There was talk of GPs working one day a week because of the stress of the job. The establishment supported this.

    It was by no means the first time that doctors have done crazy things because they were told to do them. Doctors deliberately removed yards of intestine because they were told it would help their patients. Other doctors removed or destroyed part of the human brain because they thought it would eradicate mental illness. Millions of patients became hooked on the hideously addictive benzodiazepine drugs because doctors were told they were safe and effective – and then ignored the evidence and prescribed them by the lorry load.

    After March 2020, GPs in the UK started to demand that patients consult via the telephone or the internet. The evidence shows clearly that this is an impossible way to practise medicine. Diagnoses are missed and the death rate in the next year or two will rocket as a result. Patients are so disillusioned that they don’t bother calling their GP – not because they are afraid of covid but because they know that the service provided is darned near useless and virtually non-existent.

    When the NHS bosses in the UK suggested that GPs should see more patients face to face, instead of insisting on the phone or the internet the British Medical Association, the doctors’ trade union, responded by complaining that the change was a reaction to media coverage ‘rather than based on the needs of the profession’.

    ‘Needs of the profession’.

    Does anyone in the BMA or the medical establishment give a damn about the needs of patients? I doubt it.

    And yet, miraculously, GPs in the UK managed to see their patients when they were giving thousands of covid-19 jabs – at £12 something per jab. Indeed, the rush to push needles into innocent and ignorant members of the public has been another excuse for the fact that GPs cannot provide a half-way decent service for their patients.

    In the UK, there were between 25 and 27 million fewer appointments with GPs between March and August 2020 – 25 to 27 million fewer appointments than there are in a normal year. What were all the GPs doing? Hiding behind their sofas? How many million will die because of that?

    The basic problem is that today’s medical schools teach half truths; they never teach students how to think or criticise the system. After all, what system is going to teach people to question itself?

    Students are educated by rote; taught in the way that dogs are taught tricks. Wisdom is a disadvantage. Common sense is eradicated. Young doctors are incapable of making informed decisions and that suits the pharmaceutical industry just fine. If you don’t question perceived notions then how do you ever learn? How does a profession ever progress?

    Young doctors are never exposed to the truth or to the questioning of `accepted’ beliefs or to proper debate with people like me. Because of my habit of questioning authority I used to be invited to speak at medical and nursing schools. No more.

    So medical schools churn out platoons of unquestioning prescription signing zombies. Originality is a dirty word.

    Good doctors need insight, imagination and intuition and the capacity to make diagnostic leaps; sideways if necessary. Good doctors need to be able to observe and they need to be able to think. Great discoveries are invariably made by outsiders and mavericks. Such skills are not simply not encouraged; they are now not allowed. As a result the medical profession is packed with drudges, unthinking, too frightened of losing their jobs to show any spirit.

    Today’s doctors do not have the courage to question the establishment or to have original ideas because they are employed and like all other employees they are frightened of losing their jobs. Moreover, NHS doctors are employed by the Government; they are civil servants. Today’s doctors are bought, body, mind and soul, and do not seem to have the courage to stand up for whatever principles they might have. They do not dare disagree with their administrative bosses because they are hired hands. They do not dare stick up for their patients because they live in fear of bureaucratic censure. And so they vaccinate, and they perform unnecessary operations and they prescribe drugs which they should know are unsafe. Tonsils and lengths of intestine are ripped out by surgeons who don’t seem to have the foggiest notion of the harm they are doing. Healthy breasts are slashed off unnecessarily. Doctors do not have the courage to stand up for their patients because they have lost their independence; they are simply civil servants; they have sold their souls for a fat salary, short working hours and a wonderful pension. They are so beholden to their employers that they dare not even stand up to bullying, they dare not even speak out when they see things happening which they know, in their hearts, are wrong. Their spirits have curdled.

    The modern medical establishment elevates its official beliefs into an orthodoxy, always suggesting that they are right because they are, well, right and that the absence of evidence is not to be allowed to interfere with the acceptance of their conclusions. This is tabloid science.

    For example, the supporters of vaccination deal with opposition not by debate but by denouncing anyone who disagrees. It’s the same approach as is used by global warming advocates. Critics armed with science are demonised in the same way as critics of the climate change nonsense are demonised and dismissed as flat-earthers or global warming deniers.

    Anyone who disagrees with the establishment is a dangerous heretic – to be excluded from all debates, and condemned and isolated.

    Science in general and the medical profession in particular have been hijacked by politically correct lobbyists. Dissenters, daring to question the new orthodoxy of the group-think obsessionals, are guilty of thought crime and to be vilified and suppressed. Group think unoriginality oppresses and suppresses.

    Any doctor who does not stick to the rules will be refused a licence and prevented from practising. I have been warning for years that any doctor who opposes, questions or in any way criticises vaccination will be removed from the medical register before you can say `scientific bigotry’. And now it’s happening.

    It is today more dangerous for a doctor to be ahead of his time (which is to say, critical of well-established but ill-advised and dangerously nonsensical medical practices) than it is for him to be behind his time. The doctor who dares to criticise the acknowledged mainstream is still a dangerous heretic who must be crushed.

    Over the last five decades I have made many forecasts about medical hazards. Most have already been proved entirely accurate. But accuracy is no defence against ridicule, abuse, scorn and scepticism; indeed, since being correct makes the authoritarians fearful, the ridicule, abuse, scorn and scepticism are enhanced. No part of the mainstream media or the important internet platforms would now allow me to say any of these things.

    They have been preparing for the global reset for many years.

    For example, in the world of medicine the common purpose controlled medical establishment has for years now been suppressing dissent and debate – especially on issues which might prove essential for the development of the new world order.

    All this helps explains why doctors have stayed so silent when they should have spoken out.

    And it explains why so many doctors are still not seeing patients face to face for ordinary consultants but are giving experimental jabs without looking at the evidence and questioning the rationale.

    It explains why mortality rates from cancer and heart disease are going to soar in the coming years – that’s not a difficult prediction to make.

    And it explains why so many doctors of my age and experience are ashamed of the medical profession they see now.

    Is it going to change? Are things going to improve?

    Only if we insist on change. It’s up to us.

    Doctors are too happy with the present state of affairs. They’re doing very little work and making tons of money.

  20. Lee says:

    After March 2020, GPs in the UK started to demand that patients consult via the telephone or the internet. The evidence shows clearly that this is an impossible way to practise medicine. Diagnoses are missed and the death rate in the next year or two will rocket as a result.

    Remember all of the scoffing at consulting “Dr. Google”?
    How are internet and phone “consultations” any better?

  21. H B Bear says:

    The only Nudge I want to hear from is Hey Dad. Oops that one didn’t end too well either.

  22. Ed Case says:

    I’d never seen this clip, nor understood what applying the Lotion meant, until the other day
    ww.youtube.com/watch?v=WCSZfmbFJyQ
    If you’ve never watched Silence Of The Lambs, think twice about clicking the link, but this is where we’re headed, they’re not surrendering on injecting The Vax.

  23. Lee says:

    Robert Hughes’s offences have ensured that the full series of Hey Dad will never be released on DVD and Blu-Ray in Australia.
    Not that I could care less.

  24. Vicki says:

    https://odysee.com/@BretWeinstein:f/how-to-save-the-world,-in-three-easy:0

    Ellen – I am so grateful that you posted this link. I have just spent the last hour or so watching the incredibly important discussion. I am taking a break because it is so exhausting and frightening.

    I have long been a fan of Bret Weinstein, the evolutionary scientist, who challenges woke “orthodoxy”. The other two – the inventor of the mRNA gene therapy & the other amazing guy who is challenging the use of the CV vaccines are unknown to me – but very convincing.

    If they are right – the rushed production of these vaccines (without requisite clinical trials) may prove to be the most dangerous medical experiment ever undertaken without informed consent.

  25. Squirrel says:

    Canberra has a “crack squad” of behavioural economists and assorted other nudgers – what a crock.

    All we have had so far from the army of overpaid spinners in the Bubble is an advertising campaign which looks and sounds like something from the 90s and which basically relies on pimping Nick Coatsworth.

    These are presumably the same sort of devilishly clever people who gave us that utterly bizarre advert involving a noxious girl smearing milkshake on a boy’s face.

  26. nb says:

    Last year it would have been shocking and amazing to find someone accepting a therapy that had bypassed all the required testing.
    This year, apparently, it is shocking and amazing to find someone not accepting a therapy that has bypassed all the (usually) required testing – even after year upon year of msm lying.

  27. Seco says:

    New South Wales infectious disease social scientist Holly Seale

    Wait, this is real? What was this person doing before Covid? What in the actual hell does an “infectious disease social scientist” do?

  28. Leo G says:

    … the rushed production of these vaccines (without requisite clinical trials) may prove to be the most dangerous medical experiment ever undertaken without informed consent.

    The production of the vaccines has enabled the reckless experiment, but shouldn’t be the contentious issue.
    The experiment is the thing.
    After a year and a half of pandemic, medical authorities have recognised that more than 99% of the risk is to less than 20% of the population. The at-risk group are well defined- they are the aged and those with certain morbidities that vitiate the effect of COVID infection.
    The experiment involves a monomaniacal emphasis on vaccinating those who are at no significant risk from the infection, while largely disregarding any need to maximise the effectiveness of risk reduction measures for the high-risk cohort.

  29. Michael says:

    Government does not have customers, in the sense of people who voluntarily pay for service.

  30. John A says:

    Federal officials managing the $41m information campaigns point to outbreaks as the best motivator for the complacent and hesitant. The rise to four cases in Sydney’s eastern suburbs cluster on Friday should lead to an increase in demand for jabs.

    This use of fear as a motivator will eventually expire through exhaustion. People can’t run on fear for too long, as it ruins the nervous system and induces other medical problems.

    And, whilst I accept Arky’s point about the assumption of people’s innate goodness (and agree for the same reasons, I think), enough people decline to see four or five “cases” with no fatalities as a sufficient motivator in any case. We are the generation that saw the Grim Reaper ads and came out the other side, unscathed.

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